History Main / RareGuns

18th Aug '17 5:10:22 AM EDP
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[AC:Comic Books]]
* ''ComicBook/DylanDog'' owns an antique [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodeo_Model_1889 Bodeo Modello 1889]]-and not in Italy, where it could be relatively common having been stanard issue for about fifty years, but in ''Britain''. Endlessly {{Lampshaded}} by anyone who recognizes it, [[RunningGag who invariably asks why he still uses one, how did he get one, or where does he get the munitions]].
12th Aug '17 10:28:48 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


This is mostly because some models of gun can [[RuleOfCool look incredibly cool]] or futuristic despite having real-life problems with their functionality or production that make them unpopular or dismal failures. Or it could be a case of a writer wanting to show they [[ShownTheirWork did their research]] by deliberately picking form over function without going completely into the realm of fiction. Of course, no one's supposed to care. Alternately, some authors may simply wish to avoid associating a fictional character or group with real-world products, and so choose abandoned concepts and rare weapons with fewer economic and political baggage.

to:

This is mostly because some models of gun can [[RuleOfCool look incredibly cool]] or futuristic despite having real-life problems with their functionality or production that make them unpopular unpopular, uncommon, or dismal failures. Or it could be a case of a writer wanting to show they [[ShownTheirWork did their research]] by deliberately picking form over function without going completely into the realm of fiction. Of course, no one's supposed to care. Alternately, some authors may simply wish to avoid associating a fictional character or group with real-world products, and so choose abandoned concepts and rare weapons with fewer economic and political baggage.
11th Aug '17 1:04:52 PM TheFarmboy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The De Lisle Carbine was designed in 1942 to be used to silence patrols and guard dogs. The design for the weapon was based on the Lee-Enfield rifle, but with an integrated suppressor over a modified Thompson barrel, chambered for .45 ACP with a detachable magazine based on those of the M1911. Essentially, the end result was a Frankenstein's rifle. The weapon itself was shockingly quiet, comparable to the Welrod in the Pistols page, but with greater range (owing to its longer barrel) and durability[[note]]The Welrod's suppressor used fabric and rubber components, thus requiring replacement after only a few shots. The De Lisle, in comparison, could fire hundreds of rounds before cleaning was required[[/note]]; tests have shown it's even quieter than most modern suppressed weapons, usually by 30 to 60 decibels (it helps that .45 ACP is a subsonic cartridge). However, only 129 were built in total. Modern reproductions have been created in recent years, either [[http://www.valkyriearms.com/delisle.html full rifles]] or [[http://www.specialinterestarms.com/index.php?page=enfield_conversions conversion kits for SMLE's]], the latter coming with the bonus of being able to take unmodified M1911 magazines.

to:

The De Lisle Carbine was designed in 1942 to be used by commandos to silence patrols and guard dogs.dogs during clandestine missions. The design for the weapon was based on the Lee-Enfield rifle, but with an integrated suppressor over a modified Thompson barrel, chambered for .45 ACP with a detachable magazine based on those of the M1911. Essentially, the end result was a Frankenstein's rifle. The weapon itself was shockingly quiet, comparable to the Welrod in the Pistols page, but with greater range (owing to its longer barrel) and durability[[note]]The Welrod's suppressor used fabric and rubber components, thus requiring replacement after only a few shots. The De Lisle, in comparison, could fire hundreds of rounds before cleaning was required[[/note]]; tests have shown it's even quieter than most modern suppressed weapons, usually by 30 to 60 decibels (it helps that .45 ACP is a subsonic cartridge). Most rifles has a solid stock like pictured, but there were also those with a folding stock similar to the later Sterling sub-machine gun. However, only 129 were built in total. Modern reproductions have been created in recent years, either [[http://www.valkyriearms.com/delisle.html full rifles]] or [[http://www.specialinterestarms.com/index.php?page=enfield_conversions conversion kits for SMLE's]], the latter coming with the bonus of being able to take unmodified M1911 magazines.



* Corporal "Smiler" Dawson from ''ComicBook/{{Commando}}'''s "Convict Commandos" series uses this weapon, although knives are his weapon of choice.

to:

* Corporal "Smiler" Dawson from ''ComicBook/{{Commando}}'''s "Convict Commandos" series uses this weapon, although knives [[KnifeNut knives]] are his weapon of choice.
11th Aug '17 1:00:01 PM TheFarmboy
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Ross Rifle]]
->The Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) was equipped with the Ross as they embarked for the Western Front in 1915. Exposing the Ross to the trenches of the western front made apparent that this rifle, which was otherwise an excellent and accurate rifle, was very much so unsuitable for trench warfare.
-->--'''Description''', ''VideoGame/{{Verdun}}''
[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/images_88.jpeg]]
Agreed by many to be one of the worst weapons used in World War I, the Canadian Ross Rifle was issued to Canadian troops when the country was declined Lee-Enfields by the United Kingdom and in need of a service rifle, designed by Charles Ross as a target rifle in 1903. [[note]]By the time the British requested the Canadians to adopt the Enfield years later, the Canadians declined them due to a notion of the time that Canadians must have Canadian-made equipment.[[/note]] The rifle was a straight-pull bolt action, which allows for a quicker cycle time between rounds than even the famously-fast Enfield. The rifle can also be disassembled more easily. However, much of the infamy for this rifle became more apparent thanks to conditions of trench warfare, which made the Mk. III that was used in the war an unreliable weapon to use. The straight-pull bolt requires a complex system of cams and grooves, which makes the rifle jam with even the slightest hint of dirt; there are stories of soldiers having resorted to stomping on the handles of dirtied rifles and failing to budge them an inch. And even if you were to clean it, it's possible to reassemble the rifle with the bolt head facing the wrong direction. When reassembled like this, the bolt would close, but not lock - but the rifle could still be fired, sending the bolt backwards with great force, not actually throwing the bolt out of the rifle entirely as some stories claim but still [[EyeScream smashing something rather delicate]] along its path.[[note]]One variant of the rifle attempted to address this flaw by pinning the bolt in place, but this meant that [[DidntThinkThisThrough the very dirt-sensitive bolt couldn't be disassembled for cleaning]].[[/note]] Many of these flaws were due to the fact that it was adopted too close to the outbreak of the war to have a proper period of testing and addressing of its flaws, which is a much lengthier and complicated process in wartime. When it was time for the rifle to be replaced with the Lee-Enfield in 1916, many Canadians made the switch without any second thought. The Ross rifle nevertheless saw some service in World War II as well, though mostly in the Canadian Navy, British Home Guard, or any branch that wasn't directly on European soil. It was also the official rifle of Latvia, which saw usage during the Latvian War of Independence from 1918 to 1920, and the Soviet Union had acquired many of these rifles to use as target rifles.

Many Ross rifles after being replaced were issued as target rifles for training, where their flaws were less apparent and their use there freed up more battle-worthy rifles for the front lines. Despite how it was hated by the common soldier, snipers had taken a liking for this weapon, as, being designed as a target rifle rather than a military one, it was also a fair bit more accurate at range than the Lee-Enfield. The fact that many snipers were in more ideal conditions and better-trained in disassembly and cleaning meant they wouldn't have to worry about immediate combat or incorrectly reassembling the weapon that much, though the rifle would still jam at the drop of a hat if the rounds fed to it were less-than-perfectly clean. Even though the Ross did horribly as a military rifle, it was popular as a sporting and hunting rifle during peace time before and after the war with models chambered in the .280 Ross cartridge, the first practical cartridge to come close to reaching a muzzle velocity of 3,000 feet/910 meters per second.

Midway through the war, Joseph Alphonse Huot of Quebec's Dominion Rifle Factory had taken the liberty of designing a light machine gun from the leftover Ross rifles, simply called the [[https://www.forgottenweapons.com/huot-automatic-rifle/ Huot Automatic Rifle]]. The result was a rather decent and effective weapon, which had undergone many improvements. However, by the time it was ready, the war had already ended, and unlike the [[CoolGuns/SubmachineGuns Thompson SMG]], which overcame this exact same setback by simply entering the civilian market and making history, the Huot was forgotten by time. [[WhatCouldHaveBeen One can only wonder how well it would've performed if it got the chance to see combat.]]

[[AC:Live-Action Films]]
* Clint Eastwood's character in western film ''Joe Kidd'' used a customized Ross Rifle to escape from some bounty hunters.
* The 1931 Soviet film ''Sniper'' has [[ImproperlyPlacedFirearms Russian troops use this rifle for some reason]],[[note]]Several Ross M1910s were captured after the Russian Civil War and used for target practice in the USSR between the two World Wars[[/note]] alongside their Mosin-Nagants during World War One.
* A Canadian made for TV movie called ''A Bear Named Winnie'' had some soldiers training with the Ross rifle. One soldier voiced his complaints about the Ross' flaws before the General snaps, grabs the soldier's rifle, and madly proclaims the rifle the best in the world.
* One of the IRA soldiers in the "Easter Rising" scene of ''Film/MichaelCollins'' drops one of these while surrendering.

[[AC:Video Games]]
* The Ross Rifle is issued to Canadian troops in ''VideoGames/{{Verdun}}'''s ''Horrors of War'' expansion pack.
* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' allows you to get your hands on the Huot Automatic Rifle. Despite only five of them ever ''existing'', and only used in experimenting.
* The Allied Forces Rifle DLC for ''VideoGame/SniperElite4'' allows you to get your hands on the Ross Rifle. Fortunately there are no muddy trenches for you to worry about.

[[/folder]]
7th Aug '17 3:56:31 AM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RareGuns/AssaultRifles



* RareGuns/AssaultRifles
* RareGuns/MachineGuns


Added DiffLines:

* RareGuns/MachineGuns
5th Aug '17 3:36:10 PM CynicalBastardo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Agent 47 uses this weapon as his primary sniper rifle in the ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' series. In ''VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin'', there is a custom version of this gun, used by ninja.

to:

* Agent 47 uses this weapon as his primary sniper rifle in the ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' series. In ''VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin'', there is a custom version of this gun, used by ninja. In ''VideoGame/HitmanBloodMoney'', it's customisable with a variety of GunAccessories, such as scopes, suppressors, an optional bolt action for greater accuracy, and three types of ammo.
31st Jul '17 10:17:43 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' contains a large amount of rare historical World War I-era guns, many of which are so rare that their inclusion in media is also rare (some are exclusive to just ''Battlefield 1''), making it impractical to create whole entries about them. One example that pushes this trope UpToEleven is the Standschütze Hellriegel M1915, which never went beyond the experimental phase, had no known examples that survived the war, and the only commonly available media showing it are a few known photos, all of which only show the weapon's right side. Worse, its documentation is so sparse that little is known on how it is operated, or who the name stands for. It's a miracle that it is even in the game at all.

to:

* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' contains a large amount of rare historical World War I-era guns, many of which are so rare that their inclusion in media is also rare (some are exclusive to just ''Battlefield 1''), making it impractical to create whole entries about them. One example that pushes this trope UpToEleven is the Standschütze Hellriegel M1915, which never went beyond the experimental phase, had no known examples that survived the war, and the only commonly available media showing it are a few known photos, all of which only show the weapon's right side. Worse, its documentation is so sparse that little is known on how it is operated, or who the name stands for. It's a miracle that it is even in the game at all.
31st Jul '17 10:17:19 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' contains a large amount of rare historical World War I-era guns, many of which are so rare that their inclusion in media is also rare (some are exclusive to just ''Battlefield 1''), making it impractical to create whole entries about them. One example that pushes this trope UpToEleven is the Standschütze Hellriegel M1915, which never went beyond the experimental phase, had no known examples that survived the war, had no known videos that demonstrated its use, and the only commonly available media showing it are a few known photos, all of which only show the weapon's right side. Worse, its documentation is so sparse that nobody even knows what its name means. It's a miracle that it is even in the game at all.

to:

* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' contains a large amount of rare historical World War I-era guns, many of which are so rare that their inclusion in media is also rare (some are exclusive to just ''Battlefield 1''), making it impractical to create whole entries about them. One example that pushes this trope UpToEleven is the Standschütze Hellriegel M1915, which never went beyond the experimental phase, had no known examples that survived the war, had no known videos that demonstrated its use, and the only commonly available media showing it are a few known photos, all of which only show the weapon's right side. Worse, its documentation is so sparse that nobody even knows what its little is known on how it is operated, or who the name means.stands for. It's a miracle that it is even in the game at all.
31st Jul '17 10:11:51 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' contains a large amount of rare historical World War I-era guns, many of which are so rare that their inclusion in media is also rare (some are exclusive to just ''Battlefield 1''), making it impractical to create whole entries about them. One example that pushes this trope UpToEleven is Hellriegel 1915, which never went beyond the experimental phase, had no known examples that survived the war, had no known videos that demonstrated its use, and the only commonly available media showing it are a few known photos, all of which only show the weapon's right side. It's a miracle that it is even in the game at all.

to:

* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' contains a large amount of rare historical World War I-era guns, many of which are so rare that their inclusion in media is also rare (some are exclusive to just ''Battlefield 1''), making it impractical to create whole entries about them. One example that pushes this trope UpToEleven is the Standschütze Hellriegel 1915, M1915, which never went beyond the experimental phase, had no known examples that survived the war, had no known videos that demonstrated its use, and the only commonly available media showing it are a few known photos, all of which only show the weapon's right side.side. Worse, its documentation is so sparse that nobody even knows what its name means. It's a miracle that it is even in the game at all.
31st Jul '17 10:10:38 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

!! Misc Single Examples

[[folder: Misc]]
[[AC:Video Games]]
* ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' contains a large amount of rare historical World War I-era guns, many of which are so rare that their inclusion in media is also rare (some are exclusive to just ''Battlefield 1''), making it impractical to create whole entries about them. One example that pushes this trope UpToEleven is Hellriegel 1915, which never went beyond the experimental phase, had no known examples that survived the war, had no known videos that demonstrated its use, and the only commonly available media showing it are a few known photos, all of which only show the weapon's right side. It's a miracle that it is even in the game at all.
[[/folder]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 713. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RareGuns