History Main / ReformulatedGame

5th Feb '16 6:30:33 PM nombretomado
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* ''Booby Kids'', an {{arcade game}} by Nichibutsu, was ported to the Famicom as ''Kid no Hore Hore Daisakusen'', replacing the temporary secondary weapons with collectible ''VideoGame/BomberMan''-like bombs, redid the levels to be less mazelike, and altered the treasure chests into items appropriate to each stage. ''Cratermaze'' for the UsefulNotes/{{TurboGrafx-16}} is a more faithful port, although its PC Engine counterpart was [[DolledUpInstallment dolled-up]] as a ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' game.
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* ''Booby Kids'', an {{arcade UsefulNotes/{{arcade game}} by Nichibutsu, was ported to the Famicom as ''Kid no Hore Hore Daisakusen'', replacing the temporary secondary weapons with collectible ''VideoGame/BomberMan''-like bombs, redid the levels to be less mazelike, and altered the treasure chests into items appropriate to each stage. ''Cratermaze'' for the UsefulNotes/{{TurboGrafx-16}} is a more faithful port, although its PC Engine counterpart was [[DolledUpInstallment dolled-up]] as a ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' game.

* ''VideoGame/SuperDodgeBall'' (aka ''Nekketsu Kōkō Dodgeball Bu'') is vastly different on the NES from the original ArcadeGame. In the arcade version, the player's team consisted of one adult character as the captain and three children. Only the adult characters have power shots and the health gauges shows the number of team members remaining rather than the health of each character. In the NES version, everyone is now the same size, but each player (not just captains, but all the members of a team) now have two power shots, individual stats and health gauges. The NES version also adds two new foreign teams not in the arcade version: India and Russia.
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* ''VideoGame/SuperDodgeBall'' (aka ''Nekketsu Kōkō Dodgeball Bu'') is vastly different on the NES from the original ArcadeGame.UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame. In the arcade version, the player's team consisted of one adult character as the captain and three children. Only the adult characters have power shots and the health gauges shows the number of team members remaining rather than the health of each character. In the NES version, everyone is now the same size, but each player (not just captains, but all the members of a team) now have two power shots, individual stats and health gauges. The NES version also adds two new foreign teams not in the arcade version: India and Russia.
29th Jan '16 7:47:40 PM jormis29
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* The UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy: The Mis-Edventures'' is drastically different than the console versions of the game (due to limitations on the GBA), although some plot points are remained. For starters, the first and second missions are swapped: in the console versions you do the watercooler-related mission first and then proceed to do the mission that involved Jimmy's party; in the GBA version, the party mission is now the first (and even then it was altered, as you are no longer going through a sewer), followed by the watercooler-related mission. A brand-new mission has also been added to the GBA version that was not present in the console versions.
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* The UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy: The Mis-Edventures'' ''VideoGame/EdEddNEddyTheMisEdVentures'' is drastically different than the console versions of the game (due to limitations on the GBA), although some plot points are remained. For starters, the first and second missions are swapped: in the console versions you do the watercooler-related mission first and then proceed to do the mission that involved Jimmy's party; in the GBA version, the party mission is now the first (and even then it was altered, as you are no longer going through a sewer), followed by the watercooler-related mission. A brand-new mission has also been added to the GBA version that was not present in the console versions.
21st Jan '16 4:12:37 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[VideoGame/MeatBoy Super Meat Boy Forever]]'' is a reformulated version of the original ''Super Meat Boy'', specifically designed for mobile devices in order to avoid turning the original game into a PortingDisaster. It is not exclusive to phones/touch screens, however, as it is also available on {{Steam}}.
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* ''[[VideoGame/MeatBoy Super Meat Boy Forever]]'' is a reformulated version of the original ''Super Meat Boy'', specifically designed for mobile devices in order to avoid turning the original game into a PortingDisaster. It is not exclusive to phones/touch screens, however, as it is also available on {{Steam}}.UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}.
21st Dec '15 9:20:48 AM ButterKing4Ever
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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} at the Olympic Games'' was identical between the PC and console version (bar some graphical differences), with the exception of the NintendoDS release: the ActionAdventure segments are removed entirely, leaving only the Olympic Games proper and making it a ''Track & Field'' clone. There are, however, many more events than the ones found in the other versions.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} ** ''Asterix at the Olympic Games'' was identical between the PC and console version (bar some graphical differences), with the exception of the NintendoDS release: the ActionAdventure segments are removed entirely, leaving only the Olympic Games proper and making it a ''Track & Field'' clone. There are, however, many more events than the ones found in the other versions.
19th Dec '15 5:16:50 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/StarTrader'' was a PC88 ShootEmUp with many cutscenes, adventure portions and a non-linear plot - unfortunately the shooting part, which was supposed to be still its core, was done badly. A later SharpX68000 version has much better graphics and mechanics but is just a straight shooter.
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* ''VideoGame/StarTrader'' was a PC88 ShootEmUp with many cutscenes, adventure portions and a non-linear plot - unfortunately the shooting part, which was supposed to be still its core, was done badly. A later SharpX68000 UsefulNotes/SharpX68000 version has much better graphics and mechanics but is just a straight shooter.
17th Dec '15 8:16:35 AM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/GameBoy ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong94'' is [[NostalgiaLevel rather familiar]] for the first four levels, but afterwards, the rest of the game shifts into PuzzlePlatformer mode with keys, switches and movable ladders and platforms. The physics from the original arcade version are (mostly) intact though, although greatly expanded upon. Many consider this to be the best version of Donkey Kong, and the ''VideoGame/MarioVsDonkeyKong'' games are successors to this version of Donkey Kong.
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* The UsefulNotes/GameBoy ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong94'' is [[NostalgiaLevel rather familiar]] for the first four levels, but afterwards, the rest of the game shifts into PuzzlePlatformer mode with keys, switches and movable ladders and platforms. The physics from the original arcade version are (mostly) intact though, although greatly expanded upon. Many consider this to be the best version of Donkey Kong, and the original ''VideoGame/MarioVsDonkeyKong'' games are successors for the GBA is a successor to this version of Donkey Kong.''Donkey Kong''.

* ''VideoGame/{{Shinobi}}'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem gives the player a health gauge (instead of making him a OneHitPointWonder), adds more melee and ranged weapons, and changed the input method for Musashi's ninjutsu techniques (due to the lack of a third button). It also made the bonus rounds more frequent and changed their purpose from gaining extra lives to accumulating ninjutsu techniques. ** ''Shadow Dancer'' on the Genesis was also vastly different from the arcade game. Whereas the play mechanics remained almost identical to the arcade version, the stages were completely different along with all of the bosses (although some of them were similar to their arcade counterparts). There was also a Master System version released around the same time in Europe that was much closer to the arcade version, but featured only 8 of the arcade version's 15 stages (counting the boss battles, so in reality there are only four stages) and reduced the role of the player's canine companion to a special attack only.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Shinobi}}'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem gives the player a health gauge (instead of making him a OneHitPointWonder), adds more melee and ranged weapons, and changed the input method for Musashi's ninjutsu techniques (due to the lack of a third button). It also made the bonus rounds more frequent (occurring between stages, rather than after boss battles) and changed their purpose from gaining extra lives to accumulating ninjutsu techniques. ** ''Shadow Dancer'' on the Genesis was also vastly different from the arcade game. Whereas the play mechanics remained almost identical to the arcade version, the stages were completely different along with all and only two of the four bosses (although some of them (a fire-breathing armored warrior and a sawblade-wielding female assassin) were similar to their arcade counterparts).kept from the arcade. There was also a Master System version released around the same time in Europe that was much closer to the arcade version, but featured only 8 of the arcade version's 15 stages (counting the boss battles, so in reality there are only four stages) and reduced the role of the player's canine companion to a special attack only.
17th Dec '15 7:58:32 AM Saurubiker
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* Both MSX and NES versions of ''VideoGame/YieArKungFu'' are completely different from the arcade original. They feature lesser and ''completely new'' character rosters, a ''completely new'' stage and different victory poses, including a new pose for the NES version.

* ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden'' was simultaneously produced for the arcade and NES by {{Tecmo}}, and ultimately two completely different games were created. While the arcade version is a 2-player BeatEmUp with emphasis on acrobatic moves (the joystick had an action button on top for grabbing ledges), the NES version is a ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}''-style side-scrolling platformer with a wall hanging play mechanic and cinematic sequences.
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* ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden'' was simultaneously produced for the arcade and NES by {{Tecmo}}, and ultimately two completely different games were created. While the arcade version is a 2-player BeatEmUp with emphasis on acrobatic moves (the joystick had an action button on top for grabbing ledges), the NES version is a ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}''-style side-scrolling platformer with a wall hanging play mechanic and cinematic sequences.sequences between stages.

* ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}'' was produced as a collaboration between Capcom and Motomiya Kikaku that resulted in a one-volume manga and two video games, a console version for the Famicom and an arcade version for the CP System hardware. The ''Strider'' arcade game is easily the most successful of these projects, being ported to a variety of other platforms such as the Genesis, [=X68000=] and PC Engine years after its original release, despite deviating completely from the other versions of the ''Strider'' story. The manga is virtually forgotten now, having never been re-released after its original 1988 printing, and the Famicom version was inexplicably canceled in Japan despite being announced before the arcade version, although it did see a U.S. release for the NES.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}'' was produced as a collaboration between Capcom and Motomiya Kikaku that resulted in a one-volume manga and two video games, a console version for the Famicom and an arcade version for the CP System hardware. The ''Strider'' arcade game is easily the most successful of these projects, being ported to a variety of other platforms such as the Genesis, [=X68000=] and [=X68000=], PC Engine and [=PlayStation=] years after its original release, despite deviating completely from the other versions of the ''Strider'' story. The manga is virtually forgotten now, having never been re-released after its original 1988 printing, and the Famicom version was inexplicably canceled in Japan despite being announced before the arcade version, although it did see a U.S. release for the NES.

* ''Tenchi o Kurau'' (The Devouring of Heaven and Earth), Hiroshi Motomiya's manga adaptation of the ''Three Kingdoms'' tale, was adapted into video game format by Capcom. Like ''Willow'' and ''Nemo'', they released two games at the same time: the arcade version was an action game where players fought enemies while riding on a horseback, whereas the Famicom version was an RPG. Both games were released overseas under the titles of ''Dynasty Wars'' and ''Destiny of an Emperor'' respectively.
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* ''Tenchi o Kurau'' (The Devouring of Heaven and Earth), Hiroshi Motomiya's manga adaptation of the ''Three Kingdoms'' tale, was adapted into video game format by Capcom. Like ''Willow'' and ''Nemo'', they released two games at the same time: the arcade version was an a side-scrolling action game where players fought enemies while riding on a horseback, whereas the Famicom version was an RPG.RPG similar to ''Dragon Quest''. Both games were released overseas under the titles of ''Dynasty Wars'' and ''Destiny of an Emperor'' respectively.

* ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' originally began development as a Commodore 64 game by Rainbow Arts. Factor 5, who were working on the Amiga version, originally planned their version as a straight port, but then they decided to make it a completely different game in order to utilize the Amiga's specs to its full potential. ''Turrican 2'' was developed in a similar matter.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' originally began development as a Commodore 64 game by Rainbow Arts. Factor 5, who were working on the Amiga version, originally planned their version as a straight port, but then they decided to make it a rework the game completely different game in order to utilize the Amiga's specs to its full potential. ''Turrican 2'' was developed in a similar matter.

* ''VideoGame/{{Ys}} IV'' was developed at the same time for the PCEngine and SuperFamicom. Both versions were developed by separate companies based on a rough outline written by NihonFalcom. There was also a third version planned for the UsefulNotes/MegaDrive that ended up being canceled.

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* ''VideoGame/YieArKungFu'' on the MSX and Famicom are completely different from the arcade original. They feature completely new opponents for the players, a completely new stage and different victory poses, including a new pose for the FC version. * ''VideoGame/{{Ys}} IV'' was developed at the same time for the PCEngine and SuperFamicom. Both versions were developed by separate companies based on a rough outline written provided by NihonFalcom.NihonFalcom, who developed the prior ''Ys'' games. There was also a third version planned for the UsefulNotes/MegaDrive that ended up being canceled.
17th Dec '15 7:33:31 AM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/BionicCommando'' on the arcades was a side-scrolling action platformer with a gameplay gimmick involving the use a wire to jump over obstacles instead of a jump button. The NES version, while retaining the wire-swinging gimmick, is a non-linear action game that alternates between classic side-scrolling action, ''Commando''-style overhead segments, and [[BreatherLevel neutral zones to take a breather]] and find useful items and information, while having a complex plot with an [[FamilyUnfriendlyDeath incredibly graphic villain death]] that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar wasn't censored]]. It's considered among the best action games for the NES and, unsurprisingly, it is the version that was remade as ''Bionic Commando: Rearmed'' in 2008. However, this is technically a subversion since the NES game is a sequel to the arcade game. In Japan, the game titles are ''Top Secret'' (Arcade) and ''Hitler's Revival: Top Secret'' (NES).
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* ''VideoGame/BionicCommando'' on the arcades was a side-scrolling action platformer with a gameplay gimmick involving the use a wire to jump over obstacles instead of a jump button. The NES version, while retaining the wire-swinging gimmick, is a non-linear action game that alternates between classic side-scrolling action, ''Commando''-style overhead segments, and [[BreatherLevel neutral zones to take a breather]] and find useful items and information, while having a complex plot with an [[FamilyUnfriendlyDeath incredibly graphic villain death]] that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar wasn't censored]]. It's considered among the best action games for the NES and, unsurprisingly, it is the version that was remade as ''Bionic Commando: Rearmed'' in 2008. However, this is technically a subversion since the NES game is a sequel to the arcade game. In Japan, where the game titles are original ''Bionic Commando'' was titled ''Top Secret'' (Arcade) and ''Hitler's Revival: Top Secret'' (NES).Secret'', the Famicom version was .

* ''Booby Kids'', an {{arcade game}} by Nichibutsu, was ported to the Famicom as ''Kid no Hore Hore Daisakusen'', replacing the temporary secondary weapons with collectible ''VideoGame/BomberMan''-like bombs, redid the levels to be less mazelike, and altered the treasure chests into items appropriate to each stage. ''Cratermaze'' for the TurboGrafx16 is a more faithful port, though the PC Engine release was [[DolledUpInstallment dolled-up]] as a ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' game. * ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDraculaX'' (aka ''Vampire's Kiss'') was an SNES adaptation of the PCEngine [=Super CD-ROM2=] classic ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood''. The fact that the porting team only had 16 Megabits to work with (the standard ROM size for most SNES games at the time) ensured that it was never going to be a straight port, even with the voice-acted cutscenes removed and music redone to save space. Instead, the developers took the basic plot and gameplay system from the original and developed an entirely new set of stages around them.
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* ''Booby Kids'', an {{arcade game}} by Nichibutsu, was ported to the Famicom as ''Kid no Hore Hore Daisakusen'', replacing the temporary secondary weapons with collectible ''VideoGame/BomberMan''-like bombs, redid the levels to be less mazelike, and altered the treasure chests into items appropriate to each stage. ''Cratermaze'' for the TurboGrafx16 UsefulNotes/{{TurboGrafx-16}} is a more faithful port, though the although its PC Engine release counterpart was [[DolledUpInstallment dolled-up]] as a ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' game. * ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDraculaX'' (aka ''Vampire's Kiss'') was an SNES adaptation of the PCEngine [=Super CD-ROM2=] classic ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood''.''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood Dracula X: Chi no Rondo]]''. The fact that the porting team only had 16 Megabits to work with (the standard ROM size for most SNES games at the time) ensured that it was never going to be a straight port, even with the voice-acted cutscenes removed and music redone to save space. Instead, the developers took the basic plot and gameplay system from the original and developed an entirely new set of stages around them.
3rd Dec '15 4:39:37 PM nombretomado
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* ''Miracle Warriors: Seal of the Dark Lord'' was a MasterSystem port of the [=PC88=] RPG ''Haja no Fūin'' ("Seal of the Dark Lord") by Kogado Studio (which was also released for other formats as the [=MSX2=] and Famicom). The Master System version added a larger overworld and explorable towns.
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* ''Miracle Warriors: Seal of the Dark Lord'' was a MasterSystem UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem port of the [=PC88=] RPG ''Haja no Fūin'' ("Seal of the Dark Lord") by Kogado Studio (which was also released for other formats as the [=MSX2=] and Famicom). The Master System version added a larger overworld and explorable towns.

* ''VideoGame/{{Shinobi}}'' on the UsefulNotes/MasterSystem gives the player a health gauge (instead of making him a OneHitPointWonder), adds more melee and ranged weapons, and changed the input method for Musashi's ninjutsu techniques (due to the lack of a third button). It also made the bonus rounds more frequent and changed their purpose from gaining extra lives to accumulating ninjutsu techniques.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Shinobi}}'' on the UsefulNotes/MasterSystem UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem gives the player a health gauge (instead of making him a OneHitPointWonder), adds more melee and ranged weapons, and changed the input method for Musashi's ninjutsu techniques (due to the lack of a third button). It also made the bonus rounds more frequent and changed their purpose from gaining extra lives to accumulating ninjutsu techniques.

* ''VideoGame/StreetsOfRage'' was a side-scrolling BeatEmUp for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis that was later ported to the MasterSystem and GameGear. Despite the fact that the Master System and Game Gear are virtually identical in terms of hardware specs, the two 8-bit versions of the game were substantially different from each other rather being ports of the same game. Particularly, the SMS version featured all three playable characters (the GG version was missing Adam), whereas the GG version had a 2-players mode via link cable (the SMS version was 1-Player). The SMS and GG versions of the sequel (''Streets of Rage 2'') were also different from each other.
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* ''VideoGame/StreetsOfRage'' was a side-scrolling BeatEmUp for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis that was later ported to the MasterSystem UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem and GameGear.UsefulNotes/GameGear. Despite the fact that the Master System and Game Gear are virtually identical in terms of hardware specs, the two 8-bit versions of the game were substantially different from each other rather being ports of the same game. Particularly, the SMS version featured all three playable characters (the GG version was missing Adam), whereas the GG version had a 2-players mode via link cable (the SMS version was 1-Player). The SMS and GG versions of the sequel (''Streets of Rage 2'') were also different from each other.

** The two ''Film/BatmanReturns'' games developed by Konami, one for the NES and the other for the SNES, were both side-scrolling beat-'em-ups, but that's where their similarities ended. Sega also released its own line of ''Batman Returns'' games for the GameGear, MasterSystem, Genesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD. The Sega CD version was a port of the Genesis version with added racing stages, while the Game Gear and Master System versions were almost identical.
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** The two ''Film/BatmanReturns'' games developed by Konami, one for the NES and the other for the SNES, were both side-scrolling beat-'em-ups, but that's where their similarities ended. Sega also released its own line of ''Batman Returns'' games for the GameGear, MasterSystem, UsefulNotes/GameGear, UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem, Genesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD. The Sega CD version was a port of the Genesis version with added racing stages, while the Game Gear and Master System versions were almost identical.

** The later MasterSystem, GameGear and unreleased UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis versions all claim to be "reprogrammed" versions, yet each one is an original game.
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** The later MasterSystem, GameGear UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem, UsefulNotes/GameGear and unreleased UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis versions all claim to be "reprogrammed" versions, yet each one is an original game.

** Sega also produced its own set of ''Rambo III'' games for its consoles. While the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis version of ''Rambo III'' was an overhead action shooter, the MasterSystem version was an ''VideoGame/OperationWolf''-style light gun game that required the Light Phaser gun.
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** Sega also produced its own set of ''Rambo III'' games for its consoles. While the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis version of ''Rambo III'' was an overhead action shooter, the MasterSystem Master System version was an ''VideoGame/OperationWolf''-style light gun game that required the Light Phaser gun.

* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' had 8-bit versions produced for the MasterSystem and GameGear, both of which were radically different from the 16-bit originals on the UsefulNotes/MegaDrive (the 8-bit versions of ''Sonic 2'' actually preceded the 16-bit version in some regions). The more limited hardware didn't allow for the same speed, which resulted in different level layouts, premises and soundtracks. The 8-bit ''Sonic 2'' in particular is pretty much a ''completely different game'' from the Mega Drive one, with completely different levels, enemies and even a ''very'' different ExcusePlot[[note]]Tails is captured and needs to be rescued in the 8-bit version, thereby leaving him as an NPC, whereas he's a playable character in the 16-bit version and follows Sonic around by default[[/note]]; Sonic 1 shares some of its levels between versions, albeit in modified form. Both still hold up well, and the GameGear versions in particular are considered more challenging due to their lower screen resolution and general [[OneHitPointWonder lack of rings during boss fights]].
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* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' had 8-bit versions produced for the MasterSystem UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem and GameGear, UsefulNotes/GameGear, both of which were radically different from the 16-bit originals on the UsefulNotes/MegaDrive (the 8-bit versions of ''Sonic 2'' actually preceded the 16-bit version in some regions). The more limited hardware didn't allow for the same speed, which resulted in different level layouts, premises and soundtracks. The 8-bit ''Sonic 2'' in particular is pretty much a ''completely different game'' from the Mega Drive one, with completely different levels, enemies and even a ''very'' different ExcusePlot[[note]]Tails is captured and needs to be rescued in the 8-bit version, thereby leaving him as an NPC, whereas he's a playable character in the 16-bit version and follows Sonic around by default[[/note]]; Sonic 1 shares some of its levels between versions, albeit in modified form. Both still hold up well, and the GameGear versions in particular are considered more challenging due to their lower screen resolution and general [[OneHitPointWonder lack of rings during boss fights]].
3rd Dec '15 4:38:53 PM nombretomado
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%% * ''Bomber Raid'' - A MasterSystem port of the Sega arcade game ''Sonic Boom''.
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%% * ''Bomber Raid'' - A MasterSystem UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem port of the Sega arcade game ''Sonic Boom''.
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