History Main / ReadingtheEnemysMail

19th Jun '16 2:39:45 PM nombretomado
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* In ''TheThrawnTrilogy'', eventually the New Republic did figure out that Thrawn was aware of all the plans they made in the Imperial Palace on Coruscant. They spent a lot of effort going through the palace trying to find the listening devices, to no avail. Turns out Delta Source was right in front of them the whole time.
* In DanBrown's ''Literature/DigitalFortress'', the NSA has a supercomputer capable cracking the digital encyrption keys used in e-mails. The titular program is touted as being unbreakable, prompting the NSA to [[spoiler:try and steal the program and secretly install a backdoor into the program, giving them unlimited access to enemy e-mail communications. However, things don't go as planned.]]

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* In ''TheThrawnTrilogy'', ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'', eventually the New Republic did figure out that Thrawn was aware of all the plans they made in the Imperial Palace on Coruscant. They spent a lot of effort going through the palace trying to find the listening devices, to no avail. Turns out Delta Source was right in front of them the whole time.
* In DanBrown's Creator/DanBrown's ''Literature/DigitalFortress'', the NSA has a supercomputer capable cracking the digital encyrption encryption keys used in e-mails. The titular program is touted as being unbreakable, prompting the NSA to [[spoiler:try and steal the program and secretly install a backdoor into the program, giving them unlimited access to enemy e-mail communications. However, things don't go as planned.]]
23rd Oct '15 10:50:27 AM megarockman
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* The Americans also cracked the Japanese ciphers in WorldWarTwo.

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* The Americans also cracked the Japanese ciphers in WorldWarTwo. In particular, the cracking of the Imperial Japanese Navy's JN-25b code by early 1942 allowed the US to get early warning that the IJN was planning a big operation around some place they only called "AF". On a hunch, the US [[BluffTheEavesdropper instructed the US Navy base at Midway Island to fake a water supply problem and broadcast it uncoded over radio]]; within 24 hours the Japanese had parroted the information via JN-25b saying that AF was short on water, confirming that Midway was the target and allowing the US Navy to plan a trap around them.
6th Oct '15 8:12:49 PM jormis29
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* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zimmermann_Telegram Zimmermann Telegram]] was a diplomatic note that was sent by the German Empire to Mexico, looking at seeing whether Mexico would be interested in declaring war on the United States should the increasingly pro-Triple-Entente US enter World War I. The Germans promised financial and military aid to help Mexico reclaim the "lost territories" of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. This telegram was intercepted by the British as it was passing through the US (direct communication lines from Germany to the Western Hemisphere were cut by the British, so the only way the Germans could communicate with their embassies in the Americas was via Canada and the US) and turned over to the Americans (Britain had to find other pieces of evidence so as to avoid admitting it was reading the US's diplomatic mail), thus further enraging American public opinion and leading to the US's entry into WW1 on the side of the Entente. (Mexico, by the way, declined the offer.)

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* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zimmermann_Telegram Zimmermann Telegram]] was a diplomatic note that was sent by the German Empire to Mexico, looking at seeing whether Mexico would be interested in declaring war on the United States should the increasingly pro-Triple-Entente US enter World War I. The Germans promised financial and military aid to help [[MexicoCalledTheyWantTexasBack Mexico reclaim the "lost territories" of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas.Texas]]. This telegram was intercepted by the British as it was passing through the US (direct communication lines from Germany to the Western Hemisphere were cut by the British, so the only way the Germans could communicate with their embassies in the Americas was via Canada and the US) and turned over to the Americans (Britain had to find other pieces of evidence so as to avoid admitting it was reading the US's diplomatic mail), thus further enraging American public opinion and leading to the US's entry into WW1 on the side of the Entente. (Mexico, by the way, declined the offer.)
6th Oct '15 4:52:25 PM MRAustin
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** The bombing of Coventry during the Blitz is also believed to be a cover-up; ordering the city be evacuated would have revealed that the codes had been broken.

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** The bombing of Coventry during the Blitz is also believed to be a cover-up; ordering the city be evacuated would have revealed that the codes had been broken. This has been denied by people in a position to know - specifically, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_Victor_Jones R.V. Jones]], who maintained that while messages were intercepted and decrypted indicating that Coventry was a target, the decryption came too late to do anything about it.
20th May '15 4:56:52 AM foxley
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* ''YTheLastMan''. In Paris, Alter is seen going through the mail to find the last "[[IncrediblyLamePun male]]".
* [[ComicBook/VForVendetta V]] hacks Fate, the government's central supercomputer (and, incidentally, [[CargoShip the love of the villain's life]]). He uses it to access both their surveillance systems and the freaking postal system in order to bring down the corrupt regime. Unlike the film, the postal system stuff was just to flip the bird at the establishment by showing them he was not only ''in'' their systems, but able to control them.

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* ''YTheLastMan''.''ComicBook/YTheLastMan''. In Paris, Alter is seen going through the mail to find the last "[[IncrediblyLamePun male]]".
* [[ComicBook/VForVendetta V]] In ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', V hacks Fate, the government's central supercomputer (and, incidentally, [[CargoShip the love of the villain's life]]). He uses it to access both their surveillance systems and the freaking postal system in order to bring down the corrupt regime. Unlike the film, the postal system stuff was just to flip the bird at the establishment by showing them he was not only ''in'' their systems, but able to control them.



* In the 1983 film ''Enigma'', Martin Sheen plays a CIA agent who must steal a Soviet scrambler from East Berlin. The CIA already have one- this is just a BatmanGambit to convince the Soviets they don't.

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* In the 1983 film ''Enigma'', ''Film/{{Enigma}}'', Martin Sheen plays a CIA agent who must steal a Soviet scrambler from East Berlin. The CIA already have one- this is just a BatmanGambit to convince the Soviets they don't.


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[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* A sketch on ''Series/HorribleHistories'' has Sir Francis Walsingham advertising his new postal service where your mail will be picked up, sorted, read by a spy...
[[/folder]]
15th Jan '15 7:35:14 AM Frantziscu
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** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in Sardinian Language (''Sardu''): regarded by many scholars to be the living language closest to Classical Latin, it is not an Italian dialect nor by any means related to Italian. In Italy, it is notoriously known for its difficulty to be actually understood by anyone not speaking it (that is, Italians and many Sardinians themselves, being and endangered language), unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but actual Sardinians speaking their native dialects (which, even though they are all pretty much mutually intelligible, vary greatly the pronunciation of words).

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** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinian_language Sardinian Language Language]] (''Sardu''): regarded by many scholars to be the living language closest to Classical Latin, it is not an Italian dialect nor by any means related to Italian. In Italy, it is notoriously known for its difficulty to be actually understood by anyone not speaking it (that is, Italians and many Sardinians themselves, being and endangered language), unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but actual Sardinians speaking their native dialects (which, even though they are all pretty much mutually intelligible, vary greatly the pronunciation of words).
15th Jan '15 6:46:52 AM Frantziscu
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** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in Sardinian Language: regarded by many scholars to be the living language closest to Classical Latin, it is not an Italian dialect nor by any means related to Italian. In Italy, it is notoriously known for its difficulty to be actually understood by anyone not speaking it (that is, Italians and many Sardinians themselves, being and endangered language), unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but actual Sardinians speaking their native dialects (which, even though they are all pretty much mutually intelligible, vary greatly the pronunciation of words).

to:

** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in Sardinian Language: Language (''Sardu''): regarded by many scholars to be the living language closest to Classical Latin, it is not an Italian dialect nor by any means related to Italian. In Italy, it is notoriously known for its difficulty to be actually understood by anyone not speaking it (that is, Italians and many Sardinians themselves, being and endangered language), unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but actual Sardinians speaking their native dialects (which, even though they are all pretty much mutually intelligible, vary greatly the pronunciation of words).
15th Jan '15 6:41:38 AM Frantziscu
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** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in Sardinian Language: regarded by many scholars to be the living language closest to Classical Latin, it is not an Italian dialect nor by any means related to Italian. In Italy, it is notoriously known for its difficulty to be actually understood by anyone not speaking it (that is, Italians and many Sardinians themselves, being and endangered language), unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but native Sardinians speaking their native dialects (which, even though they are all pretty much mutually intelligible, vary greatly the pronunciation of words).

to:

** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in Sardinian Language: regarded by many scholars to be the living language closest to Classical Latin, it is not an Italian dialect nor by any means related to Italian. In Italy, it is notoriously known for its difficulty to be actually understood by anyone not speaking it (that is, Italians and many Sardinians themselves, being and endangered language), unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but native actual Sardinians speaking their native dialects (which, even though they are all pretty much mutually intelligible, vary greatly the pronunciation of words).
15th Jan '15 6:35:59 AM Frantziscu
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** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in Sardinian Language, that, while strictly related to Italian (a language many in the Austro-Hungarian Empire were ''native speakers'' of, thanks to its multi-ethnic nature), cannot be understood by anyone not speaking it unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but actual Sardinians speaking their native dialects.

to:

** OlderThanTheyThink: in the [[WorldWarI previous war]], Italian communications were handled in Sardinian Language, that, while strictly Language: regarded by many scholars to be the living language closest to Classical Latin, it is not an Italian dialect nor by any means related to Italian (a language many in the Austro-Hungarian Empire were ''native speakers'' of, thanks to Italian. In Italy, it is notoriously known for its multi-ethnic nature), cannot difficulty to be actually understood by anyone not speaking it (that is, Italians and many Sardinians themselves, being and endangered language), unless spoken ''very'' slowly. And to be sure it couldn't be understood, the code-talkers weren't Italians speaking the literary version of Sardinian (that ''may'' have been understood), but actual native Sardinians speaking their native dialects.dialects (which, even though they are all pretty much mutually intelligible, vary greatly the pronunciation of words).
12th Sep '14 7:29:48 PM Bissek
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Added DiffLines:

* The W.E.B. Griffin ''Corps'' novels spend a lot of time discussing MAGIC (The codename for intercepted and decrypted Japanese communications), the importance of the data brought in by it, and the efforts necessary to ensure that (As one non-MAGIC communication obliquely put it) the rabbit stayed in the hat.
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