History Main / ReligionIsWrong

15th May '17 8:56:45 PM Fireblood
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* ''Literature/TheNeanderthalParallax'' reveals that religion (and mystical beliefs generally) is simply the result of magnetic rays affecting people's brains. After the magnetic field around earth reverses polarity, these beliefs at first flare up, and then disappear, causing improvements like peace in the Middle East.

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* ''Literature/TheNeanderthalParallax'' reveals that religion (and mystical beliefs generally) is simply the result of some magnetic rays affecting people's brains. After the magnetic field around earth reverses polarity, these beliefs at first flare up, and then disappear, causing improvements like peace in the Middle East.
14th May '17 11:09:40 PM genisgone
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* In the first episode of ''BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Giles says "The Earth is older than any of you know, and contrary to popular mythology, it did not begin as a paradise".

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* In the first episode of ''BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Giles says "The Earth is older than any of you know, and contrary to popular mythology, it did not begin as a paradise".
24th Apr '17 6:44:00 PM nombretomado
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* The ''TalesSeries'' tends to play around with this one.

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* The ''TalesSeries'' ''VideoGame/TalesSeries'' tends to play around with this one.
20th Apr '17 8:25:02 PM kome360
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* ''VideoGame/HorizonZeroDawn'': The 'gods' of this setting are just highly advanced AI that were tasked with helping humanity AfterTheEnd, but something went horribly wrong and they've been separated from contact with humans for centuries. Nora religion prays to the All-Mother, who is actually their fragmented memory of the caretakers [[spoiler:of the bunker their ancestors were born in, seeing as how androids don't exactly age for a few centuries the colonist children assumed they were immortal]]. Carja just prays to the sun, [[spoiler:but their religion is based on a scientific cosmology book, meaning they've developed a religion based on science and don't realize it]]. It gets disturbingly jarring when you find out that the local human sacrifice altar is [[spoiler:a NASA launch pad built for sending colonists to another planet in wake of the plague]], meaning that the Carja have sacrificed thousands of people in a ruin that was once dedicated to preserving human life, not butchering it with gladiatorial combat.
5th Mar '17 9:38:05 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* Invoked but subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'':

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* Invoked but subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'':''VideoGame/Fallout3'':



** By the time of ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'', the [[BigBad Prophet of Truth]] seems to be fully aware of this, and [[DoubleThink yet still believes that the rings will grant apotheosis.]]

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** By the time of ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'', ''VideoGame/Halo3'', the [[BigBad Prophet of Truth]] seems to be fully aware of this, and [[DoubleThink yet still believes that the rings will grant apotheosis.]]



** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheAbyss'' is probably the most science-fiction-y game in the series and zigzags on this one. The BigBad and his FiveBadBand are a {{Church Militant}}s working to subvert the order they're meant to protect because the church is being manipulated by an ObviouslyEvil douchebag who doesn't realise that blindly following the path laid out for him by the world's deity, Lorelei, will lead humanity extinction... Oh, and the higher-up members of the church partially knew this but kept it secret to avoid a mass panic. [[spoiler:However, this turns out to be only half-correct. Lorelei did indeed foresee the world's destruction, as part of its ComboPlatterPowers relating to the future and destiny, but it actually left the Fonstones (that record the future) behind so that humanity could ''overthrow'' this terrible future and create their own destinies. Sadly, the church didn't quite realise this as they were all blinded by the promise of a prosperous future at the end of ''one'' of the seven Fonstones. Thus, the game's ultimate stance on religion is something like, "Deities are good but religions are ultimately made up of people and, sometimes, people can get it ''horribly'' wrong.]]

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** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheAbyss'' is probably the most science-fiction-y game in the series and zigzags on this one. The BigBad and his FiveBadBand are a {{Church Militant}}s working to subvert the order they're meant to protect because the church is being manipulated by an ObviouslyEvil douchebag who doesn't realise that blindly following the path laid out for him by the world's deity, Lorelei, will lead humanity extinction... Oh, and the higher-up members of the church partially knew this but kept it secret to avoid a mass panic. [[spoiler:However, this turns out to be only half-correct. Lorelei did indeed foresee the world's destruction, as part of its ComboPlatterPowers relating to the future and destiny, but it actually left the Fonstones (that record the future) behind so that humanity could ''overthrow'' this terrible future and create their own destinies. Sadly, the church didn't quite realise this as they were all blinded by the promise of a prosperous future at the end of ''one'' of the seven Fonstones. Thus, the game's ultimate stance on religion is something like, "Deities are good but religions are ultimately made up of people and, sometimes, people can get it ''horribly'' wrong.]]



* Generally speaking, ''WesternAnimation/{{TheSimpsons}}'' tends to parody the concept of organised religion. For example, in one episode, Homer proves that God does not exist mathematically. Flanders destroys the evidence. However, it's much vaguer in most cases as Homer actually gets to meet the Big Man Upstairs on a few occasions, though it's usually in a DreamSequence.

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* Generally speaking, ''WesternAnimation/{{TheSimpsons}}'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' tends to parody the concept of organised religion. For example, in one episode, Homer proves that God does not exist mathematically. Flanders destroys the evidence. However, it's much vaguer in most cases as Homer actually gets to meet the Big Man Upstairs on a few occasions, though it's usually in a DreamSequence.
5th Mar '17 9:31:50 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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** Inverted in the episode where B'Elanna Torres encounters the Klingon afterlife. From an outsider's perspective it is only a {{near death experience}}, but from B'Elanna's point of view and the nature of events imply she really went to Gre'thor, the Klingon hell .

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** Inverted in the episode where B'Elanna Torres encounters the Klingon afterlife. From an outsider's perspective it is only a {{near death experience}}, but from B'Elanna's point of view and the nature of events imply she really went to Gre'thor, the Klingon hell .hell.
5th Mar '17 7:10:27 PM ErichoTOME
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* ''Film/TheInventionOfLying'' features religion as the first lie.
27th Feb '17 1:49:29 AM Laevatein
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* In the first episode of ''BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Giles says "The Earth is older than any of you know, and contrary to popular mythology, it did not begin as a paradise".
27th Feb '17 1:10:02 AM Fireblood
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** A few episodes imply certain religious are correct or at least not all superstitions. The episode "Day of the Dead" had an alien religious festival where the dead could communicate with the living. Many of the characters received visitations from the departed and the station personal were unable to cross into zones designated for the festival. Attempts were made to rationalize it at the end, but none made much sense or were dismissed. A direct dvd release episode featured a being claiming to be the demon Asmodeus claiming God had trapped his kind on Earth. In the end, the only known was to remove him was a spiritual exorcism while on Earth to trap him again. The priest sent to study the case commented on how the lack of finding God among the stars and scientific advancements had made religion almost irrelevant.

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** A few episodes imply certain religious are correct or at least not all superstitions. The episode "Day of the Dead" had an alien religious festival where the dead could communicate with the living. Many of the characters received visitations from the departed and the station personal personnel were unable to cross into zones designated for the festival. Attempts were made to rationalize it at the end, but none made much sense or were dismissed. The Minbari's belief in souls is shown to be correct, including that they reincarnate. The souls could even be seen by some, and even collected. A direct dvd DVD release episode featured a being claiming to be the demon Asmodeus claiming God had trapped his kind on Earth. In the end, the only known was way to remove him was a spiritual exorcism while on Earth to trap him again. The priest sent to study the case commented on how the lack of finding God among the stars and scientific advancements had made religion almost irrelevant.



** However, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henotheism it]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omnism is]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perennial_philosophy by]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monolatrism no]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusivism means]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universalism an]] universal constant of religions.

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** However, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henotheism it]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omnism is]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perennial_philosophy by]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monolatrism no]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusivism means]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universalism an]] a]] universal constant of religions.
27th Feb '17 1:03:49 AM Fireblood
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Notice that most examples come up with some kind of masquerade around a fictional religion, rather than talking about a real-world religion. That's because of the complicated, baroque cease fire negotiated between atheists and religious scholars called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-overlapping_magisteria Non-overlapping magisteria.]] Briefly, this means that modern religions are [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsifiable non-falsifiable:]] They can't be proven wrong, but, in turn, they can't ''make'' any claims that can be proven wrong.

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Notice that most examples come up with some kind of masquerade around a fictional religion, rather than talking about a real-world religion. That's because of the complicated, baroque cease fire negotiated between (some) atheists and religious scholars called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-overlapping_magisteria Non-overlapping magisteria.]] Briefly, this means that modern religions are [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsifiable non-falsifiable:]] They they can't be proven wrong, but, in turn, they can't ''make'' any claims that can be proven wrong.
wrong. Also, because it would offend a lot of people.



* In ''Literature/TheLightOfOtherDays'', the technology is invented to open windows to any point in space and time and watch events as they happened. Amongst other things, Moses never existed, being a composite of various historical figures, and Jesus did exist but never performed any miracles. Although the [[spoiler:darkening of the sun at his crucifixion]] was explained as being the result of [[spoiler:too many people opening windows to see what happened]].
* In Literature/TheSpaceOdysseySeries by Creator/ArthurCClarke, the idea of God apparently comes from the Monolith, specifically the version that uplifted hominids into humanity. In ''3001'', humanity has finally discovered this Monolith (dubbed TMA-0), and traditional religion comes to an end. Curiously, though, many people are still either [[UsefulNotes/{{Deism}} Deists]] (believing in not less than one god) or Theists (believing in not more than one).

to:

* In ''Literature/TheLightOfOtherDays'', the technology is invented to open windows to any point in space and time and watch events as they happened. Amongst Among other things, Moses never existed, being a composite of various historical figures, and Jesus did exist but never performed any miracles. Although the [[spoiler:darkening of the sun at his crucifixion]] was explained as being the result of [[spoiler:too many people opening windows to see what happened]].
* In Literature/TheSpaceOdysseySeries by Creator/ArthurCClarke, the idea of God apparently comes from the Monolith, specifically the version that uplifted hominids into humanity. In ''3001'', humanity has finally discovered this Monolith (dubbed TMA-0), and traditional religion comes to an end. Curiously, though, many people are still either [[UsefulNotes/{{Deism}} Deists]] deists]] (believing in not less than one god) or Theists theists (believing in not more than one).



* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' book ''[[HumansAreBastards Night of the Humans]]'' plays out this trope in a truly bizarre fashion. The Doctor responds to a crash-landed alien race on a massive pile of space-junk that is threatening a nearby planet. This interesting premise is quickly overshadowed by an incredibly unsubtle StrawManPolitical message that turns [[AuthorFilibuster the entire book into one long and extremely dubious]] [[BrokenAesop Aesop]] about how all religion is [[ReligionOfEvil completely eeeeeevil]]. The chosen 'god' of the crashed humans turns out to be [[NightmareFuel a creepy, creepy, clown]] [[{{Squick}} called Gobo]] used as a (very) heavy-handed metaphor for all religion.

to:

* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' book ''[[HumansAreBastards Night of the Humans]]'' plays out this trope in a truly bizarre fashion. The Doctor responds to a crash-landed alien race on a massive pile of space-junk that is threatening a nearby planet. This interesting premise is quickly overshadowed by an incredibly unsubtle StrawManPolitical message that turns [[AuthorFilibuster the entire book into one long and extremely dubious]] [[BrokenAesop Aesop]] aesop]] about how all religion is [[ReligionOfEvil completely eeeeeevil]]. The chosen 'god' of the crashed humans turns out to be [[NightmareFuel a creepy, creepy, clown]] [[{{Squick}} called Gobo]] used as a (very) heavy-handed metaphor for all religion.



* ''Literature/TheNeanderthalParallax'' reveals that religion (and mystical beliefs generally) is simply the result of magnetic rays affecting people's brains. After the magnetic field around earth reverses polarity, these beliefs at first flare up, and then disappear, causing improvements like peace in the Middle East.



** ''Voyager'' also had an episode about Neelix questioning his faith after dying and being resuscitated, which showed him that [[TheNothingAfterDeath there is nothing after death]], instead of the Talaxian afterlife he expected. This, and the visions he saw of his sister telling him that what he believed was all a lie, [[DrivenToSuicide prompts him into committing suicide]] until Chakotay, the Native American believer in spirits in the afterlife, persuades Neelix that he still has things to live for despite what he saw when he was dead, and that he needs to have a stronger faith.
*** The above was written after Lead writer Byran Fuller had a [[CreatorBreakdown nervous break over his Catholic Faith and the fact he finally realized that he was a gay man.]]
** Inverted in the episode where B'Elanna Torres encounters the Klingon afterlife. From an outsider's perspective it is only a near-death experience, but from B'Elanna's point of view and the nature of events imply she really went to Gre'thor, the Klingon hell .

to:

** ''Voyager'' also had an episode about Neelix questioning his faith after dying and being resuscitated, which showed him that [[TheNothingAfterDeath there is nothing after death]], instead of the Talaxian afterlife he expected. This, and the visions he saw of his sister telling him that what he believed was all a lie, [[DrivenToSuicide prompts him into committing suicide]] to decide he'll kill himself]] until Chakotay, the Native American believer in spirits in the afterlife, persuades Neelix that he still has things to live for despite what he saw when he was dead, and that he needs to have a stronger faith.
*** The above was written after Lead writer Byran Fuller had a [[CreatorBreakdown nervous break over his Catholic Faith faith and the fact he finally realized that he was a gay man.]]
** Inverted in the episode where B'Elanna Torres encounters the Klingon afterlife. From an outsider's perspective it is only a near-death experience, {{near death experience}}, but from B'Elanna's point of view and the nature of events imply she really went to Gre'thor, the Klingon hell .



%%* The most egregious example in the whole of ''Trek'' has to be the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Who Watches the Watchers". In it, the ''Enterprise'' crew accidentally injure a member of a primitive society and take him back to the ship for treatment. When he recovers consciousness and sees Picard, he decides the captain is God and manages to convince the rest of his people to worship him. Cue Picard and co sitting in the observation lounge going "[[WesternAnimation/SouthPark Religion is bad. Don't follow a religion. 'Cos religion is bad.]]" Creator/GeneRoddenberry expected the episode to be controversial but it had so little relevance to real world religion that no one cared.

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%%* ** The most egregious example in the whole of ''Trek'' has to be the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Who Watches the Watchers". In it, the ''Enterprise'' crew accidentally injure a member of a primitive society and take him back to the ship for treatment. When he recovers consciousness and sees Picard, he decides the captain is God and manages to convince the rest of his people to worship him. Cue Picard and co co. sitting in the observation lounge going "[[WesternAnimation/SouthPark Religion is bad. Don't follow a religion. 'Cos religion is bad.]]" Creator/GeneRoddenberry expected the episode to be controversial but it had so little relevance to real world religion that no one cared. The attitudes in it have also [[CanonDiscontinuity never been repeated since]] in any other ''Star Trek'' work.
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