History Main / RoboSpeak

17th Feb '17 5:21:56 AM luiginumber3
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Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does so in a flat and monotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)

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Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does do so in a flat and monotone MachineMonotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In When using a language with contractions, such as English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived computer-derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)



This trope seems to be [[DiscreditedTrope disappearing slowly]]. As modern computers get better at duplicating and mimicking sounds, including speech -- and the average person grows more familiar with that technology in their day-to-day life - the public at large seems to be accepting the notion that you could create a robot that doesn't sound like a sedated Darth Vader.



to:

This trope seems to be [[DiscreditedTrope disappearing slowly]]. As modern computers get better at duplicating and mimicking sounds, including speech -- and the average person grows more familiar with that technology in their day-to-day life - -- the public at large seems to be accepting the notion that you could create a robot that doesn't sound like a sedated Darth Vader.


Vader.
28th Jan '17 6:19:00 AM Prfnoff
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', Mettaton's dialogue is in ALL CAPS, but is nevertheless very eloquent and charming for a character who's ostensibly a killer robot.
29th Nov '16 11:45:11 AM Prfnoff
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* The mechanoids in ''VideoGame/{{Thief}} II''. Particularly creepy in that, when idling or patrolling, they spout religious phrases.

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* The mechanoids in ''VideoGame/{{Thief}} II''.''VideoGame/ThiefIITheMetalAge''. Particularly creepy in that, when idling or patrolling, they spout religious phrases.
29th Nov '16 11:42:50 AM Prfnoff
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Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does so in a flat and monotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons.)

to:

Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often does so in a flat and monotone voice that's devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. In English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons.reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)
29th Nov '16 11:36:05 AM Prfnoff
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* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', to an extent. The robotic Starmen speak for the most part in normal English -- albeit peppered with onomatopoeic machine sounds such as *whirr* and *click*. This is an invention of the localization, however; the original Japanese release differentiated the Starmen's robospeak by writing their dialogue entirely in katakana.

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* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', to an extent. The robotic Starmen (technically not robots but aliens) speak for the most part in normal English -- albeit peppered with onomatopoeic machine sounds such as *whirr* and *click*. This is an invention of the localization, however; the original Japanese release differentiated the Starmen's robospeak by writing their dialogue entirely in katakana.
29th Nov '16 11:28:59 AM Prfnoff
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* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', to an extent. The robotic Starmen speak for the most part in normal English -- albeit peppered with onomatopoeic machine sounds such as *whirr* and *click*. This is an invention of the localization, however; the original Japanese release differentiated the Starmen's robospeak by writing their dialogue entirely in katagana (the equivalent of using ALLCAPS TO SIGNIFY MONOTONE SPEECH.)

to:

* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', to an extent. The robotic Starmen speak for the most part in normal English -- albeit peppered with onomatopoeic machine sounds such as *whirr* and *click*. This is an invention of the localization, however; the original Japanese release differentiated the Starmen's robospeak by writing their dialogue entirely in katagana (the equivalent of using ALLCAPS TO SIGNIFY MONOTONE SPEECH.)katakana.
29th Oct '16 6:45:52 PM Crossover-Enthusiast
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This trope seems to be [[DiscreditedTrope disappearing slowly]]. As modern computers get better at duplicating and mimicking sounds, including speech -- and the average person grows more familiar with that technology in his day-to-day life - the public at large seems to be accepting the notion that you could create a robot that doesn't sound like a sedated Darth Vader.



to:

This trope seems to be [[DiscreditedTrope disappearing slowly]]. As modern computers get better at duplicating and mimicking sounds, including speech -- and the average person grows more familiar with that technology in his their day-to-day life - the public at large seems to be accepting the notion that you could create a robot that doesn't sound like a sedated Darth Vader.


12th Oct '16 6:35:38 AM Mullon
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* [[ImageBoards Anonymous's]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCbKv9yiLiQ Youtube video]] messages to [[ChurchOfHappyology Scientology]] are all done in RoboSpeak, so as to speak for all Anonymous and also to avoid retribution from the Church of Scientology.

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* [[ImageBoards [[Website/FourChan Anonymous's]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCbKv9yiLiQ Youtube video]] messages to [[ChurchOfHappyology Scientology]] are all done in RoboSpeak, so as to speak for all Anonymous and also to avoid retribution from the Church of Scientology.
30th Aug '16 8:07:44 PM nendroid
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* Mahoro and Minawa from ''Manga/{{Mahoromatic}}'' don't do it, but whether they're straight [[{{Fembot}} gynoids]] or cyborg humans isn't exactly clear.
5th Aug '16 2:14:35 PM Morgenthaler
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* In one episode of ''AtomicBetty'', RobotBuddy X5 admonishes a trick-or-treater wearing a robot costume and speaking in jarring RoboSpeak that "Robots do not talk like that".

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* In one episode of ''AtomicBetty'', ''WesternAnimation/AtomicBetty'', RobotBuddy X5 admonishes a trick-or-treater wearing a robot costume and speaking in jarring RoboSpeak that "Robots do not talk like that".
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