History Main / ReformulatedGame

14th Dec '17 3:58:06 AM jormis29
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* ''The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends'' lampshades this in the intro for the SNES version:

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* ''The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends'' ''VideoGame/TheAdventuresOfRockyAndBullwinkleAndFriends'' lampshades this in the intro for the SNES version:
8th Dec '17 1:15:56 AM Cryoclaste
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* ''Powerslave'' ([[MarketBasedTitle also known as]] ''Exhumed'' in Europe and ''Year 1999: Return of the Pharaoh'' in Japan) was released for the PC, [=PlayStation=], and UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn, and although the three versions were released together, development started on the PC using the Build engine, best known for powering ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D''. Lobotomy Software then decided to try their luck on consoles but, upon realizing a straight port was impossible, they developed the Slavedriver engine and ended up making practically another game. While PC ''Powerslave'' is forgettable and has overly long, boring levels, console ''Powerslave'' is one of the best early console [[FirstPersonShooter FPSes]], and loses some nicer textures in favor of faster action, full 3D movement and smaller, open-ended levels with new weapons and abilities to discover in order to advance, predating ''MetroidPrime'' by over five years. Also, in a fun twist of irony, Slavedriver would later be used to port ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn.

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* ''Powerslave'' ([[MarketBasedTitle also known as]] ''Exhumed'' in Europe and ''Year 1999: Return of the Pharaoh'' in Japan) was released for the PC, [=PlayStation=], and UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn, and although the three versions were released together, development started on the PC using the Build engine, best known for powering ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D''. Lobotomy Software then decided to try their luck on consoles but, upon realizing a straight port was impossible, they developed the Slavedriver engine and ended up making practically another game. While PC ''Powerslave'' is forgettable and has overly long, boring levels, console ''Powerslave'' is one of the best early console [[FirstPersonShooter FPSes]], and loses some nicer textures in favor of faster action, full 3D movement and smaller, open-ended levels with new weapons and abilities to discover in order to advance, predating ''MetroidPrime'' ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'' by over five years. Also, in a fun twist of irony, Slavedriver would later be used to port ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn.
20th Nov '17 6:20:03 PM klausbaudelaire
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* The [=PS2=] and Xbox releases of ''VideoGame/MafiaTheCityOfLostHeaven'' were drastically cut down due to memory limitations, though it can be partly blamed on how the levels were loaded as opposed to the engines used in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto''.
16th Nov '17 4:26:35 PM Midna
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' received two separate {{licensed game}}s from Konami, one for the Super NES, one for the Genesis (which received a stripped-down Game Boy port courtesy of Factor 5). They share some gameplay elements and themes in common, but are otherwise completely different down to the plot, with the Genesis game being a much more traditional platformer.
9th Nov '17 10:22:56 AM DragonRanger
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A less extreme version of this is VersionExclusiveContent, where different platforms get different extra features but are still ultimately the same game. Also related to UpdatedRerelease and RegionalBonus.



* The fourth ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' game was produced for both the Wii U and 3DS. Care was taken to make sure both played the same and had the same character roster - restrictions of the less-powerful 3DS hardware meant certain characters had to be changed or cut, even on the Wii U - but both versions had exclusive stages and secondary game modes (Smash Run on 3DS, Smash Tour on Wii U).

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* The fourth ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' game was produced for both the Wii U and 3DS. Care was taken to make sure both played the same and had the same character roster - restrictions of the less-powerful 3DS hardware meant certain characters had to be changed or cut, even on the Wii U - but both versions had exclusive stages and secondary game modes (Smash Run on 3DS, Smash Tour on Wii U).U), plus the Wii U supported eight-man multiplayer (where the 3DS was limited to four) and it had a LevelEditor.
6th Nov '17 12:20:34 AM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/FightersHistory: Mochizuki Kiki Ippatsu'' ("Mochizuki In The Nick of Time") for the Super Famicom started development as a port of the Neo-Geo based ''Fighter's History Dynamite'', but ended up evolving into a stand-alone game. ''Mochizuki Kiki Ippatsu'' lacks five of the fighters from the ''Dynamite'' roster (namely Ray, Jean, Marstorius, Matlok, and Samchay), but makes up for it by adding a new story mode with Chelnov (from the Data East game of the same name) as the final boss.

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* ''VideoGame/FightersHistory: Mochizuki Kiki Ippatsu'' ("Mochizuki In The Nick of Time") for the Super Famicom started development as a port of the Neo-Geo based ''Fighter's History Dynamite'', but ended up evolving into a stand-alone game. ''Mochizuki Kiki Ippatsu'' lacks five of the fighters from the ''Dynamite'' roster (namely Ray, Jean, Marstorius, Matlok, and Samchay), but makes up for it by adding a new story mode with Chelnov (from the Data East Creator/DataEast [[VideoGame/{{Chelnov}} game of the same name) name]]) as the final boss.
24th Sep '17 11:57:09 PM GendoIkari
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* ''The Second Samurai'' was released on the UsefulNotes/Amiga in 1993 and is similar to the first episode, both in the visual style (including a main character who looks a bit goofy) and in the large levels full of collectables. The UsefulNotes/MegaDrive version, released in 1994, is a brand new game with a completely different visual style, new music, and less open levels with a more arcadey gameplay. The two versions have basically just three bosses and an UnexpectedShmupLevel in common.

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* ''The Second Samurai'' was released on the UsefulNotes/Amiga UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} in 1993 and is rather similar to the first episode, both in the visual style (including a main character who looks a bit goofy) and in the large levels full of collectables. The UsefulNotes/MegaDrive version, released in 1994, is a brand new game with a completely different visual style, new music, and less open levels with a more arcadey gameplay. The two versions have basically just three bosses and an UnexpectedShmupLevel in common.
24th Sep '17 11:28:41 PM GendoIkari
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* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' featured new traps, new enemies and {{Boss Battle}}s, and redesigned or completely new levels, on the SNES.

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* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' featured new traps, new enemies had already several ports by the time it was released on the SNES, but all of them touched just the graphics and {{Boss Battle}}s, and sound. This one features redesigned or completely new levels, on the SNES.new traps, new enemies and even {{Boss Battle}}s, and has a time limit raised to two hours.
24th Sep '17 11:00:30 PM GendoIkari
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Bringing a game to another platform [[PortingDisaster often doesn't end well]]; less frequently, [[PolishedPort the port is better]] or, at least, nothing that makes you miss the original. Some titles, however, cannot be considered simple ports - they're closer to completely new games. Important features are added (or missing); the mechanics has had substantial changes; most or all levels are changed; the visuals may have undergone a radical facelift; it may even [[GenreShift belong to a different genre]] now. In the end, even if they are ''supposed'' to be the same game (and the publisher markets them as such), they share only the basic characters, stories, and maybe the fundamental elements. You may be a veteran of a game and still find a fresh challenge in the new version - the package is the same but the ingredients are not, or are mixed in a way to give a new flavor.

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Bringing a game to another platform [[PortingDisaster often doesn't end well]]; less frequently, [[PolishedPort the port is better]] or, at least, nothing that makes you miss the original. Some titles, however, cannot be considered simple ports - they're closer to completely new games. Important features are added (or missing); the mechanics has had have gone through substantial changes; most or all levels are changed; the visuals may have undergone a radical facelift; it may even [[GenreShift belong to a different genre]] now. In the end, even if they are ''supposed'' to be the same game (and the publisher markets them as such), they share only the basic characters, stories, and maybe the fundamental elements. You may be a veteran of a game and still find a fresh challenge in the new version - the package is the same but the ingredients are not, or are mixed in a way to give that gives a new flavor.


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* ''The Second Samurai'' was released on the UsefulNotes/Amiga in 1993 and is similar to the first episode, both in the visual style (including a main character who looks a bit goofy) and in the large levels full of collectables. The UsefulNotes/MegaDrive version, released in 1994, is a brand new game with a completely different visual style, new music, and less open levels with a more arcadey gameplay. The two versions have basically just three bosses and an UnexpectedShmupLevel in common.
22nd Sep '17 7:49:36 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Astyanax}}'' (aka ''The Lord of King'') was released for the Arcade and NES at the same time, and both versions were completely different right down to their very plot. Whereas the hero in the arcade version was a medieval barbarian-like warrior who finds the legendary Fire Axe, the protagonist in the NES game is an ordinary high school student who is transported to a fantasy setting.

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* ''{{Astyanax}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Astyanax}}'' (aka ''The Lord of King'') was released for the Arcade and NES at the same time, and both versions were completely different right down to their very plot. Whereas the hero in the arcade version was a medieval barbarian-like warrior who finds the legendary Fire Axe, the protagonist in the NES game is an ordinary high school student who is transported to a fantasy setting.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ReformulatedGame