History Main / RoboSpeak

30th Oct '17 7:54:50 PM TheWarioBros
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* This is exactly how [=KAOS=] speaks in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry3DixieKongsDoubleTrouble''. "Bzzzzt... Click... Kongs enemy. You must be... DESTROYED!!!"
30th Oct '17 7:48:11 PM TheWarioBros
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* Torkdrift in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioOdyssey'' only says two lines before its boss battle, but those two lines are about as robotic as you can get. ""FLOWERS FLOWERS FLOWERS. MUST HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS. DO NOT MESS WITH ME BIPED".
** Similarly, the Steam Gardener NPCs in the same kingdom also speak in very robotic ways. No all caps, but a lot of very formal lines, as well as computer dialogue like "Initiating first greeting dialogue".
18th Jul '17 9:13:15 AM Tightwire
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Writers may do this out of fear that the audience would be too dumb to notice that the robot is, in fact, a robot. Or perhaps it's just a misguided attempt to make up for the fact that your average robot can't display most of the more subtle physical indications of intent.

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Writers may do this out of fear that the audience would be too dumb to notice that the robot is, in fact, a robot. Or to make sure they remember. Or perhaps it's just a misguided attempt to make up for the fact that your average robot can't display most of the more subtle physical indications of intent.
20th May '17 3:55:46 PM nombretomado
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* Subverted in ''{{Vandread}}'': While the resident robot Pyoro begins speaking that way, due to an accident, he speaks in a ''very human'' way, sometimes even being ''hotblooded'' when he needs to be.

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* Subverted in ''{{Vandread}}'': ''Anime/{{Vandread}}'': While the resident robot Pyoro begins speaking that way, due to an accident, he speaks in a ''very human'' way, sometimes even being ''hotblooded'' when he needs to be.
29th Apr '17 3:42:58 PM jormis29
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* In ''Film/GrandmasBoy'', videogame programmer J. P. sometimes does this for no clear reason.

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* In ''Film/GrandmasBoy'', ''[[Film/GrandmasBoy2006 Grandma's Boy]]'', videogame programmer J. P. sometimes does this for no clear reason.
17th Feb '17 5:21:56 AM luiginumber3
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Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does so in a flat and monotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)

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Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does do so in a flat and monotone MachineMonotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In When using a language with contractions, such as English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived computer-derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)



This trope seems to be [[DiscreditedTrope disappearing slowly]]. As modern computers get better at duplicating and mimicking sounds, including speech -- and the average person grows more familiar with that technology in their day-to-day life - the public at large seems to be accepting the notion that you could create a robot that doesn't sound like a sedated Darth Vader.



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This trope seems to be [[DiscreditedTrope disappearing slowly]]. As modern computers get better at duplicating and mimicking sounds, including speech -- and the average person grows more familiar with that technology in their day-to-day life - -- the public at large seems to be accepting the notion that you could create a robot that doesn't sound like a sedated Darth Vader.


Vader.
28th Jan '17 6:19:00 AM Prfnoff
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', Mettaton's dialogue is in ALL CAPS, but is nevertheless very eloquent and charming for a character who's ostensibly a killer robot.
29th Nov '16 11:45:11 AM Prfnoff
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* The mechanoids in ''VideoGame/{{Thief}} II''. Particularly creepy in that, when idling or patrolling, they spout religious phrases.

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* The mechanoids in ''VideoGame/{{Thief}} II''.''VideoGame/ThiefIITheMetalAge''. Particularly creepy in that, when idling or patrolling, they spout religious phrases.
29th Nov '16 11:42:50 AM Prfnoff
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Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does so in a flat and monotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons.)

to:

Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does so in a flat and monotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons.reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)
29th Nov '16 11:36:05 AM Prfnoff
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* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', to an extent. The robotic Starmen speak for the most part in normal English -- albeit peppered with onomatopoeic machine sounds such as *whirr* and *click*. This is an invention of the localization, however; the original Japanese release differentiated the Starmen's robospeak by writing their dialogue entirely in katakana.

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* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', to an extent. The robotic Starmen (technically not robots but aliens) speak for the most part in normal English -- albeit peppered with onomatopoeic machine sounds such as *whirr* and *click*. This is an invention of the localization, however; the original Japanese release differentiated the Starmen's robospeak by writing their dialogue entirely in katakana.
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