History Main / RedshirtArmy

8th Sep '16 8:20:09 AM erforce
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* The Cleaners in ''[[Film/{{Underworld}} Underworld: Evolution]]'' are a group of well-trained {{Badass Normal}}s from special forces all over the world. They get quickly slaughtered by Marcus Corvinus. By the end of the film, the remaining few are mauled by his brother William and turned into first-gen Lycans. Then again, their primary job wasn't to fight vampires or Lycans but to hide any evidence of their existence from {{Muggles}}. Additionally, when going after William, they reveal that all they packed is UV ammunition, which is mostly harmless to Lycans.

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* The Cleaners in ''[[Film/{{Underworld}} Underworld: Evolution]]'' ''Film/UnderworldEvolution'' are a group of well-trained {{Badass Normal}}s from special forces all over the world. They get quickly slaughtered by Marcus Corvinus. By the end of the film, the remaining few are mauled by his brother William and turned into first-gen Lycans. Then again, their primary job wasn't to fight vampires or Lycans but to hide any evidence of their existence from {{Muggles}}. Additionally, when going after William, they reveal that all they packed is UV ammunition, which is mostly harmless to Lycans.
6th Sep '16 1:32:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* The deghans in the FarsalaTrilogy are the ruling and fighting class of Farsala, but when [[TheEmpire the Hrum]] launch an invasion they're all dead within two chapters.

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* The deghans in the FarsalaTrilogy ''Literature/FarsalaTrilogy'' are the ruling and fighting class of Farsala, but when [[TheEmpire the Hrum]] launch an invasion they're all dead within two chapters.
9th Aug '16 12:14:33 PM Ripburger
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* In the ''VideoGame/XCom'' games, you start out with a team of these. Expect casualties.

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* In the ''VideoGame/XCom'' ''[[{{VideoGame/XCOM}} X-COM]]'' games, you start out with a team of these. Expect casualties.
9th Aug '16 10:16:33 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** Some of the ''Pillar of Autumn''[='s=] crew in ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' even wore red.
9th Aug '16 10:14:59 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* While statistically fought against more then with in the main games, fairies in the Touhou series generally fill this role in the fan spin-offs revolving around strategy as relatively weak allies and foes to be shot down by more powerful (and [[TooDumbToLive intelligent]]) characters. Luckily, non-lethal spellcard rules means that fairies rarely actually die in spite of their criminal incompetence, and even when that isn't the case, fairies rarely ever stay dead with the ability to regenerate almost instantly.

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* While statistically fought against more then with in the main games, fairies in the Touhou ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' series generally fill this role in the fan spin-offs revolving around strategy as relatively weak allies and foes to be shot down by more powerful (and [[TooDumbToLive intelligent]]) characters. Luckily, non-lethal spellcard rules means that fairies rarely actually die in spite of their criminal incompetence, and even when that isn't the case, fairies rarely ever stay dead with the ability to regenerate almost instantly.
9th Aug '16 10:14:24 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* This is common in {{First Person Shooter}}s. Redshirt Armies can be used as part of the BackStory, explaining why ItsUpToYou. Other times, the Redshirt Army is made up of {{N|onPlayerCharacter}}PCs who are pathetically weak, die easily, and can barely shoot, especially when compared with the main character. It's usually difficult to keep these allies alive, and the player is rarely offered any incentive or reward for doing so, beyond, perhaps, personal satisfaction -- or a hefty penalty if they die.



* This is also common in {{First Person Shooter}}s. Redshirt Armies can be used as part of the BackStory, explaining why ItsUpToYou. Other times, the Redshirt Army is made up of {{N|onPlayerCharacter}}PCs who are pathetically weak, die easily, and can barely shoot, especially when compared with the main character. It's usually difficult to keep these allies alive, and the player is rarely offered any incentive or reward for doing so, beyond, perhaps, personal satisfaction -- or a hefty penalty if they die.
** In the original ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', the protagonist's entire military unit is wiped out before the game starts (the protagonist then blasts his way through a demon-filled complex that bested an entire unit of elite soldiers).
*** You find their corpses all the way through hell though, so it's obvious some of them managed to progress (and they probably reduced the number of enemies you face...). I'd say they were quite badass, just not badass enough.
*** Given ''DOOM'' has a love of invisible teleports, sudden ambushes and all other life-ending trickery liberally scattered around every map, it's more likely that these marines were minding their own business and then suddenly found themselves being whisked away and killed off horribly in the space of a few seconds.
** The final stages of ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' are filled with corpses of Black Mesa Expeditionists. If only they knew you were capable of single-handedly wiping out all {{Mooks}} and defeating the BigBad, they could've saved all those lives.
** ''VideoGame/SystemShock 1'' & ''2'' also show one as deceased bodies waiting for you to take their loot and diaries to finish the job they couldn't.
*** To be honest, player character in ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' had the advantage of some illegal neural implants [[spoiler:and guidance of insane AI considering him her avatar, though the latter eventually meant additional BigBad to deal with]].
*** Protagonists from both games also have the advantage of the experience of everyone that died before. For example, most people who died in the early hours didn't know about the cyborg conversion chambers, the CPU core controls on the elevators, and so on.
** Certain games have "plausible" explanations for this, such as ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', where the protagonist of the game is unique and inherently superior to normal soldiers. ''Halo'' also does the "senseless loss of life" nod to the other characters, with another NPC ("Cortana") expressing disappointment and regret if an entire unit of Marines is wiped out.
*** In fact, the marines' AI in Halo is stupid even by "normal soldier" standards. Their ArtificialStupidity makes them TooDumbToLive.
*** The AI of the marines improved somewhat each game. By the fourth installment, they even started to comprehend blast radii... The Marines were useful allies to have, but they died faster than an ice cream cone in a volcano if the player isn't careful. Unfortunately for you, the enemy's AI (including that of ''their'' red shirts, who always had decent AI) got correspondingly smarter as your Marines did. The Covenant eventually even invoked this trope and trained the red shirts as '''suicide bombers'''...
*** Some of the Pillar of Autumn crew members actually wear red.
** ''Franchise/RedFaction'''s AI wasn't the best, but your allies were especially terrible. Fellow miners would often die 20 seconds after you meet them, and couldn't at all keep up with the regular {{mook|s}} ''three''-on-one even with the same weapon.
*** In the ''Red Faction'' series, the Red Faction soldiers may as well be called the Red Shirt Faction.
*** The AI in "Red Faction: Guerrilla" isn't much better. Guerrillas last longer than they did in the first game, eventually get weapons on par with the [[spoiler: EDF]], and are smart enough to use cover, but are not nearly as efficient as the enemy, who will swarm you with loads of soldiers and gun your ass down before you can even blink.

to:

* This is also common in {{First Person Shooter}}s. Redshirt Armies can be used as part of the BackStory, explaining why ItsUpToYou. Other times, the Redshirt Army is made up of {{N|onPlayerCharacter}}PCs who are pathetically weak, die easily, and can barely shoot, especially when compared with the main character. It's usually difficult to keep these allies alive, and the player is rarely offered any incentive or reward for doing so, beyond, perhaps, personal satisfaction -- or a hefty penalty if they die.
**
In the original ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', the protagonist's entire military unit is wiped out before the game starts (the protagonist then blasts his way through a demon-filled complex that bested an entire unit of elite soldiers).
*** ** You find their corpses all the way through hell though, so it's obvious some of them managed to progress (and they probably reduced the number of enemies you face...). I'd say they were quite badass, just not badass enough.
*** ** Given ''DOOM'' has a love of invisible teleports, sudden ambushes and all other life-ending trickery liberally scattered around every map, it's more likely that these marines were minding their own business and then suddenly found themselves being whisked away and killed off horribly in the space of a few seconds.
** * The final stages of ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' are filled with corpses of Black Mesa Expeditionists. If only they knew you were capable of single-handedly wiping out all {{Mooks}} and defeating the BigBad, they could've saved all those lives.
** * ''VideoGame/SystemShock 1'' & ''2'' also show one as deceased bodies waiting for you to take their loot and diaries to finish the job they couldn't.
*** ** To be honest, player character in ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' had the advantage of some illegal neural implants [[spoiler:and guidance of insane AI considering him her avatar, though the latter eventually meant additional BigBad to deal with]].
*** ** Protagonists from both games also have the advantage of the experience of everyone that died before. For example, most people who died in the early hours didn't know about the cyborg conversion chambers, the CPU core controls on the elevators, and so on.
** Certain games * ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' is one series to have a "plausible" explanations explanation for this, such as ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', where this; the protagonist of the game is protagonists are usually unique and {{Super Soldier}}s inherently superior to normal soldiers. ''Halo'' also does the "senseless loss of life" nod to the other characters, with another NPC ("Cortana") [=NPCs=] like Cortana often expressing disappointment and regret if an entire unit of Marines is wiped out.
*** In fact, the marines'
out. That said, allied AI in Halo is stupid even by "normal soldier" standards. Their ArtificialStupidity makes them TooDumbToLive.
*** The AI of ** For the marines most part, allied AI improved somewhat each game. By the fourth installment, ''VideoGame/HaloReach'', they even started to comprehend blast radii... The In general, the Marines were and other human troops can be useful allies to have, but they died die faster than an ice cream cone in a volcano if the player isn't careful. Unfortunately for you, the enemy's AI (including that of ''their'' red shirts, who always had decent AI) got correspondingly smarter as your Marines did. The Covenant eventually even invoked this trope and trained the red shirts as '''suicide bombers'''...
*** Some of the Pillar of Autumn crew members actually wear red.
**
allies' did.
*
''Franchise/RedFaction'''s AI wasn't the best, but your allies were especially terrible. Fellow miners would often die 20 seconds after you meet them, and couldn't at all keep up with the regular {{mook|s}} ''three''-on-one even with the same weapon.
*** ** In the ''Red Faction'' series, the Red Faction soldiers may as well be called the Red Shirt Faction.
*** ** The AI in "Red Faction: Guerrilla" isn't much better. Guerrillas last longer than they did in the first game, eventually get weapons on par with the [[spoiler: EDF]], and are smart enough to use cover, but are not nearly as efficient as the enemy, who will swarm you with loads of soldiers and gun your ass down before you can even blink.
16th Jul '16 7:00:14 PM MarkWilder
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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The first broadcast episode of the original series ("The Man Trap") has a body count of four minor crewmen, most of whom of course become monster chow shortly after beaming down to the planet. Ironically, the casualties are two blues, a gold and one unknown wearing a hazmat suit.
** Despite it being the {{Trope Namer|s}}, quite a few of the characters that die in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' are blue shirts or gold shirts. In fact, no red shirt deaths occur until the seventh episode. The dubious honor goes to Crewman Mathews, who is pushed into a bottomless pit in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?"
** This is averted in "A Taste of Armageddon". Kirk, Spock, and three redshirts beam down to Eminiar VII where, upon landing, they are sent to be killed. ''All'' of them survive.
** Scotty is practically the only named character to wear a red shirt in the original series, and he's one of the few characters to survive into "Next Generation."
*** He does get killed once, but [[OnlyMostlyDead he gets better]].

to:

* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
**
''Franchise/StarTrek'': Despite it being the {{Trope Namer|s}}, quite a few of the characters that die in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' are blue shirts or gold shirts. The first broadcast episode of the original series ("The Man Trap") has a body count of four minor crewmen, most of whom of course become monster chow shortly after beaming down to the planet. Ironically, the casualties are two blues, a gold and one unknown wearing a hazmat suit.
** Despite it being the {{Trope Namer|s}}, quite a few of the characters that die in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' are blue shirts or gold shirts.
suit. In fact, no red shirt deaths occur until the seventh episode. The dubious honor goes to Crewman Mathews, who is pushed into a bottomless pit in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?"
** This
Of?". In addition, [[AvertedTrope this trope is averted completely averted]] in "A Taste of Armageddon". Armageddon": Kirk, Spock, and three redshirts beam down to Eminiar VII where, upon landing, they are sent to be killed. ''All'' of them survive.
** Scotty is practically one of the only named character few characters to wear a red shirt in the original series, and he's one of the few characters to survive into "Next Generation."
***
" He does ''does'' get killed once, but [[OnlyMostlyDead he gets better]].



** An interesting case also occurs in "By Any Other Name". Two redshirts are [[AndIMustScream turned into crystals]], one of whom is a hot female yeoman, who would usually survive. The other is a more typical [[MenAreTheExpendableGender male]] security officer and is also {{black|DudeDiesFirst}}. [[WouldHitAGirl It's the former that gets crushed into powder, however.]]
** There is in fact an even more unfortunate color to be wearing, but it's more obscure: The [[http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Hansen_(Commander) two]] [[http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Harold characters]] who wore the same beigey-yellow shirt both died in attacks on outposts, along with everyone with them.
** Even the engineers (non-security redshirts during ''TOS'') aren't safe, as shown in "The Ultimate Computer".
** According to [[http://www.sitelogicmarketing.com/blog/02-analytics-according-to-captain-kirk this]] article about analytics, red shirts do, in fact, die the most in TOS (74% of all Enterprise crew deaths.)
** According to [[http://youtu.be/GRp92HXDlgY?t=1m50s another set of statistics about Star Trek deaths]], red shirt deaths actually ''only'' make up 58% of the deaths. However, since there are so many red shirts, their ''mortality rate'' is actually lower than the yellow shirts' (25 of 239 (about 10.5%) compared to 10 of 55 (about 18%)). In fact, even if you go by 43 being the number of red shirt deaths, the yellow shirts ''still'' have a slightly higher mortality rate.
** Later incarnations of ''Star Trek'' (''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'') invert the term by switching uniform colors. Command staff in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' wore yellowish uniforms and operations staff (such as security) red; from ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' on this was swapped, making gold shirts the new target of preference while red shirts were usually safe and secure on bridge duty if not for the [[ExplosiveInstrumentation usual exploding console]]. The first goldshirt to receive this honor was Lt. Singh in "Lonely Among Us".
** Not always, though, as the helm officer on the ''Enterprise''-D was generally a redshirted ensign whose main function was to underscore how great the danger to the ship was by being the person on the bridge to die because of exploding consoles/suddenly materialising aliens/subspace phenomenon of the week/sentient voids in space/etc. Probably the best example is Ensign Haskell, who [[LargeHam died an energetic death]] in "Where Silence Has Lease".

to:

** An interesting case also occurs in "By Any Other Name". Two redshirts are [[AndIMustScream turned into crystals]], one of whom is a hot female yeoman, who would usually survive. The other is a more typical [[MenAreTheExpendableGender male]] security officer and is also {{black|DudeDiesFirst}}. [[WouldHitAGirl It's the former that gets crushed into powder, however.]]
** There is in fact an even more unfortunate color to be wearing, but it's more obscure: The [[http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Hansen_(Commander) two]] [[http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Harold characters]] who wore the same beigey-yellow shirt both died in attacks on outposts, along with everyone with them.
** Even the engineers (non-security redshirts during ''TOS'') aren't safe, as shown in "The Ultimate Computer".
** According to [[http://www.sitelogicmarketing.com/blog/02-analytics-according-to-captain-kirk this]] article about analytics, red shirts do, in fact, die the most in TOS (74% of all Enterprise crew deaths.)
** According to [[http://youtu.be/GRp92HXDlgY?t=1m50s another this set of statistics about Star Trek deaths]], red shirt deaths actually ''only'' make up 58% of the deaths. However, since there are so many red shirts, their ''mortality rate'' is actually lower than the yellow shirts' (25 of 239 (about 10.5%) compared to 10 of 55 (about 18%)). In fact, even if you go by 43 being the number of red shirt deaths, the yellow shirts ''still'' have a slightly higher mortality rate.
** Later incarnations of ''Star Trek'' (''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'') invert the term by switching uniform colors. Command staff All in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' wore yellowish uniforms and operations staff (such as security) red; from ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' on this was swapped, making gold shirts the new target of preference while red shirts were usually safe and secure on bridge duty if not for the [[ExplosiveInstrumentation usual exploding console]]. The first goldshirt to receive this honor was Lt. Singh in "Lonely Among Us".
** Not always, though, as the helm officer on the ''Enterprise''-D was generally a redshirted ensign whose main function was to underscore how great the danger to the ship was by
all, Star Trek being the person on TropeNamer makes this an UnbuiltTrope: Despite some showings of HollywoodTactics, the bridge Federation's [[SpaceMarine land-based military forces are repeatedly shown to die because be highly competent,]] and rarely are deaths of exploding consoles/suddenly materialising aliens/subspace phenomenon of any magnitude simply [[ForgottenFallenFriend forgotten,]] or simply considered unimportant to the week/sentient voids in space/etc. Probably plot. As [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJzQmh9TuqM these]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-_lrf44Gw0 scenes]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIZ3EuvTXFc demonstrate,]] later shows had the best example is Ensign Haskell, who [[LargeHam died an energetic death]] in "Where Silence Has Lease".nameless background characters averting HollywoodTactics and demonstrating great combat skill and effectiveness, even when very poorly supplied and heavily understaffed.
15th Jul '16 4:26:15 PM Discar
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This is sometimes {{justified|Trope}} by the idea that the doomed Red Shirts are actually ''quite'' competent, [[MenOfSherwood especially in other areas]], but they've never had any formal training in how to fight [[OutsideContextVillain beings that can kill them simply if you look at them funny.]] In other words, take TheWorfEffect and apply it to an entire military.

to:

This is sometimes {{justified|Trope}} by the idea that the doomed Red Shirts are actually ''quite'' competent, [[MenOfSherwood especially in other areas]], but they've never had any formal training in how to fight [[OutsideContextVillain beings that can kill them simply if you look at them funny.]] funny. In other words, take TheWorfEffect and apply it to an entire military.
15th Jul '16 8:50:02 AM FlakyPorcupine
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* Earth's military in ''VideoGame/WarOfTheMonsters'' stand no chance for the monsters, who are seen casually destroying tanks and helicopters in cutscenes.
4th Jul '16 1:09:13 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'': The Knights of Camelot, apart from the named ones...and even many of them got it eventually. Or in the case of Sir Leon, a couple times.

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* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'': ''Series/{{Merlin 2008}}'': The Knights of Camelot, apart from the named ones...and even many of them got it eventually. Or in the case of Sir Leon, a couple times.
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