History Main / ResurrectiveImmortality

6th May '17 12:12:08 PM AkoSiKuya23
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* Those cursed by the thorns in ''VideoGame/ARoseInTheTwilight'', like the main character Rose, cannot die. No matter how gruesome their death is, they will simply reappear in another area as if nothing happened. In fact, part of the game requires Rose to be placed in death traps to advance.
28th Apr '17 7:21:44 PM Andyroid
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* In ''Webcomic/UndyingHappiness'', Keisuke and his family members have a HealingFactor so strong they can recover from otherwise-fatal injuries. The first chapter alone has Keisuke slowly regenerating from ''[[StrippedToTheBone nothing but his skeleton]]'' in the space of a couple hours.
28th Apr '17 6:33:42 PM Gavitro
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** We now have an explanation as to why at least the ''Soldier'' can't die - [[http://www.teamfortress.com/doommates/#f=17 he ate an entire bottle of magical "Kill Me, Come Back Stronger" pills]] owned by his (former) [[AWizardDidIt magician]] [[MonsterRoommate roommate.]] Apparently this is enough for Merasmus to not even ''try'' killing him (in the comic, at least; he'll rip your head off in-game regardless of class). The rest of his team ''might'' have taken such pills too... And the ''other team'', too, seeing as how the Administrator ''wants'' a perpetual stalemate between RED and BLU (well, right up until [[ManVersusMachine the robots show up]], and she would be ''delighted'' to make use of such a thing...)

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** We now have an explanation as to why at A couple of the supplementary comics give two possible explanations for the game's respawn mechanic:
*** At
least for how the ''Soldier'' can't die - [[http://www.teamfortress.com/doommates/#f=17 he ate an entire bottle of magical "Kill Me, Come Back Stronger" pills]] owned by his (former) [[AWizardDidIt magician]] [[MonsterRoommate roommate.]] Apparently this is enough for Merasmus to not even ''try'' killing him (in the comic, at least; he'll rip your head off in-game regardless of class). The rest of his team ''might'' have taken such pills too... And the ''other team'', too, seeing as how the Administrator ''wants'' a perpetual stalemate between RED and BLU (well, right up until [[ManVersusMachine the robots show up]], and she would be ''delighted'' to make use of such a thing...))
*** It's revealed late in ''[[Webcomic/TeamFortress2 Team Fortress Comics]]'' that [[spoiler:the Medic somehow collected the entire team's souls, including his own, and wound them together in order to cheat a DealWithTheDevil.]] This gives all of the mercenaries the ability to come back from death unscathed, though they can be KilledOffForReal by old age.
18th Apr '17 6:20:17 AM chilled0ut
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* In the [[UltimateMarvel Ultimate]] [[UltimateUniverse Universe]], all recipients of the Oz drug turn out to have this, including Norman Osborn, Peter Parker, and presumably Miles Morales and [[CloningBlues Jessica Drew]]. CrowningMomentofHeartwarming ensues when one realizes that Peter never has to worry about [[spoiler: Mary Jane again, since she was injected during the Ultimate Clone Saga]]; FridgeLogic comes after when one remembers Harry Osborn and Peter's various clones.
17th Apr '17 2:21:02 PM Nightmask
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** Recent events have referenced a Rebirth Facility, suggesting that there's a location where new bodies are created for her with her mind uploaded into them after each death.
17th Apr '17 11:00:47 AM TropeYoshi
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* In the third arc of [[FanFic/FuegueIllusion Fuegue Illusion: Escape To Illusion]], [[spoiler: Vaati and Cirno become this after a long and action-filled battle scene between Mokou and Cirno.]]

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* In the third arc of [[FanFic/FuegueIllusion Fuegue Illusion: Escape To Illusion]], [[spoiler: Vaati and Cirno become acquire this ability after a long and action-filled battle scene between Mokou and Cirno.]]
17th Apr '17 10:51:41 AM TropeYoshi
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* In the third arc of [[FanFic/FuegueIllusion Fuegue Illusion: Escape To Illusion]], [[spoiler: Vaati and Cirno become this after a long and action-filled battle scene between Mokou and Cirno.]]
11th Apr '17 10:37:10 PM PhantomRider
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* Kamen Rider Genm from ''Series/KamenRiderExAid'' eventually gains the power of a ZombieApocalypse-themed video game, which grants him a zombie's resistance to damage and the ability to shrug off fatal injuries; this is represented by the LifeMeter on his chestplate being empty. [[spoiler:He actually had to die in order to gain the the power in the first place, meaning he's like this whether or not he's in his Rider form. Eventually, Ex-Aid finds a way to strip him of this power.]]

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* Kamen Rider Genm from the video game-themed series ''Series/KamenRiderExAid'' eventually gains the power of a ZombieApocalypse-themed video game, which grants him a zombie's resistance to damage and the ability to shrug off fatal injuries; this is represented by the LifeMeter on his chestplate being empty. [[spoiler:He actually had to die in order to gain the the power in the first place, meaning he's like this whether or not he's in his Rider form. Eventually, Ex-Aid finds a way to strip him of this power.]]
11th Apr '17 5:43:22 PM nombretomado
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* This is the kind of immortality that [[spoiler:Nessiah]] from ''VideoGame/YggdraUnion'' of the ''VideoGame/DeptHeaven'' games (and [[VideoGame/YggdraUnison its]] [[VideoGame/BlazeUnion spinoffs]]) has been cursed with. Reincarnating is supposed to be hellishly painful and leaves him weak, but he will inevitably reincarnate no matter what. It overlaps with ImmortalityTalisman (and to some extent TheAgeless, as he no longer ages), and by the time of ''YggdraUnion'' he's spent over a thousand years trying to destroy what forces him to stay alive.

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* This is the kind of immortality that [[spoiler:Nessiah]] from ''VideoGame/YggdraUnion'' of the ''VideoGame/DeptHeaven'' games (and [[VideoGame/YggdraUnison its]] [[VideoGame/BlazeUnion spinoffs]]) has been cursed with. Reincarnating is supposed to be hellishly painful and leaves him weak, but he will inevitably reincarnate no matter what. It overlaps with ImmortalityTalisman (and to some extent TheAgeless, as he no longer ages), and by the time of ''YggdraUnion'' ''Yggdra Union'' he's spent over a thousand years trying to destroy what forces him to stay alive.



* Peter the phoenix and [[spoiler:Lemon the vampire]] from ''[[ShiningForce Shining Force II]]'' can automatically resurrect after each battle for free if defeated.

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* Peter the phoenix and [[spoiler:Lemon the vampire]] from ''[[ShiningForce Shining Force II]]'' ''VideoGame/ShiningForceII'' can automatically resurrect after each battle for free if defeated.
5th Apr '17 5:02:23 PM AthenaBlue
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-->-- ''Series/DoctorWho'', "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia Utopia]]"

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-->-- ''Series/DoctorWho'', "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia Utopia]]"
[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia "Utopia"]]



* A specific variation in ''Series/{{Smallville}}''. [[spoiler:When [[EmpathicHealer Chloe]] heals fatal injuries, it kills her, but she could resurrect herself. However, when she saves ComicBook/LoisLane, she is dead for 3 hours. [[InsaneForgiveness When she saves]] ComicBook/LexLuthor, she remains dead for 18 hours. Clark thinks if she tries it again, she might stay dead. Permanently.]]
* The Trill in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' are a race of almost human-looking aliens that share their home planet with a species of highly intelligent slug-like worms, known as the Symbionts. The symbionts are able to live inside the body of a Trill and connect themselves to their nervous system, effectively becomming a second brain that is mostly passive but retains all the memories of the Trill it is bonded with and has been bonded to before. While the lifetime of an individual Trill is about the same as that of a human, the Symbionts can live for many centuries and go through over a dozen of host bodies. These bonded Trill make up less than a percent of their species and form the political, scientific, and cultural elite of their society, so only the most gifted and outstanding individuals are selected for bonding after a very long and hard selection process. While the selection process is primarily supposed to prevent any symbionts to be bonded to mentally unstable host bodies that would permanently damage the mind, it also serves to hide the fact that almost half the Trill population is capable of bonding to symbionts and gaining a kind of immortality. Since there aren't nearly enough Symbionts to make this possible, the consequences would be devastating. The most important quality looked for in candidates after high intelligence and skills, seems to be an outstanding personalty that has a good chance to create a remarkable scientist, artist, or politician. And as a result, they all tend to be highly eccentric, which only gets more intense once they gain access to the memories of several remarkable lifetimes. While a bonded symbiont can live outside a host body for only a few hours outside of their specially maintained pools, and the host dies after the symbiont is removed, the symbionts are very durable and very often survive accidents and injuries that kill the host, as long as they can be transferred into a new one in time.
* Nathan from ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' has this type of immortality. He can be hurt or injured in the normal way, but will heal all injuries once he dies and comes back to life. Best demonstrated when in an alternate timeline, after their powers had become public knowledge, Nathan demonstrated his ability by ''shooting himself in the head'' and resurrecting on live television. And then a GenreSavvy villain [[spoiler: leaves him a ''brain dead'' vegetable instead of killing him.]]
* Captain Jack Harkness of ''Series/DoctorWho'' and ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' can technically die, but only for a short while due to a mixture of this and FromASingleCell. In ''Series/TorchwoodMiracleDay'', [[spoiler:Jack became mortal again. He returns to being immortal at the end of ''Miracle Day'', with Rex also gaining this kind of immortality.]] [[note]] WordOfGod speculated in the episode commentary that [[spoiler:the Blessing may have only removed Jack's HealingFactor, and that were he to die during the Miracle, he would have simply revived as normal.]] [[/note]]
** The Doctor (and any other Time Lord) can regenerate when their body dies. They retain all their memories but gain a new appearance and personality. This has been changed slightly in the new series since The Doctor doesn't fully die before regenerating. In a 1960s episode, the Doctor once stated that Time Lords can "live forever, barring accidents." The trope is not guaranteed to be in place indefinitely, however, as the series established (in a 1976 episode, and later confirmed in 2013) that Time Lords usually may only regenerate 12 times before final death, however the High Council has the ability to grant a renewed regeneration cycle (which is done with [[spoiler: The Master, per the episode "The Sound of Drums", and The Doctor, in "The Time of the Doctor"]]).
** The regenerations of the First, War Doctor and the Eleventh Doctor, though, imply that there ''is'' a physical limit at which point the current body either dies (if it's the last regeneration) or regenerates. The First Doctor wonders whether his body's wearing out or he's being weakened by Mondas' influence shortly before he regenerates. The War Doctor regenerates immediately after parting with the Tenth and the Eleventh, his body having been worn out by the Time War (which either lasted 400 years or nearly an eternity, since it was fought on multiple battlegrounds in multiple time periods). The Eleventh Doctor [[spoiler:spends about 900 years near-constantly battling half of the known universe, trying to prevent them from conquering Trenzalore, and ends up looking like a very old man]]. By this point, the Doctor has probably beaten Jack in physical age (and he actually lived those years, while Jack spent the vast majority of them BuriedAlive).
** The character of Ashildr, introduced in Series 9, is rendered "functionally immortal" due to the Doctor installing alien tech in her head to keep her alive, but at the cost of her now losing the ability to die. This is modified in the later episode "The Woman Who Lived" when we learn she can be killed, but will usually quickly recover from other-wise fatal injury. In "Hell Bent" we learn that she ultimately [[spoiler: lives until the last moments of the universe, and even beyond thanks to being rescued by the Doctor]].
** Clara Oswald, [[spoiler: as of the end of "Hell Bent", is said to be immortal and, in fact, lives in an almost-dead state, without breathing or having a pulse. It is strongly implied that the universe will not allow her to die until she returns to the originally designated time and place of her death.]]
* In the ''Series/{{Highlander}}'' series, immortals could die just like anyone else, but they revive shortly afterward (unless the injury was a beheading, which is [[KilledOffForReal fatal for good]]). [[note]]This is different from the rest of the ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'' franchise, in which immortals simply can't die except by beheading.[[/note]] It can turn into a cycle if they're [[AndIMustScream trapped in lethal circumstances]], which can lead to an insane immortal when they're finally set free.
* Prince, an {{expy}} of {{Satan}} and the BigBad of the last two seasons of ''Series/{{LEXX}}'', could return after being killed, once a certain time period had elapsed. Worse, he could choose where he would reappear, and what his appearance would be, making him a de facto shapeshifter. His weaker enemy Duke could resurrect but not change his appearance.
** Kai plays with this too. Although he's technically dead and only animated by protoblood, he would routinely get "killed" (decapitated, cut apart, etc) which sometimes incapacitated him for a while until he was put back together properly. Other times, he's move around regardless of injuries.

to:

* A specific variation in ''Series/{{Smallville}}''. [[spoiler:When [[EmpathicHealer Chloe]] heals fatal injuries, it kills her, but she could resurrect herself. However, when she saves ComicBook/LoisLane, she is dead for 3 hours. [[InsaneForgiveness When she saves]] ComicBook/LexLuthor, she remains dead for 18 hours. Clark thinks if she tries it again, she might stay dead. Permanently.]]
* The Trill in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' are a race of almost human-looking aliens that share their home planet with a species of highly intelligent slug-like worms, known as the Symbionts. The symbionts are able to live inside the body of a Trill and connect themselves to their nervous system, effectively becomming a second brain that is mostly passive but retains all the memories of the Trill it is bonded with and has been bonded to before. While the lifetime of an individual Trill is about the same as that of a human, the Symbionts can live for many centuries and go through over a dozen of host bodies. These bonded Trill make up less than a percent of their species and form the political, scientific, and cultural elite of their society, so only the most gifted and outstanding individuals are selected for bonding after a very long and hard selection process. While the selection process is primarily supposed to prevent any symbionts to be bonded to mentally unstable host bodies that would permanently damage the mind, it also serves to hide the fact that almost half the Trill population is capable of bonding to symbionts and gaining a kind of immortality. Since there aren't nearly enough Symbionts to make Cylons on ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' do this possible, the consequences would be devastating. The most important quality looked for in candidates after high intelligence and skills, seems to be an outstanding personalty that has a good chance to create a remarkable scientist, artist, or politician. And as a result, when they all tend to be highly eccentric, which only gets more intense once they gain access to the memories of several remarkable lifetimes. While a bonded symbiont can live outside a host body for only a few hours outside of their specially maintained pools, and the host dies after the symbiont is removed, the symbionts are very durable and very often survive accidents and injuries that kill the host, as die. So long as they can be transferred into a new one in time.
* Nathan from ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' has this type of immortality. He can be hurt or injured in the normal way, but will heal all injuries once he dies and comes back to life. Best demonstrated when in an alternate timeline, after their powers had become public knowledge, Nathan demonstrated his ability by ''shooting himself in the head'' and resurrecting on live television. And then a GenreSavvy villain [[spoiler: leaves him a ''brain dead'' vegetable instead of killing him.]]
* Captain Jack Harkness of ''Series/DoctorWho'' and ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' can technically die, but only for a short while due to a mixture of this and FromASingleCell. In ''Series/TorchwoodMiracleDay'', [[spoiler:Jack became mortal again. He returns to being immortal at the end of ''Miracle Day'', with Rex also gaining this kind of immortality.]] [[note]] WordOfGod speculated in the episode commentary that [[spoiler:the Blessing may have only removed Jack's HealingFactor, and that were he to die during the Miracle, he would have simply revived as normal.]] [[/note]]
** The Doctor (and any other Time Lord) can regenerate when their body dies. They retain all their memories but gain a new appearance and personality. This has been changed slightly in the new series since The Doctor doesn't fully die before regenerating. In a 1960s episode, the Doctor once stated that Time Lords can "live forever, barring accidents." The trope is not guaranteed to be in place indefinitely, however, as the series established (in a 1976 episode, and later confirmed in 2013) that Time Lords usually may only regenerate 12 times before final death, however the High Council has the ability to grant a renewed regeneration cycle (which is done with [[spoiler: The Master, per the episode "The Sound of Drums", and The Doctor, in "The Time of the Doctor"]]).
** The regenerations of the First, War Doctor and the Eleventh Doctor, though, imply that there ''is'' a physical limit at which point the current body either dies (if it's the last regeneration) or regenerates. The First Doctor wonders whether his body's wearing out or he's being weakened by Mondas' influence shortly before he regenerates. The War Doctor regenerates immediately after parting with the Tenth and the Eleventh, his body having been worn out by the Time War (which either lasted 400 years or nearly an eternity, since it was fought on multiple battlegrounds in multiple time periods). The Eleventh Doctor [[spoiler:spends about 900 years near-constantly battling half of the known universe, trying to prevent them from conquering Trenzalore, and ends up looking like a very old man]]. By this point, the Doctor has probably beaten Jack in physical age (and he actually lived those years, while Jack spent the vast majority of them BuriedAlive).
** The character of Ashildr, introduced in Series 9, is rendered "functionally immortal" due to the Doctor installing alien tech in her head to keep her alive, but at the cost of her now losing the ability to die. This is modified in the later episode "The Woman Who Lived" when we learn she can be killed, but will usually quickly recover from other-wise fatal injury. In "Hell Bent" we learn that she ultimately [[spoiler: lives until the last moments of the universe, and even beyond thanks to being rescued by the Doctor]].
** Clara Oswald, [[spoiler: as of the end of "Hell Bent", is said to be immortal and, in fact, lives in an almost-dead state, without breathing or having a pulse. It is strongly implied that the universe will not allow her to die until she returns to the originally designated time and place of her death.]]
* In the ''Series/{{Highlander}}'' series, immortals could die just like anyone else, but they revive shortly afterward (unless the injury was a beheading, which is [[KilledOffForReal fatal for good]]). [[note]]This is different from the rest of the ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'' franchise, in which immortals simply can't die except by beheading.[[/note]] It can turn into a cycle if
they're [[AndIMustScream trapped in lethal circumstances]], which can lead to an insane immortal when they're finally set free.
* Prince, an {{expy}}
the operational range of {{Satan}} a Resurrection Ship, and the BigBad of resurrection network is online, then when they die they merely BodySurf into a dormant identical body and continue their existence. However, this also means they get to carry the last two seasons psychological and emotional trauma of ''Series/{{LEXX}}'', could dying with them into their new body and some Cylons are so traumatized by the experience that their consciousnesses are "[[TheNothingAfterDeath boxed]]" rather than having them become a BrokenBird and be a drain on Cylon society.
** In ''Series/{{Caprica}}'', Zoe and Tamara possess this ability in New Cap City in a particularly fast variant. The environment is programmed in such a way to permanently ban anyone who is killed from ever entering again. For Z&T this is just a minor nuisance because they are programs with no real body to
return after being killed, once to, so getting killed will cause a certain time period had elapsed. Worse, he could choose where he would reappear, glitch and what his appearance would be, making him a de facto shapeshifter. His weaker enemy Duke could resurrect but not change his appearance.
** Kai plays with this too. Although he's technically dead and only animated by protoblood, he would routinely get "killed" (decapitated, cut apart, etc) which sometimes incapacitated him for a while until he was put back together properly. Other times, he's move around regardless of injuries.
remodel them immediately.



* In ''{{Series/Merlin 2008}}'', Merlin himself, who is still alive in the present day. He's taken fireballs to the chest, swords, and huge slash wounds, and yet has gotten up again. It was confirmed in a DistantFinale that he really is immortal like his mythological roots.
** ''Very'' heavily implied as early as 4x02 with the Dorocha. Gaius outright says that no mortal can survive their touch, yet Merlin does.
* John Amsterdam in ''Series/NewAmsterdam''. In addition to being TheAgeless, Amsterdam also possesses this form of immortality. He dies in the pilot, but he is resurrected a few hours later in the morgue.
* The Cylons on ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' do this when they die. So long as they're in the operational range of a Resurrection Ship, and the resurrection network is online, then when they die they merely BodySurf into a dormant identical body and continue their existence. However, this also means they get to carry the psychological and emotional trauma of dying with them into their new body and some Cylons are so traumatized by the experience that their consciousnesses are "[[TheNothingAfterDeath boxed]]" rather than having them become a BrokenBird and be a drain on Cylon society.
* In ''Series/{{Caprica}}'', Zoe and Tamara possess this ability in New Cap City in a particularly fast variant. The environment is programmed in such a way to permanently ban anyone who is killed from ever entering again. For Z&T this is just a minor nuisance because they are programs with no real body to return to, so getting killed will cause a glitch and remodel them immediately.
* Phoenix of ''Series/KamenRiderWizard'': Like his namesake, his special ability is that he ''can't'' be killed for good and will simply revive stronger than before. In the end, the only way Haruto can permanently stop him is by [[HurlItIntoTheSun throwing him into the sun]] [[FateWorseThanDeath and trapping him there]].
* Kamen Rider Genm from ''Series/KamenRiderExAid'' eventually gains the power of a ZombieApocalypse-themed video game, which grants him a zombie's resistance to damage and the ability to shrug off fatal injuries; this is represented by the LifeMeter on his chestplate being empty. [[spoiler:He actually had to die in order to gain the the power in the first place, meaning he's like this whether or not he's in his Rider form. Eventually, Ex-Aid finds a way to strip him of this power.]]
* Chas Chandler on ''Series/{{Constantine}}'' has this type of immortality. There is a reason he's John Constantine's ''oldest'' friend - nobody else survives the dangers around him for long.



* Chas Chandler on ''Series/{{Constantine}}'' has this type of immortality. There is a reason he's John Constantine's ''oldest'' friend - nobody else survives the dangers around him for long.



* Dr. Henry Morgan of ''Series/{{Forever}}'' can be injured like anyone else, but if killed his body will disappear and he will wake up in the nearest body of water completely healed. He is also TheAgeless and has been around for at least 200 years. His EvilCounterpart "Adam" has been alive for over 2000 years and has grown to no longer care about the lives of everyone else, killing without remorse. The one exception to this is anyone, who has survived the [[WorldWarTwo German camps]], since "Adam" himself was being experimented on by [[MadScientist Dr. Mengele]], who was trying to learn the secret of this trope. Due to the series cancellation, we'll never know what caused Henry and "Adam" to become immortal, although it's implied to have been HeroicSacrifice for Henry.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' and ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'':
** The Doctor (and any other Time Lord) can regenerate when their body dies. They retain all their memories but gain a new appearance and personality. This has been changed slightly in the new series since The Doctor doesn't fully die before regenerating. In a 1960s episode, the Doctor once stated that Time Lords can "live forever, barring accidents." The trope is not guaranteed to be in place indefinitely, however, as the series established (in a 1976 episode, and later confirmed in 2013) that Time Lords usually may only regenerate 12 times before final death, however the High Council has the ability to grant a renewed regeneration cycle (which is done with [[spoiler: the Master, per the episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums "The Sound of Drums"]], and the Doctor, in [[Recap/DoctorWho2013CSTheTimeOfTheDoctor "The Time of the Doctor"]]]]).
*** The regenerations of the First, War Doctor and the Eleventh Doctor, though, imply that there ''is'' a physical limit at which point the current body either dies (if it's the last regeneration) or regenerates. The First Doctor wonders whether his body's wearing out or he's being weakened by Mondas' influence shortly before he regenerates. The War Doctor regenerates immediately after parting with the Tenth and the Eleventh, his body having been worn out by the Time War (which either lasted 400 years or nearly an eternity, since it was fought on multiple battlegrounds in multiple time periods). The Eleventh Doctor [[spoiler:spends about 900 years near-constantly battling half of the known universe, trying to prevent them from conquering Trenzalore, and ends up looking like a very old man]]. By this point, the Doctor has probably beaten Jack in physical age (and he actually lived those years, while Jack spent the vast majority of them BuriedAlive).
** Captain Jack Harkness can technically die, but only for a short while due to a mixture of this and FromASingleCell. In ''Series/TorchwoodMiracleDay'', [[spoiler:Jack became mortal again. He returns to being immortal at the end of ''Miracle Day'', with Rex also gaining this kind of immortality.]] [[note]] WordOfGod speculated in the episode commentary that [[spoiler:the Blessing may have only removed Jack's HealingFactor, and that were he to die during the Miracle, he would have simply revived as normal.]] [[/note]]
** The character of Ashildr, introduced in the Series 9 episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E5TheGirlWhoDied "The Girl Who Died"]], is rendered "functionally immortal" due to the Doctor installing alien tech in her head to keep her alive, but at the cost of her now losing the ability to die. This is modified in the later episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E6TheWomanWhoLived "The Woman Who Lived"]], where we learn she can be killed, but will usually quickly recover from otherwise fatal injury. In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent "Hell Bent"]] we learn that she ultimately [[spoiler: lives until the last moments of the universe, and even beyond thanks to being rescued by the Doctor]].
** Clara Oswald, [[spoiler: as of the end of "Hell Bent", is said to be immortal and, in fact, lives in an almost-dead state, without breathing or having a pulse. It is strongly implied that the universe will not allow her to die until she returns to the originally designated time and place of her death.]]
* Dr. Henry Morgan of ''Series/{{Forever}}'' can be injured like anyone else, but if killed his body will disappear and he will wake up in the nearest body of water completely healed. He is also TheAgeless and has been around for at least 200 years. His EvilCounterpart "Adam" has been alive for over 2000 years and has grown to no longer care about the lives of everyone else, killing without remorse. The one exception to this is anyone, anyone who has survived the [[WorldWarTwo German camps]], since "Adam" himself was being experimented on by [[MadScientist Dr. Mengele]], who was trying to learn the secret of this trope. Due to the series series' cancellation, we'll never know what caused Henry and "Adam" to become immortal, although it's implied to have been HeroicSacrifice for Henry.Henry.
* In the ''Series/{{Highlander}}'' series, immortals could die just like anyone else, but they revive shortly afterward (unless the injury was a beheading, which is [[KilledOffForReal fatal for good]]). [[note]]This is different from the rest of the ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'' franchise, in which immortals simply can't die except by beheading.[[/note]] It can turn into a cycle if they're [[AndIMustScream trapped in lethal circumstances]], which can lead to an insane immortal when they're finally set free.
* Phoenix of ''Series/KamenRiderWizard'': Like his namesake, his special ability is that he ''can't'' be killed for good and will simply revive stronger than before. In the end, the only way Haruto can permanently stop him is by [[HurlItIntoTheSun throwing him into the sun]] [[FateWorseThanDeath and trapping him there]].
* Kamen Rider Genm from ''Series/KamenRiderExAid'' eventually gains the power of a ZombieApocalypse-themed video game, which grants him a zombie's resistance to damage and the ability to shrug off fatal injuries; this is represented by the LifeMeter on his chestplate being empty. [[spoiler:He actually had to die in order to gain the the power in the first place, meaning he's like this whether or not he's in his Rider form. Eventually, Ex-Aid finds a way to strip him of this power.]]
* Prince, an {{expy}} of {{Satan}} and the BigBad of the last two seasons of ''Series/{{LEXX}}'', could return after being killed, once a certain time period had elapsed. Worse, he could choose where he would reappear, and what his appearance would be, making him a de facto shapeshifter. His weaker enemy Duke could resurrect but not change his appearance.
** Kai plays with this too. Although he's technically dead and only animated by protoblood, he would routinely get "killed" (decapitated, cut apart, etc.) which sometimes incapacitated him for a while until he was put back together properly. Other times, he's move around regardless of injuries.
* In ''{{Series/Merlin 2008}}'', Merlin himself, who is still alive in the present day. He's taken fireballs to the chest, swords, and huge slash wounds, and yet has gotten up again. It was confirmed in a DistantFinale that he really is immortal like his mythological roots.
** ''Very'' heavily implied as early as 4x02 with the Dorocha. Gaius outright says that no mortal can survive their touch, yet Merlin does.
* Nathan from ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' has this type of immortality. He can be hurt or injured in the normal way, but will heal all injuries once he dies and comes back to life. Best demonstrated when in an alternate timeline, after their powers had become public knowledge, Nathan demonstrated his ability by ''shooting himself in the head'' and resurrecting on live television. And then a GenreSavvy villain [[spoiler: leaves him a ''brain dead'' vegetable instead of killing him.]]
* John Amsterdam in ''Series/NewAmsterdam''. In addition to being TheAgeless, Amsterdam also possesses this form of immortality. He dies in the pilot, but he is resurrected a few hours later in the morgue.
* A specific variation in ''Series/{{Smallville}}''. [[spoiler:When [[EmpathicHealer Chloe]] heals fatal injuries, it kills her, but she could resurrect herself. However, when she saves ComicBook/LoisLane, she is dead for 3 hours. [[InsaneForgiveness When she saves]] ComicBook/LexLuthor, she remains dead for 18 hours. Clark thinks if she tries it again, she might stay dead. Permanently.]]
* The Trill in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' are a race of almost human-looking aliens that share their home planet with a species of highly intelligent slug-like worms, known as the Symbionts. The symbionts are able to live inside the body of a Trill and connect themselves to their nervous system, effectively becomming a second brain that is mostly passive but retains all the memories of the Trill it is bonded with and has been bonded to before. While the lifetime of an individual Trill is about the same as that of a human, the Symbionts can live for many centuries and go through over a dozen of host bodies. These bonded Trill make up less than a percent of their species and form the political, scientific, and cultural elite of their society, so only the most gifted and outstanding individuals are selected for bonding after a very long and hard selection process. While the selection process is primarily supposed to prevent any symbionts to be bonded to mentally unstable host bodies that would permanently damage the mind, it also serves to hide the fact that almost half the Trill population is capable of bonding to symbionts and gaining a kind of immortality. Since there aren't nearly enough Symbionts to make this possible, the consequences would be devastating. The most important quality looked for in candidates after high intelligence and skills, seems to be an outstanding personalty that has a good chance to create a remarkable scientist, artist, or politician. And as a result, they all tend to be highly eccentric, which only gets more intense once they gain access to the memories of several remarkable lifetimes. While a bonded symbiont can live outside a host body for only a few hours outside of their specially maintained pools, and the host dies after the symbiont is removed, the symbionts are very durable and very often survive accidents and injuries that kill the host, as long as they can be transferred into a new one in time.
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