History Main / ReverseWhodunnit

28th Jun '16 11:09:19 PM MikeW
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** One fun episode has a killer detailing his "perfect" murder and the audience shown how it plans out. Then the actual crime has ''nothing'' going to plan. Still, the killer gets it done only to be ironically be discovered, not for his many mistakes but because the "evidence" against the person framed for the crime was ''too'' convincing for Dr. Sloane. As he notes, it's hard to believe a smart killer can leave so much behind to implicate him and thus fights to get at the truth.
9th May '16 3:08:21 PM PixelKnight
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Also known as the "open mystery" or "howcatchem"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.

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Also known as the "open mystery" or "howcatchem"; "How To Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.
9th May '16 3:07:59 PM PixelKnight
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Also known as the "open mystery" or "How to Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.

to:

Also known as the "open mystery" or "How to Catch Them"; "howcatchem"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.
24th Apr '16 10:28:35 AM DoctorCooper
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A successful ReverseWhodunnit requires a very intelligent criminal, capable of designing a crime complex enough that its solution remains interesting even if you already know who did it and why.

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A successful ReverseWhodunnit Reverse Whodunnit requires a very intelligent criminal, capable of designing a crime complex enough that its solution remains interesting even if you already know who did it and why.



** This is very common in corruption or organized crime cases, where the problem is not knowing who the bad guy is, but building a case against him.
** Another example of the same thing was the case against Al Capone. It wasn't a question of proving he was behind any particular crime, as everyone knew he was. It was a case of finding a case where his direct involvement in illegal activities could be proven, since he could otherwise claim any particular crime was one of his EvilMinions getting out of hand. Eventually they got a conviction... for tax evasion.

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** This is very common in corruption or organized crime cases, where the problem is not knowing who the bad guy is, but building a case against him.
**
* Another example of the same thing was the case against Al Capone. It wasn't a question of proving he was behind any particular crime, as everyone knew he was. It was a case of finding a case where his direct involvement in illegal activities could be proven, since he could otherwise claim any particular crime was one of his EvilMinions minions getting out of hand. Eventually they got a conviction... for tax evasion.
20th Apr '16 12:09:03 AM freesefan
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* In ''Literature/TheScarecrow'' it is established very early that Carver and Stone are the murderers of Denise Babbit; the suspense lies in how IntrepidReporter Jack [=McEvoy=] will track them down.

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* Mystery author Creator/MichaelConnelly has indulged in this twice. In ''Literature/TheScarecrow'' it is established very early that Carver and Stone are the murderers of Denise Babbit; the suspense lies in how IntrepidReporter Jack [=McEvoy=] will track them down.down. In ''[[Literature/TheCrossing2015 The Crossing]]'' it's obvious from the get-go that dirty cops Ellis and Long are the murderers. The mystery lies in why they killed Lexi Parks and framed another man, and how protagonist Harry Bosch will figure it out.
26th Mar '16 8:50:23 AM freesefan
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Also known as the "OpenMystery" or "How to Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.

to:

Also known as the "OpenMystery" "open mystery" or "How to Catch Them"; a style of CrimeAndPunishmentSeries show popularized by ''Series/{{Columbo}}''.
26th Mar '16 8:49:46 AM freesefan
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* In ''Literature/TheScarecrow'' it is established very early that Carver and Stone are the murderers of Denise Babbit; the suspense lies in how IntrepidReporter Jack [=McEvoy=] will track them down.
24th Mar '16 2:15:36 AM erforce
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* ''[[Film/{{Fracture2007}} Fracture]]'': "I killed my wife...Prove it."

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* ''[[Film/{{Fracture2007}} ''[[Film/{{Fracture 2007}} Fracture]]'': "I killed my wife...Prove it."



* {{Frequency}} has shades of this. Although, it's less a howcatchem than a howproveit. The main characters find out who the killer is fairly early on...the problem is, they only find this out by collaborating over a 30 year time gap (they can communicate via ham radio). So, they somehow have to prove who the killer is to the cops, with evidence the cops will actually believe.
* ''Film/{{Oldboy}}'' has the villain reveal himself to both the viewer ''and'' the protagonist partway through the film, and challenges the protagonist to figure out his motive for imprisoning him.

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* {{Frequency}} ''Film/{{Frequency}}'' has shades of this. Although, it's less a howcatchem than a howproveit. The main characters find out who the killer is fairly early on...the problem is, they only find this out by collaborating over a 30 year time gap (they can communicate via ham radio). So, they somehow have to prove who the killer is to the cops, with evidence the cops will actually believe.
* ''Film/{{Oldboy}}'' ''Film/{{Oldboy 2003}}'' has the villain reveal himself to both the viewer ''and'' the protagonist partway through the film, and challenges the protagonist to figure out his motive for imprisoning him.
7th Mar '16 9:39:02 PM PaulA
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* ''Dr. Thorndyke'' was one of the first to do this; several of his stories will show the killer performing an apparently perfect coverup in the first half, then following it with scientific deduction through the second half.
** These were followed by ''Malice Aforethought'' (1931) by Anthony Berkeley Cox, and most of the Department of Dead Ends stories by Roy Vickers.

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* ''Dr. Thorndyke'' ''Literature/DrThorndyke'' was one of the first to do this; several of his stories will show the killer performing an apparently perfect coverup in the first half, then following it with scientific deduction through the second half.
** * These were followed by ''Malice Aforethought'' (1931) by Anthony Berkeley Cox, and most of the Department of Dead Ends stories by Roy Vickers.
7th Mar '16 9:38:36 PM PaulA
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This was probably invented by R. Austin Freeman in 1912, in his collection of detective short stories ''The Singing Bone'', which featured Dr. Thorndyke. He called this concept the 'inverted detective story'.

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This was probably invented by R. Austin Freeman in 1912, in his collection of detective short stories ''The Singing Bone'', which featured Dr. Thorndyke.Literature/DrThorndyke. He called this concept the 'inverted detective story'.
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