History Main / ReformulatedGame

3rd Aug '16 1:05:03 AM Midna
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** The Genesis/Mega Drive version by Sunsoft maintained the original 30 stages per difficulty level, but had to deal with the console's lower video RAM. As a result, several stages, mostly early in the game, were cut down in size, while many others were replaced entirely (some of the new stages were notably lifted from the MissionPackSequel ''Oh No! More Lemmings''). To make up for this the game features two new difficulty levels, resulting in the longest

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** The Genesis/Mega Drive version by Sunsoft maintained the original 30 stages per difficulty level, but had to deal with the console's lower video RAM. As a result, several stages, mostly early in the game, were cut down in size, while many others were replaced entirely (some of the new stages were notably lifted from the MissionPackSequel ''Oh No! More Lemmings''). To make up for this the game features two new difficulty levels, resulting in making it considerably longer than any other version of the longestgame.


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* ''VideoGame/TheLionKing'' games for the SNES, Genesis, Game Boy, and NES were all more or less ports of each other of varying quality. The versions released for Game Gear and Master System, though, were essentially completely different games with similar gameplay. Besides the different level design, there is no roar meter, the notorious ostrich rides in The Mane Event are almost completely gone, The Stampede uses the same platforming engine as the rest of the game instead of its own, and Return to Pride Rock is reduced to a BossOnlyLevel.
22nd Jul '16 2:02:01 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''VideoGame/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles'' on the NES came out almost at the same time as Konami's popular [[TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTheArcadeGame arcade beat-'em-up]] of the same title. When Konami decided to adapt the arcade game to the NES as well, they had to retitle that version ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Arcade Game'' to make it clear that it was a different game from the first NES title and a port of the arcade version.

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* ''VideoGame/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles'' on the NES came out almost at the same time as Konami's popular [[TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTheArcadeGame [[VideoGame/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTheArcadeGame arcade beat-'em-up]] of the same title. When Konami decided to adapt the arcade game to the NES as well, they had to retitle that version ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Arcade Game'' to make it clear that it was a different game from the first NES title and a port of the arcade version.



* ''TonyHawksProSkater 3'' and ''4'' both had different versions, one for the [=PS2=]/Xbox/[=GCN=], and one for the [=PS1=] with different goals and levels, done by different companies. The same thing happened again with the [=PS3=]60 version of ''Project Eight'' and ''Proving Ground'' being different to the Wii[=/=][=PS2=] version.
* ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' was a third-person shooter released for the [=PS3=] and [=Xbox 360=]. ''Transformers: Cybertron Adventures'', considered to be the Wii equivalent and having the same characters and story, is a RailShooter.

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* ''TonyHawksProSkater ''VideoGame/TonyHawksProSkater 3'' and ''4'' both had different versions, one for the [=PS2=]/Xbox/[=GCN=], and one for the [=PS1=] with different goals and levels, done by different companies. The same thing happened again with the [=PS3=]60 version of ''Project Eight'' and ''Proving Ground'' being different to the Wii[=/=][=PS2=] version.
* ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' ''VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron'' was a third-person shooter released for the [=PS3=] and [=Xbox 360=]. ''Transformers: Cybertron Adventures'', considered to be the Wii equivalent and having the same characters and story, is a RailShooter.
9th Jul '16 11:42:42 AM nombretomado
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* ''Franchise/{{BIONICLE}}: The Game'' is a typical Third-Person Action-Adventure game on console and PC, with an extremely simplified version of the Bohrok and Mask of Light story arcs. The GameBoyAdvance version is similar, but features all thirteen Toa, has more levels, and does not even bother with a plot.

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* ''Franchise/{{BIONICLE}}: ''VideoGame/{{BIONICLE}}: The Game'' is a typical Third-Person Action-Adventure game on console and PC, with an extremely simplified version of the Bohrok and Mask of Light story arcs. The GameBoyAdvance version is similar, but features all thirteen Toa, has more levels, and does not even bother with a plot.



** The NintendoDS version is a FirstPersonShooter about an [[NoNameGiven unnamed]] silver Matoran-turned-Toa rescuing the Toa Inika, who have been captured by the Piraka and [[BigBad Makuta]].

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** The NintendoDS UsefulNotes/NintendoDS version is a FirstPersonShooter about an [[NoNameGiven unnamed]] silver Matoran-turned-Toa rescuing the Toa Inika, who have been captured by the Piraka and [[BigBad Makuta]].
4th Jun '16 9:34:51 PM nombretomado
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* The Xbox release of ''VideoGame/GhostRecon 2'' is, despite its name, a sequel to the concurrently-developed Gamecube / PS2 version.

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* The Xbox release of ''VideoGame/GhostRecon 2'' is, despite its name, a sequel to the concurrently-developed Gamecube / PS2 [=PS2=] version.



* ''[[VideoGame/HarryPotter Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets]]'' had two radically different versions produced at the same time, one for PC, one for several home consoles including the PS2. The console version was vastly superior both graphically and gameplay-wise. One example: Upon landing at Hogwarts, Harry needs to get past the Whomping Willow. The PC version has him walking around it in a circle as it lazily lifts and lowers its roots. The console version has a full-on boss fight against the tree, where it viciously pounds the earth and even throws the car at you.

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* ''[[VideoGame/HarryPotter Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets]]'' had two radically different versions produced at the same time, one for PC, one for several home consoles including the PS2.[=PS2=]. The console version was vastly superior both graphically and gameplay-wise. One example: Upon landing at Hogwarts, Harry needs to get past the Whomping Willow. The PC version has him walking around it in a circle as it lazily lifts and lowers its roots. The console version has a full-on boss fight against the tree, where it viciously pounds the earth and even throws the car at you.



* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix 3'', despite using some design elements from the PC version, have a completely different story and vastly different gameplay on the Xbox and PS2, being mostly linear single-squad FPS's rather than plan-based with multiple teams.

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* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix 3'', despite using some design elements from the PC version, have a completely different story and vastly different gameplay on the Xbox and PS2, [=PS2=], being mostly linear single-squad FPS's rather than plan-based with multiple teams.



* ''VideoGame/SpiderManWebOfShadows'' - Unlike the main console version, which was a WideOpenSandbox, the PS2/PSP version was a [=2D=] brawler, the DS version was a {{Metroidvania}} (the engine of which would later be reused for ''SpiderManShatteredDimensions''). Each of these versions features its own storyline and more Marvel characters than the free-roaming one for the "bigger" systems.

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* ''VideoGame/SpiderManWebOfShadows'' - Unlike the main console version, which was a WideOpenSandbox, the PS2/PSP [=PS2=]/PSP version was a [=2D=] brawler, the DS version was a {{Metroidvania}} (the engine of which would later be reused for ''SpiderManShatteredDimensions''). Each of these versions features its own storyline and more Marvel characters than the free-roaming one for the "bigger" systems.
29th May '16 6:43:04 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/{{Descent}} Maximum'' used the same graphics engine, music, enemies, and weapons as ''Descent II'' for the PC and Macintosh in its PS1 release, but featured entirely new levels, which were [[ItsShortSoItSucks criticized for being smaller]] ([[WhoForgotTheLights and darker]]) than the PC version's.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Descent}} Maximum'' used the same graphics engine, music, enemies, and weapons as ''Descent II'' for the PC and Macintosh in its PS1 [=PS1=] release, but featured entirely new levels, which were [[ItsShortSoItSucks criticized for being smaller]] ([[WhoForgotTheLights and darker]]) than the PC version's.
28th May '16 10:48:22 AM erforce
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* Takara published GameBoy adaptations of popular Neo-Geo fighting games during the 90s such as ''[[VideoGame/FatalFury Fatal Fury 2]]'', ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'', ''[[VideoGame/WorldHeroes World Heroes 2 Jet]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters The King of Fighters '95]]'', as well as their very own [=PlayStation=] hit ''VideoGame/BattleArenaToshinden''. In Japan, these GB versions were released under the ''Nettō'' or ''Dead Heat Fighters'' branding, but the few that were released overseas were given the same titles as their original counterparts.

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* Takara published GameBoy adaptations of popular Neo-Geo fighting games during the 90s such as ''[[VideoGame/FatalFury Fatal Fury 2]]'', ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'', ''[[VideoGame/WorldHeroes World Heroes 2 Jet]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters The King of Fighters '95]]'', as well as their very own [=PlayStation=] UsefulNotes/PlayStation hit ''VideoGame/BattleArenaToshinden''. In Japan, these GB versions were released under the ''Nettō'' or ''Dead Heat Fighters'' branding, but the few that were released overseas were given the same titles as their original counterparts.



* ''Powerslave'' ([[MarketBasedTitle also known as]] ''Exhumed'' in Europe and ''Year 1999: Return of the Pharaoh'' in Japan) was released for the PC, Playstation, and Saturn, and although the three versions were released together, development started on the PC using the Build engine, best known for powering ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D''. Lobotomy Software then decided to try their luck on consoles but, upon realizing a straight port was impossible, they developed the Slavedriver engine and ended up making practically another game. While PC ''Powerslave'' is forgettable and has overly long, boring levels, console ''Powerslave'' is one of the best early console [[FirstPersonShooter FPSes]], and loses some nicer textures in favor of faster action, full 3D movement and smaller, open-ended levels with new weapons and abilities to discover in order to advance, predating ''MetroidPrime'' by over five years. Also, in a fun twist of irony, Slavedriver would later be used to port ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn.

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* ''Powerslave'' ([[MarketBasedTitle also known as]] ''Exhumed'' in Europe and ''Year 1999: Return of the Pharaoh'' in Japan) was released for the PC, Playstation, [=PlayStation=], and Saturn, UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn, and although the three versions were released together, development started on the PC using the Build engine, best known for powering ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D''. Lobotomy Software then decided to try their luck on consoles but, upon realizing a straight port was impossible, they developed the Slavedriver engine and ended up making practically another game. While PC ''Powerslave'' is forgettable and has overly long, boring levels, console ''Powerslave'' is one of the best early console [[FirstPersonShooter FPSes]], and loses some nicer textures in favor of faster action, full 3D movement and smaller, open-ended levels with new weapons and abilities to discover in order to advance, predating ''MetroidPrime'' by over five years. Also, in a fun twist of irony, Slavedriver would later be used to port ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn.



** Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, PC: practically the same, just some graphical improvements for the latter two, and cutscenes in pre-rendered [=CGI=] instead of the game's engine.

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** Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}}, UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast, PC: practically the same, just some graphical improvements for the latter two, and cutscenes in pre-rendered [=CGI=] instead of the game's engine.
24th May '16 8:21:07 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheForgottenSands''. While the 360/PS3/PC versions are the same game, the Wii version has a different storyline and different powers for the Prince. The PSP version is a 2.5D platformer with yet another storyline.

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* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheForgottenSands''. While the 360/PS3/PC 360/[=PS3=]/PC versions are the same game, the Wii version has a different storyline and different powers for the Prince. The PSP version is a 2.5D platformer with yet another storyline.



* Due to power difference between the different hardware, ''SonicUnleashed'' had two versions in development: 360/PS3 and PS2/Wii. The second had downgraded graphics, no free roaming town areas, shorter and more basic day levels, less worlds and more (infamous) Werehog levels, but the latter featured better controls and a more stable framerate.

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* Due to power difference between the different hardware, ''SonicUnleashed'' had two versions in development: 360/PS3 360/[=PS3=] and PS2/Wii.[=PS2=]/Wii. The second had downgraded graphics, no free roaming town areas, shorter and more basic day levels, less worlds and more (infamous) Werehog levels, but the latter featured better controls and a more stable framerate.



* ''TonyHawksProSkater 3'' and ''4'' both had different versions, one for the [=PS2=]/Xbox/[=GCN=], and one for the [=PS1=] with different goals and levels, done by different companies. The same thing happened again with the PS360 version of ''Project Eight'' and ''Proving Ground'' being different to the Wii[=/=]PS2 version.

to:

* ''TonyHawksProSkater 3'' and ''4'' both had different versions, one for the [=PS2=]/Xbox/[=GCN=], and one for the [=PS1=] with different goals and levels, done by different companies. The same thing happened again with the PS360 [=PS3=]60 version of ''Project Eight'' and ''Proving Ground'' being different to the Wii[=/=]PS2 Wii[=/=][=PS2=] version.
9th May '16 10:36:49 PM erforce
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* ''The {{Terminator}}'' for the UsefulNotes/SegaCD been a straight port of the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis game by the same developer with the addition of a CD-quality soundtrack and grainy cinematic sequences like other Genesis-to-Sega CD. Instead, it is a completely different game with better graphics and improved play mechanics. The manual even specifies that it's more than "just an upgrade."

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* ''The {{Terminator}}'' ''VideoGame/TheTerminator'' for the UsefulNotes/SegaCD been a straight port of the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis game by the same developer with the addition of a CD-quality soundtrack and grainy cinematic sequences like other Genesis-to-Sega CD. Instead, it is a completely different game with better graphics and improved play mechanics. The manual even specifies that it's more than "just an upgrade."
11th Mar '16 7:40:51 AM erforce
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** ''TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTournamentFighters'' was a title used for a set of Konami fighting games released for the NES, SNES and Genesis at the end of 1993. Each version was a unique game featuring its own character roster and fighting system.

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** ''TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTournamentFighters'' ''VideoGame/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTournamentFighters'' was a title used for a set of Konami fighting games released for the NES, SNES and Genesis at the end of 1993. Each version was a unique game featuring its own character roster and fighting system.
13th Feb '16 9:46:01 AM nombretomado
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* The N64 and Dreamcast versions of ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' were at least decent adaptations of the PC version. The PlayStation version, by contrast, was almost completely reprogrammed, which turned out to be [[PortingDisaster disastrous]]. Gone was the tactical planning map and the multiple-team action. Instead, players were limited to using three operatives per mission, who could either be assigned to seperate insertion points or teamed up. AI and play controls were sub-par, and graphics were worse than most first-generation PSX titles.

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* The N64 and Dreamcast versions of ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' were at least decent adaptations of the PC version. The PlayStation [=PlayStation=] version, by contrast, was almost completely reprogrammed, which turned out to be [[PortingDisaster disastrous]]. Gone was the tactical planning map and the multiple-team action. Instead, players were limited to using three operatives per mission, who could either be assigned to seperate insertion points or teamed up. AI and play controls were sub-par, and graphics were worse than most first-generation PSX titles.



* ''World Destruction League'': ''Thunder'' Tanks and ''War Jetz'' were both released simultaneously for the {{PlayStation}} and {{PlayStation 2}}. The two versions have different levels and controls, especially in the case of ''War Jetz''.

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* ''World Destruction League'': ''Thunder'' Tanks and ''War Jetz'' were both released simultaneously for the {{PlayStation}} UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} and {{PlayStation UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}}. The two versions have different levels and controls, especially in the case of ''War Jetz''.
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