History Main / RetroUniverse

11th Nov '17 11:37:53 PM jormis29
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* Alan Rudolph's ''Trouble In Mind'' (from 1985) is set in some indeterminate near-future/alternate age where Seattle is under martial law, people act and dress like a 1940s noir drama, and the newest car is ca. 1972.

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* Alan Rudolph's ''Trouble In Mind'' ''Film/TroubleInMind'' (from 1985) is set in some indeterminate near-future/alternate age where Seattle is under martial law, people act and dress like a 1940s noir drama, and the newest car is ca. 1972.
20th Oct '17 12:55:34 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* WordOfGod is that ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' is set in one of these. They have most of the technology and culture we have in the 21st century, but there are no guns or cars, electronic communication is extremely difficult/expensive over long distances, and video games are still in the 8-bit era. The DistantFinale shows technology has changed within the last dozen or so years. They had computers when Naruto was a kid but they weren't seen much. Naruto is shown using a laptop when he does [[spoiler:Hokage duties]]. This becomes even more obvious in the ''Boruto'' movie. It takes place at minimum fifteen to twenty years after the manga ended. In that time technology has advanced quite a bit. Computers and other modern technologies are common places however their flying machines aren't exactly real-world.

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* ''Franchise/{{Naruto}}'': WordOfGod is that ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' the [[Manga/{{Naruto}} original series]] is set in one of these. They have most of the technology and culture we have had in the 21st 20th century, but there are no guns or cars, electronic communication is extremely difficult/expensive over long distances, and video games are still in the 8-bit era. The DistantFinale shows the series starting to diverge from this trope as technology has changed within the last dozen or so years. They had advances; for example, while computers when Naruto was a kid but they weren't seen much. Naruto is were rare and rather primitive during Naruto's childhood, [[spoiler:he's shown using a modern laptop as an adult when he does [[spoiler:Hokage perfomring Hokage duties]]. This becomes even more obvious in the ''Boruto'' movie. It ''Manga/{{Boruto}}'' era, which takes place at minimum fifteen to twenty years after the manga ended. In that time original series ended; the technology has advanced quite a bit. Computers and other modern technologies are common places however their flying machines is now pretty much on par with our own, except there still aren't exactly real-world.any cars or airplanes (though they ''do'' have airships and bullet trains).
10th Oct '17 12:56:23 PM chopshop
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* IDW's ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}'' comics gradually developed a visual style evocative of [[{{Animesque}} 90's science fiction anime]] and 80's Saturday morning cartoons. The coloring is usually bright and vibrant and the technology often has UsedFuture / {{Zeerust}} stylings (an advanced communications device that can cross time resembles a walkie-talkie). This is especially apparent when Alex Milne or Nick Roche does the art.
** A cute detail about this is how [[RetrauxFlashback flashbacks to prehistoric Cybertron switch to a different retro style]]; they're done in the style of 70's to 80's comic creators like Creator/WaltSimonson and Creator/JackKirby. The art is given a worn-out look evocative of a really old comic, there are KirbyDots everywhere, and [[StylisticSuck characters talk in a stilted, exposition-heavy manner]].
4th Oct '17 5:49:05 AM PersonWithManyAliases
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* ''VideoGame/AlienIsolation'': To mimic the aesthetic of [[Film/''Alien'' the first film]], the game features a thoroughly '70s sci-fi look, complete with monochrome cathode ray computers, Saul Bass-style advertisements, and even a special filter that mimics the ''film grain'' of '70s film stock.

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* ''VideoGame/AlienIsolation'': To mimic the aesthetic of [[Film/''Alien'' [[{{Film/Alien}} the first film]], the game features a thoroughly '70s sci-fi look, complete with monochrome cathode ray computers, Saul Bass-style advertisements, and even a special filter that mimics the ''film grain'' of '70s film stock.
28th Sep '17 2:45:10 AM HelloLamppost
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[[folder:NewspaperComics]]
* The current writer and artist team on ''ComicStrip/DickTracy'' have embraced this trope. While still nominally set in the present day, various elements -- most notably the police cars -- look they belong to the 1980's at the latest. Since the strip has been running since the 1930's, and includes both a cast of characters and props introduced at different points all through those decades, this seems like a reasonable [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall acknowledgement]] of ComicBookTime.

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8th Sep '17 5:13:59 PM ProfessorDetective
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** The anime takes place in a steampunkish world where many of the airships have a streamlined 1930s-era appearance. Most of the fashions worn by the common people seem to date from the 1920s and '30s as well. Most of the military uniforms, however, seem distinctly 18th and 19th century, and the gowns worn by noble women look as though they date from the late Renaissance. In contrast to this, the costumes worn by members of the scientifically advanced Guild have more of an alien, CrystalSpiresAndTogas look to them.

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** The anime takes place in a steampunkish steampunk-ish world where many of the airships have a streamlined 1930s-era appearance. Most of the fashions worn by the common people seem to date from the 1920s and '30s as well. Most of the military uniforms, however, seem distinctly 18th and 19th century, and the gowns worn by noble women look as though they date from the late Renaissance. In contrast to this, the costumes worn by members of the scientifically advanced Guild have more of an alien, CrystalSpiresAndTogas look to them.



** The series apparently takes place in an AlternateUniverse from ours; televisions and the setting in general are very retro, but the series is technically happening in modern times. The years are given Showa era numbering, even when referring dates after 1989-- for example, 2004 (Heisei 15) is still referred as Showa 89.

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** The series apparently takes place in an AlternateUniverse from ours; televisions and the setting setting, in general general, are very retro, but the series is technically happening in modern times. The years are given Showa era numbering, even when referring dates after 1989-- for example, 2004 (Heisei 15) is still referred as Showa 89.



* ''Anime/ZoidsChaoticCentury'': Set on a distant planet in the far future. A world with animal like Mecha used to fight wars. One of the main powers, the Republic, has a capital city with skyscrapers and cars, and telephones that are rotary dial. The other main power, the Empire, has a capital city that looks like some cross between Berlin and ancient Byzantium. The rural areas are equally strange, featuring ancient ruins that look an awful lot like a shopping mall, and a town that looks a middle eastern Bazaar.
* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in 2070s, but the clothing, hair-styles, music and general mood come straight from the 1970s. Also, a lot of the style is pretty 1940s looking. In fact, [[{{Retraux}} even the [=DVDs=] are designed to look like vinyl LPs]].

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* ''Anime/ZoidsChaoticCentury'': Set on a distant planet in the far future. A world with animal like animal-like Mecha used to fight wars. One of the main powers, the Republic, has a capital city with skyscrapers and cars, and telephones that are rotary dial. The other main power, the Empire, has a capital city that looks like some cross between Berlin and ancient Byzantium. The rural areas are equally strange, featuring ancient ruins that look an awful lot like a shopping mall, and a town that looks a middle eastern Bazaar.
* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in 2070s, but the clothing, hair-styles, hairstyles, music and general mood come straight from the 1970s. Also, a lot of the style is pretty 1940s looking. In fact, [[{{Retraux}} even the [=DVDs=] are designed to look like vinyl LPs]].



* WordOfGod is that ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' is set in one of these. They have most of the technology and culture we have in the 21st century, but there are no guns or cars, electronic communication is extremely difficult/expensive over long distances, and video games are still in the 8-bit era. The DistantFinale shows technology has changed within the last dozen or so years. They had computers when Naruto was a kid but they weren't seen much. Naruto is shown using a laptop when he does [[spoiler:Hokage duties]]. This becomes even more obvious in the ''Boruto'' movie. It takes place at minimum fifteen to twenty years after the manga ended. In that time technology has advanced quite a bit. Computers and other modern technologies are common place however their flying machines aren't exactly real-world.

to:

* WordOfGod is that ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' is set in one of these. They have most of the technology and culture we have in the 21st century, but there are no guns or cars, electronic communication is extremely difficult/expensive over long distances, and video games are still in the 8-bit era. The DistantFinale shows technology has changed within the last dozen or so years. They had computers when Naruto was a kid but they weren't seen much. Naruto is shown using a laptop when he does [[spoiler:Hokage duties]]. This becomes even more obvious in the ''Boruto'' movie. It takes place at minimum fifteen to twenty years after the manga ended. In that time technology has advanced quite a bit. Computers and other modern technologies are common place places however their flying machines aren't exactly real-world.



* The cars and architecture of Gotham City in the ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' franchise seem to be perpetually stuck in the 1940s. One of the city's mottos is actually "The Dark Deco City". This is very notable in the [[Film/{{Batman}} 1989 movie]] and in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. In 1999, much of Gotham City was damaged in an earthquake during the Cataclysm/No Man's Land event. This was used to justify an extensive architectural revamp that turned the city into a mix of 40s, modern and retro-futuristic architecture.

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* The cars and architecture of Gotham City in the ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' franchise seem to be perpetually stuck in the 1940s. One of the city's mottos is actually "The Dark Deco City". This is very notable in the [[Film/{{Batman}} 1989 movie]] and in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. In 1999, much of Gotham City was damaged in an earthquake during the Cataclysm/No Man's Land event. This was used to justify an extensive architectural revamp that turned the city into a mix of the 40s, modern and retro-futuristic architecture.



* Director Creator/WesAnderson likes to use this. In particular, ''Film/TheRoyalTenenbaums'' has such a distinctly 1970s style that the "2001" date on [[spoiler:Royal's tombstone]] was quite jarring. ''Film/{{Rushmore}}'', which has 1997 inscribed on the Swiss Army knife Dirk gives Max, but includes manual typewriters, tape machines, and a general aesthetic (clothes, buildings) skewed towards a late 60s/70s feel.

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* Director Creator/WesAnderson likes to use this. In particular, ''Film/TheRoyalTenenbaums'' has such a distinctly 1970s style that the "2001" date on [[spoiler:Royal's tombstone]] was quite jarring. ''Film/{{Rushmore}}'', which has 1997 inscribed on the Swiss Army knife Dirk gives Max, Max but includes manual typewriters, tape machines, and a general aesthetic (clothes, buildings) skewed towards a late 60s/70s feel.



* ''Film/EdwardScissorhands'' seems to be set in some kind of eerie cross between the 1950s and the 1980s because the FramingDevice is an old woman telling about her life as a teenager in the 50s to her grandchild in the 80s. How she aged so fast however is anyone's guess.

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* ''Film/EdwardScissorhands'' seems to be set in some kind of an eerie cross between the 1950s and the 1980s because the FramingDevice is an old woman telling about her life as a teenager in the 50s to her grandchild in the 80s. How she aged so fast however fast, however, is anyone's guess.



* ''Film/{{Penelope}}'' has modern technology and (mostly) modern costumes, but the architecture and interior design look like early 20th century with a fairy-tale twist.

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* ''Film/{{Penelope}}'' has modern technology and (mostly) modern costumes, but the architecture and interior design look like the early 20th century with a fairy-tale twist.



* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' is largely set in an advanced spacefaring society, but the tech and environments frequently have a boxy, UsedFuture aesthetic and the general visual style was designed to evoke pulp ScienceFantasy comics like the works of Creator/JackKirby. Star-Lord is also [[DiscoDan totally trapped in the 80's]], using an old Walkman and playing classic rock/funk music from the 70's and 60's. In his case it's a plot point, as he was taken from Earth when he was ten back in the early 80's; as far as he knows Earth is still like it was back than.
** The TwoDecadesBehind aesthetics get amusingly lampshaded at the end of the second film; Kraglin gives Peter a new music playing device, claiming it's the hot new thing back on Earth. [[spoiler: Its a laughably outdated Zune that looks like it was bought cheap at a yard sale.]]

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* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' is largely set in an advanced spacefaring society, but the tech and environments frequently have a boxy, UsedFuture aesthetic and the general visual style was designed to evoke pulp ScienceFantasy comics like the works of Creator/JackKirby. Star-Lord is also [[DiscoDan totally trapped in the 80's]], using an old Walkman and playing classic rock/funk music from the 70's and 60's. In his case it's a plot point, as he was taken from Earth when he was ten back in the early 80's; as far as he knows Earth is still like it was back than.
then.
** The TwoDecadesBehind aesthetics get amusingly lampshaded at the end of the second film; Kraglin gives Peter a new music playing device, claiming it's the hot new thing back on Earth. [[spoiler: Its It's a laughably outdated Zune that looks like it was bought cheap at a yard sale.]]



** Considering the total lack of interest for the muggle technology and culture the wizards display (except Mr Weasley, maybe); this could also be seen as a form of MedievalStasis.

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** Considering the total lack of interest for the muggle Muggle technology and culture the wizards display (except Mr Weasley, maybe); this could also be seen as a form of MedievalStasis.



* ''Literature/FitzpatricksWar'' and ''The Martian General's Daughter'' by sci-fi writer Theodore Judson combine this with SchizoTech and some mild PunkPunk, taking place on Earth a few centuries into the future, when previous high technology and modern political systems have all but collapsed. Each is a RomanAClef from AncientGrome; one is the life of Commodus, the Roman emperor who was featured in Gladiator, and the other is the life of [[UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat Alexander the Great]].

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* ''Literature/FitzpatricksWar'' and ''The Martian General's Daughter'' by sci-fi writer Theodore Judson combine this with SchizoTech and some mild PunkPunk, taking place on Earth a few centuries into the future, future when previous high technology and modern political systems have all but collapsed. Each is a RomanAClef from AncientGrome; one is the life of Commodus, the Roman emperor who was featured in Gladiator, and the other is the life of [[UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat Alexander the Great]].



* The BBC production of ''Literature/{{Gormenghast}}'' juxtaposes elements of different time periods to emphasise that it takes place in its own, timeless, ahistorical reality.
* Justified in ''Series/{{Lost}}''. The Dharma Initiative built research stations all over the island in the 1970s. The modern day islanders find and use these stations which leads to this.

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* The BBC production of ''Literature/{{Gormenghast}}'' juxtaposes elements of different time periods to emphasise emphasize that it takes place in its own, timeless, ahistorical reality.
* Justified in ''Series/{{Lost}}''. The Dharma Initiative built research stations all over the island in the 1970s. The modern day islanders find and use these stations which leads lead to this.



* ''Series/KamenRiderDouble'' is technically set in the present day, but the world is styled after hardboiled FilmNoir.
* An episode of ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is entirely about a story told by Walter to children. This story is set in a [[NoirEpisode noir-like]] world with Internet and cell phones but old-fashioned clothing. It also includes musical number. Of course, given that Walter was high when he told this story, this can be expected. Before telling the story he mentions his mother and father's favorite genres of film: musicals and noir detective films.

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* ''Series/KamenRiderDouble'' is technically set in the present day, but the world is styled after hardboiled hard-boiled FilmNoir.
* An episode of ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is entirely about a story told by Walter to children. This story is set in a [[NoirEpisode noir-like]] world with Internet and cell phones but old-fashioned clothing. It also includes a musical number. Of course, given that Walter was high when he told this story, this can be expected. Before telling the story he mentions his mother and father's favorite genres of film: musicals and noir detective films.



* ''Series/FatherTed'' is full of this, presumably due to the island's inhabitants being so isolated from the rest of the world. The layout of the parochial house is extremely 1970s, and they often play board games for entertainment. They are shown listening to records (e.g. the Eurovision track they almost used for the tune of My Lovely Horse), and are actually able to buy new ones (The BBC Sound Effects records) in John And Mary's shop in 1996, at a time when most other places would have stopped selling them. Also, when a Cuban priest visits them, he brings them a VHS player, which they are astonished by as they think it must have been really expensive. The joke here is that he is obviously regifting them his old one. Ted uses a mobile phone on occasion, but also uses a rotary telephone in the parochial house. The one time the Irish Army makes an appearance, they are armed with [[ImproperlyPlacedFirearms Cold War-era British army weaponry]].
* Camden in ''Series/MyNameIsEarl'' falls into this category. Although the series is set at the TurnOfTheMillennium, the clothing and technology is that of the late '80s or early '90s. May be somewhat justified, as Camden is implied to be largely [[WrongSideOfTheTracks an impoverished hick-town]]. And there are mentions (mostly in the cities surrounding Camden, like Nathanville) of technology more appropriate to the time period. For example, Earl is in a bookstore, and is amazed that not only are there books on tape, but books available as [=CDs=] and [=MP3s=]...and he doesn't know what either of those things are. A later episode subverts the trope; most of Camden suddenly has computers and Internet out of nowhere, and they're all on a Website/{{Facebook}} {{Expy}} called [[BlandNameProduct "BuddyBook."]] Darnell stays up all night creating fake "friends" for Joy, so she can feel validated.

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* ''Series/FatherTed'' is full of this, presumably due to the island's inhabitants being so isolated from the rest of the world. The layout of the parochial house is extremely 1970s, and they often play board games for entertainment. They are shown listening to records (e.g. the Eurovision track they almost used for the tune of My Lovely Horse), and are actually able to buy new ones (The BBC Sound Effects records) in John And Mary's shop in 1996, at a time when most other places would have stopped selling them. Also, when a Cuban priest visits them, he brings them a VHS player, which they are astonished by as they think it must have been really expensive. The joke here is that he is obviously regifting them his old one. Ted uses a mobile phone on occasion, occasion but also uses a rotary telephone in the parochial house. The one time the Irish Army makes an appearance, they are armed with [[ImproperlyPlacedFirearms Cold War-era British army weaponry]].
* Camden in ''Series/MyNameIsEarl'' falls into this category. Although the series is set at the TurnOfTheMillennium, the clothing and technology is that of the late '80s or early '90s. May be somewhat justified, as Camden is implied to be largely [[WrongSideOfTheTracks an impoverished hick-town]]. And there are mentions (mostly in the cities surrounding Camden, like Nathanville) of technology more appropriate to the time period. For example, Earl is in a bookstore, bookstore and is amazed that not only are there books on tape, but books available as [=CDs=] and [=MP3s=]...and he doesn't know what either of those things are. A later episode subverts the trope; most of Camden suddenly has computers and the Internet out of nowhere, and they're all on a Website/{{Facebook}} {{Expy}} called [[BlandNameProduct "BuddyBook."]] Darnell stays up all night creating fake "friends" for Joy, so she can feel validated.



* 2007's Get Up! By Global Deejays and Technotronic is an example of a song froms the [[TurnOfTheMillennium 2000s]] that draws heavily from [[TheEighties 1980s]] and [[TheNineties 1990s]] electronica, both in its sound, and in the fashion and imagery in its [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4JNpmLPvcY video]].

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* 2007's Get Up! By Global Deejays and Technotronic is an example of a song froms from the [[TurnOfTheMillennium 2000s]] that draws heavily from [[TheEighties 1980s]] and [[TheNineties 1990s]] electronica, both in its sound, sound and in the fashion and imagery in its [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4JNpmLPvcY video]].



* ''TabletopGame/{{Space 1889}}''. The complete slogan for the game goes: “Role-Playing In A More Civilized Time. Everything Jules Verne should have written. Everything H. G. Wells could have written. Everything A. Conan Doyle thought of, but never published because it was too fantastic.” Thus the game is obviously retro science fiction: a game about science fiction the way science fiction was a hundred years ago. The ''Space 1889'' universe, however, is not retro from the perspective of people in that world since it takes place in an alternative year 1889 with 1889-current technology (plus some extra), fashion, politics, ideology, etc.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Space 1889}}''. The complete slogan for the game goes: “Role-Playing In A More Civilized Time. Everything Jules Verne should have written. Everything H. G. Wells could have written. Everything A. Conan Doyle thought of, but never published because it was too fantastic.” Thus the game is obviously retro science fiction: a game about science fiction the way science fiction was a hundred years ago. The ''Space 1889'' universe, however, is not retro from the perspective of people in that world since it takes place in an alternative year 1889 with 1889-current technology (plus some extra), fashion, politics, ideology, etc.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series is a classic example. Despite being set two centuries after a nuclear war that is still 60 years into our future, everything has old school art deco stylings, every computer has a [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture monochromatic greenscreen]], and the music consists of golden oldies from the early-mid 20th century. Note that all of this exists alongside EnergyWeapons, PoweredArmor, and [[RidiculouslyHumanRobots androids indistinguishable from humans]]. Fallout America is an amalgam of all the decades of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, as well as the SciFi Produced during those decades. TheForties give the setting its wartime propaganda, urging you to buy Victory Bonds. TheFifties give it their Pre-War fashions, car designs, and [[RedScare hysterical anti-communist propaganda]]; Fifties SciFi gives it ''nuclear cars'' and the styling of its robots. TheSixties give it the use of the word "hippies" (in ''Fallout 3'') and anti-war graffiti (all over Hidden Valley in ''New Vegas''). TheSeventies give it [[TheApunkalypse the punk fashion of the raiders]] and [[PostPeakOil the pre-war oil crisis]]. TheEighties give it computers that look like UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}}s. The post-war civilizations also show elements of TheGreatDepression and TheWildWest, showing how society reverted to [[AfterTheEnd a less technologically advanced time after the war disrupted human society]].
* ''VideoGame/DeadRising'' explicitly states that its events begin the night of [[TurnOfTheMillennium "September 18, 2006"]], and demonstrates this by introducing us to Brad Garrison and Jessica Mcarney, agents of the Department of Homeland Security (established in 2002 in response to 9/11), after which you're handed a small yellow walkie-talkie by Otis to carry. However, it clearly deviates from some modern tones by the severe lack of cell phones, next-to-no mention of the internet, and the somewhat backwards sense of general fashion/aesthetic in both the mall and its inhabitants, producing an environment reminiscent of the '70s and '80s [[SpiritualLicensee as seen in the original]] ''Film/DawnOfTheDead1978''. (Frank West also uses an old-fashioned film-reel camera, though this can be justified by him being a professional photojournalist; while digital cameras were taking over the consumer market by 2006, film still had niches in high-end photography.) This can be seen as an aesthetic choice like that of ''Napoleon Dynamite'', in that the game's setting of [[NoCommunitiesWereHarmed Willamette, Colorado]] is a [[EverytownAmerica small Midwestern town]] that's "behind the pulse of society" in some ways. [[FridgeBrilliance Upon retrospect, it is a seemingly perfect place for a terrorist attack to happen.]]

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series is a classic example. Despite being set two centuries after a nuclear war that is still 60 years into our future, everything has old school art deco stylings, every computer has a [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture monochromatic greenscreen]], green screen]], and the music consists of golden oldies from the early-mid 20th century. Note that all of this exists alongside EnergyWeapons, PoweredArmor, and [[RidiculouslyHumanRobots androids indistinguishable from humans]]. Fallout America is an amalgam of all the decades of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, as well as the SciFi Produced during those decades. TheForties give the setting its wartime propaganda, urging you to buy Victory Bonds. TheFifties give it their Pre-War fashions, car designs, and [[RedScare hysterical anti-communist propaganda]]; Fifties SciFi gives it ''nuclear cars'' and the styling of its robots. TheSixties give it the use of the word "hippies" (in ''Fallout 3'') and anti-war graffiti (all over Hidden Valley in ''New Vegas''). TheSeventies give it [[TheApunkalypse the punk fashion of the raiders]] Raiders]] and [[PostPeakOil the pre-war oil crisis]]. TheEighties give it computers that look like UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}}s. The post-war civilizations also show elements of TheGreatDepression and TheWildWest, showing how society reverted to [[AfterTheEnd a less technologically advanced time after the war disrupted human society]].
* ''VideoGame/DeadRising'' explicitly states that its events begin the night of [[TurnOfTheMillennium "September 18, 2006"]], and demonstrates this by introducing us to Brad Garrison and Jessica Mcarney, McCarney, agents of the Department of Homeland Security (established in 2002 in response to 9/11), after which you're handed a small yellow walkie-talkie by Otis to carry. However, it clearly deviates from some modern tones by the severe lack of cell phones, next-to-no mention of the internet, and the somewhat backwards sense of general fashion/aesthetic in both the mall and its inhabitants, producing an environment reminiscent of the '70s and '80s [[SpiritualLicensee as seen in the original]] ''Film/DawnOfTheDead1978''. (Frank West also uses an old-fashioned film-reel camera, though this can be justified by him being a professional photojournalist; while digital cameras were taking over the consumer market by 2006, film still had niches in high-end photography.) This can be seen as an aesthetic choice like that of ''Napoleon Dynamite'', in that the game's setting of [[NoCommunitiesWereHarmed Willamette, Colorado]] is a [[EverytownAmerica small Midwestern town]] that's "behind the pulse of society" in some ways. [[FridgeBrilliance Upon retrospect, it is a seemingly perfect place for a terrorist attack to happen.]]



* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series takes place in a fantasy world very reminiscent of TheLateMiddleAges. Yet, it also shows many Victorian influences in things like architecture, furniture, art, technology and attitudes. What's most intriguing is how both of these very different eras are [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief combined nearly seamlessly]] (it helps that they're united by the whole CityNoir atmosphere and SteamPunk aesthetic of the series).

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series takes place in a fantasy world very reminiscent of TheLateMiddleAges. Yet, it also shows many Victorian influences in things like architecture, furniture, art, technology technology, and attitudes. What's most intriguing is how both of these very different eras are [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief combined nearly seamlessly]] (it helps that they're united by the whole CityNoir atmosphere and SteamPunk aesthetic of the series).



* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' has many modern conveniences, but the world itself appears to be somewhere around medieval, or perhaps renaissance times.
* An odd example in ''VideoGame/DeadSpace3''. While the other two games are pretty much straight examples of a SciFi setting, the third takes place on, or in orbit of, a planet filled with ruins left behind by the Sovereign Colonies Armed Forces ([[BalkaniseMe a political entity that apparently no longer exists as of the time of]] ''Dead Space 3'') 200 years earlier. The Sovereign Colonies technology and designs seem rather more primitive then the more "modern" examples seen in the earlier games. [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture Their computer technology seems to be rather dated]], many of their doors need to be opened manually, [[NoPaperFuture they use a lot more paper then is common in later time periods]], they have black and white photographs on the walls (possibly due to aging, or the low light levels), the advertisements for the fictional drink called "Peng" which appear in Dead Space and Dead Space 2 are done in a cyber punk style, showing an attractive woman dressed in futuristic clothes, where as the advertisements for Peng from the Sovereign Colonies era however show women in a more 1950s pin-up style, similar to old school Coke ads.
* The universe that ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' takes place in is reminscient of the 1930-40s, though both weapons and telecommunication technology seems to be at least a decade or two ahead; and it's implied that things like cellphones and video games (albeit in primitive forms) exist, too. Though non-canon, there is official art of two of the characters playing in a circa-2015 fighting game tournament, both of them using arcade fight-sticks.

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* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' has many modern conveniences, but the world itself appears to be somewhere around medieval, or perhaps renaissance Renaissance times.
* An odd example in ''VideoGame/DeadSpace3''. While the other two games are pretty much straight examples of a SciFi setting, the third takes place on, or in orbit of, a planet filled with ruins left behind by the Sovereign Colonies Armed Forces ([[BalkaniseMe a political entity that apparently no longer exists as of the time of]] ''Dead Space 3'') 200 years earlier. The Sovereign Colonies technology and designs seem rather more primitive then than the more "modern" examples seen in the earlier games. [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture Their computer technology seems to be rather dated]], many of their doors need to be opened manually, [[NoPaperFuture they use a lot more paper then than is common in later time periods]], they have black and white photographs on the walls (possibly due to aging, or the low light levels), the advertisements for the fictional drink called "Peng" which appear in Dead Space and Dead Space 2 are done in a cyber punk style, showing an attractive woman dressed in futuristic clothes, where as the advertisements for Peng from the Sovereign Colonies era however show women in a more 1950s pin-up style, similar to old school Coke ads.
* The universe that ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' takes place in is reminscient reminiscent of the 1930-40s, though both weapons and telecommunication technology seems to be at least a decade or two ahead; and it's implied that things like cellphones cell phones and video games (albeit in primitive forms) exist, too. Though non-canon, there is official art of two of the characters playing in a circa-2015 fighting game tournament, both of them using arcade fight-sticks.



* ''VideoGame/XCOMApocalypse'' reeks of this - it's a mid-high scifi setting with handheld energy weapons, personal anti-gravity jetpacks, hovercars on every driveway, you name it. What's the catch? The city council has ordered that ''everything'' from handguns to heat-seeking missiles, '''no exceptions''' (well, okay, maybe a few), must maintain a very 50s-style aesthetic. Cars look straight out of the 50s and 60s, televisions (and television-analogues) have the classic slightly-rounded, slightly-bulging screen, and so on.

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* ''VideoGame/XCOMApocalypse'' reeks of this - it's a mid-high scifi sci-fi setting with handheld energy weapons, personal anti-gravity jetpacks, hovercars on jet packs, hovr cars in every driveway, you name it. What's the catch? The city council has ordered that ''everything'' from handguns to heat-seeking missiles, '''no exceptions''' (well, okay, maybe a few), must maintain a very 50s-style aesthetic. Cars look straight out of the 50s and 60s, televisions (and television-analogues) have the classic slightly-rounded, slightly-bulging screen, and so on.



* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. Architecture, clothes and cars in Gotham mostly resembles the 40s and 50s, but on the rare occasion that real dates are given the show is ostensibly set in ThePresentDay.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. Architecture, clothes clothes, and cars in Gotham mostly resembles resemble the 40s and 50s, but on the rare occasion that real dates are given the show is ostensibly set in ThePresentDay.



** The episode with the Grey Ghost showed a young Bruce Wayne watching the series as a child on a black and white tv in what seemed to be the 60s. At the end of the episode, the episode is shown to have taken place in late 1992.

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** The episode with the Grey Ghost showed a young Bruce Wayne watching the series as a child on a black and white tv TV in what seemed to be the 60s. At the end of the episode, the episode is shown to have taken place in late 1992.



** This changed back and forth throughout the series. ''Sub Zero'' has computers in hospitals and color tv, while ''Mask Of The Phantasm'' has little trace of the present day. The best explanation is that BTAS Gotham is a city that lives in the past. By the time the series was revamped into ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries The New Batman Adventures]]'' it was completely in the nineties, however.

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** This changed back and forth throughout the series. ''Sub Zero'' has computers in hospitals and color tv, TV, while ''Mask Of The Phantasm'' has little trace of the present day. The best explanation is that BTAS Gotham is a city that lives in the past. By the time the series was revamped into ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries The New Batman Adventures]]'' it was completely in the nineties, however.



* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'' continues this trend by making it a bit of an AnachronismStew. Modern innovations like cellphones, video games and the internet are around, but a lot of the buildings, cars, and characters have decidedly retro vibes. There's very little consistency in this regard, as one episode will have modern clothing and tech, while the next will have fedora-clad gangsters shooting at Batman with Tommy-guns. Though despite this retro vibe, the show definitely has modern social values. Nobody ever comments on the races of minority heroes like ComicBook/{{Firestorm}}, ComicBook/BlueBeetle and ComicBook/TheAtom, nor the genders of characters like Comicbook/{{Vixen}} and ComicBook/BlackCanary.
* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'': In the episode "Legends", half the team gets blown into an alternate 50s-style universe that invokes UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, and team up (after the obligatory LetsYouAndHimFight, of course) with the Justice Guild of America, a team full of [[CaptainErsatz Captains Ersatz]] for the Justice Society of America. And oddly enough, all those characters are characters from comic books from Green Lantern's youth. Hawkgirl gets pissed at the gender standards, Green Lantern is happy to meet his idols (casually letting a YouAreACreditToYourRace comment slide), Flash is ''already'' so corny that he fits right in, and ComicBook/MartianManhunter receives intense mental images of nuclear holocaust. [[BreadEggsMilkSquick Wait, what?]] [[spoiler:Turns out in this universe the UsefulNotes/ColdWar led to mutually assured destruction, but the Justice Guild sacrificed themselves to save as many as they could. A kid gained mental powers [[ILoveNuclearPower from the fallout]], and basically became a purple, warty RealityWarper, recreating the Justice Guild and placing himself as their kid sidekick, and forcing the townspeople to live out their roles as extras (one man was trapped in an ice cream truck for ''forty'' years)]]. Basically it was a weird episode, and the phrase "Nuns and Dynamite" was important in TheReveal.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'' continues this trend by making it a bit of an AnachronismStew. Modern innovations like cellphones, cell phones, video games games, and the internet are around, but a lot of the buildings, cars, and characters have decidedly retro vibes. There's very little consistency in this regard, as one episode will have modern clothing and tech, while the next will have fedora-clad gangsters shooting at Batman with Tommy-guns. Though despite this retro vibe, the show definitely has modern social values. Nobody ever comments on the races of minority heroes like ComicBook/{{Firestorm}}, ComicBook/BlueBeetle and ComicBook/TheAtom, nor the genders of characters like Comicbook/{{Vixen}} and ComicBook/BlackCanary.
* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'': In the episode "Legends", half the team gets blown into an alternate 50s-style universe that invokes UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, and team up (after the obligatory LetsYouAndHimFight, of course) with the Justice Guild of America, a team full of [[CaptainErsatz Captains Ersatz]] for the Justice Society of America. And oddly enough, all those characters are characters from comic books from Green Lantern's youth. Hawkgirl gets pissed at the gender standards, Green Lantern is happy to meet his idols (casually letting a YouAreACreditToYourRace comment slide), Flash is ''already'' so corny that he fits right in, and ComicBook/MartianManhunter receives intense mental images of nuclear holocaust. [[BreadEggsMilkSquick Wait, what?]] [[spoiler:Turns out in this universe the UsefulNotes/ColdWar led to mutually assured destruction, but the Justice Guild sacrificed themselves to save as many as they could. A kid gained mental powers [[ILoveNuclearPower from the fallout]], and basically became a purple, warty RealityWarper, recreating the Justice Guild and placing himself as their kid sidekick, and forcing the townspeople to live out their roles as extras (one man was trapped in an ice cream truck for ''forty'' years)]]. Basically Basically, it was a weird episode, and the phrase "Nuns and Dynamite" was important in TheReveal.



* The home of ''Literature/TheBerenstainBears'' doesn't even look like it's from the 20th century, nevermind the 21st, though the cubs are somewhat more modern looking than their parents. The rest of the town looks considerably more modern. This becomes obvious when you compare most cubs to Sister and Brother. Some things are still perpetually retro though, such as [[SteamNeverDies the trains]].

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* The home of ''Literature/TheBerenstainBears'' doesn't even look like it's from the 20th century, nevermind never mind the 21st, though the cubs are somewhat more modern looking than their parents. The rest of the town looks considerably more modern. This becomes obvious when you compare most cubs to Sister and Brother. Some things are still perpetually retro though, such as [[SteamNeverDies the trains]].



* Large part of what you might call the Third World still uses technology from decades or even centuries ago as part of their infrastructure, because it is that hard to change, but that doesn't stop locals who can afford it to get imported tech, usually of the portable kind. There's nothing strange, really, about a shepherd boy that looks like he stepped out of Biblical times playing his Gameboy while keeping an eye on the family's sheep.

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* Large part of what you might call the Third World still uses technology from decades or even centuries ago as part of their infrastructure, infrastructure because it is that hard to change, but that doesn't stop locals who can afford it to get imported tech, usually of the portable kind. There's nothing strange, really, about a shepherd boy that looks like he stepped out of Biblical times playing his Gameboy while keeping an eye on the family's sheep.



* [[http://www.missilebases.com/ 20th Century Castles]] - a real estate company specialising in decommissioned Cold War-era bunkers and missile silos.

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* [[http://www.missilebases.com/ 20th Century Castles]] - a real estate company specialising specializing in decommissioned Cold War-era bunkers and missile silos.
7th Sep '17 5:06:27 PM chopshop
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' is largely set in an advanced spacefaring society, but the tech and environments frequently have a boxy, UsedFuture aesthetic and the general visual style was designed to evoke pulp ScienceFantasy comics like the works of Creator/JackKirby. Star-Lord is also [[DiscoDan totally trapped in the 80's]], using an old Walkman and playing classic rock/funk music from the 70's and 60's. In his case it's a plot point, as he was taken from Earth when he was ten back in the early 80's; as far as he knows Earth is still like it was back than.
** The TwoDecadesBehind aesthetics get amusingly lampshaded at the end of the second film; Kraglin gives Peter a new music playing device, claiming it's the hot new thing back on Earth. [[spoiler: Its a laughably outdated Zune that looks like it was bought cheap at a yard sale.]]
13th Aug '17 5:09:47 AM drew.g
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* An episode of ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is entirely about a story told by Walter to children. This story is set in a [[NoirEpisode noir-like]] world with Internet and cell phones but old-fashioned clothing. Of course, given that Walter was high when he told this story, this can be expected.

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* An episode of ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is entirely about a story told by Walter to children. This story is set in a [[NoirEpisode noir-like]] world with Internet and cell phones but old-fashioned clothing. It also includes musical number. Of course, given that Walter was high when he told this story, this can be expected.expected. Before telling the story he mentions his mother and father's favorite genres of film: musicals and noir detective films.
1st Aug '17 12:18:08 PM WarriorsGate
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/AlienIsolation'': To mimic the aesthetic of [[Film/''Alien'' the first film]], the game features a thoroughly '70s sci-fi look, complete with monochrome cathode ray computers, Saul Bass-style advertisements, and even a special filter that mimics the ''film grain'' of '70s film stock.
15th Jul '17 10:10:54 AM nombretomado
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** The sequel series, which takes place on Earth, is shown to be in a similar situation, with added bits and pieces of WorldWarII and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar as well as LostTechnology.

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** The sequel series, which takes place on Earth, is shown to be in a similar situation, with added bits and pieces of WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar as well as LostTechnology.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RetroUniverse