History Main / RemittanceMan

8th Aug '16 9:42:29 AM TimberRidge
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* Lord Crispin Fitzjames-Holles-Clare-Malet, the Duke of Taunton's brother, in the ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels. A very modern example, he left his wife and children to drink and party his way around the world and admits, in the end, that he did so because he couldn't or wouldn't change and thought it better the kids not see him make a swine of himself at close range.
26th Jun '16 6:14:54 AM Morgenthaler
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* Mym of the IncarnationsOfImmortality series is a non-European variant of this trope, a prince of India who didn't fit in with the royal court because he can't talk without severe stuttering. He travels around [[KingIncognito unrecognized]] with a [[CircusBrat circus]], within the borders of India. Since he is the second son, the royal court's policy is to tolerate his runaway lifestyle - until Mym hears the news that his brother has died in a war, and the court, who has been secretly tracking his whereabouts all along, will begin insisting that Mym shall come back to the palace and live the lifestyle appropriate to the heir to the throne.

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* Mym of the IncarnationsOfImmortality ''Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality'' series is a non-European variant of this trope, a prince of India who didn't fit in with the royal court because he can't talk without severe stuttering. He travels around [[KingIncognito unrecognized]] with a [[CircusBrat circus]], within the borders of India. Since he is the second son, the royal court's policy is to tolerate his runaway lifestyle - until Mym hears the news that his brother has died in a war, and the court, who has been secretly tracking his whereabouts all along, will begin insisting that Mym shall come back to the palace and live the lifestyle appropriate to the heir to the throne.
14th Mar '16 1:18:01 AM PaulA
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* The planet Surebleak in the Literature/LiadenUniverse series is a space opera equivalent to the frontier town in a Western, complete with MissKitty, a crusading sheriff, etc. In ''Dragon in Exile'', one of the characters who passes through is a similarly updated version of this trope: Vel Ter yo'Bern, a ne'er-do-well younger son of a Liaden clan who's on a perpetual tour through the galaxy, supported by an allowance from his family that's conditional on him never coming home.
31st Oct '15 10:27:20 AM Morgenthaler
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* In a rare case of the American counterpart to the Mountie version, there is Sheriff John T. Langston, played by John Cleese in the 1985 film ''{{Silverado}}''.

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* In a rare case of the American counterpart to the Mountie version, there is Sheriff John T. Langston, played by John Cleese in the 1985 film ''{{Silverado}}''.''Film/{{Silverado}}''.
26th Jul '15 11:58:04 AM DaibhidC
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* In an interview in ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' magazine, Ed Greenwood said that unrepentant wastrel children of the Waterdhavian nobility are often sent to distant corners of the TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms to make their fortunes. (Assuming the family isn't ruthless enough to [[OffingTheOffspring just kill them]] and ''say'' they've gone to make their fortunes.)

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* In an interview in ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' magazine, Ed Greenwood said that unrepentant wastrel children of the Waterdhavian nobility are often sent to distant corners of the TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms to make their fortunes. (Assuming the family isn't [[AristocratsAreEvil ruthless enough enough]] to [[OffingTheOffspring just kill them]] and ''say'' they've gone to make their fortunes.)
26th Jul '15 11:56:03 AM DaibhidC
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* In an interview in ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' magazine, Ed Greenwood said that unrepentant wastrel children of the Waterdhavian nobility are often sent to distant corners of the TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms to make their fortunes. (Assuming the family isn't ruthless enough to [[OffingTheOffspring just kill them]] and ''say'' they've gone to make their fortunes.)
26th Jul '15 11:27:13 AM DaibhidC
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* Once [[LandDownunder FourEcks]] is discovered (again) in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', there are occasional references to the younger sons of the Ankh-Morpork nobility being sent there to keep them out of trouble.

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* Once [[LandDownunder FourEcks]] is discovered (again) in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', there are occasional references to the younger sons of the Ankh-Morpork nobility being sent there to keep them out of trouble. In particular, in ''Discworld/TheTruth'', Lord de Word threatens his son with it, although his definition of "trouble" is "[[spoiler: stop being an honest hardworking chap who wants to stop my conspiracy]]".
26th Jul '15 11:25:10 AM DaibhidC
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* Once [[LandDownunder FourEcks]] is discovered (again) in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', there are occasional references to the younger sons of the Ankh-Morpork nobility being sent there to keep them out of trouble.
31st Mar '15 8:03:00 PM mlsmithca
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"That fop with the English Accent." An upper-crust younger [[BlueBlood son of an English lord]] with no prospect of inheriting, sent off to the Americas (or Australia, or South Africa, or anywhere on the map that happens to be painted pink during the time period) to get him out of the way. Usually given a small allowance (the "remittance"), that isn't sufficient to support him in the way he is accustomed. He also has an ingrained aversion to "working in trade", and he's not used to manual labor.

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"That fop with the English Accent." An upper-crust younger [[BlueBlood son of an English lord]] with no prospect of inheriting, sent off to the Americas (or Australia, or South Africa, or anywhere on the map that happens to be painted pink during the time period) to get him out of the way. Usually given a small allowance (the "remittance"), that isn't sufficient to support him in the way he is accustomed. He also has an ingrained aversion to "working in trade", and he's not used to manual labor.




* One shows up in "[[ComicBook/LuckyLuke The Tenderfoot]]", though he doesn't receive an allowance.

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\n* One shows up in "[[ComicBook/LuckyLuke The Tenderfoot]]", the ComicBook/LuckyLuke story "The Tenderfoot", though he doesn't receive an allowance.
allowance.




* In MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic tale "FluttershyIsFree," it is implied that Fluttershy is one of these. Her family is a distinguished one, they are ashamed of her, she lives away from them, and she never seems short of money.

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\n* In MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' tale "FluttershyIsFree," ''Fanfic/FluttershyIsFree'', it is implied that Fluttershy is one of these. Her family is a distinguished one, they are ashamed of her, she lives away from them, and she never seems short of money.
money.






* The [[NoNameGiven unnamed]] Englishman in the Canadian short WesternAnimation/WildLifeOrUneVieSauvage, the film starts out satirizing this phenomenon but takes a decidedly melancholy turn.

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* The [[NoNameGiven unnamed]] Englishman in the Canadian short WesternAnimation/WildLifeOrUneVieSauvage, ''WesternAnimation/WildLifeOrUneVieSauvage'', the film starts out satirizing this phenomenon but takes a decidedly melancholy turn.









* In ''TheGreatGatsby'', the first time Nick goes to one of Gatsby's parties, he notices several young Englishmen among the guests, "all well dressed, all looking a little hungry, and all talking in low, earnest voices to solid and prosperous Americans."

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* In ''TheGreatGatsby'', ''Literature/TheGreatGatsby'', the first time Nick goes to one of Gatsby's parties, he notices several young Englishmen among the guests, "all well dressed, all looking a little hungry, and all talking in low, earnest voices to solid and prosperous Americans."



* In another SF example, Cadman Weyland describes another member of the first interstellar expedition as "the ultimate remittance man" in [[LarryNiven Larry Niven's]] ''The Legacy of Heorot''

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* In another SF example, Cadman Weyland describes another member of the first interstellar expedition as "the ultimate remittance man" in [[LarryNiven Larry Niven's]] LarryNiven's ''The Legacy of Heorot''

























* Thicker on the ground than gophers in pre-WorldWarI Calgary, which probably explains why the trope is more common in Canadian shows. One old apocryphal joke had a local lawyer writing the noble father of a remittance man who was convicted of murder and hanged: "I regret to inform Your Lordship that your son has died. He was participating in a public function when the platform gave way."
* A lot of influential figures in Victorian/Edwardian Canada were examples. One major reason why children were shipped off to Canada was because they were an embarasment. While a lot of of them ended badly, a lot just needed an outlet for the insticts that would have driven them to drink and gambling back home. Out in Canada they had good educations, experience in dealing with people and, most importantly, very little to lose.
* "Lord" Phillip Darrell Duppa, English gentry and classically educated but factually no man's or woman's lord, co-founded (with Jack Swilling) two cities in Phoenix. The settlement in the Salt River Valley, called by some inhabitants "Salina" and by others "Pumpkinville", was laid out on an ancient network of irrigation canals, built by the Hohokam; he saw that this was a town rising from its own ruins, and suggested naming it for the legendary Phoenix. And he looked down into the adjoining river valley where Arizona State University now stands and thought it looked like a place in Greece he'd once visited, the Vale of Tempe. Until his death in 1892, his family sent him $3000 (then a very tidy sum) on condition that he remain at a decent distance; he is reputed to have drunk most of it.

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\n* Thicker on the ground than gophers in pre-WorldWarI pre-UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Calgary, which probably explains why the trope is more common in Canadian shows. One old apocryphal joke had a local lawyer writing the noble father of a remittance man who was convicted of murder and hanged: "I regret to inform Your Lordship that your son has died. He was participating in a public function when the platform gave way."
* A lot of influential figures in Victorian/Edwardian Canada were examples. One major reason why children were shipped off to Canada was because they were an embarasment. embarrassment. While a lot of of them ended badly, a lot just needed an outlet for the insticts instincts that would have driven them to drink and gambling back home. Out in Canada they had good educations, experience in dealing with people and, most importantly, very little to lose.
* "Lord" Phillip Darrell Duppa, English gentry and classically educated but factually no man's or woman's lord, co-founded (with Jack Swilling) two cities in Phoenix.Arizona. The settlement in the Salt River Valley, called by some inhabitants "Salina" and by others "Pumpkinville", was laid out on an ancient network of irrigation canals, built by the Hohokam; he saw that this was a town rising from its own ruins, and suggested naming it for the legendary Phoenix. And he looked down into the adjoining river valley where Arizona State University now stands and thought it looked like a place in Greece he'd once visited, the Vale of Tempe. Until his death in 1892, his family sent him $3000 (then a very tidy sum) on condition that he remain at a decent distance; he is reputed to have drunk most of it.
it.
19th Mar '15 8:07:11 PM nombretomado
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* A sort of truth-in-television example is Frank Dickens, used in the novel (and {{Flashman}} pastiche) ''Dickens of the Mounted''. Frank was the wastrel son of Creator/CharlesDickens and became a member of the Mounted Police in Canada.

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* A sort of truth-in-television example is Frank Dickens, used in the novel (and {{Flashman}} {{Literature/Flashman}} pastiche) ''Dickens of the Mounted''. Frank was the wastrel son of Creator/CharlesDickens and became a member of the Mounted Police in Canada.
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