History Main / RidiculousExchangeRates

18th May '18 8:53:45 PM UppityParty
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* On October 2016, the Venezuelan bolivar is undergoing an inflation around ''700%'', and some predict, for the next year, a ''minimum rate'' of at least '''1500%'''. By September 2017 the bolivar was past 20,000 per USD. The opposition-led Asamblea Nacional reported an annual inflation rate of ''2616%'' for 2017. The exchange rate reached nearly 700,000 bolivars per USD (700 ''million'' pre-2008 bolivars), which is obviously over 800,000 per euro (as 9 May 2018).
** The government has planned to redenominate its currency at the rate of 1 bolivar soberano to 1000 old bolivars.

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* On October 2016, the Venezuelan bolivar is undergoing an inflation around ''700%'', and some predict, for the next year, a ''minimum rate'' of at least '''1500%'''. By September 2017 the bolivar was past 20,000 per USD. The opposition-led Asamblea Nacional reported an annual inflation rate of ''2616%'' ''over 13,700%'' for 2017. the twelve months to April 2018. The exchange rate reached nearly 700,000 bolivars per USD (700 ''million'' pre-2008 bolivars), which is obviously over 800,000 per euro (as 9 May 2018).
2018). However, according to the [=AirTM=] startup platform (blocked by the Venezuelan government), the rate exceeded one million bolivars per USD as of 18 May 2018. This is despite the fact exchanging money through the black market is illegal in Venezuela.
** The government has planned to redenominate its currency at the rate of 1 1000 current bolivars to a new bolivar, known as the bolivar soberano to 1000 old bolivars.soberano.
9th May '18 3:58:22 PM UppityParty
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** After going through a long period of hyperinflation (at one point the inflation rate was over 230 ''million'' percent, and the money supply was growing by 658 ''billion'' percent) and three revaluations, the Zimbabwean dollar was suspended in January 2009, and finally abandoned in April 2009. Before the third revaluation, the exchange rate was 300 trillion Zimbabwean dollars to 1 US dollar. [=ATMs=] were unable to cope with the amounts of money people needed to withdraw, producing overflow errors. One 2005 Zimbabwe dollar was worth 10 ''septillion'' (10^25) 2009 Zimbabwe dollars. Also, by the end of 2008, the inflation rate was estimated to be 89.7 ''sextillion'' (8.97 x 10^22) percent.

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** After going through a long period of hyperinflation (at one point the inflation rate was over 230 ''million'' percent, and the money supply was growing by 658 ''billion'' percent) and three revaluations, the Zimbabwean dollar was suspended in January 2009, and finally abandoned in April 2009. Before the third revaluation, the exchange rate was 300 trillion Zimbabwean dollars to 1 US dollar. [=ATMs=] were unable to cope with the amounts of money people needed to withdraw, producing overflow errors. One 2005 2009 Zimbabwe dollar was worth 10 ''septillion'' (10^25) 2009 2005 Zimbabwe dollars. Also, by the end of 2008, the inflation rate was estimated to be 89.7 ''sextillion'' (8.97 x 10^22) percent.



*** In 2009, following the major inflation crisis, Zimbabwe retired its currency and now considers the American dollar official for its goverment.
* The CFA franc, which is at a fixed rate of 655.67 francs for a Euro[[note]]Before 2002, 100 CFA francs were worth 1 French franc[[/note]].

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*** In 2009, following the major inflation crisis, Zimbabwe retired its currency and now considers the American dollar official for its goverment.
government.
* The CFA franc, which is at a fixed rate of 655.67 957 francs for a Euro[[note]]Before 2002, 100 CFA francs were worth 1 French franc[[/note]].franc until it was replaced by the euro at 6.55957 French francs per euro.[[/note]].




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* In 2009, São Tomé and Príncipe signed a deal with Portugal in 2009, linking the dobra with the euro after falling greatly in value over the past several years. The rate was now fixed to 24,500 dobras per euro, compared to 12,000 dobras per euro in 2004. São Tomé and Príncipe revalued their currency at the rate of 1,000 old dobras (STD) to one new dobra (STN) in 2018. It is still pegged to the euro at 24.50 new dobras for a dollar.



* One US dollar is worth around 600 Chilean pesos. While the Chileans did drop the cents they had during the 1980s and then went into a progressive inflation during the '90s, compared to the Dollar, now, 500 Chilean pesos per dollar is '''cheap'''. During the '90s the a Dollar was worth around ''1000 Chilean Pesos'' in the most extreme cases. While the inflation, heavily controlled by the government, has really rendered the 1 peso coin worthless, the Chilean Peso internationally is in fact strong: In the middle of the 2000s, there's a time the Dollar went to be worth 500 Chilean Pesos not because something wrong happened with the Dollar, that was because the Chilean Peso was getting stronger!

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* One US dollar is worth around 600 Chilean pesos. While the Chileans did drop the cents they had during the 1980s and then went into a progressive inflation during the '90s, compared to the Dollar, now, 500 600 Chilean pesos per dollar is '''cheap'''. During the '90s the a Dollar was worth around ''1000 Chilean Pesos'' in the most extreme cases. While the inflation, heavily controlled by the government, has really rendered the 1 peso coin worthless, unusable, the Chilean Peso internationally is in fact strong: In the middle of the 2000s, there's a time the Dollar went to be worth 500 Chilean Pesos not because something wrong happened with the Dollar, that was because the Chilean Peso was getting stronger!


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* As of 10 May 2018, one U.S. dollar is worth 2,859 Colombian pesos.
* Before Ecuador abandoned its own currency, the sucre, in favor of the US dollar, one US dollar bought 25,000 sucres.
* By 1990, Peru's inti was rendered essentially worthless by hyperinflation, having printed a 5,000,000 inti note. It redenominated its currency at the rate of one nuevo sol to one million intis a year later.
9th May '18 3:33:43 PM UppityParty
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* During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the value of Polish zloty (currency code: PLZ) fell so badly that before the redenomination in 1995, the largest bill in circulation (introduced in 1992) was "only" [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-tsrhPoQ27C0/TeEUiXWnxAI/AAAAAAAAO0E/eEHdUhofyLo/s1600/banknoty_stare_pl_2000000z%25C5%2582.jpg two million zlotys]] -- worth roughly 80 USD at the time. The new money (currency code: PLN) was established by dropping four zeroes from the old one's value (1 PLN = 10000 PLZ) and in 2011, the largest bill in use, 200 PLN (introduced in 1995), is worth roughly 70 USD.
* Of course, these examples pale in comparison with the post-war Hungarian pengő, which experienced the '''single worst example of hyperinflation in history'''. The 100 million B-pengő (i.e. ''100,000,000,000,000,000,000 pengő'') [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HUP_100MB_1946_obverse.jpg note]] is the single highest denomination bill ever issued, according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki. And that banknote was effectively '''worthless'''. (A 1 milliard B-Pengő note was printed but not issued.) At the height of the hyperinflation, prices doubled in every fifteen hours. To quote one source (''Postwar'' by Tony Judt) "by the time the pengo was replaced by the forint in August 1946 the dollar value of all Hungarian banknotes in circulation was just one-thousandth of one cent."
* The early-90s Yugoslav dinar ([[http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:500000000000_dinars.jpg image]]) once held the record for the most zeroes printed on a banknote, before Zimbabwe broke it in 2009.

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* During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the value of Polish zloty (currency code: PLZ) fell so badly that before the redenomination in 1995, the largest bill in circulation (introduced in 1992) was "only" [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-tsrhPoQ27C0/TeEUiXWnxAI/AAAAAAAAO0E/eEHdUhofyLo/s1600/banknoty_stare_pl_2000000z%25C5%2582.jpg two million zlotys]] -- worth roughly 80 USD at the time. The new money (currency code: PLN) was established by dropping four zeroes zeros from the old one's value (1 PLN = 10000 PLZ) and in 2011, the largest bill in use, 200 PLN (introduced in 1995), is worth roughly 70 USD.
* Of course, these examples pale in comparison with the post-war Hungarian pengő, which experienced the '''single worst example of hyperinflation in history'''. The 100 million B-pengő (i.e. ''100,000,000,000,000,000,000 pengő'') [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HUP_100MB_1946_obverse.jpg note]] is the single highest denomination bill ever issued, according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki. And that banknote was effectively '''worthless'''. (A 1 milliard B-Pengő note was printed but not issued.) At the height of the hyperinflation, prices doubled in every fifteen hours. To quote one source (''Postwar'' by Tony Judt) "by the time the pengo was replaced by the forint at the rate of 400 octillion pengő to one forint in August 1946 the dollar value of all Hungarian banknotes in circulation was just one-thousandth of one cent."
* The early-90s Yugoslav dinar ([[http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:500000000000_dinars.jpg image]]) once held the record for the most zeroes zeros printed on a banknote, before Zimbabwe broke it in 2009.



*** As of October 2014, the ruble's now down to about 1/40 of a dollar and still heading downwards.

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*** As of October 2014, May 2018, the ruble's now down to ruble is worth about 1/40 1/63 of a dollar and still heading downwards.dollar.




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*When Turkey revalued its currency in 2005, the Romanian leu briefly became the world's least valued currency until it redenominated its currency in July that year at the rate of 10,000 old lei (ROL) to one new leu (RON). The exchange rate before redenomination was 36,000 old lei for a euro.



** A bit used once on ''Radio/TheHowardSternShow'' was "Who Wants To Be A Turkish Millionaire" where a series of not-surprisingly scantily-clad, very attractive young women were asked a series of trivia questions, with the winner receiving a million Turkish lire. In other words, about fifty cents.

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** A bit used once on ''Radio/TheHowardSternShow'' was "Who Wants To Be A Turkish Millionaire" where a series of not-surprisingly scantily-clad, very attractive young women were asked a series of trivia questions, with the winner receiving a million Turkish lire.lira. In other words, about fifty cents.



* The Israeli lira was replaced ten-to-one by the sheqel in 1980. The sheqel was replaced by the new sheqel in 1985 at a thousand to one.
* The Egyptian pound, with its current exchange rate of about six pounds to the dollar ($0.16 to the pound) doesn't seem so bad...until you realize how far it's fallen. When the pound was originally established in the early 20th century, it was worth exactly one British guinea--a pound and a shilling, or £1.05 when decimalised.[[note]]The pound is a fairly new currency; in the late 19th century, the main currency was the ''qirsh'' or piastre (plural ''qurūsh''). The term for the Egyptian pound in Arabic, ''gineeh'', is derived from "guinea", which was worth almost exactly 100 ''qurūsh'' when the currency was established. Since this was awfully convenient--decimalisation without the fuss!--the Egyptian government decided to just make that the standard currency unit.[[/note]] Eventually, circumstances were such that the Egyptian pound appreciated against the pound sterling--eventually hitting £2 to £3 at some point. However, part of the economic restructuring started in TheSeventies under Anwar Sadat (and continued since then) involved letting the currency float--and float it has, all the way down to its current value. This had three peculiar effects:

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* The Israeli lira pound was replaced ten-to-one by the old sheqel in 1980. The old sheqel was replaced by the new sheqel in 1985 at a thousand to one.
* The Egyptian pound, with its current exchange rate of about six 17.8 pounds to the dollar ($0.16 to the (5.6 US cents for a pound) doesn't seem so bad...until you realize how far it's fallen. When the pound was originally established in the early 20th century, it was worth exactly one British guinea--a pound and a shilling, or £1.05 when decimalised.[[note]]The pound is a fairly new currency; in the late 19th century, the main currency was the ''qirsh'' or piastre (plural ''qurūsh''). The term for the Egyptian pound in Arabic, ''gineeh'', is derived from "guinea", which was worth almost exactly 100 ''qurūsh'' when the currency was established. Since this was awfully convenient--decimalisation without the fuss!--the Egyptian government decided to just make that the standard currency unit.[[/note]] Eventually, circumstances were such that the Egyptian pound appreciated against the pound sterling--eventually hitting £2 to £3 at some point. However, part of the economic restructuring started in TheSeventies under Anwar Sadat (and continued since then) involved letting the currency float--and float it has, all the way down to its current value. This had three peculiar effects:



* The Mexican peso occasionally gets this treatment, even though the actual exchange rate has been 1 US dollar = 10 pesos for most of the decade, being currently around $1 USD = $13 MXN; this has to do mostly because Mexico is the neighboring country and therefore an {{acceptable target|s}}, and partly because the peso ''was'' Funny Money between 1982 and 1994: after a series of wrong doings by the presidents from that time, and after a sudden fall on the petroleum's price, the Mexican peso collapsed and the entire economy sank to the bottom (along with a sharp rise in crime during these times). In 1993, the ''new peso'' was issued at an exchange rate of N$1 = $1,000; the "new" was then dropped in 1996.

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* The Mexican peso occasionally gets this treatment, even though the actual exchange rate has been 1 US dollar = 10 pesos for most of the decade, being currently around $1 USD = $13 $19 MXN; this has to do mostly because Mexico is the neighboring country and therefore an {{acceptable target|s}}, and partly because the peso ''was'' Funny Money between 1982 and 1994: after a series of wrong doings by the presidents from that time, and after a sudden fall on the petroleum's price, the Mexican peso collapsed and the entire economy sank to the bottom (along with a sharp rise in crime during these times). In 1993, the ''new peso'' was issued at an exchange rate of N$1 = $1,000; the "new" was then dropped in 1996.



* One US dollar is worth around 500 Chilean pesos. While the Chileans did drop the cents they had during the 1980s and then went into a progressive inflation during the '90s, compared to the Dollar, now, 500 Chilean pesos per dollar is '''cheap'''. During the '90s the a Dollar was worth around ''1000 Chilean Pesos'' in the most extreme cases. While the inflation, heavily controlled by the government, has really rendered the 1 peso coin worthless, the Chilean Peso internationally is in fact strong: In the middle of the 2000s, there's a time the Dollar went to be worth 500 Chilean Pesos not because something wrong happened with the Dollar, that was because the Chilean Peso was getting stronger!

to:

* One US dollar is worth around 500 600 Chilean pesos. While the Chileans did drop the cents they had during the 1980s and then went into a progressive inflation during the '90s, compared to the Dollar, now, 500 Chilean pesos per dollar is '''cheap'''. During the '90s the a Dollar was worth around ''1000 Chilean Pesos'' in the most extreme cases. While the inflation, heavily controlled by the government, has really rendered the 1 peso coin worthless, the Chilean Peso internationally is in fact strong: In the middle of the 2000s, there's a time the Dollar went to be worth 500 Chilean Pesos not because something wrong happened with the Dollar, that was because the Chilean Peso was getting stronger!



** As a side note: A real= 2,750 cruzeiros real (1993-1994)= 2,750,000 1990 cruzeiros= 2,750,000,000 1986 cruzados= 2,750,000,000,000 1963 cruzeiros= 2,750,000,000,000,000 1942 cruzeiros= 2,750,000,000,000,000,000 (colonial-era) reis.
* In 1944, a dollar was worth 4 Argentine Pesos Moneda Nacional. Nowadays, a dollar is worth 19 ''pesos argentinos''... except 1 ''peso argentino'' is worth ''10 '''trillion''''' Pesos Moneda Nacional after several revaluations. During the second half of the 20th Century, the Argentine monetary system would go like this: hyperinflation - rename the currency (Moneda Nacional, Pesos Ley, Austral, Pesos Convertibles, Pesos Argentinos) and drop some zeroes on the way - a decade or so of peace - whoops hyperinflation again - rinse and repeat. These days, inflation stands at 25% yearly, one of the 5 highest rates in the world.
* On October 2016, the Venezuelan bolivar is undergoing an inflation around ''700%'', and some predict, for the next year, a ''minimum rate'' of at least '''1500%'''. By September 2017 the bolivar was past 20,000 per USD. The opposition-led Asamblea Nacional reported an annual inflation rate of ''2616%'' for 2017. The exchange rate reached nearly 180,000 bolivars per USD (180 ''million'' pre-2008 bolivars), which is obviously over 210,000 per euro (as 12 January 2018).

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** As a side note: A real= 2,750 cruzeiros real reais (1993-1994)= 2,750,000 1990 cruzeiros= 2,750,000,000 1986 cruzados= 2,750,000,000,000 1963 cruzeiros= 2,750,000,000,000,000 1942 cruzeiros= 2,750,000,000,000,000,000 (colonial-era) reis.
* In 1944, a dollar was worth 4 Argentine Pesos Moneda Nacional. Nowadays, a dollar is worth 19 23 ''pesos argentinos''... except 1 ''peso argentino'' is worth ''10 '''trillion''''' Pesos Moneda Nacional after several revaluations. During the second half of the 20th Century, the Argentine monetary system would go like this: hyperinflation - rename the currency (Moneda Nacional, Pesos Ley, Austral, Pesos Convertibles, Pesos Argentinos) and drop some zeroes on the way - a decade or so of peace - whoops hyperinflation again - rinse and repeat. These days, inflation stands at 25% yearly, one of the 5 highest rates in the world.
* On October 2016, the Venezuelan bolivar is undergoing an inflation around ''700%'', and some predict, for the next year, a ''minimum rate'' of at least '''1500%'''. By September 2017 the bolivar was past 20,000 per USD. The opposition-led Asamblea Nacional reported an annual inflation rate of ''2616%'' for 2017. The exchange rate reached nearly 180,000 700,000 bolivars per USD (180 (700 ''million'' pre-2008 bolivars), which is obviously over 210,000 800,000 per euro (as 12 January 2018).9 May 2018).
** The government has planned to redenominate its currency at the rate of 1 bolivar soberano to 1000 old bolivars.
7th May '18 8:03:42 PM nombretomado
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* Played with in the ''Series/TopGear'' Vietnam special, where the presenters were sent to Vietnam and given 15 million đồng to buy a vehicle (complete with said đồng being delivered to them [[BriefcaseFullOfMoney in shoe boxes full of paper cash]]). The presenters' initial glee at finally being given a reasonable budget for one of these challenges quickly fizzled out when they realized that it equated to about $1,000 US (or £487 in their case).

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* Played with in the ''Series/TopGear'' ''Series/{{Top Gear|UK}}'' Vietnam special, where the presenters were sent to Vietnam and given 15 million đồng to buy a vehicle (complete with said đồng being delivered to them [[BriefcaseFullOfMoney in shoe boxes full of paper cash]]). The presenters' initial glee at finally being given a reasonable budget for one of these challenges quickly fizzled out when they realized that it equated to about $1,000 US (or £487 in their case).



* Mentioned above in the ''TopGear'' example, $1 US Dollar equaled $15,000 Vietnamese đồng (pronounced "Dough-ng") back in 2008. In mid-2010: $1 USD = $19,000 VND. As of fall 2016, it's $22,301 VND.

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* Mentioned above in the ''TopGear'' ''Series/TopGearUK'' example, $1 US Dollar equaled $15,000 Vietnamese đồng (pronounced "Dough-ng") back in 2008. In mid-2010: $1 USD = $19,000 VND. As of fall 2016, it's $22,301 VND.
22nd Feb '18 4:54:53 PM MisterBeeg
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* ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' used this: Jason gets paid $10, adds it to the money he had under his mattress, and announces that he's a millionaire (in Turkish lira). He spends the rest of the week running around acting like a stereotypical rich guy, reverting back to his normal self after he spends his money ("Wow, three whole comic books," [[DeadpanSnarker snarks Peter]]).

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* ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' used this: Jason gets paid $10, adds it to the money he had under his mattress, and announces that he's a millionaire (in Turkish lira). He spends the rest of the week running around acting like a stereotypical rich guy, reverting back to his normal self after he spends his money ("Wow, three five whole comic books," [[DeadpanSnarker snarks Peter]]).
16th Feb '18 7:52:41 AM Vir
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* In [[http://danbooru.donmai.us/pool/show/718 this]] ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' {{doujin}} [[{{yonkoma}} 4koma]], Reimu convinces Marisa to donate to her shrine through use of one of her birds. Marisa drops a bill for 10,000 Zimbabwean dollars into Reimu's donation box (not even worth a single yen). The next strip has [[OhCrap Reimu going on the warpath]].[[/folder]]

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* In [[http://danbooru.donmai.us/pool/show/718 this]] ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' {{doujin}} [[{{yonkoma}} [[{{Yonkoma}} 4koma]], Reimu convinces Marisa to donate to her shrine through use of one of her birds. Marisa drops a bill for 10,000 Zimbabwean dollars into Reimu's donation box (not even worth a single yen). The next strip has [[OhCrap Reimu going on the warpath]].[[/folder]]



* In the Joe Oriolo WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat cartoon "Penelope the Elephant", Rock Bottom kidnaps a lost elephant from Felix that he intended to return to her Rajah for a 50,000,000 bakshee reward. Rock Bottom makes it there ahead of Felix, but to the formers shock, it turns out the reward money is worthless--50,000,000 bakshee is only worth 10 cents in American money. He's so flabbergasted at this outcome, he angrily throws the meager award aside and goes into shock, while Felix gets the last laugh.
* In the RealityShow parody cartoon ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether'', 500 billion pesos are apparently the equivalent of 12 U.S. dollars.
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'', the two titular characters take a plane towards Canada after entering a funny home video contest, and they win 20,000 Canadian dollars... but little did they knew, that the exchange rate was $1 US = $80,000 Canadian, which means they just won 25 American cents...

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* In the Joe Oriolo WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat cartoon "Penelope the Elephant", Rock Bottom kidnaps a lost elephant from Felix that he intended to return to her Rajah for a 50,000,000 bakshee reward. Rock Bottom makes it there ahead of Felix, but to the formers former's shock, it turns out the reward money is worthless--50,000,000 bakshee is only worth 10 cents in American money. He's so flabbergasted at this outcome, he angrily throws the meager award aside and goes into shock, while Felix gets the last laugh.
* In the RealityShow parody cartoon ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether'', 500 billion pesos are is apparently the equivalent of 12 U.S. dollars.
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'', the two titular characters take a plane towards Canada after entering a funny home video contest, and they win 20,000 Canadian dollars... but little did they knew, that the exchange rate was $1 US = $80,000 Canadian, which means they just won 25 American cents...cents.



** In the season 2 episode: "Three Men and a Comic Book" Bart tries to raise one hundred dollars to buy a rare vintage comic book. He opts to taking an old foreign coin collection of his to a bank to exchange it to American currency. He was disappointed to find out that the whole collection was only worth three cents.

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** In the season 2 episode: episode "Three Men and a Comic Book" Book", Bart tries to raise one hundred dollars to buy a rare vintage comic book. He opts to for taking an old foreign coin collection of his to a bank to exchange it to for American currency. He was disappointed to find out that the whole collection was only worth three cents.



* A first-season episode of ''ScoobyDoo'' saw Scooby as a potential heir to a share in a considerable fortune--a million American dollars. [[spoiler:Turns out, while Colonel Sanders (no! not ''that'' Colonel Sanders!) had the million-dollar fortune... the dollars were in [[WorthlessTreasureTwist worthless Confederate paper money]]. [[FridgeLogic No attempt is made to explain why the mansion isn't noted as part of the estate, since it'd at least be worth something]]. Or the fact that Confederate money is highly valuable among collectors.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'', Eddy gets a (comically) huge envelope of money from a penpal in Korea, and immediately tries to buy jawbreakers. Right before he gets tossed out of the store, Edd remarks:

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* A first-season episode of ''ScoobyDoo'' ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooWhereAreYou'' saw Scooby as a potential heir to a share in a considerable fortune--a million American dollars. [[spoiler:Turns out, while Colonel Sanders (no! not ''that'' Colonel Sanders!) had the million-dollar fortune... the dollars were in [[WorthlessTreasureTwist worthless Confederate paper money]]. [[FridgeLogic No attempt is made to explain why the mansion isn't noted as part of the estate, estate since it'd at least be worth something]]. Or the fact that Confederate money is highly valuable among valued by collectors.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'', Eddy gets a (comically) huge envelope of money from a penpal in Korea, Korea and immediately tries to buy jawbreakers. Right before he gets tossed out of the store, Edd remarks:



* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'': Dr. Venture is initially very pleased at the amount of the check he receives for lecturing at a Mexican University, then he dejectedly notes it's in pesos.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'': Dr. Venture is initially very pleased at the amount of the check he receives for lecturing at a Mexican University, university, then he dejectedly notes it's in pesos.



TruthInTelevision: Hyperinflation is generally caused when a country decides that they'll alleviate their poor problem by printing more money. However, a currency's worth is determined by some baseline (originally the country's gold holdings, based on the gold standard, and more recently based on the country's output or Gross Domestic Product). Printing more money is a very, very short term solution to a big problem: creating more cash will work until everyone realizes that what's backing the cash hasn't changed. In simpler terms, each piece of hard currency is a slice of a pie: creating more cash doesn't make a bigger pie, it just creates more cuts and reduces the size of the existing slices, so you need more and more slices to equal what you had before. And hyperinflation is absolutely, unbelievably ''horrible'' for a country. Just look at all these examples of the consequences of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinflation hyperinflation]]:

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TruthInTelevision: Hyperinflation is generally caused when a country decides that they'll alleviate their poor problem by printing more money. However, a currency's worth is determined by some baseline (originally the country's gold holdings, based on the gold standard, and more recently based on the country's output or Gross Domestic Product). Printing more money is a very, very short term short-term solution to a big problem: creating more cash will work until everyone realizes that what's backing the cash hasn't changed. In simpler terms, each piece of hard currency is a slice of a pie: creating more cash doesn't make a bigger pie, it just creates more cuts and reduces the size of the existing slices, so you need more and more slices to equal what you had before. And hyperinflation is absolutely, unbelievably ''horrible'' for a country. Just look at all these examples of the consequences of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinflation hyperinflation]]:



*** At those rates, it becomes meaningless to speak of inflation in percentages due to the way compounding works. It makes more sense to speak of the currency's half-life or tenth-life (the time it takes to lose half or 90% of its value, respectively). A currency with 2% inflation has a half-life of about 35 years, but a hyperinflating currency might have a half-life of a few days. For the record, at the peak of the inflation, the half-life of the Zimbabwean dollar fluctuated about twenty four ''hours'', almost reaching the all-time record of 1946 Hungary, where in July the half-life of pengő was roughly half of that.
*** In 2009, following the major inflation crisis, Zimbawe retired its currency and now considers the American dollar official for its goverment.
* The CFA franc, which is at a fixed rate of 655.67 francs for an Euro[[note]]Before 2002, 100 CFA francs were worth 1 French franc[[/note]].

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*** At those rates, it becomes meaningless to speak of inflation in percentages due to the way compounding works. It makes more sense to speak of the currency's half-life or tenth-life (the time it takes to lose half or 90% of its value, respectively). A currency with 2% inflation has a half-life of about 35 years, but a hyperinflating currency might have a half-life of a few days. For the record, at the peak of the inflation, the half-life of the Zimbabwean dollar fluctuated about twenty four 24 ''hours'', almost reaching the all-time record of 1946 Hungary, where in July the half-life of pengő was roughly half of that.
*** In 2009, following the major inflation crisis, Zimbawe Zimbabwe retired its currency and now considers the American dollar official for its goverment.
* The CFA franc, which is at a fixed rate of 655.67 francs for an a Euro[[note]]Before 2002, 100 CFA francs were worth 1 French franc[[/note]].



* The UsefulNotes/{{Mozambique}} metical was the currency with the lowest value on 2004 (the exchange rate being t 24,500 meticais per USD) until Zimbabwe took the place on late August 2005. On July 1, 2006, Mozambique redenominated the metical at a rate of 1000:1.

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* The UsefulNotes/{{Mozambique}} metical was the currency with the lowest value on 2004 (the exchange rate being t 24,500 meticais per USD) until Zimbabwe took the place on in late August 2005. On July 1, 2006, Mozambique redenominated the metical at a rate of 1000:1.



* Prior to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Japanese Yen was worth around $12 in current (2009) U.S. currency, but faced a steep decline during and after. It was set at 360 to the dollar for a long time after the war, but now fluctuates with the market, usually hovering just over $0.01 since a few years ago.

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* Prior to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Japanese Yen was worth around $12 in current (2009) U.S. currency, currency but faced a steep decline during and after. It was set at 360 to the dollar for a long time after the war, war but now fluctuates with the market, usually hovering just over $0.01 since a few years ago.



** Back in the bad old days of UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, the conquering Japanese printed new money for use in their occupied territories, known as "banana money" as the design incorporated a banana plant. It ended up being worthless due to to [[CounterfeitCash massive counterfeiting]] (there were no serial numbers) and then totally valueless after the Japanese forces surrendered to the allies, and samples are still given out for free in compilations of replicas of wartime relics (although rarer notes do still fetch hefty prices in auctions.)
* Because the Philippines used to rub shoulders with America during the Wars, the Philippine Peso used to be 1=1. Now it's somewhere between 1=50 and 1=40 and on a roller coaster ride between them. And it doesn't help that most restaurants / hospitals have Wartime photos of their first place with menus showing a full course dinner for 10 pesos, house calls for 3 pesos, and a delivery for 20. (Kids: Wow, everything was cheap in the past!! Adults: Why god, WHY?!?!)

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** Back in the bad old days of UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, the conquering Japanese printed new money for use in their occupied territories, known as "banana money" as the design incorporated a banana plant. It ended up being worthless due to to [[CounterfeitCash massive counterfeiting]] (there were no serial numbers) and then totally valueless after the Japanese forces surrendered to the allies, and samples are still given out for free in compilations of replicas of wartime relics (although rarer notes do still fetch hefty prices in auctions.)
* Because the Philippines used to rub shoulders with America during the Wars, the Philippine Peso used to be 1=1. Now it's somewhere between 1=50 and 1=40 and on a roller coaster ride between them. And it doesn't help that most restaurants / hospitals restaurants/hospitals have Wartime photos of their first place with menus showing a full course dinner for 10 pesos, house calls for 3 pesos, and a delivery for 20. (Kids: Wow, everything was cheap in the past!! Adults: Why god, WHY?!?!)



* One of the best known examples is the German mark (not to be confused with the pre-Euro ''Deutsche Mark'') from the interwar UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic. Destroyed by the war and without a single penny left to pay the war penalties, Germany had no choice but to run the presses until the whole debt was paid; as a result, the Mark's value collapsed, and the biggest banknote ever printed was the 100 quadrillion Mark bill, ''which was worth something around 24 US dollars!''. When Stresemann became chancellor in 1923, the ''Rentenmark'' was issued at ''1 RM = 1 trillion Marks''.

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* One of the best known best-known examples is the German mark (not to be confused with the pre-Euro ''Deutsche Mark'') from the interwar UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic. Destroyed by the war and without a single penny left to pay the war penalties, Germany had no choice but to run the presses until the whole debt was paid; as a result, the Mark's value collapsed, and the biggest banknote ever printed was the 100 quadrillion Mark bill, ''which was worth something around 24 US dollars!''. When Stresemann became chancellor in 1923, the ''Rentenmark'' was issued at ''1 RM = 1 trillion Marks''.



** There are stamps that still exist that are for the postage of 20 '''billion''' Marks (actually 20 '''milliard''', due to differences in how the US and Europe calculate one billion, but it is still an unimaginably huge number to mail a letter...) So many of them were printed and so few were actually used that you can get mint uncancelled specimens for little more than a song, but a genuinelly cancelled and postally-used one could set you back a pretty ''pfennig''.

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** There are stamps that still exist that are for the postage of 20 '''billion''' Marks (actually 20 '''milliard''', due to differences in how the US and Europe calculate one billion, but it is still an unimaginably huge number to mail a letter...) So many of them were printed and so few were actually used that you can get mint uncancelled specimens for little more than a song, but a genuinelly cancelled genuinely canceled and postally-used one could set you back a pretty ''pfennig''.



* Of course, these examples pale into comparison with the post-war Hungarian pengő, which experienced the '''single worst example of hyperinflation in history'''. The 100 million B-pengő (i.e. ''100,000,000,000,000,000,000 pengő'') [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HUP_100MB_1946_obverse.jpg note]] is the single highest denomination bill ever issued, according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki. And that banknote was effectively '''worthless'''. (A 1 milliard B-Pengő note was printed but not issued.) At the height of the hyperinflation, prices doubled in every fifteen hours. To quote one source (''Postwar'' by Tony Judt) "by the time the pengo was replaced by the forint in August 1946 the dollar value of all Hungarian banknotes in circulation was just one-thousandth of one cent."

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* Of course, these examples pale into in comparison with the post-war Hungarian pengő, which experienced the '''single worst example of hyperinflation in history'''. The 100 million B-pengő (i.e. ''100,000,000,000,000,000,000 pengő'') [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HUP_100MB_1946_obverse.jpg note]] is the single highest denomination bill ever issued, according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki. And that banknote was effectively '''worthless'''. (A 1 milliard B-Pengő note was printed but not issued.) At the height of the hyperinflation, prices doubled in every fifteen hours. To quote one source (''Postwar'' by Tony Judt) "by the time the pengo was replaced by the forint in August 1946 the dollar value of all Hungarian banknotes in circulation was just one-thousandth of one cent."



* One US dollar is worth around 500 Chilean pesos. While the Chileans did drop the cents they had during the 1980s and then went into a progressive inflation during the '90s, compared to the Dollar, now, 500 chilean pesos per dollar is '''cheap'''. During the '90s the a Dollar was worth around ''1000 Chilean Pesos'' in the most extreme cases. While the inflation, heavily controlled by the government, has really rendered the 1 peso coin worthless, the Chilean Peso internationally is in fact strong: In the middle of the 2000s, there's a time the Dollar went to be worth 500 Chilean Pesos not because something wrong happened with the Dollar, that was because the Chilean Peso was getting stronger!

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* One US dollar is worth around 500 Chilean pesos. While the Chileans did drop the cents they had during the 1980s and then went into a progressive inflation during the '90s, compared to the Dollar, now, 500 chilean Chilean pesos per dollar is '''cheap'''. During the '90s the a Dollar was worth around ''1000 Chilean Pesos'' in the most extreme cases. While the inflation, heavily controlled by the government, has really rendered the 1 peso coin worthless, the Chilean Peso internationally is in fact strong: In the middle of the 2000s, there's a time the Dollar went to be worth 500 Chilean Pesos not because something wrong happened with the Dollar, that was because the Chilean Peso was getting stronger!
15th Feb '18 4:45:31 PM nombretomado
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** Incidentally, that's about right. One yen is really (roughly) about one cent. Hence the SightGag in one strip where we see a [[PennyArcade 1¥ Arcade]].

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** Incidentally, that's about right. One yen is really (roughly) about one cent. Hence the SightGag in one strip where we see a [[PennyArcade [[Webcomic/PennyArcade 1¥ Arcade]].
18th Jan '18 3:16:16 AM jormis29
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* "Awful Flight", a FunnyAnimal parody of the Canadian supehero team ''ComicBook/AlphaFlight'' that appeared in an issue of ''The Spectacular Spider-Ham'' back in TheEighties, has one of the team excitedly point out a dollar on the ground. When the others ask what the big deal is, he explains that it's a ''US'' dollar! They're rich!

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* "Awful Flight", a FunnyAnimal parody of the Canadian supehero team ''ComicBook/AlphaFlight'' that appeared in an issue of ''The ''[[ComicBook/SpiderHam The Spectacular Spider-Ham'' Spider-Ham]]'' back in TheEighties, has one of the team excitedly point out a dollar on the ground. When the others ask what the big deal is, he explains that it's a ''US'' dollar! They're rich!
12th Jan '18 12:16:37 PM UppityParty
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* On October 2016, the Venezuelan bolivar is undergoing an inflation around ''700%'', and some predict, for the next year, a ''minimum rate'' of at least '''1500%'''. By September 2017 the bolivar was past 20,000 per USD.
** The opposition-led Asamblea Nacional reported an annual inflation rate of ''2616%'' for 2017. The exchange rate reached nearly 180,000 bolivars per USD, which is obviously over 210,000 per euro (as 12 January 2018).

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* On October 2016, the Venezuelan bolivar is undergoing an inflation around ''700%'', and some predict, for the next year, a ''minimum rate'' of at least '''1500%'''. By September 2017 the bolivar was past 20,000 per USD.
**
USD. The opposition-led Asamblea Nacional reported an annual inflation rate of ''2616%'' for 2017. The exchange rate reached nearly 180,000 bolivars per USD, USD (180 ''million'' pre-2008 bolivars), which is obviously over 210,000 per euro (as 12 January 2018).
12th Jan '18 12:10:47 PM UppityParty
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* In 1944, a dollar was worth 4 Argentine Pesos Moneda Nacional. Nowadays, a dollar is worth 6 Pesos Argentinos... except 1 Peso Argentino is worth ''10 '''trillion''''' Pesos Moneda Nacional after several revaluations. During the second half of the 20th Century, the Argentine monetary system would go like this: hyperinflation - rename the currency (Moneda Nacional, Pesos Ley, Austral, Pesos Convertibles, Pesos Argentinos) and drop some zeroes on the way - a decade or so of peace - whoops hyperinflation again - rinse and repeat. These days, inflation stands at 25% yearly, one of the 5 highest rates in the world.

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* In 1944, a dollar was worth 4 Argentine Pesos Moneda Nacional. Nowadays, a dollar is worth 6 Pesos Argentinos... 19 ''pesos argentinos''... except 1 Peso Argentino ''peso argentino'' is worth ''10 '''trillion''''' Pesos Moneda Nacional after several revaluations. During the second half of the 20th Century, the Argentine monetary system would go like this: hyperinflation - rename the currency (Moneda Nacional, Pesos Ley, Austral, Pesos Convertibles, Pesos Argentinos) and drop some zeroes on the way - a decade or so of peace - whoops hyperinflation again - rinse and repeat. These days, inflation stands at 25% yearly, one of the 5 highest rates in the world.


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** The opposition-led Asamblea Nacional reported an annual inflation rate of ''2616%'' for 2017. The exchange rate reached nearly 180,000 bolivars per USD, which is obviously over 210,000 per euro (as 12 January 2018).
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