History Main / ReverseWhodunnit

15th Jan '17 9:54:03 PM ElodieHiras
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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* How to run investigation adventures with mediums or other character with psychic powers: Sure, we know who did it since our resident psychic/medium/necromancer asked the dead guy who killed him/had a psychic flash and saw the crime happen just as if it had happened in front of his very eyes/is a LivingLieDetector and saw right through the lies of the culprit, but WeNeedToGetProof if we want to avoid an innocent character to whom we have a connection becoming victim of a MiscarriageOfJustice.
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10th Jan '17 9:26:12 AM Gosicrystal
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[[folder:Video Games]]
* The first case in most ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games is one of these, with the murderer being shown for the player's benefit in the opening cutscene and then serving as the all-too-obvious WarmUpBoss. The most notable aversions are the third and fourth games' first cases, which are more standard whodunnits [[spoiler:partly because in both cases the real murderer is played much more seriously and continue on to be the game's respective BigBad even after their initial defeat. The fourth game's first case even serves as its WhamEpisode]].
** Sometimes true nature of the guilty party is obvious when you see them for the first time, but other times they pull a U-Turn and make it someone you aren't expecting. ...Then other times, they'll know that players are expecting a U-Turn so won't give you one, instead making the real culprit the person all the evidence has been pointing to. All in all, the series does all three examples so sporadically that you usually can't tell if you should be looking out for the too obvious culprit, the so-completely-innocent-looking culprit, or the in-your-face culprit.
** On occasion, this also happens with the second cases, such as [[spoiler:the first game and Dual Destinies]]. And even the third case in ''Trials and Tribulations'' shows you the killer at the start.

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[[folder:Video Games]]
[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* The first case in most ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games is one of these, with the murderer being shown for the player's benefit in the opening cutscene and then serving as the all-too-obvious WarmUpBoss. The most notable aversions are the third and fourth games' first cases, which are more standard whodunnits [[spoiler:partly because in both cases the real murderer is played much more seriously and continue on to be the game's respective BigBad even after their initial defeat. defeat]]. The fourth game's first case even serves as its WhamEpisode]].
**
WhamEpisode.\\\
Sometimes true nature of the guilty party is obvious when you see them for the first time, but other times they pull a U-Turn and make it someone you aren't expecting. ...Then other times, they'll know that players are expecting a U-Turn so won't give you one, instead making the real culprit the person all the evidence has been pointing to. All in all, the series does all three examples so sporadically that you usually can't tell if you should be looking out for the too obvious culprit, the so-completely-innocent-looking culprit, or the in-your-face culprit.
**
culprit.\\\
On occasion, this also happens with the second cases, such as [[spoiler:the first game and Dual Destinies]].''Dual Destinies'']]. And even the third case in ''Trials and Tribulations'' shows you the killer at the start.
15th Dec '16 11:12:59 AM Gosicrystal
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* The entire premise of Series/{{Motive}} is that the viewer is told who the killer is within the first few minutes but you have to figure out... well, the motive. It's not a whodunit, it's a "whydunit". But, the detectives don't know who the killer is or their motive, but the answer to both is revealed in the ensuing investigation.

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* The entire premise of Series/{{Motive}} ''Series/{{Motive}}'' is that the viewer is told who the killer is within the first few minutes but you have to figure out... well, the motive. It's not a whodunit, it's a "whydunit". But, the The detectives don't know who the killer is or their motive, but the answer to both is revealed in the ensuing investigation.
7th Sep '16 10:24:43 AM Mdumas43073
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Sometimes called a "Police Procedural" (but not to be confused with the PoliceProcedural) because its focus is on the ''procedure'' rather than the ''solution''.

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Sometimes called a "Police Procedural" (but not "pocedural" (not to be confused with the PoliceProcedural) PoliceProcedural), because its focus is on the ''procedure'' rather than the ''solution''.



A subtrope of InternalReveal. Compare and Contrast both CluelessMystery and FairPlayWhoDunnit

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A subtrope of InternalReveal. Compare and Contrast both CluelessMystery and FairPlayWhoDunnitFairPlayWhoDunnit.
28th Jun '16 11:09:19 PM MikeW
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** One fun episode has a killer detailing his "perfect" murder and the audience shown how it plans out. Then the actual crime has ''nothing'' going to plan. Still, the killer gets it done only to be ironically be discovered, not for his many mistakes but because the "evidence" against the person framed for the crime was ''too'' convincing for Dr. Sloane. As he notes, it's hard to believe a smart killer can leave so much behind to implicate him and thus fights to get at the truth.
9th May '16 3:08:21 PM PixelKnight
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Also known as the "open mystery" or "howcatchem"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.

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Also known as the "open mystery" or "howcatchem"; "How To Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.
9th May '16 3:07:59 PM PixelKnight
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Also known as the "open mystery" or "How to Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.

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Also known as the "open mystery" or "How to Catch Them"; "howcatchem"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.
24th Apr '16 10:28:35 AM DoctorCooper
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A successful ReverseWhodunnit requires a very intelligent criminal, capable of designing a crime complex enough that its solution remains interesting even if you already know who did it and why.

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A successful ReverseWhodunnit Reverse Whodunnit requires a very intelligent criminal, capable of designing a crime complex enough that its solution remains interesting even if you already know who did it and why.



** This is very common in corruption or organized crime cases, where the problem is not knowing who the bad guy is, but building a case against him.
** Another example of the same thing was the case against Al Capone. It wasn't a question of proving he was behind any particular crime, as everyone knew he was. It was a case of finding a case where his direct involvement in illegal activities could be proven, since he could otherwise claim any particular crime was one of his EvilMinions getting out of hand. Eventually they got a conviction... for tax evasion.

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** This is very common in corruption or organized crime cases, where the problem is not knowing who the bad guy is, but building a case against him.
**
* Another example of the same thing was the case against Al Capone. It wasn't a question of proving he was behind any particular crime, as everyone knew he was. It was a case of finding a case where his direct involvement in illegal activities could be proven, since he could otherwise claim any particular crime was one of his EvilMinions minions getting out of hand. Eventually they got a conviction... for tax evasion.
20th Apr '16 12:09:03 AM freesefan
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* In ''Literature/TheScarecrow'' it is established very early that Carver and Stone are the murderers of Denise Babbit; the suspense lies in how IntrepidReporter Jack [=McEvoy=] will track them down.

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* Mystery author Creator/MichaelConnelly has indulged in this twice. In ''Literature/TheScarecrow'' it is established very early that Carver and Stone are the murderers of Denise Babbit; the suspense lies in how IntrepidReporter Jack [=McEvoy=] will track them down.down. In ''[[Literature/TheCrossing2015 The Crossing]]'' it's obvious from the get-go that dirty cops Ellis and Long are the murderers. The mystery lies in why they killed Lexi Parks and framed another man, and how protagonist Harry Bosch will figure it out.
26th Mar '16 8:50:23 AM freesefan
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Also known as the "OpenMystery" or "How to Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.

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Also known as the "OpenMystery" "open mystery" or "How to Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.
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