History Main / ReverseCerebusSyndrome

18th Dec '16 6:10:35 PM MyFinalEdits
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* The direct-to-video ScoobyDoo movies that started being released in the late 90's follow this. The first two, ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooOnZombieIsland'' and ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheWitchsGhost'', were DarkerAndEdgier than the television shows and featured genuinely threatening antagonists with real supernatural qualities who were trying to kill Mystery Inc. The next two, ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheAlienInvaders'' and ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheCyberChase'' feature the gang in a bit more danger than usual but were portrayed as a bit ligher, and the antagonists were human this time around. ''Legend of the Vampire'' goes completely campy and is done in the style of the old cartoons, and most of the movies have followed the style of this one since.

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* The direct-to-video ScoobyDoo Franchise/ScoobyDoo movies that started being released in the late 90's [[TheNineties 90's]] follow this. The first two, ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooOnZombieIsland'' and ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheWitchsGhost'', were are DarkerAndEdgier than the television shows and featured feature genuinely threatening antagonists with real supernatural qualities who were are trying to kill Mystery Inc. The next two, ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheAlienInvaders'' and ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheCyberChase'' feature the gang in a bit more danger than usual but were are portrayed as a bit ligher, and the antagonists were are human this time around. ''Legend of the Vampire'' goes completely campy and is done in the style of the old cartoons, and most of the movies have followed the style of this one since.
18th Dec '16 6:08:56 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Slight in-universe example in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': the ShowWithinAShow ''Police Cops'' is changed from an action series to a comedy and, to Homer's dismay, changing his namesake character Homer Simpson from TheHero to the [[TookALevelInDumbass useless]] PluckyComicRelief.
** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' follows this trope itself. Season 1 was somewhat dark and gloomy, at times it even barely kept its elements of comedy, and elements that eventually meant nothing in the show were taken very seriously then. Episodes ranged from Homer attempting to commit suicide at the thought of being a hopeless loser, Bart and Lisa barely escaping death at the hands of a criminal babysitter, and ''Moaning Lisa'' was just plain heartbreaking. Seasons 2 and 3 did step up the comedy, but only a bit. In fact, in the premiere for the second season[[note]]"Bart Gets an 'F'"[[/note]] we even see ''the American bad boy'' Bart Simpson cry; and in the first episode of the third[[note]]"Stark Raving Dad"[[/note]] we see mental health issues taken quite seriously.

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* Slight in-universe example in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': the ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'':
** The
ShowWithinAShow ''Police Cops'' is an InUniverse example for being changed from an action series to a comedy and, to Homer's dismay, changing his namesake character Homer Simpson from TheHero to the [[TookALevelInDumbass useless]] PluckyComicRelief.
** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' follows this trope itself. Season 1 was somewhat dark and gloomy, at times it even barely kept its elements of comedy, and elements that eventually meant nothing in the show were taken very seriously then. Episodes ranged from Homer attempting to commit suicide at the thought of being a hopeless loser, Bart and Lisa barely escaping death at the hands of a criminal babysitter, and ''Moaning Lisa'' was just plain heartbreaking. Seasons 2 and 3 did step up the comedy, but only a bit. In fact, in the premiere for the second season[[note]]"Bart Gets an 'F'"[[/note]] we even see ''the American bad boy'' Bart Simpson cry; and in the first episode of the third[[note]]"Stark Raving Dad"[[/note]] we see mental health issues taken quite seriously.



* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' represents a borderline case when comparing the first two episodes to the rest of Season 1. The unleashed [[SealedEvilInACan Nightmare]] [[MadGod Moon]] and her desire to bring about TheNightThatNeverEnds represents a greater threat than everything else put together... and she's defeated in the second episode. The show then slips into a more [[SliceOfLife everyday]] [[MonsterOfTheWeek one-conflict-per-episode]] formula for the remainder of the season, until [[GodOfEvil Discord]] comes along in the second season's first episode to flip it back by being ''much'' worse than Nightmare Moon; it is once again defeated in the second episode of the season, allowing the remainder of Season 2 (except the finale) to follow the example set by first season.

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* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** The series
represents a borderline case when comparing the first two episodes to the rest of Season 1. The unleashed [[SealedEvilInACan Nightmare]] [[MadGod Moon]] and her desire to bring about TheNightThatNeverEnds represents a greater threat than everything else put together... and she's defeated in the second episode. The show then slips into a more [[SliceOfLife everyday]] [[MonsterOfTheWeek one-conflict-per-episode]] formula for the remainder of the season, until [[GodOfEvil Discord]] comes along in the second season's first episode to flip it back by being ''much'' worse than Nightmare Moon; it is once again defeated in the second episode of the season, allowing the remainder of Season 2 (except the finale) to follow the example set by first season.
18th Dec '16 4:05:51 PM RAraya
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** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' follows this trope itself. Season 1 was somewhat dark and gloomy, at times it even barely kept its elements of comedy, and elements that eventually meant nothing in the show were taken very seriously then. Episodes ranged from Homer attempting to commit suicide at the thought of being a hopeless loser, Bart and Lisa barely escaping death at the hands of a criminal babysitter, and ''Moaning Lisa'' was just plain heartbreaking. Seasons 2 and 3 did step up the comedy, but only a bit. In fact, in the premiere for the second season[[note]]"Bart Gets an 'F'"[[/note]] we even see ''the American bad boy'' Bart Simpson cry; and in the first episode of the third[[note]]"Stark Raving Dad"[[/note]] we see mental health issues taken quite seriously.
** Beginning with season 4, the Simpsons rarely had any dark, depressing moments for around a decade, and anything shown to be a downer was usually either played for laughs or treated like no serious problem (except for some episodes such as "A Milhouse Divided" and "Alone Again, Natura-Diddly"). During Al Jean's (current) tenure, the seriousness was gradually amped up (although not to the extent of the first three seasons), the darkest episode of the later seasons probably being ''The Boys Of Bummer'', which disappointed many by ending a very dark episode with an unintentional snorefest. Since then, serious themes have been used sparingly and often as sources of BlackComedy.



** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' follows this trope itself. Season 1 was somewhat dark and gloomy, at times it even barely kept its elements of comedy, and elements that eventually meant nothing in the show were taken very seriously then. Episodes ranged from Homer attempting to commit suicide at the thought of being a hopeless loser, Bart and Lisa barely escaping death at the hands of a criminal babysitter, and ''Moaning Lisa'' was just plain heartbreaking. Season 2 did step up the comedy, but only a bit. In fact, in the premier for said season we even see ''the American bad boy'' Bart Simpson cry. Since then, the Simpsons rarely has any dark, depressing moments, and anything shown to be a downer is usually either played for laughs or treated like no serious problem. The darkest episode of the later seasons is ''The Boys Of Bummer'', which disappointed many by ending a very dark episode with an unintentional snorefest.
5th Nov '16 10:48:56 AM erforce
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* ''ComicBook/GodzillaKingdomOfMonsters'' attempted (and failed) to emulate the DarkerAndEdgier nature of the original Godzilla film and Heisei Era films with gratuitous violence, constant aversions of InfantImmortality, and limp-fisted attempts at dated social commentary. This proved pretty unpopular and so the comics afterwards decided to go in the opposite direction, emulating the CrazyAwesome fun and adventure of the Showa Era films with insane set-piece moments, loads of monster brawling, occasional bits of dramedy, and a MythArc that would be at home in a pulp adventure serial. The results have been much better received by fans.

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* ''ComicBook/GodzillaKingdomOfMonsters'' attempted (and failed) to emulate the DarkerAndEdgier nature of the original Godzilla ''Film/{{Godzilla|1954}}'' film and Heisei Era films with gratuitous violence, constant aversions of InfantImmortality, and limp-fisted attempts at dated social commentary. This proved pretty unpopular and so the comics afterwards decided to go in the opposite direction, emulating the CrazyAwesome fun and adventure of the Showa Era films with insane set-piece moments, loads of monster brawling, occasional bits of dramedy, and a MythArc that would be at home in a pulp adventure serial. The results have been much better received by fans.



* The ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' franchise started off depicting the horrors of a nuclear holocaust. The first movie was very dark and, even by today's standards, frightening. The series gradually [[GenreShift shifted]] from allegorical horror to a children's movie series best known for goofy rubber suits and ridiculous plots. The titular monster, originally a metaphor for the atomic bomb, turned into a proud national icon and the source for cartoons, toys, video games, etc. It wasn't until 1984's ''The Return of Godzilla'' (and, to a lesser degree, the previous two movies, which preceded it by ten years) that the series took a partial turn back to its serious roots, and [[CerebusRollercoaster it's been wavering back and forth between both extremes ever since]].

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* The ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' franchise started off depicting the horrors of a nuclear holocaust. The [[Film/Godzilla1954 first movie movie]] was very dark and, even by today's standards, frightening. The series gradually [[GenreShift shifted]] from allegorical horror to a children's movie series best known for goofy rubber suits and ridiculous plots. The titular monster, originally a metaphor for the atomic bomb, turned into a proud national icon and the source for cartoons, toys, video games, etc. It wasn't until 1984's ''The Return of Godzilla'' ''Film/TheReturnOfGodzilla'' (and, to a lesser degree, the previous two movies, which preceded it by ten years) that the series took a partial turn back to its serious roots, and [[CerebusRollercoaster it's been wavering back and forth between both extremes ever since]].



* The third ''Film/TheNeverendingStory'' movie was widely criticized for having goofy depictions of characters like Falcor and the Rockbiter who spew pop culture references as opposed to the far more serious mood of the first movie.

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* The third ''Film/TheNeverendingStory'' movie ''Film/TheNeverendingStoryIIIEscapeFromFantasia'' was widely criticized for having goofy depictions of characters like Falcor and the Rockbiter who spew pop culture references as opposed to the far more serious mood of the [[Film/TheNeverEndingStory first movie.movie]].
28th Sep '16 6:19:33 AM SaraJaye
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** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' follows this trope itself. Season 1 was somewhat dark and gloomy, at times it even barely kept its elements of comedy, and elements that eventually meant nothing in the show were taken very seriously then. Episodes ranged from Homer attempting to commit suicide at the thought of being a hopeless loser, Bart and Lisa barely escaping death at the hands of a criminal babysitter, and ''Moaning Lisa'' was so depressing that it almost had the entire fanbase hating Lisa for glooming up the show. Season 2 did step up the comedy, but only a bit. In fact, in the premier for said season we even see ''the American bad boy'' Bart Simpson cry. Since then, the Simpsons rarely has any dark, depressing moments, and anything shown to be a downer is usually either played for laughs or treated like no serious problem. The darkest episode of the later seasons is ''The Boys Of Bummer'', which disappointed many by ending a very dark episode with an unintentional snorefest.

to:

** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' follows this trope itself. Season 1 was somewhat dark and gloomy, at times it even barely kept its elements of comedy, and elements that eventually meant nothing in the show were taken very seriously then. Episodes ranged from Homer attempting to commit suicide at the thought of being a hopeless loser, Bart and Lisa barely escaping death at the hands of a criminal babysitter, and ''Moaning Lisa'' was so depressing that it almost had the entire fanbase hating Lisa for glooming up the show.just plain heartbreaking. Season 2 did step up the comedy, but only a bit. In fact, in the premier for said season we even see ''the American bad boy'' Bart Simpson cry. Since then, the Simpsons rarely has any dark, depressing moments, and anything shown to be a downer is usually either played for laughs or treated like no serious problem. The darkest episode of the later seasons is ''The Boys Of Bummer'', which disappointed many by ending a very dark episode with an unintentional snorefest.
24th Sep '16 6:04:52 PM nombretomado
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* The U.S version of {{Series/The Apprentice}} became this when it changed its format to become an all-celebrity show. The [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama birther]] opinions from DonaldTrump don't help the show's possible view of itself as a paragon of solemnity either.

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* The U.S version of {{Series/The Apprentice}} became this when it changed its format to become an all-celebrity show. The [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama birther]] opinions from DonaldTrump Creator/DonaldTrump don't help the show's possible view of itself as a paragon of solemnity either.
11th Sep '16 4:51:12 AM SatoshiBakura
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* ''Manga/YuGiOh'' started as a surprisingly dark, bleak manga about a kid who had an evil alter ego that inflicted punishments on bullies that ranged from psychologically crippling, to killing, to eternally damning in limbo forever, but then that card game came along. Cue a LighterAndSofter progression, to which kid and alter ego start [[CharacterDevelopment changing]] via ThePowerOfFriendship. There were also several instances, pre-and-post Duelist Kingdom arc, where the games featured were very cutesy on the surface. And the manga itself begins with an IJustWantToHaveFriends motivation on Yugi's part.
30th Aug '16 7:03:10 PM comicwriter
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* The first series of ''Manga/CatsEye'' was fairly serious and action-driven, albeit with a lot of lighthearted comedy moments in-between robberies. The second series was a borderline RomanticComedy, with increasingly absurd heists and [[PlotTumor a larger amount of focus]] on the DatingCatwoman relationship between Hitomi and Toshio.

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* The first series of ''Manga/CatsEye'' was fairly serious and action-driven, albeit with a lot of lighthearted comedy moments in-between robberies. The second series was a borderline RomanticComedy, with increasingly absurd heists and [[PlotTumor [[RomanticPlotTumor a larger amount of focus]] on the DatingCatwoman relationship between Hitomi and Toshio.
20th Aug '16 9:16:07 PM Arsidias
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* The very first episode of the 1960s ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series, "Hey Diddle Riddle", while comedic in tone, [[ContinuityNod did make reference to the murder of Bruce Wayne's parents by "a gang of criminals"]] (an origin story almost exactly like the one from the comics, and one the producers of the show hesitated to so much as allude to), and it's clear from the dialogue that (again, just as in the comics), Wayne has become Batman in order to fulfill a promise he made to his parents for that very reason. Following this two-episode story arc, the show never brought up the murder again.

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* The very first episode of the 1960s ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series, "Hey Diddle Riddle", while comedic in tone, [[ContinuityNod did make reference to the murder of Bruce Wayne's parents by "a gang of "dastardly criminals"]] (an origin story almost exactly like the one from the comics, and one the producers of the show hesitated to so much as allude to), and it's clear from the dialogue that (again, just as in the comics), Wayne has become Batman in order to fulfill a promise he made to his parents for that very reason. Following this two-episode story arc, the show never brought up the murder again.
15th Aug '16 4:59:46 PM bt8257
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This ToneShift away from seriousness and more towards humor can happen for any number of reasons. Maybe audiences weren't jiving with the more serious take. Maybe there was some ExecutiveMeddling involved. Maybe the writers were just bored. In some cases, the story ''started'' funny, [[CerebusSyndrome became serious]], but then returned to its roots. And if it [[LongRunner runs long enough]], it may go serious ''[[CerebusRollerCoaster again]]''.

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This ToneShift away from seriousness and more towards humor can happen for any number of reasons. Maybe audiences weren't jiving with the more serious take. Maybe there was some ExecutiveMeddling involved. Maybe the writers were just bored. In some cases, the story ''started'' funny, [[CerebusSyndrome became serious]], but then returned to its roots. And if it [[LongRunner runs long enough]], it may go serious ''[[CerebusRollerCoaster ''[[CerebusRollercoaster again]]''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ReverseCerebusSyndrome