History Main / RetiredGameShowElement

21st Feb '17 6:39:11 PM Lirodon
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* Time Is Money (debuted 2003): In its original incarnation, there was a major rule change on its third playing that removed the $500 voucher that could be traded for a second try (making its name an ArtifactTitle, plus the producers had trouble filming and editing the game. Roger had planned a comeback on the Turntable with a smaller set, but never ended up getting around to it before he was fired. The game was discontinued for 10 years until making a surprise return in September 2014, with a new set and revamped rules.



* Time Is Money (2003-04): Production issues that spent way too much time on filming and editing; a major rule change on its third playing to remove the $500 voucher made the name an ArtifactTitle and didn't help. Roger had planned a comeback on the Turntable with a smaller set, but never ended up getting around to it before he was fired.
** The game was revived in September 2014 with rule changes that managed to better reflect the name of the game.
26th Oct '16 6:03:26 PM nombretomado
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* Gas Money (debuted 2008), for its first season, was ''TriviaTrap'' [[XMeetsY meets]] ''DealOrNoDeal'': the player chose the car's price first, then won money by picking off the wrong prices one at a time; the hook was that the first decision made was always hanging over the player's head.

to:

* Gas Money (debuted 2008), for its first season, was ''TriviaTrap'' [[XMeetsY meets]] ''DealOrNoDeal'': ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'': the player chose the car's price first, then won money by picking off the wrong prices one at a time; the hook was that the first decision made was always hanging over the player's head.
17th Oct '16 6:17:59 PM nombretomado
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* Initially, in ''Series/FamilyFeud'', whoever rang in with the higher answer could choose to have their family play the question or pass it to the other family. [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome At least 99% of the time]], "play" was chosen. This situation was even parodied in ''{{Mad}}'' Magazine's "Family Fools" - A contestant offered the choice asks what happens if he picks 'pass', Richard Dawson admits he has no idea since it almost never happens. The play/pass option was retired for the 1988-95 revival, but returned when the current version began in 1999.

to:

* Initially, in ''Series/FamilyFeud'', whoever rang in with the higher answer could choose to have their family play the question or pass it to the other family. [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome At least 99% of the time]], "play" was chosen. This situation was even parodied in ''{{Mad}}'' ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' Magazine's "Family Fools" - A contestant offered the choice asks what happens if he picks 'pass', Richard Dawson admits he has no idea since it almost never happens. The play/pass option was retired for the 1988-95 revival, but returned when the current version began in 1999.
3rd Oct '16 12:18:19 AM Gimere
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* The American ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' axed the Fastest Finger when the syndicated run debuted and just had contestants brought in one at a time. Later on, they removed the 50:50 (replaced by Double Dip amidst fan allegations that it wasn't actually random, basically started by Norm [=MacDonald=] during the original ABC run), Phone-A-Friend (which had devolved into Phone-Someone-To-Website/{{Google}}-The-Answer) and Switch the Question.

to:

* The American ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' axed the Fastest Finger when the syndicated run debuted and just had contestants brought in one at a time. Later on, they removed the 50:50 (replaced by Double Dip amidst fan allegations that it wasn't actually random, basically started by Norm [=MacDonald=] during the original ABC run), Phone-A-Friend (which had devolved into Phone-Someone-To-Website/{{Google}}-The-Answer) "phone someone who can Website/{{Google}} the answer" and Switch the Question.
30th Sep '16 11:42:03 AM WarioBarker
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* Bullseye (1972; unofficially "Bullseye '72"): The fifth game ever played on the show, ousted after the ninth episode because it was nigh {{Unwinnable}}. They tried adding a $500 range, playing for a boat, and even ditching the range in favor of rounding the price to the nearest $10; didn't work.

to:

* Bullseye (1972; unofficially "Bullseye '72"): The fifth game ever played on the show, ousted after the ninth episode because it was nigh {{Unwinnable}}. They tried adding a $500 range, playing for a boat, boat (it normally offered a car), and even ditching the range in favor of rounding the price to the nearest $10; $10.
** The game might have also been retired due to player confusion, if [[http://www.golden-road.net/index.php/topic,1691.0.html this record]] of the final playing (also the only one with that last rule tweak) is any indication: after managing to get the car's price within a $200 range in her first three bids, the contestant went ''below'' her first bid of $2,500 and only increased by small amounts, ending the game with a bid $10 ''less'' than the one she began it with!
** Of note, the game's electronics (also shared by Any Number; both games were a single board with different faceplates, very likely because the show initially
didn't work.have much of a budget) actually includes ''ten'' light-up numbers, indicating that Bullseye underwent some tweaking between the prop's construction and the game's debut.



* Double Bullseye (1972): Two-player ReTool of Bullseye that required a fourth One-Bid and guaranteed a car giveaway. Ironically, the game ended in less than seven guesses at least twice, suggesting that Bullseye might not have been ''quite'' as unwinnable as originally thought. The game actually debuted on Dennis James' nighttime version, which was well-known for experimenting with the established games.
* Double Digits (1973): Played once with one set of rules, resulting in a win; played four more times with a second set of rules, resulting in losses. Incidentally, its game board was actually a cover put on the front of the prop used for Bullseye and Any Number (both games were a single board with different faceplates, very likely because the show initially didn't have much of a budget).
* Finish Line (1978): Mechanical problems, despite a favorable 12-4 record; while it's also too similar to Give or Keep, it appears to have been intended as the latter's replacement.

to:

* Double Bullseye (1972): Two-player ReTool of Bullseye that required a fourth One-Bid and guaranteed a car giveaway. Ironically, the game ended in less than seven guesses or less at least twice, suggesting that Bullseye might not have been ''quite'' as unwinnable as originally thought. thought.
**
The game actually debuted on the fifth episode of Dennis James' nighttime version, which was well-known for experimenting with the established games.
* Double Digits (1973): Played once with one set of rules, resulting in a win; played four more times with a second set of rules, resulting in losses. Incidentally, its the game board was actually a cover put on the front of the prop used for Bullseye and Any aforementioned Bullseye/Any Number (both games were a single board with different faceplates, very likely because the show initially didn't have much of a budget).
prop.
* Finish Line (1978): Mechanical problems, despite a favorable 12-4 record; while it's also too similar to Give or Keep, it appears to have been intended as the latter's replacement.replacement, as the two were never in the rotation at the same time.



* Gallery Game (1990-91): Essentially Pick-a-Number with an overly tacky "art gallery" motif, too few wins.

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* Gallery Game (1990-91): Essentially Pick-a-Number Pick-A-Number with an overly tacky "art gallery" motif, too few wins.



* Hit Me (1980-2006): Deemed too confusing; the lack of a consistent rule regarding Aces held by the House, whose ruling seemed to hinge on Barker's mood, certainly didn't help.

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** The play frequency also dropped drastically: Season 16 (1987-88) had it played 15 times; Season 17 saw just eight uses, while Season 18 got just five and Season 19 got '''two'''.
* Hit Me (1980-2006): Deemed too confusing; the lack of a consistent rule regarding Aces held by the House, whose ruling seemed to hinge on Barker's mood, certainly didn't help. Retired just three playings into Season 35.



* Joker (1994-2007): Roger Dobkowitz decided that Drew Carey probably wouldn't like the fact that the game could be lost even if the contestant played the pricing portion perfectly (which happened several times), and opted to get rid of the game rather than have a fight about it. [[note]](The game had been scheduled to return on February 29, 2008, but was replaced by Bonus Game.)[[/note]]

to:

* Joker (1994-2007): Roger Dobkowitz decided that Drew Carey probably wouldn't like the fact that the game could be lost even if the contestant played the pricing portion perfectly (which happened several times), and opted to get rid of the game rather than have a fight about it. [[note]](The game had been scheduled to As a result, the game's intended return on February 29, 2008, but 2008 was replaced by Bonus Game.)[[/note]]



* On the Nose (1984-85): Car game that focused on one of five sports-related stunts (the pricing aspect determined how many chances the player got, although guessing the right price won $1,000), which ended up being [[http://gameshowgarbage.com/ind101_onthenose.html quite a loss magnet.]]

to:

* On the Nose (1984-85): Car game that focused on one of five sports-related stunts (the pricing aspect determined how many chances the player got, although guessing the right price won $1,000), which ended up being [[http://gameshowgarbage.com/ind101_onthenose.html quite a loss magnet.]]]] Quite an accomplishment for a game played just 19 times (two more were planned, which would've brought the game into 1986, but these were later replaced).



* Telephone Game (1978): A car game where the contestant picked two grocery items that did not total more than 90 cents (so they'd have enough money to use a payphone), and then had to choose the price of the car from three (where two were actually the prices of smaller prizes represented in dollars and one decimal place) by dialing it on a giant rotary phone (complete with models answering on the other end for the reveal). WordOfGod (Roger) said "It was lame!" Played just three times, and infamous for the fandom believing it used a completely ''wrong'' set of rules.
* Time Is Money (2003-04): Production issues that spent way too much time on filming and editing; a major rule change on its third playing to remove the $500 voucher made the name an ArtifactTitle and didn't help. Roger had planned a comeback on the Turntable with a smaller set, but never got around to it.
** The game was revived in September 2014 for the new season with rule changes that managed to better reflect the name of the game.

to:

* Telephone Game (1978): A car Car game where the contestant picked two grocery items that did not total more than 90 cents (so they'd have enough money to use a payphone), and then had to choose the price of the car from three (where two were actually the prices of smaller prizes represented in dollars and one decimal place) by dialing it on a giant rotary phone (complete with models answering on the other end for the reveal). WordOfGod (Roger) said "It was lame!" Played just three times, and infamous for the fandom believing it used a completely ''wrong'' set of rules.
rules for many years.
* Time Is Money (2003-04): Production issues that spent way too much time on filming and editing; a major rule change on its third playing to remove the $500 voucher made the name an ArtifactTitle and didn't help. Roger had planned a comeback on the Turntable with a smaller set, but never got ended up getting around to it.
it before he was fired.
** The game was revived in September 2014 for the new season with rule changes that managed to better reflect the name of the game.


Added DiffLines:

** The inflation issues are what likely led to the game's scarcity as time went on: Season 12 (1983-84) got 18 playings, while Season 13 saw it appear just nine times and Season 14 had a mere ''three'' playings.
1st Sep '16 8:52:06 PM AmourMitts
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* In February 1997, the trilon-based puzzle board was retired, replaced by a new board with touch-based screens. The last thing shown on the old board? FOR SALE. [[note]]In fact, the board was later sent to the Smithsonian.[[/note]]

to:

* In February 1997, the trilon-based puzzle board was retired, replaced by a new board with touch-based screens. The last thing shown on the old board? FOR SALE. [[note]]In fact, the board was later going to be sent to the Smithsonian.Smithsonian, but was rejected as they did not have enough space.[[/note]]
4th Jan '16 1:49:56 PM Gimere
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** Season 13 had '''Double Play''', a token which could be used to double the value of the contestant's next spin. Many contestants had a habit of using it immediately after earning it, usually landing on an insignificant amount for an infrequent letter [[note]](Although one exception was when the '''Double Play''' was used prior to landing on the $10,000 prize wedge, doubling it to $20,000 if the player picked it up and then won the round, [[MomentOfAwesome which actually happened]])[[/note]]. Others just never got around to using it. [[note]](WordOfGod is that landing on a Prize wedge, Surprise, or Free Spin after using it gave that player the choice of taking the token back or applying it to their next spin.)[[/note]]

to:

** Season 13 had '''Double Play''', a token which could be used to double the value of the contestant's next spin. Many contestants had a habit of using it immediately after earning it, usually landing on an insignificant amount for an infrequent letter [[note]](Although one exception was when the '''Double Play''' was used prior to landing on the $10,000 prize wedge, doubling it to $20,000 if the player picked it up and then won the round, [[MomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome which actually happened]])[[/note]]. Others just never got around to using it. [[note]](WordOfGod is that landing on a Prize wedge, Surprise, or Free Spin after using it gave that player the choice of taking the token back or applying it to their next spin.)[[/note]]



* The American ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' axed the Fastest Finger when the syndicated run debuted and just had contestants brought in one at a time. Later on, they removed the 50:50 (replaced by Double Dip amidst fan allegations that it wasn't actually random, basically started by Norm [=MacDonald=] during the original ABC run), Phone-A-Friend (devolved into Phone-Someone-To-Website/{{Google}}-The-Answer) and Switch the Question.

to:

* The American ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' axed the Fastest Finger when the syndicated run debuted and just had contestants brought in one at a time. Later on, they removed the 50:50 (replaced by Double Dip amidst fan allegations that it wasn't actually random, basically started by Norm [=MacDonald=] during the original ABC run), Phone-A-Friend (devolved (which had devolved into Phone-Someone-To-Website/{{Google}}-The-Answer) and Switch the Question.
31st Dec '15 1:43:15 PM WarioBarker
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* The game "Breakthrough & Conquer" during the first half of ''Series/AmericanGladiators'' had the ring (the "Conquer" portion of the game) elevated in one episode. When gladiator Sunny [[http://gameshowgarbage.com/ind007_agconquer.html dislocated her knee]], the original non-elevated ring was brought back ''right after the commercial break''.

to:

* The game "Breakthrough & Conquer" during the first half of ''Series/AmericanGladiators'' Season 1 had the ring (the "Conquer" portion of the game) elevated in one episode. When gladiator Sunny [[http://gameshowgarbage.com/ind007_agconquer.html dislocated her knee]], the original non-elevated ring was brought back ''right after the commercial break''.



* The style of clue-writing on ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' has generally evolved over time such that the simple answer-to-a-question prompts have been mostly replaced with longer clues featuring secondary facts. One style of clue that's entirely disappeared is the list of items with a common bond (save for the rare "Common Bonds" type category, of course). An example from [[https://youtu.be/Z4g27HTZNXg?t=3m30s the 1987 Teen Tournament]]:

to:

* The style of clue-writing on ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' has generally evolved over time such that the simple answer-to-a-question prompts have been mostly replaced with longer clues featuring secondary facts. One style of clue that's entirely disappeared is the list of items with a common bond (save for the rare "Common Bonds" type category, of course). An example from [[https://youtu.be/Z4g27HTZNXg?t=3m30s be/Z4g27HTZNXg&t=3m30s the 1987 Teen Tournament]]:



** In 2003 (season 20), [[GameShowWinningsCap the five-day limit for champions]] was lifted as well...just in time for Ken Jennings to make his legendary 75-game run.

to:

** In 2003 (season (Season 20), [[GameShowWinningsCap the five-day limit for champions]] was lifted as well...just in time for Ken Jennings to make his legendary 75-game run.



* In early 1974, a contestant going to the Super Match in consecutive times could not call on a celebrity for the head-to-head match that had already been called. This was rescinded a couple of weeks later.

to:

* In early 1974, a contestant going to the Super Match Super-Match in consecutive times could not call on a celebrity for the head-to-head match Head-To-Head Match that had already been called. This change, likely made to halt the ever-growing number of times players picked Richard Dawson, was rescinded a couple of weeks later.



* Punch-a-Bunch (debuted 1978) originally involved punching out a number, and then another slip with either "thousand", "hundred", or "dollars" before just switching to slips with amounts on them.
* Range Game (debuted 1973) has always had the $600 scale but debuted with a ''$50'' rangefinder. This was upped to $100 sometime between April 17 and May 8, then to the current $150 by June 8.

to:

* Punch-a-Bunch Punch-A-Bunch (debuted 1978) originally involved punching out picking the small prizes one at a number, and time. If a prize was won, the contestant chose a letter from "PUNCHBOARD" for a number (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 10), then another punched a hole on the main board for a slip with either "thousand", "hundred", or "dollars" before just switching "dollar" on it.
** While the standard rules debuted on the game's first playing of 1979, the Punchboard itself remained until the start of Season 25. The only real change in that time were
to slips with amounts on them.
the board itself was that the logo, originally rainbow-colored, changed to a solid yellow at some point between December 1979 and September 1980.
* Range Game (debuted 1973) has always had the $600 scale scale, but debuted with a ''$50'' rangefinder. This was upped to $100 sometime between April 17 and May 8, then to the current $150 by June 8.8, 1973. During this period, the game only appeared once on the nighttime version (#035N, taped April 9, 1973), and used a '''$200''' rangefinder.



* Credit Card (1987-2008): Supposedly withdrawn to be "revamped for HD", although Richards claimed in June 2011 that it is ''not'' retired and its status remains unclear. Amusingly, the game was played for nearly a full year after the titular card's "expiration date" of December 2007.

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* Credit Card (1987-2008): Supposedly withdrawn to be "revamped for HD", although Richards claimed in June 2011 that it is ''not'' retired...although the fact the game is not on the official website likely means that it has been retired and its status remains unclear.(the fact it was the only five-prize game didn't help matters). Amusingly, the game was played for nearly a full year after the titular card's "expiration date" of December 2007.



* Joker (1994-2007): Drew Carey didn't like that it could be lost even if the contestant played the pricing portion perfectly, which happened several times. [[note]](The game had been scheduled to return on February 29, 2008, but was replaced by Bonus Game.)[[/note]]

to:

* Joker (1994-2007): Roger Dobkowitz decided that Drew Carey didn't probably wouldn't like the fact that it the game could be lost even if the contestant played the pricing portion perfectly, which perfectly (which happened several times.times), and opted to get rid of the game rather than have a fight about it. [[note]](The game had been scheduled to return on February 29, 2008, but was replaced by Bonus Game.)[[/note]]



* On the Nose (1984-85): Car game that focused on sports-related stunts (the pricing aspect determined how many chances the player got, although guessing the right price won $1,000), which ended up being [[http://gameshowgarbage.com/ind101_onthenose.html quite a loss magnet.]]

to:

* On the Nose (1984-85): Car game that focused on one of five sports-related stunts (the pricing aspect determined how many chances the player got, although guessing the right price won $1,000), which ended up being [[http://gameshowgarbage.com/ind101_onthenose.html quite a loss magnet.]]



* Professor Price (1977): A setup which had almost nothing to do with the show's core format of identifying prices (trivia questions that had numbers as answers, then determining whether that number was in the price of the car) and a win structure that ''required'' getting at least one of the trivia questions right. To be fair, while it was only played twice (November 14 and 21, 1977) it ''was'' won on both playings, making it the only pricing game with a perfect record.

to:

* Professor Price (1977): A setup which had almost nothing to do with the show's core format of identifying prices (trivia (general-knowledge questions that had numbers as answers, then determining whether that number was in the price of the car) and a win structure that ''required'' getting at least one of the trivia questions right. To be fair, while it was only played twice (November 14 and 21, 1977) it ''was'' won on both playings, making it the only pricing game with a perfect record.



** The game was revived in September 2014 for the new season with rule change that manages to better reflect the name of the game.

to:

** The game was revived in September 2014 for the new season with rule change changes that manages managed to better reflect the name of the game.



* On ''The $25,000 Series/{{Pyramid}}'', the 7-11 offered a choice: the team could take $50 per word, or try to get all seven words for the $1,100 bonus. "Play it safe" was retired because almost nobody ever took it. The choice later returned, now offering $500 per word, in the 2009 ''$1,000,000 Pyramid'' pilots.

to:

* On ''The $25,000 Series/{{Pyramid}}'', the 7-11 offered a choice: the team could take $50 per word, or try to get all seven words for the $1,100 bonus. "Play it safe" was retired because almost nobody ever took it. The choice later returned, now offering $500 per word, in the 2009 ''$1,000,000 Pyramid'' pilots.



** For a time in 1983, contestants were required to accumulate ''exactly'' $1,000, meaning if they meant over, they must find TIC and TAC to win. Thankfully, this lasted only a few months.

to:

** For a time in 1983, contestants were required to accumulate ''exactly'' $1,000, meaning if they meant over, they must had to find the TIC and TAC to win. Thankfully, this lasted only a few months.



* Perhaps the most famous element that was retired from ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' was the shopping; initially, contestants used their cash winnings to buy prizes (or as Pat referred to it on several occasions, "fake money with which you'd buy cheesy prizes"). The nighttime version experimented with a play-for-cash format from October 5-30, 1987, which proved so successful that the shopping was seamlessly and permanently ousted from there. The daytime show continued to use shopping until the first CBS episode (July 17, 1989), which began using a scaled-down version of the play-for-cash format.

to:

* Perhaps the most famous element that was retired from ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' was the shopping; initially, contestants used their cash winnings to buy prizes (or as Pat referred to it on several occasions, "fake money with which you'd buy cheesy prizes"). The nighttime version experimented with a play-for-cash format from October 5-30, 1987, which proved so successful that the shopping was seamlessly and permanently ousted from there. The daytime show continued to use shopping until the first CBS episode (July 17, 1989), at which point it began using a scaled-down version of the play-for-cash format.format.












*** While it was used from the original 1973 pilot until Fall 1975, it was redundant from the start: through at least September 5, 1975, players could buy vowels anytime. The Milton Bradley {{Home Game}}s in '75 show that Buy A Vowel not only lasted long enough to see the ousting of the original two-digit spaces and the arrival of gift certificates, but became a far more useful wedge by way of ''requiring'' players to hit it...until ''Wheel'' decided to just get rid of the thing by November 3.

to:

*** While it was used from the original 1973 pilot until Fall 1975, it was redundant from the start: through at least September 5, 1975, players could buy vowels anytime. The Milton Bradley {{Home Game}}s in '75 show that Buy A Vowel not only lasted long enough to see the ousting of the original two-digit spaces and the arrival of gift certificates, but became certificates; however, they also have it being a far more useful wedge by way of ''requiring'' players to hit it...until it (whether this rule was actually used on the show is uncertain and, based on the above, unlikely). By November 3, ''Wheel'' decided to just get rid of the thing by November 3.thing.
8th Dec '15 6:00:29 PM 8088ben
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* In February 1997, the trilon-based puzzle board was retired, replaced by a new board with touch-based screens. The last thing shown on the old board? FOR SALE.

to:

* In February 1997, the trilon-based puzzle board was retired, replaced by a new board with touch-based screens. The last thing shown on the old board? FOR SALE. [[note]]In fact, the board was later sent to the Smithsonian.[[/note]]
30th Nov '15 5:45:48 AM Gimere
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* ''[[DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'' had a number of stunts and obstacles retired after the first couple appearances. Most notable is how, for one episode, they tried replacing the pies in the "Catch the Pies in your Large Clown Pants" challenge with G.I. Joe figures. This led to a contestant's broken nose and the idea was dropped.

to:

* ''[[DoubleDare1986 ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'' had a number of stunts and obstacles retired after the first couple appearances. Most notable is how, for one episode, they tried replacing the pies in the "Catch the Pies in your Large Clown Pants" challenge with G.I. Joe figures. This led to a contestant's broken nose and the idea was dropped.



* The style of clue-writing on ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}!'' has generally evolved over time such that the simple answer-to-a-question prompts have been mostly replaced with longer clues featuring secondary facts. One style of clue that's entirely disappeared is the list of items with a common bond (save for the rare "Common Bonds" type category, of course). An example from [[https://youtu.be/Z4g27HTZNXg?t=3m30s the 1987 Teen Tournament]]:

to:

* The style of clue-writing on ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}!'' ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' has generally evolved over time such that the simple answer-to-a-question prompts have been mostly replaced with longer clues featuring secondary facts. One style of clue that's entirely disappeared is the list of items with a common bond (save for the rare "Common Bonds" type category, of course). An example from [[https://youtu.be/Z4g27HTZNXg?t=3m30s the 1987 Teen Tournament]]:



* The 1984-86 ''[[LetsMakeADeal All-New Let's Make a Deal]]'' featured a "Door #4" element that would pop up at a random time over the course of each episode. A random contestant would be chosen via the "People Picker Computer" and have the opportunity to make a deal with Monty.

to:

* The 1984-86 ''[[LetsMakeADeal ''[[Series/LetsMakeADeal All-New Let's Make a Deal]]'' featured a "Door #4" element that would pop up at a random time over the course of each episode. A random contestant would be chosen via the "People Picker Computer" and have the opportunity to make a deal with Monty.



The current version of ''ThePriceIsRight'' began with only five pricing games, and has constantly taken games in and out of the rotation over time. Along with modifying the number of games in the rotation, some of the active games had their rules altered over time:

to:

The current version of ''ThePriceIsRight'' ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' began with only five pricing games, and has constantly taken games in and out of the rotation over time. Along with modifying the number of games in the rotation, some of the active games had their rules altered over time:



* On ''The $25,000 {{Pyramid}}'', the 7-11 offered a choice: the team could take $50 per word, or try to get all seven words for the $1,100 bonus. "Play it safe" was retired because almost nobody ever took it. The choice later returned, now offering $500 per word, in the 2009 ''$1,000,000 Pyramid'' pilots.

to:

* On ''The $25,000 {{Pyramid}}'', Series/{{Pyramid}}'', the 7-11 offered a choice: the team could take $50 per word, or try to get all seven words for the $1,100 bonus. "Play it safe" was retired because almost nobody ever took it. The choice later returned, now offering $500 per word, in the 2009 ''$1,000,000 Pyramid'' pilots.



* The first Lifetime season of ''SupermarketSweep'' had a giant monster (such as [[Franchise/{{Frankenstein}} Frankenstein's Monster]] or a gorilla) that would occasionally roam the aisles, and contestants would have to turn around if they encountered it.

to:

* The first Lifetime season of ''SupermarketSweep'' ''Series/SupermarketSweep'' had a giant monster (such as [[Franchise/{{Frankenstein}} Frankenstein's Monster]] or a gorilla) that would occasionally roam the aisles, and contestants would have to turn around if they encountered it.



* The first two Lifetime seasons of ''ShopTilYouDrop'' (1991-92) had a lower-budget bonus round: the goal was $1,000, and the items the team began with ranged from 49 cents to $250; further, among the items (both with the team and in the mall) were gag gifts, which weren't worth much of anything. The standard $2,500 goal was introduced at the start of Season 3 (1993), the gag gifts were ousted, and there were only a few prizes worth less than $100.

to:

* The first two Lifetime seasons of ''ShopTilYouDrop'' ''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'' (1991-92) had a lower-budget bonus round: the goal was $1,000, and the items the team began with ranged from 49 cents to $250; further, among the items (both with the team and in the mall) were gag gifts, which weren't worth much of anything. The standard $2,500 goal was introduced at the start of Season 3 (1993), the gag gifts were ousted, and there were only a few prizes worth less than $100.



* When ''{{Tattletales}}'' debuted in February 1974, there were two kinds of questions: one derived from the show's predecessor ''Series/HeSaidSheSaid'' (telling a story based on a question about the couples' lives, then having the other spouse match the story from a clue word), the other a "''Tattletales'' Quickie" (predicting how the spouse would answer a multiple-choice question). In June 1974, the format went to all-Quickies.

to:

* When ''{{Tattletales}}'' ''Series/{{Tattletales}}'' debuted in February 1974, there were two kinds of questions: one derived from the show's predecessor ''Series/HeSaidSheSaid'' (telling a story based on a question about the couples' lives, then having the other spouse match the story from a clue word), the other a "''Tattletales'' Quickie" (predicting how the spouse would answer a multiple-choice question). In June 1974, the format went to all-Quickies.
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