History Main / ReedRichardsIsUseless

20th Jan '18 8:15:08 PM DarkHunter
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* ''Anime/DragonBallZ'': Dr. Gero's Android 17 and 18 have infinite power cells, that never run dry no matter how long they live or how much power they put out in a fight. They do seem to be limited in how much power they can put out ''at once'', though, which keeps them from being complete GameBreakers. Output limitations or not though, Dr. Gero apparently managed to invent a ''Perpetual Motion Machine''. Had he marketed that, he could have instantly become the richest man in history. Then again, his goal was getting revenge on Goku, not making money.

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* ''Anime/DragonBallZ'': Dr. Gero's Android 17 and 18 have infinite power cells, that never run dry no matter how long they live or how much power they put out in a fight. They do seem to be limited in how much power they can put out ''at once'', though, which keeps them from being complete GameBreakers.{{Game Breaker}}s. Output limitations or not though, Dr. Gero apparently managed to invent a ''Perpetual Motion Machine''.''PerpetualMotionMachine''. Had he marketed that, he could have instantly become the richest man in history. Then again, his goal was getting revenge on Goku, not making money.
20th Jan '18 8:14:38 PM DarkHunter
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Anime/DragonBallZ'': Dr. Gero's Android 17 and 18 have infinite power cells, that never run dry no matter how long they live or how much power they put out in a fight. They do seem to be limited in how much power they can put out ''at once'', though, which keeps them from being complete GameBreakers. Output limitations or not though, Dr. Gero apparently managed to invent a ''Perpetual Motion Machine''. Had he marketed that, he could have instantly become the richest man in history. Then again, his goal was getting revenge on Goku, not making money.
10th Jan '18 3:35:00 PM comicwriter
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* Similarly to the page image, ''ComicBook/SuperSons'' reveals that the Justice League has access to universal translators that are designed to work across dimensions. They still haven't distributed it to the republic and Robin actually pilfered one for his own use.

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* Similarly to the page image, ''ComicBook/SuperSons'' reveals that the Justice League has access to universal translators that are designed to work across dimensions. They still haven't distributed it to the republic public and Robin actually pilfered one for his own use.




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* In an issue of ''Comicbook/OldManLogan'', Silver Samurai reveals that he possesses high-tech nanites that allow him to survive seemingly-fatal injuries. He then casually mentions that actually producing the nanites is far too expensive to market the tech to the public.
5th Jan '18 3:04:10 AM Matchstick
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[[WeatherManipulation A person who controls weather]] will never make it rain in drought-stricken areas, or stop the rain during terrible flooding, or stop a heatwave. A person who can [[MakingASplash control water]] will never douse bush fires or burning buildings, or [[JustForFun/TheseLookLikeJobsForTheSuperman get a job at a power station.]] And a [[SuperIntelligence supergenius]] (such as [[TropeNamers Reed Richards]] of the Comicbook/FantasticFour) can save the life of starving demi-god beings like ComicBook/{{Galactus}}, but will never take a weekend to duplicate and market Doctor Doom's burn-victim cure device or release his inventions that could solve a variety of real-world problems (and earn their creator millions of dollars). All potential solutions to real-life problems will only be done in novel (fictional) situations -- useless. StatusQuoIsGod, and the status quo of the real world even more so. It's the same reason [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct you can't stop Hitler from starting World War II]].

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[[WeatherManipulation A person who controls weather]] will never make it rain in drought-stricken areas, or stop the rain during terrible flooding, or stop a heatwave. A person who can [[MakingASplash control water]] will never douse bush fires or burning buildings, or [[JustForFun/TheseLookLikeJobsForTheSuperman get a job at a power station.]] And a [[SuperIntelligence supergenius]] (such as [[TropeNamers Reed Richards]] of the Comicbook/FantasticFour) can save the life of starving demi-god beings like ComicBook/{{Galactus}}, but will never take a weekend to duplicate and market Doctor Doom's burn-victim cure device or release his inventions that could solve a variety of real-world problems (and earn their creator millions of dollars). All potential solutions to real-life problems will only be done in novel (fictional) situations -- useless.situations--useless. StatusQuoIsGod, and the status quo of the real world even more so. It's the same reason [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct you can't stop Hitler from starting World War II]].



* In ''Anime/GundamBuildFighters'', scientists TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture have developed special particles that allow [[AnimateInanimateObject certain inanimate plastics to move]]...and the only use this technology sees is in high stakes duels using plastic Franchise/{{Gundam}} model kits. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d by the character [[BlackAndNerdy Nils Nielsen]], who enters the Gunpla Battle tournament to investigate the Plavsky Particles and see if they can be used for other, more practical pursuits.

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* In ''Anime/GundamBuildFighters'', scientists TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture have developed special particles that allow [[AnimateInanimateObject certain inanimate plastics to move]]... and the only use this technology sees is in high stakes duels using plastic Franchise/{{Gundam}} model kits. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d by the character [[BlackAndNerdy Nils Nielsen]], who enters the Gunpla Battle tournament to investigate the Plavsky Particles and see if they can be used for other, more practical pursuits.



* The biggest examples of this trope in DC, or even comics in general, have to be Johnny Thunder and his successor, Jakeem. Here are two guys who had a Genie at their command, with no limitations on the number of wishes, and they only ever used it to fight crime? There was a storyline where he started to feel bad that he wasn't doing more to solve people's non-crime-related problems and - against the advice of his elders in the ComicBook/{{Justice Society|OfAmerica}} - he decided to start granting wishes for anyone who wanted his help. Lines formed around the block, near riots broke out if he tried to take a break; it soon occurred to him that if he kept it up, he would be spending the rest of his life granting other people's wishes 24/7 (hey, he can wish to not have to sleep, right?). The people waiting in line for wishes considered this an acceptable sacrifice; Jakeem, not so much.

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* The biggest examples of this trope in DC, or even comics in general, have to be Johnny Thunder and his successor, Jakeem. Here are two guys who had a Genie at their command, with no limitations on the number of wishes, and they only ever used it to fight crime? There was a storyline where he started to feel bad that he wasn't doing more to solve people's non-crime-related problems and - against and--against the advice of his elders in the ComicBook/{{Justice Society|OfAmerica}} - he Society|OfAmerica}}--he decided to start granting wishes for anyone who wanted his help. Lines formed around the block, near riots broke out if he tried to take a break; it soon occurred to him that if he kept it up, he would be spending the rest of his life granting other people's wishes 24/7 (hey, he can wish to not have to sleep, right?). The people waiting in line for wishes considered this an acceptable sacrifice; Jakeem, not so much.



** In ''ComicBook/JLAAvengers'', Superman privately admits that he fears the JLA may be stunting humanity's growth and they're doing too much for the world. (ComicBook/CaptainAmerica's fear is the opposite - that the Avengers can't do enough.)

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** In ''ComicBook/JLAAvengers'', Superman privately admits that he fears the JLA may be stunting humanity's growth and they're doing too much for the world. (ComicBook/CaptainAmerica's fear is the opposite - that opposite--that the Avengers can't do enough.)



--->'''Wonder Woman:''' Amazon, alien, human-- the ray can heal almost any wound for any of us in seconds. It's an amazing, world-changing technology... and it can't cure cancer, Kara. You're in above your head.\\
'''Supergirl:''' I'll find a way. I know I can do it. [...] What if we've all been wrong? What if we've all been fighting crime and saving dozens-- when we could have been saving billions? Saving '''everyone'''?

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--->'''Wonder Woman:''' Amazon, alien, human-- the human--the ray can heal almost any wound for any of us in seconds. It's an amazing, world-changing technology... and it can't cure cancer, Kara. You're in above your head.\\
'''Supergirl:''' I'll find a way. I know I can do it. [...] What if we've all been wrong? What if we've all been fighting crime and saving dozens-- when dozens--when we could have been saving billions? Saving '''everyone'''?



* Likewise, the Alan Scott Green Lantern was outright terrified of his ring in a few continuities. In a ''Batman: Black and White'' story, he joins Batman in searching a group of gangsters who nearly burned down the Gotham Broadcasting Building. In it, he effortlessly turns Batman invisible, travels back in time to save the gangsters (with zero timeline repercussions), uses the standard Green Lantern constructs, and more. He confesses that he eventually came to fear the sheer power of the ring, and that was the precise reason he abandoned Gotham - the city needs a hero... not a god.

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* Likewise, the Alan Scott Green Lantern was outright terrified of his ring in a few continuities. In a ''Batman: Black and White'' story, he joins Batman in searching a group of gangsters who nearly burned down the Gotham Broadcasting Building. In it, he effortlessly turns Batman invisible, travels back in time to save the gangsters (with zero timeline repercussions), uses the standard Green Lantern constructs, and more. He confesses that he eventually came to fear the sheer power of the ring, and that was the precise reason he abandoned Gotham - the Gotham--the city needs a hero... not a god.



* Usually played straight in ''ComicBook/AstroCity'', as the author believes that it's important that the stories take place in our world, but the superhero Samaritan was able to stop the Challenger disaster, and there's a story dealing with a lawyer who attempts to defend his client in a mundane case by citing superhuman events - he argues that yes, forty witnesses say that they saw his client commit the murder, but there was once a bank robbery seemingly committed by celebrities who turned out to be shapeshifters, the superheroes First Family were suspected of selling defense secrets, but it was their Alternate Universe counterparts, etc. It ends up actually getting his client off the hook.

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* Usually played straight in ''ComicBook/AstroCity'', as the author believes that it's important that the stories take place in our world, but the superhero Samaritan was able to stop the Challenger disaster, and there's a story dealing with a lawyer who attempts to defend his client in a mundane case by citing superhuman events - he events--he argues that yes, forty witnesses say that they saw his client commit the murder, but there was once a bank robbery seemingly committed by celebrities who turned out to be shapeshifters, the superheroes First Family were suspected of selling defense secrets, but it was their Alternate Universe counterparts, etc. It ends up actually getting his client off the hook.



* In ''Sultry Teenage Super-Foxes'', the US military develops an "alchemy ray", which they test by turning dog poop into gold...and then the head scientist remarks that it's considered "too theoretical" for them to get more funding. [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]] flips out at this, pointing out that such a device is '''infinitely''' useful since it could be used to safely dispose of nuclear waste (among other uses). The machine is destroyed in the accident that creates the titular heroes, rendering the whole debate moot.

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* In ''Sultry Teenage Super-Foxes'', the US military develops an "alchemy ray", which they test by turning dog poop into gold... and then the head scientist remarks that it's considered "too theoretical" for them to get more funding. [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]] flips out at this, pointing out that such a device is '''infinitely''' useful since it could be used to safely dispose of nuclear waste (among other uses). The machine is destroyed in the accident that creates the titular heroes, rendering the whole debate moot.



** Discussed in ''Film/IronMan1''. Tony Stark's power cell is stated as being able to generate 3 gigajoules per second of energy -- which is 3 gigawatts of power generation. This is about as much power as produced by the largest man-made nuclear reactor and about 15 times the power of a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier (and two and a half times the power required to [[Film/BackToTheFuture travel through time]]). The movie makes it clear that the Arc Reactor is incredibly valuable, and Obidiah Stane wants to use it for profit, but Tony is adamant that the technology stays in his hands and ''his alone'', because he's seen what happens when his technology ends up in unsupervised hands. In ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', Tony shows that he is preparing to spread his Arc Reactor technology around the globe, but on his terms. There's also his newly completed Stark Tower, a revolutionary "green" skyscraper which has self-sufficient power generation, even providing a surplus to the city.

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** Discussed in ''Film/IronMan1''. Tony Stark's power cell is stated as being able to generate 3 gigajoules per second of energy -- which energy--which is 3 gigawatts of power generation. This is about as much power as produced by the largest man-made nuclear reactor and about 15 times the power of a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier (and two and a half times the power required to [[Film/BackToTheFuture travel through time]]). The movie makes it clear that the Arc Reactor is incredibly valuable, and Obidiah Stane wants to use it for profit, but Tony is adamant that the technology stays in his hands and ''his alone'', because he's seen what happens when his technology ends up in unsupervised hands. In ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', Tony shows that he is preparing to spread his Arc Reactor technology around the globe, but on his terms. There's also his newly completed Stark Tower, a revolutionary "green" skyscraper which has self-sufficient power generation, even providing a surplus to the city.



* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Film/BackToTheBeach'' where Bob Denver -- clearly playing Series/{{Gilligan|sIsland}} -- is working as a bartender, and complains to a customer about being stranded on a deserted island with a guy so smart he could make a nuclear reactor out of a couple of coconuts... but who couldn't fix a two-foot hole in a boat.
* The ''Film/MenInBlack'' possess enormous amounts of confiscated advanced technology. While they ''do'' release some of the technology to the public, holding the patents on numerous alien technologies sold to the public -- velcro, microwave ovens and [=CDs=], to name a few -- they are doing a great deal of constant memory erasing to hide alien existence to avoid possible panic. This is further shown in the [[WesternAnimation/MenInBlack animated version]], where the [=MIB=] puts a waiting period on each piece of confiscated tech, which runs into centuries in some cases.

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* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Film/BackToTheBeach'' where Bob Denver -- clearly Denver--clearly playing Series/{{Gilligan|sIsland}} -- is Series/{{Gilligan|sIsland}}--is working as a bartender, and complains to a customer about being stranded on a deserted island with a guy so smart he could make a nuclear reactor out of a couple of coconuts... but who couldn't fix a two-foot hole in a boat.
* The ''Film/MenInBlack'' possess enormous amounts of confiscated advanced technology. While they ''do'' release some of the technology to the public, holding the patents on numerous alien technologies sold to the public -- velcro, public--velcro, microwave ovens and [=CDs=], to name a few -- they few--they are doing a great deal of constant memory erasing to hide alien existence to avoid possible panic. This is further shown in the [[WesternAnimation/MenInBlack animated version]], where the [=MIB=] puts a waiting period on each piece of confiscated tech, which runs into centuries in some cases.



* ''Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Willy Wonka can make a meal come out of gum, an ice cream that stays cold and doesn't melt in the sun, build a chocolate palace without a metal framework, teleport things into TV screens, and has anti-gravity technology - yet he only applies his know-how to candy. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d by Mike Teavee in the 2005 movie: "Don't you realize what you've invented? It's a teleporter! It's the most important invention in the world! And all you think about is ''chocolate''!" That movie at least has the justification that Willy Wonka hated adults and seeing as teleporters would belong in the hands of adults, he wouldn't have wanted to share. Of course, given what happens to Mike after he tries to prove he's right, you can't really blame Wonka for not using it to teleport people. In the book the "meal from gum" candy actually ''was'' intended to end hunger, but Wonka says he hasn't perfected it yet. Given that it turns anyone who eats it into a blueberry, he's right to not market it yet.

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* ''Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Willy Wonka can make a meal come out of gum, an ice cream that stays cold and doesn't melt in the sun, build a chocolate palace without a metal framework, teleport things into TV screens, and has anti-gravity technology - yet technology--yet he only applies his know-how to candy. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d by Mike Teavee in the 2005 movie: "Don't you realize what you've invented? It's a teleporter! It's the most important invention in the world! And all you think about is ''chocolate''!" That movie at least has the justification that Willy Wonka hated adults and seeing as teleporters would belong in the hands of adults, he wouldn't have wanted to share. Of course, given what happens to Mike after he tries to prove he's right, you can't really blame Wonka for not using it to teleport people. In the book the "meal from gum" candy actually ''was'' intended to end hunger, but Wonka says he hasn't perfected it yet. Given that it turns anyone who eats it into a blueberry, he's right to not market it yet.



* In defense of the ''Film/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' series, Optimus Prime says explicitly that [[YouAreNotReady humanity is not ready]] for the Autobots' advanced ''weaponry''. The same is ''not'' said about the Autobots' ''other'' significant technologies, such as (apparently) FTL travel, mindblowingly advanced computer miniaturisation, robotics, and fabrication. This is particularly egregious since in the first film Simmonds ''expressly'' says that ''much of humanity's'' best 20th century technologies -- from the CD player to the microwave to the internal combustion engine -- derives from what they learned studying a trapped an ''unconscious'' Transformer. Imagine how far they could have pushed if they had a consenting friendly one around to fill in the gaps. In the fourth film, one tech company manages to get their hands on "Transformium", the stuff Transformers are made of. Except their version is the raw stuff, giving it far more shapeshifting capability. We see it taking shapes like children's toys and handguns and [[spoiler:their own Transformers which they lose control of in short order]] -- wait, maybe Optimus was more right than we thought. To be fair, though, the only reason [[spoiler:they lose control of Galvatron is because Megatron downloaded himself into the new body]].

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* In defense of the ''Film/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' series, Optimus Prime says explicitly that [[YouAreNotReady humanity is not ready]] for the Autobots' advanced ''weaponry''. The same is ''not'' said about the Autobots' ''other'' significant technologies, such as (apparently) FTL travel, mindblowingly advanced computer miniaturisation, robotics, and fabrication. This is particularly egregious since in the first film Simmonds ''expressly'' says that ''much of humanity's'' best 20th century technologies -- from technologies--from the CD player to the microwave to the internal combustion engine -- derives engine--derives from what they learned studying a trapped an ''unconscious'' Transformer. Imagine how far they could have pushed if they had a consenting friendly one around to fill in the gaps. In the fourth film, one tech company manages to get their hands on "Transformium", the stuff Transformers are made of. Except their version is the raw stuff, giving it far more shapeshifting capability. We see it taking shapes like children's toys and handguns and [[spoiler:their own Transformers which they lose control of in short order]] -- wait, order]]--wait, maybe Optimus was more right than we thought. To be fair, though, the only reason [[spoiler:they lose control of Galvatron is because Megatron downloaded himself into the new body]].



* In ''Film/ExMachina'', Nathan - working by himself - makes real, working sex and house-servant robots. His robots also walk on two legs like a human, something 2015 robots have a devil of a time with. The rest of the world evidently doesn't have any of this, or Caleb wouldn't have needed it explained to him. Instead of making more money in dumb robot tech, he keeps it to himself and plays with putting AI in the bodies.

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* In ''Film/ExMachina'', Nathan - working Nathan--working by himself - makes himself--makes real, working sex and house-servant robots. His robots also walk on two legs like a human, something 2015 robots have a devil of a time with. The rest of the world evidently doesn't have any of this, or Caleb wouldn't have needed it explained to him. Instead of making more money in dumb robot tech, he keeps it to himself and plays with putting AI in the bodies.



* For the majority of 'super-inventors' in ''Literature/WildCards'', their creations are actually an expression of their wild-card talent - the device doesn't work for others because it is really powered by their psychic abilities. It is mentioned that attempts to reverse engineer such 'inventions' often find things like apple cores, Klein bottles (which are impossible in a 3-dimensional space), and/or schematics of the desired circuits where the circuits should be.

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* For the majority of 'super-inventors' in ''Literature/WildCards'', their creations are actually an expression of their wild-card talent - the talent--the device doesn't work for others because it is really powered by their psychic abilities. It is mentioned that attempts to reverse engineer such 'inventions' often find things like apple cores, Klein bottles (which are impossible in a 3-dimensional space), and/or schematics of the desired circuits where the circuits should be.



* Whole premise of ''Literature/MondayBeginsOnSaturday'' is an aversion - it takes place in Soviet research facility, dedicated to sharing benefits of magic with mundane part of humanity. Some of projects include wide distribution of Living Water (bottled healing factor), creating solvents for grief and hatred, seeking the meaning of life etc. Though most of their real successes are mentioned off-screen, while book concentrates on hilarious failures and research process itself.

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* Whole premise of ''Literature/MondayBeginsOnSaturday'' is an aversion - it aversion--it takes place in Soviet research facility, dedicated to sharing benefits of magic with mundane part of humanity. Some of projects include wide distribution of Living Water (bottled healing factor), creating solvents for grief and hatred, seeking the meaning of life etc. Though most of their real successes are mentioned off-screen, while book concentrates on hilarious failures and research process itself.



* In ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', Clark Kent discovers that his blood can bring people back to life, but the revived people have to keep taking it every twelve hours or else they die, ''for good''. And, being around kryptonite hastens the time limit. In addition, they come back increasingly psychotic. [[spoiler:Clark disposes of all the blood samples, deciding it isn't worth it.]] In one episode it was subverted when [[spoiler:Clark used his blood to revive Zod of all people, not only bringing him back to life, but also giving him/releasing his locked super powers. No 12 hours limit there - possibly due to Zod also being from Krypton? Way to go Clark]].

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* In ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', Clark Kent discovers that his blood can bring people back to life, but the revived people have to keep taking it every twelve hours or else they die, ''for good''. And, being around kryptonite hastens the time limit. In addition, they come back increasingly psychotic. [[spoiler:Clark disposes of all the blood samples, deciding it isn't worth it.]] In one episode it was subverted when [[spoiler:Clark used his blood to revive Zod of all people, not only bringing him back to life, but also giving him/releasing his locked super powers. No 12 hours limit there - possibly there--possibly due to Zod also being from Krypton? Way to go Clark]].



* Government scientists in ''Series/TheSixMillionDollarMan'' can make artificial limbs that not only look indistinguishable from the real thing, but outperform their biological equivalents by an order of magnitude. Yet none of this technology is ever used to restore amputees or paraplegics -- they'd rather keep it all for a one-shot test pilot super-agent. Even their previous use of this technology (with Barney Miller/Hiller, the 7 Million Dollar Man) is something they sweep under the rug. A possible justification is that 6 million dollars in the 1970s is a lot of money, making these too prohibitively expensive to produce. The fact that Jaime Sommers nearly died when her body rejected her bionic implant and initially survived with amnesia and subconscious episodes of agonizing pain also likely mean the Food and Drug administration would never approve bionics wholesale implementation until satisfied that problem was solved.
* ''Series/PersonOfInterest''. Lampshaded at the beginning of Season 2 when Finch (creator of a supercomputer which analyses all surveillance data in the country so as to predict threats against national security) is kidnapped by sociopathic hacker Root. Root realises that the true implication of the Machine is not its potential misuse as a tool of Big Brother -- to successfully predict human actions, [[spoiler:Finch has created '''the first true artificial general intelligence'''. Root can't believe that Finch's response to doing this was to BlackBox the system and hand it over to a corrupt and power-hungry US government, and is determined to set the Machine free]]. By the end of season 3, [[spoiler:Decima Technologies, recognizing the power of the technology, has brought another AGI online in order to [[TakeOverTheWorld take over the world]]]].

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* Government scientists in ''Series/TheSixMillionDollarMan'' can make artificial limbs that not only look indistinguishable from the real thing, but outperform their biological equivalents by an order of magnitude. Yet none of this technology is ever used to restore amputees or paraplegics -- they'd paraplegics--they'd rather keep it all for a one-shot test pilot super-agent. Even their previous use of this technology (with Barney Miller/Hiller, the 7 Million Dollar Man) is something they sweep under the rug. A possible justification is that 6 million dollars in the 1970s is a lot of money, making these too prohibitively expensive to produce. The fact that Jaime Sommers nearly died when her body rejected her bionic implant and initially survived with amnesia and subconscious episodes of agonizing pain also likely mean the Food and Drug administration would never approve bionics wholesale implementation until satisfied that problem was solved.
* ''Series/PersonOfInterest''. Lampshaded at the beginning of Season 2 when Finch (creator of a supercomputer which analyses all surveillance data in the country so as to predict threats against national security) is kidnapped by sociopathic hacker Root. Root realises that the true implication of the Machine is not its potential misuse as a tool of Big Brother -- to Brother--to successfully predict human actions, [[spoiler:Finch has created '''the first true artificial general intelligence'''. Root can't believe that Finch's response to doing this was to BlackBox the system and hand it over to a corrupt and power-hungry US government, and is determined to set the Machine free]]. By the end of season 3, [[spoiler:Decima Technologies, recognizing the power of the technology, has brought another AGI online in order to [[TakeOverTheWorld take over the world]]]].



** ''TabletopGame/{{Eberron}}'' did a lot of work both averting and justifying this trope. Magic has been industrialized and (partially thanks to a recent war) a lot of people have two or three levels in various classes, making low-level magic a lot more prevalent and regularly applied to improving daily life. However, high-level magic is still rare, with only a small number of people able to pull off the grand tricks like teleportation with any regularity - and most can only do it once a day or just aren't for hire. As a result, people are healthier and more productive, but shipping via teleportation is prohibitively expensive and actually ''slower'' for bulk cargo, so you have to rely on old-fashioned mundane means like [[{{Magitek}} magic trains]].

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** ''TabletopGame/{{Eberron}}'' did a lot of work both averting and justifying this trope. Magic has been industrialized and (partially thanks to a recent war) a lot of people have two or three levels in various classes, making low-level magic a lot more prevalent and regularly applied to improving daily life. However, high-level magic is still rare, with only a small number of people able to pull off the grand tricks like teleportation with any regularity - and regularity--and most can only do it once a day or just aren't for hire. As a result, people are healthier and more productive, but shipping via teleportation is prohibitively expensive and actually ''slower'' for bulk cargo, so you have to rely on old-fashioned mundane means like [[{{Magitek}} magic trains]].



** There are people who have found ways to use the various supernatural forces of the World of Darkness to further science, but rarity - whether of the supernaturals, or of the resources available to the researchers - prices such advances out of the reach of all but the wealthiest or most powerful. One such example is Last Dynasty Inc. from ''TabletopGame/MummyTheCurse'', which has discovered that the mystical force known as Sekhem can be filtered into medication, producing steroids with no ill side effects and possible cures for cancer and HIV. The problem is that Sekhem can only be found in divine, immortal killing machines ringed by cultists, and the Relics said killing machines and cults are sworn to protect.

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** There are people who have found ways to use the various supernatural forces of the World of Darkness to further science, but rarity - whether rarity--whether of the supernaturals, or of the resources available to the researchers - prices researchers--prices such advances out of the reach of all but the wealthiest or most powerful. One such example is Last Dynasty Inc. from ''TabletopGame/MummyTheCurse'', which has discovered that the mystical force known as Sekhem can be filtered into medication, producing steroids with no ill side effects and possible cures for cancer and HIV. The problem is that Sekhem can only be found in divine, immortal killing machines ringed by cultists, and the Relics said killing machines and cults are sworn to protect.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'', Aperture Science developed several technologies that, with proper application, would have revolutionized the world. Just one, the portal gun, could have, in an instant, solved nearly every transportation and logistical problem on the planet, enabled CasualInterstellarTravel, and incidentally made the company trillions. They also developed BrainUploading, [[AIIsACrapshoot true AI]], HardLight, some really amazing hardware to prevent [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou injury from falling]], and a variety of other things. But they were so into testing all their MadScience inventions that they utterly failed to market them properly -- or marketed them for entirely the wrong things. It also doesn't help that they ignored even the most basic of safety standards, to the point where their facilities would have given [[NoOSHACompliance OSHA inspectors]] a heart attack. Then they were all [[TurnedAgainstTheirMasters killed by the AI]] that they put in charge of the facility, which happened around the same time as the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Combine invasion of Earth]].

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'', Aperture Science developed several technologies that, with proper application, would have revolutionized the world. Just one, the portal gun, could have, in an instant, solved nearly every transportation and logistical problem on the planet, enabled CasualInterstellarTravel, and incidentally made the company trillions. They also developed BrainUploading, [[AIIsACrapshoot true AI]], HardLight, some really amazing hardware to prevent [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou injury from falling]], and a variety of other things. But they were so into testing all their MadScience inventions that they utterly failed to market them properly -- or properly--or marketed them for entirely the wrong things. It also doesn't help that they ignored even the most basic of safety standards, to the point where their facilities would have given [[NoOSHACompliance OSHA inspectors]] a heart attack. Then they were all [[TurnedAgainstTheirMasters killed by the AI]] that they put in charge of the facility, which happened around the same time as the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Combine invasion of Earth]].



* Averted in ''VideoGame/TheSecretWorld'' with Orochi Grp., whose inventions are applied worldwide and are bleeding edge of research of natural and supernatural, besides all that addictive drugs in soda and worldwide surveillance system. Played straight with all other supernaturals, but justified - most part of the secret world is very malevolent and dangerous and it took a lot of effort to cull all that demons and vampires to current level of Masquerade.

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* Averted in ''VideoGame/TheSecretWorld'' with Orochi Grp., whose inventions are applied worldwide and are bleeding edge of research of natural and supernatural, besides all that addictive drugs in soda and worldwide surveillance system. Played straight with all other supernaturals, but justified - most justified--most part of the secret world is very malevolent and dangerous and it took a lot of effort to cull all that demons and vampires to current level of Masquerade.



* Justified in ''Webcomic/{{Mindmistress}}'' -- the title heroine has the most advanced technology in the world, but is afraid that released it could change our society for the ''worse''. On the other hand, Forethought, the only person smarter that Minidmistress, is actively trying to save the humanity from [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt self-destructing war]] he foresees. Too bad his first idea was to create more people like him, well aware that humanity would turn on them. And lost. At one point the comic also visits an alternate history where Mindmistress's deceased counterpart ''did'' release all of her tech to the general population, resulting in global economic upheaval and a massive surge in terrorist attacks.

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* Justified in ''Webcomic/{{Mindmistress}}'' -- the ''Webcomic/{{Mindmistress}}''--the title heroine has the most advanced technology in the world, but is afraid that released it could change our society for the ''worse''. On the other hand, Forethought, the only person smarter that Minidmistress, is actively trying to save the humanity from [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt self-destructing war]] he foresees. Too bad his first idea was to create more people like him, well aware that humanity would turn on them. And lost. At one point the comic also visits an alternate history where Mindmistress's Mindmistress' deceased counterpart ''did'' release all of her tech to the general population, resulting in global economic upheaval and a massive surge in terrorist attacks.



* Justified in ''Webcomic/LadySpectraAndSparky'' -- Lady Spectra promised her husband on his deathbed that she would not let their inventions fall into the hands of the military.

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* Justified in ''Webcomic/LadySpectraAndSparky'' -- Lady ''Webcomic/LadySpectraAndSparky''--Lady Spectra promised her husband on his deathbed that she would not let their inventions fall into the hands of the military.



* Justified in ''Webcomic/{{Widdershins}}'', where magic is significantly weaker away from the Anchors (a few {{Eldritch Location}}s that seem to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin anchor magic to the Earth]]) - many people have a tiny gift for magic, but never discover it unless they visit an Anchor, while true wizards who can perform magic in the broader world aren't very common. Certainly not enough to build a {{Magitek}} Industrial Revolution around, nor is it very feasible to run one entirely out of a handful of small cities around the world.

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* Justified in ''Webcomic/{{Widdershins}}'', where magic is significantly weaker away from the Anchors (a few {{Eldritch Location}}s that seem to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin anchor magic to the Earth]]) - many Earth]])--many people have a tiny gift for magic, but never discover it unless they visit an Anchor, while true wizards who can perform magic in the broader world aren't very common. Certainly not enough to build a {{Magitek}} Industrial Revolution around, nor is it very feasible to run one entirely out of a handful of small cities around the world.



* The ''Wiki/SCPFoundation'' could have changed the world with the [=SCPs=]...[[JustifiedTrope if they weren't so dangerous]] and most of those that aren't are mostly used to help containing other [=SCPs=]. And the Serpent's Hand still consider the Foundation enemies, because they do not want to improve the world with [=SCPs=]. And they don't want it to fall into the hands of the Chaos Insurgency.

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* The ''Wiki/SCPFoundation'' could have changed the world with the [=SCPs=]... [[JustifiedTrope if they weren't so dangerous]] and most of those that aren't are mostly used to help containing other [=SCPs=]. And the Serpent's Hand still consider the Foundation enemies, because they do not want to improve the world with [=SCPs=]. And they don't want it to fall into the hands of the Chaos Insurgency.



** Accord, a supervillain, attempts to avert this trope using his superhuman planning skills -- he has a plan that could end world hunger within twenty-three years -- but generally fails due to his psychosis and the fact that nobody takes him seriously due to said psychosis.
** Panacea has the power to heal pretty much any disease or injury. She manifested this ability when she was 13 or 14 (she's about 16 at the start of the story) and spends a good chunk of her time going to hospitals and healing. She's constantly riddled with guilt about never doing enough, and is occasionally tempted to make a mistake to lessen the expectations on her - and then feels guilt about those temptations, leading her to loath herself and to irrationally resent those she heals, leading to greater guilt.

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** Accord, a supervillain, attempts to avert this trope using his superhuman planning skills -- he skills--he has a plan that could end world hunger within twenty-three years -- but years--but generally fails due to his psychosis and the fact that nobody takes him seriously due to said psychosis.
** Panacea has the power to heal pretty much any disease or injury. She manifested this ability when she was 13 or 14 (she's about 16 at the start of the story) and spends a good chunk of her time going to hospitals and healing. She's constantly riddled with guilt about never doing enough, and is occasionally tempted to make a mistake to lessen the expectations on her - and her--and then feels guilt about those temptations, leading her to loath herself and to irrationally resent those she heals, leading to greater guilt.



** The show's creators have stated that this is part of the central premise of "failure" that permeates [[CrapsackWorld the Ventures' world]]. Everything exists in a sort of "death of the jet-age" state where all the promises of technology have failed to deliver. Things like jetpacks, laser weapons, sentient AI, and magic all exist, but have proven to be too expensive, impractical, or dangerous to ever see general use. So the world mostly resembles our own, except you have all these obsessive weirdos around who use this stuff for crime or crime fighting, and it never sees wider applications. Some of the more "mundane" stuff, though, would be incredibly valuable - like [=HELPeR=] (a sentient, durable, dexterous robot assistant) and Billy Quizboy's fully functional mechanical arm. The former alone would make Dr. Venture a rich man again (the latter is revealed to have been designed by a madman who wasted his life obsessing with a girl he knew in college and getting posthumous revenge on his classmates).

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** The show's creators have stated that this is part of the central premise of "failure" that permeates [[CrapsackWorld the Ventures' world]]. Everything exists in a sort of "death of the jet-age" state where all the promises of technology have failed to deliver. Things like jetpacks, laser weapons, sentient AI, and magic all exist, but have proven to be too expensive, impractical, or dangerous to ever see general use. So the world mostly resembles our own, except you have all these obsessive weirdos around who use this stuff for crime or crime fighting, and it never sees wider applications. Some of the more "mundane" stuff, though, would be incredibly valuable - like valuable--like [=HELPeR=] (a sentient, durable, dexterous robot assistant) and Billy Quizboy's fully functional mechanical arm. The former alone would make Dr. Venture a rich man again (the latter is revealed to have been designed by a madman who wasted his life obsessing with a girl he knew in college and getting posthumous revenge on his classmates).



* In ''WesternAnimation/ArchiesWeirdMysteries'', Dilton invents some rather...advanced things. Why he's still in a public school is ''beyond'' anyone's guess.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/ArchiesWeirdMysteries'', Dilton invents some rather... advanced things. Why he's still in a public school is ''beyond'' anyone's guess.



* The Crystal Gems of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' have incredible technology, including teleportation and HardLight projections that appear to violate conservation of energy, but humans seem completely unaware they even have it. Presumably they have some AlienNonInterferenceClause, given [[spoiler:what Homeworld planned to do to the planet]]. It's implied that much of their really good technology is PoweredByAForsakenChild - but even without relying on gem-powered mechanisms, Pearl has the knowledge to build giant robots, city-wide EMP bombs, and nearly-functional spaceships out of scraps found in Steven's barn, and shows no interest in sharing any of this with anyone.
* Averted for the most part with Stu Pickles in ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}''. His income actually ''comes'' from his selling his inventions. The one time he seems useless is when he builds a fully functional HumongousMecha of [[Franchise/{{Godzilla}} Reptar]] that can stretch its limbs, has a [[{{Jetpack}} butt rocket]], is surprisingly durable, and can throw a mean punch...and sells it to a stage show in France instead of the military or NASA for millions.

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* The Crystal Gems of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' have incredible technology, including teleportation and HardLight projections that appear to violate conservation of energy, but humans seem completely unaware they even have it. Presumably they have some AlienNonInterferenceClause, given [[spoiler:what Homeworld planned to do to the planet]]. It's implied that much of their really good technology is PoweredByAForsakenChild - but PoweredByAForsakenChild--but even without relying on gem-powered mechanisms, Pearl has the knowledge to build giant robots, city-wide EMP bombs, and nearly-functional spaceships out of scraps found in Steven's barn, and shows no interest in sharing any of this with anyone.
* Averted for the most part with Stu Pickles in ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}''. His income actually ''comes'' from his selling his inventions. The one time he seems useless is when he builds a fully functional HumongousMecha of [[Franchise/{{Godzilla}} Reptar]] that can stretch its limbs, has a [[{{Jetpack}} butt rocket]], is surprisingly durable, and can throw a mean punch... and sells it to a stage show in France instead of the military or NASA for millions.
27th Dec '17 1:49:02 PM lillolillo
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* This trope was used to justify Barbara "Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}[=/=]Oracle" Gordon remaining wheelchair-bound despite the ready availability of possible cures. She doesn't want to receive special treatment and therefore dishonor public servants who were disabled in the line of duty; either a cure becomes available for everyone, or she stays in the chair. That raises the question of why the numerous cures can't be made available to the public. The New 52 reboot [[ComicBook/BatGirl2011 changed this]], having her undergo a procedure to restore the use of her legs.

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** In ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} story arc ''[[ComicBook/Supergirl2005 Way of the World]]'', the titular heroine attempts to find a cure for cancer to save a little child's life. She refuses to listen when other heroes warn her that she is over her head and even their powers have their limits, and argue they should be more proactive, but ultimately she fails.
--->'''Wonder Woman:''' Amazon, alien, human-- the ray can heal almost any wound for any of us in seconds. It's an amazing, world-changing technology... and it can't cure cancer, Kara. You're in above your head.\\
'''Supergirl:''' I'll find a way. I know I can do it. [...] What if we've all been wrong? What if we've all been fighting crime and saving dozens-- when we could have been saving billions? Saving '''everyone'''?
** Discussed when Lex Luthor dated Matrix. Lex noted that if Supergirl's shapeshifting molecules could be duplicated, then it would ruin the fashion industry.
* This trope was used to justify Barbara "Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}[=/=]Oracle" "ComicBook/{{Batgirl}}[=/=]Oracle" Gordon remaining wheelchair-bound despite the ready availability of possible cures. She doesn't want to receive special treatment and therefore dishonor public servants who were disabled in the line of duty; either a cure becomes available for everyone, or she stays in the chair. That raises the question of why the numerous cures can't be made available to the public. The New 52 reboot [[ComicBook/BatGirl2011 changed this]], having her undergo a procedure to restore the use of her legs.



* Discussed when Lex Luthor dated Lana Lang/Matrix Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}. Lex noted that if Supergirl's shapeshifting molecules could be duplicated, then it would ruin the fashion industry.
3rd Dec '17 10:54:24 AM nombretomado
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* In [[WebOriginal/AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]]'s review of ''Rise of Arsenal'' he points out the titular character getting a robotic arm transplant and wonders just how available robotic limbs are to the DC Universe's general public. Linkara also asks if the DC superheroes can clone body parts, then why is Comicbook/{{Cyborg}} still stuck in his cybernetic body.[[note]]Cyborg actually ''was'' in a cloned body at the time of Linkara's review. For a while in the 90's, he looked perfectly human, and had the ability to switch back and forth between his organic and armored forms at will. Then StatusQuoIsGod hit, leaving him permanently trapped in his armored form, which was done to make him look closer to his original, iconic appearance.[[/note]]

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* In [[WebOriginal/AtopTheFourthWall [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]]'s review of ''Rise of Arsenal'' he points out the titular character getting a robotic arm transplant and wonders just how available robotic limbs are to the DC Universe's general public. Linkara also asks if the DC superheroes can clone body parts, then why is Comicbook/{{Cyborg}} still stuck in his cybernetic body.[[note]]Cyborg actually ''was'' in a cloned body at the time of Linkara's review. For a while in the 90's, he looked perfectly human, and had the ability to switch back and forth between his organic and armored forms at will. Then StatusQuoIsGod hit, leaving him permanently trapped in his armored form, which was done to make him look closer to his original, iconic appearance.[[/note]]
2nd Dec '17 11:42:54 AM KJMackley
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** When talking to Penny about his work, Leonard had a EurekaMoment when it came to superfluid helium and interaction with the universe, and he partners up with Sheldon to flesh out the theory. Their idea quickly makes the rounds in the scientific community, praised by no less than Creator/StephenHawking, and in swift order they start getting published in science journals and lecturing at other universities.

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** When talking to Penny about his work, Leonard had a EurekaMoment when it came to superfluid helium and interaction with the universe, and he partners up with Sheldon to flesh out the theory. Their idea quickly makes the rounds in the scientific community, praised by no less than Creator/StephenHawking, and in swift order they start getting published in science journals and lecturing at other universities. This ended up being the longest and most well-developed StoryArc of the series, as Howard ended up suggesting a navigation system that would be possible based on their theories and they go in together with a patent. Said patent later catches the attention of the military and all three end up with a military contract to develop it. Once completed the military [[RealityEnsues let them go without ceremony]], although they later juggle offering other technology that could be developed based on their original idea.
22nd Nov '17 8:59:39 AM chilled0ut
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** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, the same thing happened with Reed Richards. Because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' is such a LongRunner, Reed Richards actually invented [[BoringButPractical X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers]] years before any of these appeared in the real world.

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** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, the same thing happened with Reed Richards.the TropeNamer. Because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' is such a LongRunner, Reed Richards actually invented [[BoringButPractical X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers]] years before any of these appeared in the real world.
22nd Nov '17 8:57:51 AM chilled0ut
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** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' is such a LongRunner, Reed Richards actually did invent several machines that went on to revolutionize human society years before they appeared in the real world, including [[BoringButPractical X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers]].


Added DiffLines:

** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, the same thing happened with Reed Richards. Because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' is such a LongRunner, Reed Richards actually invented [[BoringButPractical X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers]] years before any of these appeared in the real world.
22nd Nov '17 8:51:38 AM chilled0ut
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** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' is such a LongRunner, Reed Richards actually did invent several machines that went on to revolutionize human society years before they appeared in the real world, including X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers.

to:

** As [[http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/superscience_technology.html this page]] points out, because the ''ComicBook/{{Fantastic Four}}'' is such a LongRunner, Reed Richards actually did invent several machines that went on to revolutionize human society years before they appeared in the real world, including [[BoringButPractical X-Ray machines, metal detectors, microwave ovens, solar panels, and dishwashers.dishwashers]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ReedRichardsIsUseless