History Main / RecycledPremise

6th Dec '16 3:32:15 PM MrLavisherMoot
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* Creator/RockstarGames is a serious offender: Compare ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto3'', ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity Vice City]]'', ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]'' and ''VideoGame/{{Manhunt}}'' to ''Film/TheGodfather'', ''Film/{{Scarface 1983}}'', ''Film/MenaceIISociety'' and ''Film/TheRunningMan''. The main character of ''Vice City'' even has a mansion that contains obvious {{Shout Out}}s to ''Scarface''. Also worth noting that both ''Godfather'' and ''Scarface'' have been turned into games that rip off the gameplay style of ''GTA''. ''Vice City'' also needs to mention ''Series/MiamiVice''. Considering the sidekick from the show is your sidekick in the game...

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* Creator/RockstarGames is a serious offender: Compare ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto3'', ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIII'', ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity Vice City]]'', ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]'' and ''VideoGame/{{Manhunt}}'' to ''Film/TheGodfather'', ''Film/{{Scarface 1983}}'', ''Film/{{Scarface|1983}}'', ''Film/MenaceIISociety'' and ''Film/TheRunningMan''. The main character of ''Vice City'' even has a mansion that contains obvious {{Shout Out}}s to ''Scarface''. Also worth noting that both ''Godfather'' and ''Scarface'' have been turned into games that rip off the gameplay style of ''GTA''. ''Vice City'' also needs to mention ''Series/MiamiVice''. Considering the sidekick from the show is your sidekick in the game...
15th Sep '16 5:39:12 PM MarkLungo
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** "Prisoner of War" and "Assault on 42" both see Captain America leading heroes and villains trapped in an intergalactic prison in fending off a destructive alien force together. Worse, Disney XD aired the latter episode only a little over a month after the former's premiere. At least the motive behind fending off the alien differs in each of those two cases.
** "Ultron Unlimited" seems almost like [[XMeetsY "Gamma World" meets "Infiltration"]], as it has a villain who wants to remake the world in his image[[note]]The Leader turns people into monsters in "Gamma World," Ultron replaces people with robots in "Ultron Unlimited"[[/note]], and evil duplicates of the Avengers assisting a world domination plan[[note]]Skrull Avengers in "Infiltration," robot Avengers in "Ultron Unlimited"[[/note]]. However, you could argue that this episode takes those plot points into different directions.
** "Some Assembly Required" and "The Deadliest Man Alive" both have a villain manipulating the Hulk into acting even more destructive than usual, nearly destroying his relationship with the other Avengers in the process. They even both end with [[spoiler: Hulk quitting the Avengers, although the second time at least has Hulk assure the others that he'll return eventually]].

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** "Prisoner "[[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS2E10PrisonerOfWar Prisoner of War" War]]" and "Assault "[[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS2E16AssaultOn42 Assault on 42" 42]]" both see Captain America ComicBook/CaptainAmerica leading heroes and villains trapped in an intergalactic prison in fending off a destructive alien force together. Worse, Disney XD Creator/DisneyXD aired the latter episode only a little over a month after the former's premiere. At least the motive behind fending off the alien differs in each of those two cases.
** "Ultron Unlimited" "[[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS2E17UltronUnlimited Ultron Unlimited]]" seems almost like [[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS1E12GammaWorldPart1 "Gamma]] [[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS1E13GammaWorldPart2 World]]" [[XMeetsY "Gamma World" meets meets]] [[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS2E11Infiltration "Infiltration"]], as it has a villain who wants to remake the world in his image[[note]]The Leader turns people into monsters in "Gamma World," Ultron replaces people with robots in "Ultron Unlimited"[[/note]], and evil duplicates of the Avengers assisting a world domination plan[[note]]Skrull Avengers in "Infiltration," robot Avengers in "Ultron Unlimited"[[/note]]. However, you could argue that this episode takes those plot points into different directions.
** "Some "[[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS1E8SomeAssemblyRequired Some Assembly Required" Required]]" and "The "[[Recap/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroesS2E22TheDeadliestManAlive The Deadliest Man Alive" Alive]]" both have a villain manipulating the Hulk Franchise/TheIncredibleHulk into acting even more destructive than usual, nearly destroying his relationship with the other Avengers in the process. They even both end with [[spoiler: Hulk quitting the Avengers, although the second time at least has Hulk assure the others that he'll return eventually]].
15th Sep '16 5:32:54 PM MarkLungo
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* Paranormal elements aside, Manga/DeathNote is a story about brilliant yet secretive student committing crimes "for the greater good of society" and slowly becoming a megalomaniac in process, all while playing mind games against a genius detective [[spoiler:(which eventually get him in trouble and his worldview brutally shattered in the end)]]. In other words, it's pretty much a modern supernatural version of Dostoevsky's Literature/CrimeAndPunishment.
* Nearly every Franchise/{{Gundam}} series since [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam the original]], though this is quite intentional and pretty much the point of the series.

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* Paranormal elements aside, Manga/DeathNote ''Franchise/DeathNote'' is a story about brilliant yet secretive student committing crimes "for the greater good of society" and slowly becoming a megalomaniac in process, all while playing mind games against a genius detective [[spoiler:(which eventually get him in trouble and his worldview brutally shattered in the end)]]. In other words, it's pretty much a modern supernatural version of Dostoevsky's Literature/CrimeAndPunishment.
* Nearly every Franchise/{{Gundam}} ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' series since [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam the original]], though this is quite intentional and pretty much the point of the series.
9th Sep '16 10:00:16 AM Dravencour
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* Paranormal elements aside, Manga/DeathNote is a story about brilliant yet secretive student committing crimes "for the greater good of society" and slowly becoming a megalomaniac in process, all while playing mind games against a genius detective [[spoiler:(which eventually get him in trouble and his worldview brutally shattered in the end)]]. In other words, it's pretty much a modern, more fictional version of Dostoevsky's Literature/CrimeAndPunishment.

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* Paranormal elements aside, Manga/DeathNote is a story about brilliant yet secretive student committing crimes "for the greater good of society" and slowly becoming a megalomaniac in process, all while playing mind games against a genius detective [[spoiler:(which eventually get him in trouble and his worldview brutally shattered in the end)]]. In other words, it's pretty much a modern, more fictional modern supernatural version of Dostoevsky's Literature/CrimeAndPunishment.
4th Sep '16 10:11:55 AM Malady
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** ''Video Village Jr.'' (1962) -> ''Shenanigans'' (1964--although ''Shenanigans'' actually originated in 1960 on local New York TV)
** ''P.D.Q.'' (1965) -> ''Baffle'' (1973)
** ''He Said, She Said'' (1969) -> ''{{Tattletales}}'' (1974)
** ''The Who, What Or Where Game'' (1969) -> ''The Challengers'' (1990)
** ''Everybody's Talking'' (1967) -> ''Hollywood's Talking'' (1973)
** ''Showoffs'' (1975) -> ''Body Language'' (1984),
** ''Shoot For The Stars'' (1977) -> ''Double Talk'' (1986)

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** ''Video Village Jr.'' ''Series/VideoVillageJr'' (1962) -> ''Shenanigans'' ''Series/{{Shenanigans}}'' (1964--although ''Shenanigans'' actually originated in 1960 on local New York TV)
** ''P.D.Q.'' ''Series/{{PDQ}}'' (1965) -> ''Baffle'' ''Series/{{Baffle}}'' (1973)
** ''He Said, She Said'' ''Series/HeSaidSheSaid'' (1969) -> ''{{Tattletales}}'' ''Series/{{Tattletales}}'' (1974)
** ''The Who, What Or Where Game'' ''Series/TheWhoWhatOrWhereGame'' (1969) -> ''The Challengers'' ''Series/TheChallengers'' (1990)
** ''Everybody's Talking'' ''Series/EverybodysTalking'' (1967) -> ''Hollywood's Talking'' ''Series/HollywoodsTalking'' (1973)
** ''Showoffs'' ''Series/{{Showoffs}}'' (1975) -> ''Body Language'' ''Series/BodyLanguage'' (1984),
** ''Shoot For The Stars'' ''Series/ShootForTheStars'' (1977) -> ''Double Talk'' ''Series/DoubleTalk'' (1986)
29th Aug '16 4:38:27 PM nombretomado
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* {{Nickelodeon}}'s ''{{Series/How to Rock}}'' copied {{Disney Channel}}'s ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'' with the episode "How to Rock a Statue" copying "Art Breaker", respectively. Both involve a statue created in the main protagonist's likeness, both involve said protagonist wanting to change the statue (specifically the nose), thus breaking the statue, and both involve the main protagonist acting as a double for the statue.

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* {{Nickelodeon}}'s Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s ''{{Series/How to Rock}}'' copied {{Disney Creator/{{Disney Channel}}'s ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'' with the episode "How to Rock a Statue" copying "Art Breaker", respectively. Both involve a statue created in the main protagonist's likeness, both involve said protagonist wanting to change the statue (specifically the nose), thus breaking the statue, and both involve the main protagonist acting as a double for the statue.
3rd Aug '16 4:18:05 PM Sharlee
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* ''Film/KissOfTheTarantula'' is basically ''Film/{{Willard}}'' with a {{gender flip}}ped VillainProtagonist and tarantulas instead of rats.

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* ''Film/KissOfTheTarantula'' is basically ''Film/{{Willard}}'' ''[[Literature/RatmansNotebooks Willard]]'' with a {{gender flip}}ped VillainProtagonist and tarantulas instead of rats.
15th Jul '16 5:17:48 PM Malady
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* The third season of ''The Legend of Korra'' has Lin Bei Fong being forced to forgive her long estranged half-sister Suyin for disfiguring her face years ago when Lin broke up a crime Suyin took part in (and in general for Suyin being a pain in the ass who always got what she wanted while Lin got nothing in return for her hard work), which is a pretty blatant rehash of Lin's arc in the first season where she had to learn to let go of her long standing resentment of her former lover Tenzin leaving her for the much younger Pema. It also rehashes a theme from the second season about siblings still suffering damaged relationships as adults due to the mistakes of their parents (in the second season this was between Tenzin and his older siblings, brother Bumi and sister Kya, since their father Aang, unintentionally, neglected the older siblings in favor of Tenzin, who was the only air bender in the family at the time, while in the third season Toph is revealed to have been a less than ideal parent to Lin and Suyin).

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* The third season of ''The Legend of Korra'' ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' has Lin Bei Fong being forced to forgive her long estranged half-sister Suyin for disfiguring her face years ago when Lin broke up a crime Suyin took part in (and in general for Suyin being a pain in the ass who always got what she wanted while Lin got nothing in return for her hard work), which is a pretty blatant rehash of Lin's arc in the first season where she had to learn to let go of her long standing resentment of her former lover Tenzin leaving her for the much younger Pema. It also rehashes a theme from the second season about siblings still suffering damaged relationships as adults due to the mistakes of their parents (in the second season this was between Tenzin and his older siblings, brother Bumi and sister Kya, since their father Aang, unintentionally, neglected the older siblings in favor of Tenzin, who was the only air bender in the family at the time, while in the third season Toph is revealed to have been a less than ideal parent to Lin and Suyin).
9th Jul '16 11:41:49 AM nombretomado
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* In the earlier parts of ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'', the stories often involved the characters' home island being overrun by (usually non-sentient) beings, and the heroes having to collect various {{MacGuffin}}s (masks, mask-like parasites, more masks, disks, pieces of a map), mostly in order to defeat the villains. The Mata Nui sagas were basically built around the formula of baddies showing up, the village elders sharing their knowledge with the heroes, heroes collecting stuff and having in-fights, going underground to face a boss, and coming back up, having learned the importance of teamwork for the umpteenth time. Further, the village of Le-Koro being overrun and its protector Lewa getting mindcontrolled by the enemies, with Onua freeing Lewa and other villagers (with Takua among them) saving Le-Koro was used as a side-plot in two consecutive years.

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* In the earlier parts of ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'', ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'', the stories often involved the characters' home island being overrun by (usually non-sentient) beings, and the heroes having to collect various {{MacGuffin}}s (masks, mask-like parasites, more masks, disks, pieces of a map), mostly in order to defeat the villains. The Mata Nui sagas were basically built around the formula of baddies showing up, the village elders sharing their knowledge with the heroes, heroes collecting stuff and having in-fights, going underground to face a boss, and coming back up, having learned the importance of teamwork for the umpteenth time. Further, the village of Le-Koro being overrun and its protector Lewa getting mindcontrolled by the enemies, with Onua freeing Lewa and other villagers (with Takua among them) saving Le-Koro was used as a side-plot in two consecutive years.
4th Jul '16 7:01:52 AM GitarooHero
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* {{Nickelodeon}}'s ''{{Series/How to Rock}}'' copied {{Disney Channel}}'s ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'' with the episode "How to Rock a Statue" copying "Art Breaker, respectively. Both involve a statue created in the main protagonist's likeness, both involve said protagonist wanting to change the statue (specifically the nose), thus breaking the statue, and both involve the main protagonist acting as a double for the statue.

to:

* {{Nickelodeon}}'s ''{{Series/How to Rock}}'' copied {{Disney Channel}}'s ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'' with the episode "How to Rock a Statue" copying "Art Breaker, Breaker", respectively. Both involve a statue created in the main protagonist's likeness, both involve said protagonist wanting to change the statue (specifically the nose), thus breaking the statue, and both involve the main protagonist acting as a double for the statue.
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