History Main / ResurrectiveImmortality

25th Nov '16 9:49:02 AM Pseudoname
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Evolve}}'', [[spoiler: the monsters have this. "Killing" them just severs their connection to their corporeal form and forces them back to their dimension, where they can easily reform and return.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Evolve}}'', [[spoiler: the monsters have this. "Killing" them just severs their connection to their corporeal form and forces them back to their dimension, where they can easily reform and return.]]


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* In ''VideoGame/{{Evolve}}'', [[spoiler: the monsters have this. "Killing" them just severs their connection to their corporeal form and forces them back to their dimension, where they can easily reform and return.]]
20th Nov '16 9:19:19 PM HiddenWindshield
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* Vigilante from the ''Literature/{{Curveball}}'' series can come back to life from absolutely anything. His [[SuperTeam teammates]] keep a body bag around so they have an easy way to transport him while he's "recovering" from a fight.
20th Nov '16 9:04:18 PM HiddenWindshield
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* ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'', both film and TV. Immortals can die just like anyone else, but their bodies then heal and they revive.(Unless the injury was a beheading, which is fatal for good.) And it can turn into a cycle if conditions are bad, which can lead to an insane immortal or at least an immortal with a huge desire for revenge.
** Actually the temporary death was series-only...in the films, they just kept going. Connor walked under water, The Kurgan was shot mutiple times...the series probably introduced temporary deaths as a PlotDevice.
*** It also happened during one of Duncan's {{Flash Back}}s, when he was trapped underground with a LoveInterest. Due to a gas leak, she ends up dying, but he continues to sit there and hold her, even though, according to this trope, he should have collapsed as well (then got up and collapsed again).

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* ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'', both film and TV. Immortals can In the ''Series/{{Highlander}}'' series, immortals could die just like anyone else, but their bodies then heal and they revive.(Unless revive shortly afterward (unless the injury was a beheading, which is [[KilledOffForReal fatal for good.) And it good]]). [[note]]This is different from the rest of the ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'' franchise, in which immortals simply can't die except by beheading.[[/note]] It can turn into a cycle if conditions are bad, they're [[AndIMustScream trapped in lethal circumstances]], which can lead to an insane immortal or at least an immortal with a huge desire for revenge.
** Actually the temporary death was series-only...in the films, they just kept going. Connor walked under water, The Kurgan was shot mutiple times...the series probably introduced temporary deaths as a PlotDevice.
*** It also happened during one of Duncan's {{Flash Back}}s,
when he was trapped underground with a LoveInterest. Due to a gas leak, she ends up dying, but he continues to sit there and hold her, even though, according to this trope, he should have collapsed as well (then got up and collapsed again).they're finally set free.
7th Nov '16 10:57:40 AM SomberCaelifera
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* The Trill in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' are a race of almost human-looking aliens that share their home planet with a species of highly intelligent slug-like worms, known as the Symbionts. The symbionts are able to live inside the body of a Trill and connect themselves to their nervous system, effectively becomming a second brain that is mostly passive but retains all the memories of the Trill it is bonded with and has been bonded to before. While the lifetime of an individual Trill is about the same as that of a human, the Symbionts can live for many centuries and go through over a dozen of host bodies. These bonded Trill make up less than a percent of their species and form the political, scientific, and cultural elite of their society, so only the most gifted and outstanding individuals are selected for bonding after a very long and hard selection process. While the selection process is primarily supposed to prevent any symbionts to be bonded to mentally unstable host bodies that would permanently damage the mind, it also serves to hide the fact that almost half the Trill population is capable of bonding to symbionts and gaining a kind of immortality. Since there aren't nearly enough Symbionts to make this possible, the consequences would be devastating. The most important quality looked for in candidates after high intelligence and skills, seems to be an outstanding personalty that has a good chance to create a remarkable scientist, artist, or politican. And as a result, they all tend to be highly eccentric, which only gets more intense once they gain access to the memories of several remarkable lifetimes. While a bonded symbiont can live outside a host body for only a few hours outside of their specially maintained pools, and the host dies after the symbiont is removed, the symbionts are very durable and very often survive accidents and injuries that kill the host, as long as they can be transferred into a new one in time.

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* The Trill in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' are a race of almost human-looking aliens that share their home planet with a species of highly intelligent slug-like worms, known as the Symbionts. The symbionts are able to live inside the body of a Trill and connect themselves to their nervous system, effectively becomming a second brain that is mostly passive but retains all the memories of the Trill it is bonded with and has been bonded to before. While the lifetime of an individual Trill is about the same as that of a human, the Symbionts can live for many centuries and go through over a dozen of host bodies. These bonded Trill make up less than a percent of their species and form the political, scientific, and cultural elite of their society, so only the most gifted and outstanding individuals are selected for bonding after a very long and hard selection process. While the selection process is primarily supposed to prevent any symbionts to be bonded to mentally unstable host bodies that would permanently damage the mind, it also serves to hide the fact that almost half the Trill population is capable of bonding to symbionts and gaining a kind of immortality. Since there aren't nearly enough Symbionts to make this possible, the consequences would be devastating. The most important quality looked for in candidates after high intelligence and skills, seems to be an outstanding personalty that has a good chance to create a remarkable scientist, artist, or politican.politician. And as a result, they all tend to be highly eccentric, which only gets more intense once they gain access to the memories of several remarkable lifetimes. While a bonded symbiont can live outside a host body for only a few hours outside of their specially maintained pools, and the host dies after the symbiont is removed, the symbionts are very durable and very often survive accidents and injuries that kill the host, as long as they can be transferred into a new one in time.



** Clara Oswald, [[spoiler: as of the end of "Hell Bent", is said to be immortal and, in fact, lives in an AlmostDead state. It is strongly implied that the universe will not allow her to die until she returns to the originally designated time and place of her death.]]

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** Clara Oswald, [[spoiler: as of the end of "Hell Bent", is said to be immortal and, in fact, lives in an AlmostDead state.almost-dead state, without breathing or having a pulse. It is strongly implied that the universe will not allow her to die until she returns to the originally designated time and place of her death.]]
28th Oct '16 3:34:30 PM Pseudoname
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Evolve}}'', [[spoiler: the monsters have this. "Killing" them just severs their connection to their corporeal form and forces them back to their dimension, where they can easily reform and return.]]
27th Oct '16 9:49:59 PM nombretomado
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* Kenji Murasame from ''GiantRobo'' has this type of immortality. He's also got a bit of MadeOfIron going on, since non-fatal wounds barely slow him down, but he'll always come back from anything that would definitely kill anyone else, including complete bodily disintegration. He's quick about it, too. Getting shot in the head doesn't even put him down for more than half a minute or so.

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* Kenji Murasame from ''GiantRobo'' ''Manga/GiantRobo'' has this type of immortality. He's also got a bit of MadeOfIron going on, since non-fatal wounds barely slow him down, but he'll always come back from anything that would definitely kill anyone else, including complete bodily disintegration. He's quick about it, too. Getting shot in the head doesn't even put him down for more than half a minute or so.
26th Oct '16 6:15:50 AM ChronoLegion
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* Dr. Henry Morgan of ''Series/{{Forever}}'' can be injured like anyone else, but if killed his body will disappear and he will wake up in the nearest body of water completely healed. He is also TheAgeless and has been around for at least 200 years.

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* Dr. Henry Morgan of ''Series/{{Forever}}'' can be injured like anyone else, but if killed his body will disappear and he will wake up in the nearest body of water completely healed. He is also TheAgeless and has been around for at least 200 years. His EvilCounterpart "Adam" has been alive for over 2000 years and has grown to no longer care about the lives of everyone else, killing without remorse. The one exception to this is anyone, who has survived the [[WorldWarTwo German camps]], since "Adam" himself was being experimented on by [[MadScientist Dr. Mengele]], who was trying to learn the secret of this trope. Due to the series cancellation, we'll never know what caused Henry and "Adam" to become immortal, although it's implied to have been HeroicSacrifice for Henry.
22nd Oct '16 6:35:35 AM Morgenthaler
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[[quoteright:299:[[ComicBook/ResurrectionMan http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/resurrection_man.png]]]]
18th Oct '16 3:15:39 AM eroock
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Characters with '''Resurrective Immortality''' can die just like anyone else. The thing is, they will not ''stay'' dead.

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Characters with '''Resurrective Immortality''' Resurrective Immortality can die just like anyone else. The thing is, they will not ''stay'' dead.
6th Oct '16 2:42:21 AM ChronoLegion
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* In Creator/JohnScalzi's ''Literature/TheDispatcher'', almost any person, who is killed vanishes in a puff of air and materializes naked in his or her home, with no injuries from just before death. This applies only to murder, though, and there is a 1 in 1000 chance it won't work and the person will be dead for good. A special job has been created to allow trained people to kill those they deem about to die, thus ensuring their survival (remember, only murder triggers the resurrection). These people, called Dispatchers, are typically present in operating rooms during critical surgeries. If the surgeons fail to save the patient, the Dispatcher in the room demands that the surgeon in charge declare the patient lost. Then the Dispatcher uses a special tool to inject the patient with a tiny explosive charge straight into the brain. The charge then detonates, killing (and saving) the patient. No one knows why people are coming back, but it has become a fact of life for the past 10 years.

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* In Creator/JohnScalzi's ''Literature/TheDispatcher'', almost any person, who is killed vanishes in a puff of air and materializes naked in his or her home, with no injuries from just several hours before death. This applies only to murder, though, and there is a 1 in 1000 chance it won't work and the person will be dead for good. A special job has been created to allow trained people to kill those they deem about to die, thus ensuring their survival (remember, only murder triggers the resurrection). These people, called Dispatchers, are typically present in operating rooms during critical surgeries. If the surgeons fail to save the patient, the Dispatcher in the room demands that the surgeon in charge declare the patient lost. Then the Dispatcher uses a special tool to inject the patient with a tiny explosive charge straight into the brain. The charge then detonates, killing (and saving) the patient. No one knows why people are coming back, but it has become a fact of life for the past 10 years. This leads to some people doing reckless things, privately hiring Dispatchers to ensure there's someone on hand to kill them if necessary.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ResurrectiveImmortality