History Main / Realpolitik

30th Dec '17 1:04:12 AM TheWildWestPyro
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** Allied {{Realpolitik}} after the war resulted in actions such as "Operation Paperclip", the de-Nazification of scientists and technical personnel who had built the V2 Rockets for Germany, often using slave labor from concentration camps in dreadful conditions. Indeed, more people were killed making these rockets than the rockets did on its own. The most notorious is Wernher von Braun. The reason for this absorption was that the USA wanted to make sure that the Soviet Union, in the early stages of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, didn't get a leg-up in the space race (they failed). Another notorious case is the story of General Scobie, a British officer appointed by Churchill to sideline the Greek partisans who had resisted Nazism and its collaborators, mostly because several of them were communist, socialist and leftist. This resulted in Scobie arming and putting into place Nazi collaborators and Greek fascists who unleashed three decades of dictatorship, and this manifested itself in British and American troops firing at Greek crowds at a victory-rally.

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** Allied {{Realpolitik}} after the war resulted in actions such as "Operation Paperclip", the de-Nazification of scientists and technical personnel who had built the V2 Rockets for Germany, often using slave labor from concentration camps in dreadful conditions. Indeed, more people were killed making these rockets than the rockets did on its own. The most notorious is Wernher von Braun. The reason for this absorption was that the USA wanted to make sure that the Soviet Union, in the early stages of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, didn't get a leg-up in the space race (they failed). Another notorious case is the story of General Scobie, a British officer appointed by Churchill to sideline the Greek partisans who had resisted Nazism and its collaborators, mostly because several of them were communist, socialist and leftist. This resulted in Scobie arming and putting into place Nazi collaborators and Greek fascists who unleashed three decades of dictatorship, and this manifested itself in [[https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/nov/30/athens-1944-britains-dirty-secret British and American troops firing at Greek crowds at a victory-rally.victory rally]].
30th Dec '17 12:47:45 AM TheWildWestPyro
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** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was a ''very'' corrupt authoritarian regime with no interest in become democratic anytime soon. Said corruption and the KMT's terrible domestic policy record disillusioned many American personnel. Yet China's contribution - tying down half of the IJA in China to stop them from garrisoning Japan's Pacific territories - was invaluable to the Allies. As a result, the US did provide China with military aid and tried their best to prop up Chiang's government. By 1945, China had regained several territories (including Taiwan) from Japan, ended most of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unequal_treaty unequal treaties]] and was a permanent member of the UN Security Council. However, corruption had worsened and the regime was struggling to hold itself up after eight years of destructive fighting. The US eventually got frustrated with Chiang and withdrew aid during the civil war, which was one of the decisive factors in the communist victory.

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China Chiang decided to convince the Americans Roosevelt that they were China was a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was a ''very'' corrupt authoritarian regime with no interest in become democratic anytime soon. Said corruption and the KMT's terrible domestic policy record disillusioned many American personnel. Yet China's contribution - tying down half of the IJA in China to stop them from garrisoning Japan's Pacific territories - was invaluable to the Allies. Roosevelt also maintained good relations with Chiang (it helped both men had much in common, such as being staunch anti-colonialists). As a result, the US did provide China with military aid and tried their best to prop up Chiang's government. By 1945, China had regained several territories (including Taiwan) from Japan, ended most of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unequal_treaty unequal treaties]] and was a permanent member of the UN Security Council. However, corruption had worsened and the regime was struggling to hold itself up after eight years of destructive fighting. The US eventually got frustrated with Chiang and withdrew aid during the civil war, which was one of the decisive factors in the communist victory.
30th Dec '17 12:46:29 AM TheWildWestPyro
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** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was a ''very'' corrupt authoritarian regime with no interest in become democratic anytime soon. Said corruption and the KMT's terrible domestic policy record disillusioned many American personnel. Yet China's contribution - tying down half of the IJA in China to stop them from garrisoning Japan's Pacific territories - was invaluable to the Allies. As a result, the US did provide China with military aid and tried their best to prop up Chiang's government. By 1945, China had regained several territories (including Taiwan) from Japan, ended most of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unequal_treaty unequal treaties]] and was a permanent member of the UN Security Council. However, corruption had worsened and the regime was struggling to hold itself up after eight years of destructive fighting. The US eventually got frustrated with Chiang and withdrew aid during the civil war, which was one of the factors in the communist victory.
* During the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, the rationale for the democratic US to prop up, support, and aid autocratic strongman regimes and dictatorships with dubious, if not outright brutal and horrific human rights records just to fight Communism, even overthrowing democratic regimes to make way for such autocracies, was based upon realpolitik. Whether it worked or was effective or not, or whether more humane decisions could have been made to fight Communism (i.e: letting the countries remain democratic and try to work with them) is a very controversial topic when examining US history, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and let's leave it at that]]. The U.S. has pursued a similar policy (and this Wiki will use [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement similar tact]]) in their dealings with the Middle East, with the goals being (a) keeping oil prices reasonable, and (b) minimizing overt hostilities between Israel and her neighbors.

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** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was a ''very'' corrupt authoritarian regime with no interest in become democratic anytime soon. Said corruption and the KMT's terrible domestic policy record disillusioned many American personnel. Yet China's contribution - tying down half of the IJA in China to stop them from garrisoning Japan's Pacific territories - was invaluable to the Allies. As a result, the US did provide China with military aid and tried their best to prop up Chiang's government. By 1945, China had regained several territories (including Taiwan) from Japan, ended most of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unequal_treaty unequal treaties]] and was a permanent member of the UN Security Council. However, corruption had worsened and the regime was struggling to hold itself up after eight years of destructive fighting. The US eventually got frustrated with Chiang and withdrew aid during the civil war, which was one of the decisive factors in the communist victory.
* During the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, the rationale for the democratic US to prop up, support, and aid autocratic strongman regimes and dictatorships with dubious, if not outright brutal and horrific human rights records just to fight Communism, even overthrowing democratic regimes to make way for such autocracies, autocracies or totalitarian juntas, was based upon realpolitik. Whether it worked or was effective or not, or whether more humane decisions could have been made to fight Communism (i.e: letting the countries remain democratic and try to work with them) is a very controversial topic when examining US history, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and let's leave it at that]]. The U.S. has pursued a similar policy (and this Wiki will use [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement similar tact]]) in their dealings with the Middle East, with the goals being (a) keeping oil prices reasonable, and (b) minimizing overt hostilities between Israel and her neighbors.
30th Dec '17 12:46:11 AM TheWildWestPyro
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** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was a''very'' corrupt authoritarian regime, and had no interest in become democratic anytime soon. Said corruption and the KMT's terrible domestic policy record upset many American personnel. Yet China's contribution - tying down half of the IJA to stop them from fortifying their island territories - was invaluable to the Pacific war effort. As a result, the US did provide China with military aid and did their best to prop up Chiang's government (although it was never enough to stop them being ultimately defeated by the communists in the civil war).

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was a''very'' a ''very'' corrupt authoritarian regime, and had regime with no interest in become democratic anytime soon. Said corruption and the KMT's terrible domestic policy record upset disillusioned many American personnel. Yet China's contribution - tying down half of the IJA in China to stop them from fortifying their island garrisoning Japan's Pacific territories - was invaluable to the Pacific war effort. Allies. As a result, the US did provide China with military aid and did tried their best to prop up Chiang's government (although it government. By 1945, China had regained several territories (including Taiwan) from Japan, ended most of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unequal_treaty unequal treaties]] and was never enough to stop them being ultimately defeated by a permanent member of the communists in UN Security Council. However, corruption had worsened and the regime was struggling to hold itself up after eight years of destructive fighting. The US eventually got frustrated with Chiang and withdrew aid during the civil war). war, which was one of the factors in the communist victory.
30th Dec '17 12:41:46 AM TheWildWestPyro
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* One of the most well-known examples of this was the Western Allies allying with the Soviet Union during World War II. On one side, you had a group of largely democratic countries (most of which, admittedly, had large, distinctly un-democratically-run Empires) who had a strong history of anti-Communism. On the other, you had a totalitarian Communist state which had killed nearly a million of its own people as ideological enemies and imprisoned a few million more. What brought them together-- the ''only'' thing, even --was a common EnemyMine in the form of ThoseWackyNazis. While this did lead to beneficial co-operation between the two powers, it also led to things such as what some have called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_betrayal the Western Betrayal]]. Winston Churchill, a vehement anti-Communist, rather famously summed it up as:

to:

* One of the most well-known examples of this was the Western Allies allying with the Soviet Union during World War II. On one side, you had a group of largely democratic countries (most of which, admittedly, had large, distinctly un-democratically-run Empires) who had a strong history of anti-Communism. On the other, you had a totalitarian Communist state which had killed nearly a million of its own people as ideological enemies and imprisoned a few million more. What brought them together-- the ''only'' thing, even --was a common EnemyMine in the form of ThoseWackyNazis.ThoseWackyNazis and Italian fascism. While this did lead to beneficial co-operation between the two powers, it also led to things such as what some have called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_betrayal the Western Betrayal]]. Winston Churchill, a vehement anti-Communist, rather famously summed it up as:



** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was an authoritarian regime, and had no interest in a democratic China anytime soon.

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was an a''very'' corrupt authoritarian regime, and had no interest in a become democratic China anytime soon.soon. Said corruption and the KMT's terrible domestic policy record upset many American personnel. Yet China's contribution - tying down half of the IJA to stop them from fortifying their island territories - was invaluable to the Pacific war effort. As a result, the US did provide China with military aid and did their best to prop up Chiang's government (although it was never enough to stop them being ultimately defeated by the communists in the civil war).
30th Dec '17 12:34:34 AM TheWildWestPyro
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** Let's not forget how the US protected the majority of war criminals from the infamous Unit 731 in the Imperial Japanese Army and giving them political and legal immunity from prosecution in exchange for their cooperation for American bioweapons research. Almost all the core members of Unit 731 are infamous for conducting truly horrific experimentation on unwilling ''live'' subjects (mostly Chinese, White Russians and Koreans), such as vivisecting people while they were unconscious, throwing prisoners in pressure chambers to watch them die and herding men, women and children into huge chambers to be killed by the full effects of bubonic plague or frostbite. By securing cooperation from the war criminals, the US demanded that they shared the data obtained through those experiments with them. It should be noted, though, that the members didn't tell the Americans ''how'' they got the data, but simply the results. When the US government actually discovered [[TheyWouldCutYouUp just how the Unit conducted their so-called research]], many were so horrified that a number of ex-Unit members were pulled from US bioweapons projects and handed over to the Soviets, who executed or imprisoned them.

to:

** Let's not forget how the US protected the majority of war criminals from the infamous Unit 731 in the Imperial Japanese Army and giving them political and legal immunity from prosecution in exchange for their cooperation for American bioweapons research. Almost all the core members of Unit 731 are infamous for conducting truly horrific experimentation on unwilling ''live'' subjects (mostly Chinese, White Russians and Koreans), such as vivisecting people while they were unconscious, throwing prisoners in pressure chambers to watch them die and herding men, women and children entire village populations into huge chambers to be killed by the full effects of bubonic plague plague, anthrax or frostbite. By securing cooperation from the war criminals, the US demanded that they shared the data obtained through those experiments with them. It should be noted, though, that the members didn't tell the Americans ''how'' they got the data, but simply the results. When the US government actually discovered [[TheyWouldCutYouUp just how the Unit conducted their so-called research]], many were so horrified that a number of ex-Unit members were pulled from US bioweapons projects and handed over to the Soviets, who executed or imprisoned them.them.
** [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Nationalist China]], the fourth major Allied power, is an interesting case. The regime was a military dictatorship under Generalissimo UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek, controlling China as a single-party state. The Kuomintang ruling party encompassed various bickering wings, from socialists to traditionalists. However, each wing was kept united under Chiang, who settled on a centrist position. This let China get foreign aid from Nazi Germany and the USSR throughout the 1930s. When China joined the Allies in 1941, it was America that took the most interest. America had plenty of business and missionary interests in China, and FDR believed that the nation deserved to become a power with American guidance. So China decided to convince the Americans that they were a potential liberal democracy. This had some basis in fact - the KMT under Chiang was in the "People's Tutelage" stage theorized by its founder, democratic socialist Dr. Sun Yat-sen, which prepared the people for democracy through single-party rule. Although the Americans initially believed this, it become abundantly clear that Chiang's government was an authoritarian regime, and had no interest in a democratic China anytime soon.
17th Dec '17 3:06:39 AM ACW
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* John 'Gentleman Johnny' Marcone, later Accorded Baron Marcone of Chicago in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' is a typical example of the Kingpin type - he's the head of Chicago's underworld, and a ruthless criminal... but after his takeover of the Chicago underworld, he went about a ruthlessly efficient clean-up, doing what Dresden terms, "Putting the 'civil' back in 'civil offender'", cutting collateral damage to a minimum and personally executing anyone who tries to involve or victimise children. As Dresden notes, there's enough decency in him that, to Dresden's irritation, he can't just file him under CompleteMonster and call it a day. However, this relative decency, tight control of Chicago's underworld, and considerable resultant power mean that Dresden winds up saving him on several occasions, and helping him expand his power by becoming an Accorded Baron under the Unseelie Accords, simply because he is far better than the alternative and, in the latter case, Dresden can't be everywhere and Marcone will defend Chicago out of pure pragmatism (it's ''his'' turf) if given the opportunity.

to:

* John 'Gentleman Johnny' Marcone, later Accorded Baron Marcone of Chicago in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' is a typical example of the Kingpin type - he's the head of Chicago's underworld, and a ruthless criminal... but after his takeover of the Chicago underworld, he went about a ruthlessly efficient clean-up, doing what Dresden terms, "Putting the 'civil' back in 'civil offender'", cutting collateral damage to a minimum and personally executing anyone who tries to involve or victimise children. As Dresden notes, there's enough decency in him that, to Dresden's irritation, he can't just file him under CompleteMonster pure villain and call it a day. However, this relative decency, tight control of Chicago's underworld, and considerable resultant power mean that Dresden winds up saving him on several occasions, and helping him expand his power by becoming an Accorded Baron under the Unseelie Accords, simply because he is far better than the alternative and, in the latter case, Dresden can't be everywhere and Marcone will defend Chicago out of pure pragmatism (it's ''his'' turf) if given the opportunity.
13th Dec '17 1:16:24 AM PaulA
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* One of the most well-known examples of this was the Western Allies allying with the Soviet Union during WW2. On one side, you had a group of largely democratic countries (most of which, admittedly, had large, distinctly un-democratically-run Empires) who had a strong history of anti-Communism. On the other, you had a totalitarian Communist state which had killed nearly a million of its own people as ideological enemies and imprisoned a few million more. What brought them together-- the ''only'' thing, even --was a common EnemyMine in the form of ThoseWackyNazis. While this did lead to beneficial co-operation between the two powers, it also led to things such as what some have called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_betrayal the Western Betrayal]]. Winston Churchill, a vehement anti-Communist, rather famously summed it up as:

to:

* One of the most well-known examples of this was the Western Allies allying with the Soviet Union during WW2.World War II. On one side, you had a group of largely democratic countries (most of which, admittedly, had large, distinctly un-democratically-run Empires) who had a strong history of anti-Communism. On the other, you had a totalitarian Communist state which had killed nearly a million of its own people as ideological enemies and imprisoned a few million more. What brought them together-- the ''only'' thing, even --was a common EnemyMine in the form of ThoseWackyNazis. While this did lead to beneficial co-operation between the two powers, it also led to things such as what some have called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_betrayal the Western Betrayal]]. Winston Churchill, a vehement anti-Communist, rather famously summed it up as:
7th Dec '17 11:01:19 AM DarkPhoenix94
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** Fury's protege, Director Peter Wisdom of [=MI13=], is an even worse offender. He takes advantage of Parliament's fears over the current global situation in order to amass resources and power at a rate that frightens the rest of British Intelligence, uses blackmail and bribery to secure the aid of superpowered individuals, and is working to control, or outright supplant altogether, the Ministry of Magic as Britain's magic response organization.

to:

** Fury's protege, protégé, Director Peter Wisdom of [=MI13=], is an even worse offender. offender, having almost none of his teacher's scruples and being a textbook example of TheUnfettered. He takes advantage of Parliament's fears over the current global situation in order to amass resources and power at a rate that frightens the rest of British Intelligence, uses blackmail and bribery to secure the aid of superpowered individuals, and is working to control, or outright supplant altogether, the currently crippled Ministry of Magic as Britain's magic response organization.organisation.
** Doctor Strange, meanwhile, plays both of the above, and just about everyone else like a harp, even when they ''know'' he's manipulating them. How? Two reasons. First, they know that he never lies. This is not the same as being honest, but it's an important baseline. Second, the consequences of ''not'' doing what he advises are usually a great deal worse. This means that everyone winds up, reluctantly, marching to Strange's fife.


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* John 'Gentleman Johnny' Marcone, later Accorded Baron Marcone of Chicago in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' is a typical example of the Kingpin type - he's the head of Chicago's underworld, and a ruthless criminal... but after his takeover of the Chicago underworld, he went about a ruthlessly efficient clean-up, doing what Dresden terms, "Putting the 'civil' back in 'civil offender'", cutting collateral damage to a minimum and personally executing anyone who tries to involve or victimise children. As Dresden notes, there's enough decency in him that, to Dresden's irritation, he can't just file him under CompleteMonster and call it a day. However, this relative decency, tight control of Chicago's underworld, and considerable resultant power mean that Dresden winds up saving him on several occasions, and helping him expand his power by becoming an Accorded Baron under the Unseelie Accords, simply because he is far better than the alternative and, in the latter case, Dresden can't be everywhere and Marcone will defend Chicago out of pure pragmatism (it's ''his'' turf) if given the opportunity.
** Lara Raith of the White Court is a similar case, with her and Dresden repeatedly using each other as catspaws to achieve their own ends, and [[EnemyMine both are willing to make alliances to deal with mutual enemies.]] This is despite the fact that she's perfectly happy to admit that she's a monster, if an AffablyEvil one, and Dresden has made it bluntly clear that she is "on his list", as is Marcone.
** Mab, Queen of the Winter Court, is basically the Queen of Realpolitik too, being the most purely pragmatic character in the Dresdenverse. She's also absolutely terrifying.
8th Nov '17 7:06:27 PM ZimFan89
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* ''Fanfic/SummerCrowns'' has the alliances that the Dragonhunt forges with the Tattered Prince and Salladhor Saan against the Free Cities, despite most of the former's leadership not caring for either of them.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Realpolitik