History Main / RandomlyGeneratedLoot

1st Jul '16 10:37:57 PM wolftickets1969
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* In the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series, container loot is randomly generated upon entering a building or cell. Loot outside containers is static except for certain [[LevelLockedLoot level-based spawns]]. In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'', Legendary enemies carry "rare" weapons or armor pieces with randomly chosen stat boosts or special effects.
22nd Jan '16 5:55:38 PM GrammarNavi
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* ''SuperSmashBros for 3DS\[=WiiU=]'' has equipment, which a fighter can equip three of, each of which increases one stat, and decreases another, and sometimes giving another advantage or penalty. Anyone can equip badges, but there are other types that only a few fighters (or just one) can use.

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* ''SuperSmashBros ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. for 3DS\[=WiiU=]'' Wii U / 3DS]]'' has equipment, which a fighter can equip three of, each of which increases one stat, and decreases another, and sometimes giving another advantage or penalty. Anyone can equip badges, but there are other types that only a few fighters (or just one) can use.
15th Jun '15 9:46:14 AM Winter
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* In ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' items of rarity higher than "common" have a list of modifiers that can be added (uncommon gets one, rare gets two, very rare gets three). Some can be bought in particular configurations from vendors, but RandomDrops are procedurally generated.

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* In ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' items of rarity higher than "common" have a list of modifiers that can be added (uncommon gets one, rare gets two, very rare gets three). Some can be bought in particular configurations from vendors, but RandomDrops are procedurally generated. As of Season 9.5, equipment created through ItemCrafting also gets randomly-generated mods, a source of much frustration for players seeking "perfect" gear.
13th Mar '15 11:17:49 AM Nerrin
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[[folder: Tabletop Games]]
* Magical weapons and armor in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3rd Edition, when rolled for instead of picked by the GameMaster, are wholly randomly generated starting from weapon or armor type to the nature of the enchantments upon them. Well, random except anything magical always has at least a +1 bonus before any other properties. The strength of the item (minor, medium, or major) sets upper and lower bounds on the power level that can be rolled. It's generally easier to get an extra plus on something rather a special property.
[[/folder]]
26th Oct '14 8:18:51 AM case
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[[folder: Fighting ]]
* ''SuperSmashBros for 3DS\[=WiiU=]'' has equipment, which a fighter can equip three of, each of which increases one stat, and decreases another, and sometimes giving another advantage or penalty. Anyone can equip badges, but there are other types that only a few fighters (or just one) can use.
[[/folder]]



24th Oct '14 1:04:14 PM slvstrChung
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The downside, of course, is that randomness is the enemy of skill development. To get good at something--a FightingGame, a Roguelike, TabletopGame/{{chess}}--you need to do it over and over, learning as you do about patterns and behaviors. Eventually, you reach a point where you can guess what's going to happen next, and what to do under those circumstances. RandomlyGeneratedLoot can slow down this process because one of the things you need to know about are your own character's capabilities--and when those are constantly changing because you're constantly swapping out new equipment, you can't establish a baseline and will have trouble learning to play or fight to the best of your abilities. (This is a big reason why games like ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' have random elements, like CriticalHits, turned off during high-level TournamentPlay.)

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The downside, of course, is that randomness is the enemy of skill development. To get good at something--a FightingGame, a Roguelike, TabletopGame/{{chess}}--you need to do it over and over, learning as you do about patterns and behaviors. Eventually, you reach a point where you can guess what's going to happen next, and what to do under those circumstances. RandomlyGeneratedLoot can slow down this process because one of the things you need to know about are your own character's capabilities--and when those are constantly changing because you're constantly swapping out new equipment, you can't establish a baseline and will have trouble learning to play or fight to the best of your abilities. (This is a big reason why games like ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' have random elements, like CriticalHits, {{Critical Hit}}s, turned off during high-level TournamentPlay.)
24th Oct '14 1:03:39 PM slvstrChung
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This trope has the odd side effect of invoking VideoGameCaringPotential: the loot that emerges from the RandomNumberGod can have a lot of personality, and it's not unusual for players to get attached to their various pieces of gear. Of course, no matter how great your [[ShockAndAwe Sparking]] [[VideoGame/DeadSpace3 Shootbanger]] of [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe +5 Fortitude]] is, there's always something greater awaiting you in the next dungeon, so it can be advisable to keep your emotional distance.

When this is done with levels, see RandomlyGeneratedLevels. Compare and contrast DesignItYourselfEquipment (when the player can control the stats themselves), SocketedEquipment (where the player can determine bonuses themselves and the SwordOfPlotAdvancement (which is usually fixed). SubTrope of RandomDrops.

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The downside, of course, is that randomness is the enemy of skill development. To get good at something--a FightingGame, a Roguelike, TabletopGame/{{chess}}--you need to do it over and over, learning as you do about patterns and behaviors. Eventually, you reach a point where you can guess what's going to happen next, and what to do under those circumstances. RandomlyGeneratedLoot can slow down this process because one of the things you need to know about are your own character's capabilities--and when those are constantly changing because you're constantly swapping out new equipment, you can't establish a baseline and will have trouble learning to play or fight to the best of your abilities. (This is a big reason why games like ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' have random elements, like CriticalHits, turned off during high-level TournamentPlay.)

This trope has the odd side effect of invoking VideoGameCaringPotential: the loot that emerges from the RandomNumberGod can have a lot of personality, and it's not unusual for players to get attached to their various pieces of gear. Of course, no matter how great your [[ShockAndAwe gun is ([[ShockAndAwe Sparking]] [[VideoGame/DeadSpace3 Shootbanger]] of [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe +5 Fortitude]] is, Fortitude]], [[HyperspaceArsenal +6 Grenade capacity]], [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking +3 Socks]]), there's always something greater awaiting you in the next dungeon, so and to exploit it can be advisable you'll need to keep your emotional distance.

discard [[ICallItVera Vera]] or whatever without a second thought. Remember, If every piece of gear in the game is awesome, then every piece is simultaneously VendorTrash.

When this is done with levels, see RandomlyGeneratedLevels. Compare and contrast DesignItYourselfEquipment (when the player can control the stats themselves), SocketedEquipment (where the player can determine bonuses themselves themselves) and the SwordOfPlotAdvancement (which is usually fixed). SubTrope of RandomDrops.
1st Oct '14 8:46:24 AM slvstrChung
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This trope covers equipment which is [[ProceduralGeneration generated using random numbers by the game engine]] rather than being hard-coded into the game. Obviously the algorithms used for this vary, but usually involve some combination of;

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This trope covers equipment which is [[ProceduralGeneration generated using random numbers by the game engine]] rather than being hard-coded into the game. Obviously the algorithms used for this vary, but usually involve some combination of;
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This trope has the odd side effect of invoking VideoGameCaringPotential: the loot that emerges from the RandomNumberGod can have a lot of personality, and it's not unusual for players to get attached to their various pieces of gear. Of course, no matter how great your [[ShockAndAwe Sparking]] [[VideoGame/DeadSpace3 Shootbanger]] of [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe +5 Fortitude]] is, there's always something greater awaiting you in the next dungeon, so it can be advisable to keep your emotional distance.
16th Sep '14 10:35:16 AM hbi2k
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* ''Videogame/RogueLegacy'': Randomised item appearences can furnish you with powerful new equipment or rooms full of fiendish monsters, depending on how the RNG is feeling. Fortunately your next character may be more lucky in their new castle.
12th Jun '14 12:50:06 PM BeerBaron
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** ''Videogame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' averts it with loot outside of containers, which is hand placed and never changes. Savvy veteran players can find extremely high level loot well before it will start being randomly generated in containers.
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