History Main / ReedRichardsIsUseless

21st May '18 8:11:08 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In the JLA story "Divided We Fall", Franchise/TheFlash runs into a type of extradimensional wish-granter named Id, and upon doing so, is wowed by all the possibilities open to him on improving the world, tempted to fix all of life's problems with simple wishes. But he's GenreSavvy enough to know that since Id is a LiteralGenie and has seen the wishes he grants always occur in the most horrible ways (like seeing that a boy's father CameBackWrong because the kid made incorrect wording on his wish), it'd be safer just to turn him down.

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* In the JLA story "Divided We Fall", Franchise/TheFlash runs into a type of extradimensional wish-granter named Id, and upon doing so, is wowed by all the possibilities open to him on improving the world, tempted to fix all of life's problems with simple wishes. But he's GenreSavvy enough to know he knows that since Id is a LiteralGenie and has seen the wishes he grants always occur in the most horrible ways (like seeing that a boy's father CameBackWrong because the kid made incorrect wording on his wish), it'd be safer just to turn him down.



** In the sourcebook ''Immortals'', this trope is justified with regard to the procedures used to keep the Patchwork People alive: the book acknowledges that these techniques would revolutionize health care across the world, but points out that they were developed through horrific experiments on unwilling subjects and require [[HumanResources forcible extraction of necessary parts from live donors]]. The doctors who developed them are GenreSavvy enough to realize that if what they had done ever came to light, they'd be trying to outrun the TorchesAndPitchforks, not stopping by Stockholm to pick up their Nobels. So they prefer to keep it a secret and sell their services to the rich and immoral.

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** In the sourcebook ''Immortals'', this trope is justified with regard to the procedures used to keep the Patchwork People alive: the book acknowledges that these techniques would revolutionize health care across the world, but points out that they were developed through horrific experiments on unwilling subjects and require [[HumanResources forcible extraction of necessary parts from live donors]]. The doctors who developed them are GenreSavvy enough to realize that if what they had done ever came to light, they'd be trying to outrun the TorchesAndPitchforks, not stopping by Stockholm to pick up their Nobels. So they prefer to keep it a secret and sell their services to the rich and immoral.
17th May '18 3:44:17 PM BattleMaster
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* Subverted in ''Film/TheAbsentMindedProfessor'': Brainard immediately tried to sell flubber to the government after he realized its potential, but the {{Obstructive Bureaucrat}}s he got on the phone weren't interested.
3rd May '18 2:40:21 PM merotoker
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* The biggest examples of this trope in DC, or even comics in general, have to be Johnny Thunder and his successor, Jakeem. Here are two guys who had a Genie at their command, with no limitations on the number of wishes, and they only ever used it to fight crime? There was a storyline where he started to feel bad that he wasn't doing more to solve people's non-crime-related problems and--against the advice of his elders in the ComicBook/{{Justice Society|OfAmerica}}--he decided to start granting wishes for anyone who wanted his help. Lines formed around the block, near riots broke out if he tried to take a break; it soon occurred to him that if he kept it up, he would be spending the rest of his life granting other people's wishes 24/7 (hey, he can wish to not have to sleep, right?). The people waiting in line for wishes considered this an acceptable sacrifice; Jakeem, not so much.

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* The biggest examples of this trope in DC, or even comics in general, have to be Johnny Thunder and his successor, Jakeem. Here are two guys who had a Genie [[OurGeniesAreDifferent Genie]] at their command, with no limitations on the number of wishes, and they only ever used it to fight crime? There was a storyline where he started to feel bad that he wasn't doing more to solve people's non-crime-related problems and--against the advice of his elders in the ComicBook/{{Justice Society|OfAmerica}}--he decided to start granting wishes for anyone who wanted his help. Lines formed around the block, near riots broke out if he tried to take a break; it soon occurred to him that if he kept it up, he would be spending the rest of his life granting other people's wishes 24/7 (hey, he can wish to not have to sleep, right?). The people waiting in line for wishes considered this an acceptable sacrifice; Jakeem, not so much.



* Likewise, the Alan Scott Green Lantern was outright terrified of his ring in a few continuities. In a ''Batman: Black and White'' story, he joins Batman in searching a group of gangsters who nearly burned down the Gotham Broadcasting Building. In it, he effortlessly turns Batman invisible, travels back in time to save the gangsters (with zero timeline repercussions), uses the standard Green Lantern constructs, and more. He confesses that he eventually came to fear the sheer power of the ring, and that was the precise reason he abandoned Gotham--the city needs a hero... not a god.

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* Likewise, the Alan Scott Green Lantern was outright terrified of his ring in a few continuities. In a ''Batman: Black and White'' story, he joins Batman in searching for a group of gangsters who nearly burned down the Gotham Broadcasting Building. In it, he effortlessly turns Batman invisible, travels back in time to save the gangsters (with zero timeline repercussions), uses the standard Green Lantern constructs, and more. He confesses that he eventually came to fear the sheer power of the ring, and that was the precise reason he abandoned Gotham--the city needs a hero... not a god.



** The discussion of this trope by the Comedian at the first (and last) [[SuperTeam Crimebusters]] reunion is what [[spoiler: sets the whole plot]]

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** The discussion of this trope by the Comedian at the first (and last) [[SuperTeam Crimebusters]] reunion is what [[spoiler: sets the whole plot]]
plot]].



* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'' has the seemingly retired, former Blue Beetle convincing the current Blue Beetle to help put the alien technology that gives him his powers to greater use via a fleet of perpetual-energy machines and robots that'll irrigate the Sahara, end world hunger and turn the world into a paradise. It doesn't work out that way, but neither Batman nor the Blue Beetle stops to wonder if such a plan really wouldn't be better than just using it to beat up crooks. [[spoiler:The former Blue Beetle was actually dead, this guy was an impostor, and he planned to use the robots to conquer the world.]]

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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'' has the seemingly retired, former Blue Beetle convincing the current Blue Beetle to help put the alien technology that gives him his powers to greater use via a fleet of perpetual-energy machines and robots that'll irrigate the Sahara, end world hunger and turn the world into a paradise. It doesn't work out that way, but neither Batman nor the Blue Beetle stops to wonder if such a plan really wouldn't be better than just using it to beat up crooks. [[spoiler:The former Blue Beetle was actually dead, dead; this guy was an impostor, and he planned to use the robots to conquer the world.]]






** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, the same thing happened with the TropeNamer. Because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' is such a LongRunner, Reed Richards actually invented [[BoringButPractical X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers]] years before any of these appeared in the real world.

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** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, the same thing happened with the TropeNamer. {{Trope Namer|s}}. Because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' is such a LongRunner, {{Long Runner|s}}, Reed Richards actually invented [[BoringButPractical X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers]] years before any of these appeared in the real world.



* Toyed with in ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', where the Phoenix-powered Phoenix Five (ComicBook/{{Cyclops}}, ComicBook/EmmaFrost, [[ComicBook/SubMariner Namor]], Colossus, & [[ComicBook/IllyanaRasputin Magik]]) use their powers to make the world a better place by ending war, starvation, disease, etc. However, the Phoenix Five eventually let the power get to their heads, and their fellow Mutants ultimately turn on them. Furthermore, the Phoenix Five grow increasingly naive, such as Colossus, in wanting to make lives better for the whales, endows them with the ability to walk on land (forgetting that these sea mammals cannot breathe outside of water). Meanwhile, the members of the Illuminati (which contains people like Reed Richards and Black Bolt) justify not getting involved in the conflict by stating that the X-Men might be right, and thus helping the Avengers defeat them could prevent a whole lot of good from being done.

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* Toyed with in ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', where the Phoenix-powered Phoenix Five (ComicBook/{{Cyclops}}, ComicBook/EmmaFrost, [[ComicBook/SubMariner Namor]], Colossus, ComicBook/{{Colossus}}, & [[ComicBook/IllyanaRasputin Magik]]) use their powers to make the world a better place by ending war, starvation, disease, etc. However, the Phoenix Five eventually let the power get to their heads, and their fellow Mutants ultimately turn on them. Furthermore, the Phoenix Five grow increasingly naive, such as Colossus, in wanting to make lives better for the whales, endows them with the ability to walk on land (forgetting that these sea mammals cannot breathe outside of water). Meanwhile, the members of the Illuminati ComicBook/TheIlluminati (which contains people like Reed Richards and Black Bolt) ComicBook/BlackBolt) justify not getting involved in the conflict by stating that the X-Men might be right, and thus helping the Avengers defeat them could prevent a whole lot of good from being done.



* One of the biggest examples of this trope in the Marvel Universe if not superhero comics in general is the original Human Torch, a sentient superpowered android created in 1939 America. Never mind the countless scientific advances needed to create such a device, such creation had NO effect on consumer electronics technology.
** Because the android Human Torch was made up of synthetic flesh and not a machine, although once medicine reached the point of organ transplants it would have made the need for organ donation unnecessary and eliminate the need for waiting lists for organs.

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* One of the biggest examples of this trope in the Marvel Universe if not superhero comics in general is the original Human Torch, a sentient superpowered android created in 1939 America. Never mind the countless scientific advances needed to create such a device, such creation had NO effect on consumer electronics technology.
** Because the
technology. The android Human Torch was made up of synthetic flesh and not a machine, although once medicine reached the point of organ transplants it would have made the need for organ donation unnecessary and eliminate the need for waiting lists for organs.



* In one ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' story, a group of Avengers enter a secret US Government facility in search for answers towards a mysterious contagion that started in Mount Rushmore. As they're looking through computers, Scott Lang finds out that only a few scientists knew the truth of what they were making, that the others thought they were making a cure for HIV and he sadly laments that, with so much money poured into it, they could have.

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* In one ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' story, story of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'', a group of Avengers enter a secret US Government facility in search for answers towards a mysterious contagion that started in Mount Rushmore. As they're looking through computers, [[ComicBook/AntMan Scott Lang Lang]] finds out that only a few scientists knew the truth of what they were making, that the others thought they were making a cure for HIV and he sadly laments that, with so much money poured into it, they could have.



** The lawyer example actually went meta with this trope: While the lawyer was proud of mounting a successful defense he was also very worried about the legal precedent he was setting. The same lawyer (in his role as the {{narrator}}, adressing a classroom some decades later) states that the aforementioned defense caused a major overhaul of legal praxis concerning suspected metahuman involvement and that there is no way that defense would fly in the comic's "present".

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** The lawyer example actually went meta with this trope: While the lawyer was proud of mounting a successful defense he was also very worried about the legal precedent he was setting. The same lawyer (in his role as the {{narrator}}, adressing addressing a classroom some decades later) states that the aforementioned defense caused a major overhaul of legal praxis concerning suspected metahuman involvement and that there is no way that defense would fly in the comic's "present".



** Justified and discussed in ''Film/BlackPanther''. Justified when it is stated that Wakanda doesn't send its tech to the world as they think it will cause war. [[spoiler:This is proven right when Killmonger gets control and starts sending weapons to war dogs in other countries.]] However, many characters think that Wakanda would be able to provide aid and technology on an unprecedented scale, [[spoiler:which is what it starts doing at the end of the film.]]

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** Justified and discussed in ''Film/BlackPanther''. Justified when it is stated that Wakanda doesn't send its tech to the world as they think it will cause war. [[spoiler:This is proven right when Killmonger gets control and starts sending weapons to war dogs in other countries.]] However, many characters think that Wakanda would be able to provide aid and technology on an unprecedented scale, [[spoiler:which is what it starts doing at the end of the film.]]film]].



* Alfred is constantly harping on this trope to Bruce throughout ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', pointing out that if he shared his innovations he could do as much or even more good in Gotham as he tries to as a masked vigilante. Somewhat subverted when a great deal of those innovations are stolen by Bane, including a fusion energy source Bruce had shelved for exactly the reasons it becomes used for. Additionally, the whole reason Bruce was able to get his hands on the tech is because a lot of it was in the "dead end" department, usually things deemed impractical or too costly for mass production. For example, the [[CoolCar Tumbler]]'s purpose was to jump rivers and build temporary bridges. They were able to get the jumping to work but not the bridge-building, so the project was scrapped. The advanced bodysuit was deemed too costly for equipping every single soldier with it. On the other hand, Bruce also has no right to take that stuff, as it belongs to his company and investors rather than him personally (although he does own, at least, a controlling interest in the company and it was started by his father). If it ever comes to light, then he'll be up on embezzlement charges [[note]] A guy does indeed try to blackmail Bruce this way. He backs off when Fox points out that he's BullyingADragon [[/note]].

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* Alfred is constantly harping on this trope to Bruce throughout ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', pointing out that if he shared his innovations he could do as much or even more good in Gotham as he tries to as a masked vigilante. Somewhat subverted when a great deal of those innovations are stolen by Bane, including a fusion energy source Bruce had shelved for exactly the reasons it becomes used for. Additionally, the whole reason Bruce was able to get his hands on the tech is because a lot of it was in the "dead end" department, usually things deemed impractical or too costly for mass production. For example, the [[CoolCar Tumbler]]'s purpose was to jump rivers and build temporary bridges. They were able to get the jumping to work but not the bridge-building, so the project was scrapped. The advanced bodysuit was deemed too costly for equipping every single soldier with it. On the other hand, Bruce also has no right to take that stuff, as it belongs to his company and investors rather than him personally (although he does own, at least, a controlling interest in the company and it was started by his father). If it ever comes to light, then he'll be up on embezzlement charges [[note]] A guy does indeed try to blackmail Bruce this way. He backs off when Fox points out that he's BullyingADragon [[/note]].BullyingADragon[[/note]].



* In the live-action ''Film/{{Casper}}'' movie, it is revealed that Casper's father created a serum that can '''bring back the dead''', but, unfortunately for the characters, there is only one. [[spoiler:It is used to bring Kat's father back after his accidental death.]] Not once does it occur to anyone that they should perhaps give it to a scientist so that the formula could be duplicated.

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* In the live-action ''Film/{{Casper}}'' movie, ''Film/{{Casper}}'', it is revealed that Casper's father created a serum that can '''bring back the dead''', but, unfortunately for the characters, there is only one. [[spoiler:It is used to bring Kat's father back after his accidental death.]] Not once does it occur to anyone that they should perhaps give it to a scientist so that the formula could be duplicated.



* ''Series/PersonOfInterest''. Lampshaded at the beginning of Season 2 when Finch (creator of a supercomputer which analyses all surveillance data in the country so as to predict threats against national security) is kidnapped by sociopathic hacker Root. Root realises that the true implication of the Machine is not its potential misuse as a tool of Big Brother--to successfully predict human actions,Finch has created '''the first true artificial general intelligence'''. Root can't believe that Finch's response to doing this was to BlackBox the system and hand it over to a corrupt and power-hungry US government, and is determined to set the Machine free. By the end of season 3, [[spoiler:Decima Technologies, recognizing the power of the technology, has brought another AGI online in order to [[TakeOverTheWorld take over the world]]]]. The rest of the series explores just how dangerous that kind of technology can be if it falls into the wrong hands. When two [=AGIs=] go to war with each other, thousands of people die. Finch chose to severely limit the Machine's functionality after the first dozens of iterations all tried to kill him after being turned on.

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* ''Series/PersonOfInterest''. Lampshaded at the beginning of Season 2 when Finch (creator of a supercomputer which analyses all surveillance data in the country so as to predict threats against national security) is kidnapped by sociopathic hacker Root. Root realises that the true implication of the Machine is not its potential misuse as a tool of Big Brother--to successfully predict human actions,Finch actions, Finch has created '''the first true artificial general intelligence'''. Root can't believe that Finch's response to doing this was to BlackBox the system and hand it over to a corrupt and power-hungry US government, and is determined to set the Machine free. By the end of season 3, [[spoiler:Decima Technologies, recognizing the power of the technology, has brought another AGI online in order to [[TakeOverTheWorld take over the world]]]]. The rest of the series explores just how dangerous that kind of technology can be if it falls into the wrong hands. When two [=AGIs=] go to war with each other, thousands of people die. Finch chose to severely limit the Machine's functionality after the first dozens of iterations all tried to kill him after being turned on.



** Howard had been established early as being an engineer for NASA and design the toilet on the International Space Station (which apparently had a design flaw they spent an episode trying to fix). This connection with NASA leads him to be chosen as a payload specialist for a new piece of tech going up, with him getting the opportunity to brag about actually being in space.

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** Howard had been established early as being an engineer for NASA and design designs the toilet on the International Space Station (which apparently had a design flaw they spent an episode trying to fix). This connection with NASA leads him to be chosen as a payload specialist for a new piece of tech going up, with him getting the opportunity to brag about actually being in space.



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''

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* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''40000}}'':



* Klungo, Gruntilda's [[TheDragon minion]] from ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'' builds a beauty-swapping machine, he makes a mechanical body for Grunty's spirit to inhabit, he also makes potions for [[MakeMyMonsterGrow growth]], {{invisibility}} and [[DoppelgangerAttack cloning]], and then quits his job and makes a HeelFaceTurn. He could release all his inventions to the public and also continue to use his intellect to benefit his world, yet instead he becomes a video game designer.

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* Klungo, Gruntilda's [[TheDragon minion]] from ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'' builds a beauty-swapping machine, he makes a mechanical body for Grunty's spirit to inhabit, he also makes potions for [[MakeMyMonsterGrow growth]], {{invisibility}} and [[DoppelgangerAttack cloning]], and then quits his job and makes a HeelFaceTurn. He could release all his inventions to the public and also continue to use his intellect to benefit his world, yet instead he becomes a video game designer.



* Deconstructed in ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder'' with [[spoiler: the Da'at Yichud, a secret society of Jewish scientists. They have invented technology hundreds of years ahead of its time, including a functional suit of PowerArmor that can allow a crippled person to walk again, and Set Roth, the surviving member Blascowicz meets, states that they have had a level of technology like this for centuries. So what does the society do with all their fantastical, world changing technology? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. According to Set, they create their technological wonders solely as a form of worship so that they can feel closer to God. There was no point to inventing their machines other than simply inventing them and the scientists are happy to just let them collect dust in their various vaults around the world. This comes back to bite them ''hard'' when the Nazis stumble across one of the Da'at Yichud's vaults and proceed to reverse engineer their works, creating new weaponry that allows them to [[CurbStompBattle easily conquer]] every other nation on Earth and establish themselves as the rulers of the world before the Da'at Yichud can do anything to stop them. In short, the entire plot of the game is a direct consequence of this trope at work]].

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* Deconstructed in ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder'' with [[spoiler: the Da'at Yichud, a secret society of Jewish scientists. They have invented technology hundreds of years ahead of its time, including a functional suit of PowerArmor PoweredArmor that can allow a crippled person to walk again, and Set Roth, the surviving member Blascowicz meets, states that they have had a level of technology like this for centuries. So what does the society do with all their fantastical, world changing technology? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. According to Set, they create their technological wonders solely as a form of worship so that they can feel closer to God. There was no point to inventing their machines other than simply inventing them and the scientists are happy to just let them collect dust in their various vaults around the world. This comes back to bite them ''hard'' when the Nazis stumble across one of the Da'at Yichud's vaults and proceed to reverse engineer their works, creating new weaponry that allows them to [[CurbStompBattle easily conquer]] every other nation on Earth and establish themselves as the rulers of the world before the Da'at Yichud can do anything to stop them. In short, the entire plot of the game is a direct consequence of this trope at work]].



** Timmy never makes any sort of world-benefiting wish, like no discrimination, world peace, a cure for cancer, etc. While this could be justified in that he's a self-centered 10-year-old child and when he grows up all remnants of his fairies' magic will disappear, it seems implausible that he never thought to wish for something like this not even ''once''.
*** Timmy may have tried to do this once, or even more than once. The times he has wished for a situation to be better for someone other than him has blown up in his face.

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** Timmy never makes any sort of world-benefiting wish, like no discrimination, world peace, a cure for cancer, etc. While this could be justified in that he's a self-centered 10-year-old child and when he grows up all remnants of his fairies' magic will disappear, it seems implausible that he never thought to wish for something like this not even ''once''.
***
''once''. Timmy may have tried to do this once, or even more than once. The times he has wished for a situation to be better for someone other than him has blown up in his face.
21st Apr '18 6:48:20 PM Rebu
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* This trope was used to justify Barbara "ComicBook/{{Batgirl}}[=/=]Oracle" Gordon remaining wheelchair-bound despite the ready availability of possible cures. She doesn't want to receive special treatment and therefore dishonor public servants who were disabled in the line of duty; either a cure becomes available for everyone, or she stays in the chair. That raises the question of why the numerous cures can't be made available to the public. The New 52 reboot [[ComicBook/BatGirl2011 changed this]], having her undergo a procedure to restore the use of her legs.

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* This trope was used to justify Barbara "ComicBook/{{Batgirl}}[=/=]Oracle" Gordon remaining wheelchair-bound despite the ready availability of possible cures. She doesn't want to receive special treatment and therefore dishonor public servants who were disabled in the line of duty; either a cure becomes available for everyone, or she stays in the chair. That raises the question of why the numerous cures can't be made available to the public. The New 52 reboot [[ComicBook/BatGirl2011 changed this]], having her undergo a procedure to restore the use of her legs.legs, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Gordon#Critical_and_editorial_commentary which was still somewhat controversial out-of-universe]].
18th Apr '18 11:05:04 AM ChronoLegion
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* Series/{{Warehouse 13}} is chock-full of great inventions that could revolutionize whole industries, but some of the inventions have unintended side effects, while others are only used by Warehouse agents. This includes the Tesla-made StunGuns. Imagine issuing every cop a Tesla gun instead of a lethal weapon. The only side effect is short-term memory loss (i.e. the target doesn't remember the events immediately preceding being hit with a bolt). There's also Thomas Edison's Bioelectric Stagecoach, an old-fashioned car that runs off the miniscule bioelectricity produced by its passengers (rejected by Henry Ford in order to sell more replacement parts for regular cars).
* Averting this is the whole point of ''Series/TheVisitor'', as the protagonist Adam fled back to Earth from the aliens, who had abducted him, in order to find inventors and help them spread their knowledge for the betterment of humankind. Unfortunately, not everyone is of the same mind, which includes his fellow abductees and the US military. For instance, the guy who invents [[ArtificialGravity anti-gravity]] is put in a secret military prison, as the military claims his discovery is too dangerous, as it can be used to make black holes. Meanwhile, a scientist-farmer attempting to produce AntiMatter instead figures out a way to grow crops incredibly quickly. Adam tells the man that he can single-handedly solve world hunger.
18th Apr '18 9:38:48 AM ChronoLegion
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* Played straight in ''Series/{{The Flash|2014}}''. Cisco and Caitlin are brilliant scientists, whose inventions can revolutionize the world, and yet they never bother to do anything with the tech that doesn't help Team Flash. Averted in the Flashpoint timeline, where Cisco is the richest man in the world, using his genius to run a tech company. Also averted on Earth 2, where "Harry" Wells has made great strides in technology by selling his inventions.
18th Apr '18 9:35:59 AM ChronoLegion
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** One of the prequel comics brings back the briefly mentioned hero Johnny Snow, who has a straighter form of a FreezeRay. Despite the numerous possible applications of the tech, he only uses it to fight crime.
18th Apr '18 9:32:28 AM ChronoLegion
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* Averted in ''Series/{{Arrow}}''. Felicity was shot in the Season 4 midseason finale and left in a wheelchair. Within a few episodes, Curtis was able to use advanced technology to invent a chip that will allow her [[StatusQuoIsGod to walk again]]. It apparently can't be reproduced, but the implications alone are staggering. The criticism this drew (see motivation 3 at the top of the page) from viewers and even the actress who plays Felicity demonstrates why this trope is usually played straight.

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* Averted in ''Series/{{Arrow}}''. Felicity was shot in the Season 4 midseason finale and left in a wheelchair. Within a few episodes, Curtis was able to use advanced technology to invent a chip that will allow her [[StatusQuoIsGod to walk again]]. It apparently can't be reproduced, but the implications alone are staggering. The criticism this drew (see motivation 3 at the top of the page) from viewers and even the actress who plays Felicity demonstrates why this trope is usually played straight. Later on, Felicity and Curtis form a start-up with the specific goal of replicating the prototype and mass-producing it. Curtis even manages to make a similar chip to overcome the nerve damage in Diggle's hand. However, the falling out between the original Team Arrow and the new recruits may put an end to the start-up.
18th Apr '18 9:21:06 AM ChronoLegion
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* Generally averted in ''Literature/TheVillainsCode''. The de facto leader of the League of Villainous Reformation, Doctor Mechaniacal, spends most of his time running his tech company, using his MadScientist genius to make billions on his inventions. The "capes" have their own counterpart in the form of Professor Quantum, although he tends to spend most of his time in his own private island lab, so it's unclear if any of his inventions end up being sold to the public. The general tech level is roughly the same as in RealLife, though, so Mechaniacal's inventions must not be anything overly revolutionary. To be sure, he ''does'' have tech that's light years ahead of the curve (PoweredArmor, ArtificialGravity, BrainComputerInterface) but he's keeping it for himself.

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* Generally averted in ''Literature/TheVillainsCode''.''Literature/VillainsCode''. The de facto leader of the League of Villainous Reformation, Doctor Mechaniacal, spends most of his time running his tech company, using his MadScientist genius to make billions on his inventions. The "capes" have their own counterpart in the form of Professor Quantum, although he tends to spend most of his time in his own private island lab, so it's unclear if any of his inventions end up being sold to the public. The general tech level is roughly the same as in RealLife, though, so Mechaniacal's inventions must not be anything overly revolutionary. To be sure, he ''does'' have tech that's light years ahead of the curve (PoweredArmor, ArtificialGravity, BrainComputerInterface) but he's keeping it for himself.
18th Apr '18 9:20:34 AM ChronoLegion
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Added DiffLines:

* Generally averted in ''Literature/TheVillainsCode''. The de facto leader of the League of Villainous Reformation, Doctor Mechaniacal, spends most of his time running his tech company, using his MadScientist genius to make billions on his inventions. The "capes" have their own counterpart in the form of Professor Quantum, although he tends to spend most of his time in his own private island lab, so it's unclear if any of his inventions end up being sold to the public. The general tech level is roughly the same as in RealLife, though, so Mechaniacal's inventions must not be anything overly revolutionary. To be sure, he ''does'' have tech that's light years ahead of the curve (PoweredArmor, ArtificialGravity, BrainComputerInterface) but he's keeping it for himself.
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