History Main / ReformulatedGame

27th Mar '17 2:16:23 PM DragonRanger
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* The first five ''VideoGame/{{Skylanders}}'' games had companion titles for the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS, which were compatible with the same [[RevenueEnhancingDevices toys-to-life figures]] as the console versions but had completely different gameplay and plots. For game five, ''[=SuperChargers=]'', the Wii version qualified as well, being the same as the 3DS version rather than the other console versions. Averted as of the sixth game, ''Imaginators'', where there is only the one version for consoles and no portable companion.
25th Mar '17 1:33:01 PM nombretomado
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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} & Obelix XXL 2'' were released a year after the original [=PS2=] and PC releases on handhelds. While the [=PSP=] version is the same game, the NintendoDS couldn't handle it, so it was changed into a [=2D=] mix of a platformer and brawler.
** ''Asterix at the Olympic Games'' was identical between the PC and console version (bar some graphical differences), with the exception of the NintendoDS release: the ActionAdventure segments are removed entirely, leaving only the Olympic Games proper and making it a ''Track & Field'' clone. There are, however, many more events than the ones found in the other versions.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} & Obelix XXL 2'' were released a year after the original [=PS2=] and PC releases on handhelds. While the [=PSP=] version is the same game, the NintendoDS UsefulNotes/NintendoDS couldn't handle it, so it was changed into a [=2D=] mix of a platformer and brawler.
** ''Asterix at the Olympic Games'' was identical between the PC and console version (bar some graphical differences), with the exception of the NintendoDS UsefulNotes/NintendoDS release: the ActionAdventure segments are removed entirely, leaving only the Olympic Games proper and making it a ''Track & Field'' clone. There are, however, many more events than the ones found in the other versions.



** The GameBoyAdvance versions of Konami's first two ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles'' games based on the [[WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003 2003 series]], as well as the NintendoDS version of ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3: Mutant Nightmare'', were completely different games from their PC and console counterparts.

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** The GameBoyAdvance versions of Konami's first two ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles'' games based on the [[WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003 2003 series]], as well as the NintendoDS UsefulNotes/NintendoDS version of ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3: Mutant Nightmare'', were completely different games from their PC and console counterparts.
15th Mar '17 6:40:47 PM nombretomado
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* ''Golvellius'' was originally a ''Zelda''-style action RPG that switches between overhead and side-scrolling segments, and was developed by Compile on the {{MSX}}. It suffered from extremely bland graphics and sound and falls victim to the system's notorious problems with scrolling. Sega remade the game on the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Master System]] with polished play mechanics, improved graphics, a completely new layout for dungeons and overworld, and some additions like new sub-bosses. Compile took note and made a sequel for the [=MSX2=] titled ''Shin Maō Golvellius'' (nicknamed "Golvellius 2" among non-Japanese speaker), which played very similarly to the Master System version of the original.

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* ''Golvellius'' was originally a ''Zelda''-style action RPG that switches between overhead and side-scrolling segments, and was developed by Compile on the {{MSX}}.{{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. It suffered from extremely bland graphics and sound and falls victim to the system's notorious problems with scrolling. Sega remade the game on the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Master System]] with polished play mechanics, improved graphics, a completely new layout for dungeons and overworld, and some additions like new sub-bosses. Compile took note and made a sequel for the [=MSX2=] titled ''Shin Maō Golvellius'' (nicknamed "Golvellius 2" among non-Japanese speaker), which played very similarly to the Master System version of the original.



* ''VideoGame/NutsAndMilk'' was originally a MazeGame for the {{MSX}}, PC88 and other Japanese home computers; the Famicom version completely redesigned the game around ''Donkey Kong Jr.''-style platforming rather than tunneling.

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* ''VideoGame/NutsAndMilk'' was originally a MazeGame for the {{MSX}}, PC88 {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}, UsefulNotes/PC88 and other Japanese home computers; the Famicom version completely redesigned the game around ''Donkey Kong Jr.''-style platforming rather than tunneling.



* ''VideoGame/{{Zanac}}'' was originally released on the {{MSX}} in several versions with blotchy graphics reminiscent of ''VideoGame/{{Xevious}}'', but was greatly reworked for the NES. The NES version was ported back to the [=MSX2=] as ''Zanac EX''.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Zanac}}'' was originally released on the {{MSX}} {{UsefulNotes/MSX}} in several versions with blotchy graphics reminiscent of ''VideoGame/{{Xevious}}'', but was greatly reworked for the NES. The NES version was ported back to the [=MSX2=] as ''Zanac EX''.
26th Feb '17 2:44:32 PM nombretomado
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* ''Goemon: Shinseidai Shūmei'' ("Goemon: The New Generation") for the [=PlayStation=] and ''Goemon: New Age Shutsudō!!'' (New Age Sailing) for the GameBoyAdvance were essentially the same game, being released two months apart. The two games were part of an unsuccessful attempt by {{Konami}} to reinvent the ''Ganbare Goemon'' franchise (aka ''MysticalNinja'') to younger players around 2001-2002. The GBA version is essentially a watered down version of the PS game, with text and still imagery instead of voice acted cutscenes, along with less stages, but it does have some exclusive content to make up for it.

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* ''Goemon: Shinseidai Shūmei'' ("Goemon: The New Generation") for the [=PlayStation=] and ''Goemon: New Age Shutsudō!!'' (New Age Sailing) for the GameBoyAdvance were essentially the same game, being released two months apart. The two games were part of an unsuccessful attempt by {{Konami}} {{Creator/Konami}} to reinvent the ''Ganbare Goemon'' franchise (aka ''MysticalNinja'') to younger players around 2001-2002. The GBA version is essentially a watered down version of the PS game, with text and still imagery instead of voice acted cutscenes, along with less stages, but it does have some exclusive content to make up for it.
13th Feb '17 9:39:02 PM Saurubiker
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* The N64 and Dreamcast versions of ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' were at least decent adaptations of the PC version. The [=PlayStation=] version, by contrast, was almost completely reprogrammed, which turned out to be [[PortingDisaster disastrous]]. Gone was the tactical planning map and the multiple-team action. Instead, players were limited to using three operatives per mission, who could either be assigned to seperate insertion points or teamed up. AI and play controls were sub-par, and graphics were worse than most first-generation PSX titles.

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* The N64 and Dreamcast versions of ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' were at least decent adaptations of the PC version. The [=PlayStation=] version, by contrast, was almost completely reprogrammed, which turned out to be [[PortingDisaster disastrous]]. Gone was the tactical planning map and the multiple-team action. Instead, players were limited to using three operatives per mission, who could either be assigned to seperate insertion points or teamed up. AI and play controls were sub-par, and graphics were worse than most first-generation PSX early [=PS1=] titles.
6th Feb '17 11:14:38 AM ZombieAladdin
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* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' was originally going to be ported to the {{Wii}} as well, but the people at Sonic Team soon realized they couldn't feasibly do it, even with a graphics downgrade. Instead, the group in charge of the port repurposed what they had and created ''VideoGame/SonicAndTheSecretRings'' out of it.

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* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' was originally going to be ported to the {{Wii}} as well, but the people at Sonic Team soon realized they couldn't feasibly do it, even with a graphics downgrade. Instead, the group in charge of the port repurposed what they had and created ''VideoGame/SonicAndTheSecretRings'' ''[[VideoGame/SonicStorybookSeries Sonic and the Secret Rings]]'' out of it.


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* The mobile version of ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' uses the same characters and graphics as the console version but, due to the nature of mobile devices, requires a completely different control scheme and thus different gameplay as well. Because Lab Zero doesn't have the resources to work on the mobile game ''and'' their current projects, development was outsourced to Hidden Variable Games, and they wound up crafting a mostly separate story from the original version.
6th Feb '17 11:05:48 AM ZombieAladdin
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* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' was originally going to be ported to the {{Wii}} as well, but the people at Sonic Team soon realized they couldn't feasibly do it, even with a graphics downgrade. Instead, the group in charge of the port repurposed what they had and created ''VideoGame/SonicAndTheSecretRings'' out of it.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' recieved completely different adaptations for the SNES and Genesis. The SNES game, by Beam Software, is an isometric action RPG starring an amnesiac named Jake, while the Genesis game, developed by Blue Sky Software, is a ''[[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda Legend of Zelda]]''-style overhead RPG with a protagonist named Joshua avenging the death of his brother.
* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' had 8-bit versions produced for the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem and UsefulNotes/GameGear, both of which were radically different from the 16-bit originals on the UsefulNotes/MegaDrive (the 8-bit versions of ''Sonic 2'' actually preceded the 16-bit version in some regions). The more limited hardware didn't allow for the same speed, which resulted in different level layouts, premises and soundtracks. The 8-bit ''Sonic 2'' in particular is pretty much a ''completely different game'' from the Mega Drive one, with completely different levels, enemies and even a ''very'' different ExcusePlot[[note]]Tails is captured and needs to be rescued in the 8-bit version, thereby leaving him as an NPC, whereas he's a playable character in the 16-bit version and follows Sonic around by default[[/note]]; Sonic 1 shares some of its levels between versions, albeit in modified form. Both still hold up well, and the UsefulNotes/GameGear versions in particular are considered more challenging due to their lower screen resolution and general [[OneHitPointWonder lack of rings during boss fights]].

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' recieved received completely different adaptations for the SNES and Genesis. The SNES game, by Beam Software, is an isometric action RPG starring an amnesiac named Jake, while the Genesis game, developed by Blue Sky Software, is a ''[[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda Legend of Zelda]]''-style overhead RPG with a protagonist named Joshua avenging the death of his brother.
* This has been a pretty common process in the Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog series:
**
''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' had 8-bit versions produced for the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem and UsefulNotes/GameGear, both of which were radically different from the 16-bit originals on the UsefulNotes/MegaDrive (the 8-bit versions of ''Sonic 2'' actually preceded the 16-bit version in some regions). The more limited hardware didn't allow for the same speed, which resulted in different level layouts, premises and soundtracks. The 8-bit ''Sonic 2'' in particular is pretty much a ''completely different game'' from the Mega Drive one, with completely different levels, enemies and even a ''very'' different ExcusePlot[[note]]Tails is captured and needs to be rescued in the 8-bit version, thereby leaving him as an NPC, whereas he's a playable character in the 16-bit version and follows Sonic around by default[[/note]]; Sonic 1 shares some of its levels between versions, albeit in modified form. Both still hold up well, and the UsefulNotes/GameGear versions in particular are considered more challenging due to their lower screen resolution and general [[OneHitPointWonder lack of rings during boss fights]].fights]].
** As ''VideoGame/Sonic3DBlast'' was in production (with pretty similar 16-bit and Sega Saturn versions), another department was working on ''VideoGame/SonicBlast'' (not to be confused with the above-mentioned ''Sonic Blast Man''). The only things they have in common are that Sonic, Eggman, and Knuckles are in both of them. They are otherwise totally different, with different stages, soundtracks, story, and types of platformer (the former being a non-linear 3-D platformer, and the latter being a traditional linear 2-D platformer).
** Between 2010 and 2014, as Sonic Team worked on a main series Sonic game for home systems, Dimps would simultaneously develop a game sharing the title, soundtrack, and story on Nintendo handheld systems. This was the approach to ''VideoGame/SonicColors'', ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'', and ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld''. In all three cases, Dimps would receive basic information, music, and gameplay suggestions from Sonic Team, then Dimps would create their own interpretation. For Dimps's ''Sonic Colors'' and ''Sonic Generations'', the gameplay closely resembled that of the ''VideoGame/SonicRush'' games they previously worked on, though for ''Sonic Lost World'', it was in full 3-D with their own stage layouts and gimmicks.
26th Jan '17 10:35:39 PM Ominae
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* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' received a series of tie-in games around the time the first season ended. Although the versions released for the Nintendo platforms were published by {{Bandai}}, the Sega versions were first-party products. The SuperNES and UsefulNotes/GameBoy versions were both side-scrolling action games, while the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/GameGear versions were fighting games, each completely unique. A UsefulNotes/SegaCD version was also released which was an InteractiveMovie game which used FMV clips from key episodes of the series.

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* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' received a series of tie-in games around the time the first season ended. Although the versions released for the Nintendo platforms were published by {{Bandai}}, Bandai, the Sega versions were first-party products. The SuperNES and UsefulNotes/GameBoy versions were both side-scrolling action games, while the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/GameGear versions were fighting games, each completely unique. A UsefulNotes/SegaCD version was also released which was an InteractiveMovie game which used FMV clips from key episodes of the series.
21st Dec '16 12:59:01 PM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/BionicCommando'' on the arcades was a side-scrolling action platformer with a gameplay gimmick involving the use a wire to jump over obstacles instead of a jump button. The NES version, while retaining the wire-swinging gimmick, is a non-linear action game that alternates between classic side-scrolling action, ''Commando''-style overhead segments, and [[BreatherLevel neutral zones to take a breather]] and find useful items and information, while having a complex plot with an [[FamilyUnfriendlyDeath incredibly graphic villain death]] that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar wasn't censored]]. It's considered among the best action games for the NES and, unsurprisingly, it is the version that was remade as ''Bionic Commando: Rearmed'' in 2008. In Japan, where the original ''Bionic Commando'' was titled ''Top Secret'', the Famicom version was .

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* ''VideoGame/BionicCommando'' on the arcades was a side-scrolling action platformer with a gameplay gimmick involving the use a wire to jump over obstacles instead of a jump button. The NES version, while retaining the wire-swinging gimmick, is a non-linear action game that alternates between classic side-scrolling action, ''Commando''-style overhead segments, and [[BreatherLevel neutral zones to take a breather]] and find useful items and information, while having a complex plot with an [[FamilyUnfriendlyDeath incredibly graphic villain death]] that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar wasn't censored]]. It's considered among the best action games for the NES and, unsurprisingly, it is the version that was remade as ''Bionic Commando: Rearmed'' in 2008. In Japan, where the original ''Bionic Commando'' was titled ''Top Secret'', the Famicom version was .was subtitled ''Hitler no Fukkatsu'' (Hitler's Revival) and was clearly marketed as a different game.
3rd Dec '16 8:29:42 PM Saurubiker
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* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' received a series of tie-in games around the time the first season ended. Although the versions released for the Nintendo platforms were published by {{Bandai}}, the Sega versions were first-party products. Although the SuperNES and UsefulNotes/GameBoy versions were both side-scrolling action games, while the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/GameGear versions were competitive fighting games, they were all completely different from each other. A UsefulNotes/SegaCD version was also released which was an InteractiveMovie game which used FMV clips from key episodes of the series.
** ''[[Film/MightyMorphinPowerRangers MMPR: The Movie]]'' also received its own sets of tie-in games. While the SNES, Game Boy and Game Gear versions were similar to their respective predecesors, the Genesis version was a beat-'em-up that actually covered both, the events of the film and the latter half of Season 2.

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* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' received a series of tie-in games around the time the first season ended. Although the versions released for the Nintendo platforms were published by {{Bandai}}, the Sega versions were first-party products. Although the The SuperNES and UsefulNotes/GameBoy versions were both side-scrolling action games, while the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/GameGear versions were competitive fighting games, they were all each completely different from each other.unique. A UsefulNotes/SegaCD version was also released which was an InteractiveMovie game which used FMV clips from key episodes of the series.
** ''[[Film/MightyMorphinPowerRangers MMPR: The Movie]]'' also received its own sets of tie-in games. While the SNES, Game Boy and Game Gear versions were similar to their respective predecesors, the Genesis version was a side-scrolling beat-'em-up that actually covered both, the events of the film and the latter half of Season 2.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ReformulatedGame