History Main / RandomEncounters

29th Jan '17 4:05:48 PM Malady
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Subtrope of RandomEvent. Contrast PreexistingEncounters, a specific aversion where enemies can be seen (and avoided) on the field, RoamingEnemy, which is for enemies that move (which also may be a PatrollingEnemy), or appear to move from place to place, are triggered by events, or anything which is neither this or PreexistingEncounters. There's also the FairyBattle, a variation where the random encounter isn't hostile but actually helps the player along. See also EncounterBait and EncounterRepellant for the mechanics of adjusting the rate of encounters, as well as EscapeBattleTechnique, for the mechanics of avoiding them once they've started. Compare BigLippedAlligatorMoment, where as that trope is about a single random occurrence that goes unmentioned, this trope covers repeating events that are rarely, if ever, mentioned by the story. Has a pinch of ButThouMust, because players trying to EnjoyTheStorySkipTheGame can find this infuriating.

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Subtrope of RandomEvent. Contrast PreexistingEncounters, a specific aversion where enemies can be seen (and avoided) on the field, RoamingEnemy, which is for enemies that move (which also may be a PatrollingEnemy), PatrollingMook), or appear to move from place to place, are triggered by events, or anything which is neither this or PreexistingEncounters. There's also the FairyBattle, a variation where the random encounter isn't hostile but actually helps the player along. See also EncounterBait and EncounterRepellant for the mechanics of adjusting the rate of encounters, as well as EscapeBattleTechnique, for the mechanics of avoiding them once they've started. Compare BigLippedAlligatorMoment, where as that trope is about a single random occurrence that goes unmentioned, this trope covers repeating events that are rarely, if ever, mentioned by the story. Has a pinch of ButThouMust, because players trying to EnjoyTheStorySkipTheGame can find this infuriating.


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* ''VideoGame/AVeryLongRopeToTheTopOfTheSky'': There is this for most enemies, but sometimes for special enemies like the Balfur Champions, which are standing / sitting about and only are faced when interacted with or in their line of sight.
29th Jan '17 4:02:35 PM Malady
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Subtrope of RandomEvent. Contrast PreexistingEncounters, a specific aversion where enemies can be seen (and avoided) on the field, and FairyBattle, a variation where the random encounter isn't hostile but actually helps the player along. See also EncounterBait and EncounterRepellant for the mechanics of adjusting the rate of encounters, as well as EscapeBattleTechnique, for the mechanics of avoiding them once they've started. Compare BigLippedAlligatorMoment, where as that trope is about a single random occurrence that goes unmentioned, this trope covers repeating events that are rarely, if ever, mentioned by the story. Has a pinch of ButThouMust, because players trying to EnjoyTheStorySkipTheGame can find this infuriating.

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Subtrope of RandomEvent. Contrast PreexistingEncounters, a specific aversion where enemies can be seen (and avoided) on the field, and RoamingEnemy, which is for enemies that move (which also may be a PatrollingEnemy), or appear to move from place to place, are triggered by events, or anything which is neither this or PreexistingEncounters. There's also the FairyBattle, a variation where the random encounter isn't hostile but actually helps the player along. See also EncounterBait and EncounterRepellant for the mechanics of adjusting the rate of encounters, as well as EscapeBattleTechnique, for the mechanics of avoiding them once they've started. Compare BigLippedAlligatorMoment, where as that trope is about a single random occurrence that goes unmentioned, this trope covers repeating events that are rarely, if ever, mentioned by the story. Has a pinch of ButThouMust, because players trying to EnjoyTheStorySkipTheGame can find this infuriating.
27th Jan '17 2:15:54 PM sampacm
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[[folder:Others]]
* ''VideoGame/OneHundredPercentOrangeJuice'' has battle panels in its boards, where if you step in one, you engage either a seagull, a chicken, or a robo-ball, decided randomly. After one of the players reaches Level 4, these panels are replaced for Boss panels, indicating it's time to confront the boss of that particular board.
[[/folder]]
9th Nov '16 6:33:45 PM ArcaneAzmadi
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* ''BreathOfFireII'' was so bad about this that it even had a little dancing imp in its pause screen to indicate the level of "monster activity" in the area (and a "smoke" item that supposedly reduced it).

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* ''VideoGame/BreathOfFireI'' has a pretty ridiculous encounter rate, even when held against other similar games. The developers must have realized this, since they included a merchant in the ''very first town'' that sells [[EncounterRepellant Monster-repelling marbles]]. Smart players should stock up immediately for the sake of their sanity.
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''BreathOfFireII'' was so bad about this that it even had a little dancing imp in its pause screen to indicate the level of "monster activity" in the area (and a "smoke" item that supposedly reduced it).



* ''VideoGame/BreathOfFireI'' has a pretty ridiculous encounter rate, even when held against other similar games. The developers must have realized this, since they included a merchant in the ''very first town'' that sells [[EncounterRepellant Monster-repelling marbles]]. Smart players should stock up immediately for the sake of their sanity.


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* ''VideoGame/LufiaAndTheFortressOfDoom'' had a frustratingly-high encounter rate, with enemies regularly jumping you just 2 or 3 squares after the last batch were disposed of. It could be temporarily alleviated with Pure Water (or ''increased'' with Foul Water if you desperately wanted to farm), but you couldn't block them out completely. Thankfully, ''LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals'' replaced this with [[PreexistingEncounters enemies being visible on the dungeon screen]], who would freely move around as you did with varying levels of aggression, with your party having the ability to stun them with tools such as arrows if you didn't want to fight (although you still faced random encounters on the overworld map).
12th Oct '16 6:33:01 PM Cavery210
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''(For the proper experience, run the music from [[https://youtube.com/watch?v=NLZwxD8kwc8 this video]] while reading this page.)''

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''(For the proper experience, run the music from [[https://youtube.com/watch?v=NLZwxD8kwc8 [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCIfTzsHnkc this video]] while reading this page.)''



''You finished the page! You gain JustForFun/FortyTwo ExperiencePoints, [[MoneySpider $]][[Manga/DragonBall 9001]] [[Franchise/FinalFantasy gil]], and a [[RandomDrop Unicorn]] [[VideoGame/GoldenSun Ring]].'' [-[Insert {{Fanfare}} [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFch6XO5I_c here]]!]-]

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''You finished the page! You gain JustForFun/FortyTwo ExperiencePoints, [[MoneySpider $]][[Manga/DragonBall 9001]] [[Franchise/FinalFantasy gil]], and a [[RandomDrop Unicorn]] [[VideoGame/GoldenSun Ring]].'' [-[Insert {{Fanfare}} [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFch6XO5I_c com/watch?v=ZMovw9o9YCk here]]!]-]
1st Sep '16 8:12:40 AM Diask
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They were invented for {{tabletop RPG}}s and are reasonably common there. The original rationale was that as characters crossed a world map with each square representing half a day's march, they could reasonably expect to meet a pack of wild animals or band of highwaymen every few days or so (the practical reason was to get players TravellingAtTheSpeedOfPlot without obsessively checking behind literally every rock, shrub, and [[AlwaysCheckBehindTheChair chair]] that they might encounter on the way). But in some games it seems you can't walk ten feet down a narrow dungeon hallway without getting ambushed by a somewhat illogical combat encounter with nine mummy wizards.

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They were invented for {{tabletop RPG}}s and are reasonably common there. The original rationale was that as characters crossed a world map with each square representing half a day's march, they could reasonably expect to meet a pack of wild animals or band of highwaymen every few days or so (the practical reason was to get players TravellingAtTheSpeedOfPlot without obsessively [[AlwaysCheckBehindTheChair checking behind literally every rock, shrub, shrub and [[AlwaysCheckBehindTheChair chair]] that they might encounter on the way). But in some games it seems you can't walk ten feet down a narrow dungeon hallway without getting ambushed by a somewhat illogical combat encounter with nine mummy wizards.



* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' [[GenreDeconstruction deconstructs the idea]] by making the encounters in any area finite. As such, it's possible to kill every monster before moving on. Doing things puts you on the game's "No Mercy" path, wherein the remaining monsters are terrified of you. Alternatively, you can [[SheatheYourSword spare the monsters]] and befriend them. By doing so you don't get EXP [[note]][[KarmaMeter Execution Point]][[/note]], but you may get gold dropped by monsters.



** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has a variation of this - there are multiple pre-determined points that can spawn random random and/or special encounters, and walking close enough to them will cause an encounter to be randomly picked off a list and spawn. The random encounters are typically attacks by raiders or mercenaries (which mercenaries you get depends on your Karma; Mister Burke will hire evil Talon Company mercs to assassinate a Good character, while the freelance cops called Regulators will take it upon themselves to put an Evil character down), while Special Encounters run the gamut from two wasters fighting over a refridgerator full of clean water to a flying saucer exploding overhead. This is a mixed bag, as some impressive equipment can be withheld from the player at random (the aforementioned UFO, for example, drops a unique laser pistol that sets the target on fire), or cause tough encounters to spawn very early (as anyone who's had the "wounded [[BossInMooksClothing Deathclaw]]" spawn in front of the Super Duper Mart you visit around level 4 can tell you).

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' ''VideoGame/Fallout3'' has a variation of this - there are multiple pre-determined points that can spawn random random and/or special encounters, and walking close enough to them will cause an encounter to be randomly picked off a list and spawn. The random encounters are typically attacks by raiders or mercenaries (which mercenaries you get depends on your Karma; Mister Burke will hire evil Talon Company mercs to assassinate a Good character, while the freelance cops called Regulators will take it upon themselves to put an Evil character down), while Special Encounters run the gamut from two wasters fighting over a refridgerator full of clean water to a flying saucer exploding overhead. This is a mixed bag, as some impressive equipment can be withheld from the player at random (the aforementioned UFO, for example, drops a unique laser pistol that sets the target on fire), or cause tough encounters to spawn very early (as anyone who's had the "wounded [[BossInMooksClothing Deathclaw]]" spawn in front of the Super Duper Mart you visit around level 4 can tell you).



* ''SigmaStarSaga'' for the GBA justifies this trope. Your allies have unmanned ships flying around above, and when they see something they don't like, they get spooked and summon up the nearest available pilot to help.

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* ''SigmaStarSaga'' ''VideoGame/SigmaStarSaga'' for the GBA justifies this trope. Your allies have unmanned ships flying around above, and when they see something they don't like, they get spooked and summon up the nearest available pilot to help.



* ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 2}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 3}}'' had an interesting variation on this called "Migrant Points". Just before a random encounter, you would be alerted and given the chance to skip the battle by spending Migrant Points (which could be restored by fighting battles or picking up crystals). At higher levels, you could even skip low-level encounters for free. This system was also used in the remake of ''[[VideoGame/WildArms1 Wild ARMs]]'', ''Alter Code F''.
** ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 4}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 5}}'' allow you to turn off random encounters in a particular area after you've "cleared" a save point (usually by fighting a battle of some kind).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 2}}'' ''VideoGame/WildARMs2'' and ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 3}}'' ''VideoGame/WildARMs3'' had an interesting variation on this called "Migrant Points". Just before a random encounter, you would be alerted and given the chance to skip the battle by spending Migrant Points (which could be restored by fighting battles or picking up crystals). At higher levels, you could even skip low-level encounters for free. This system was also used in the remake of ''[[VideoGame/WildArms1 Wild ARMs]]'', ''Alter Code F''.
** ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 4}}'' ''VideoGame/WildARMs4'' and ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 5}}'' ''VideoGame/WildARMs5'' allow you to turn off random encounters in a particular area after you've "cleared" a save point (usually by fighting a battle of some kind).



* There's a reason why ''VideoGame/MOTHER1'' is considered the [[OddballInTheSeries black sheep]] in the ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER}}'' trilogy, and that's due largely in part to the numerous (almost never-ending) random encounters thrust upon the player. Combine that with generally being NintendoHard, and...
** The random encounter rate in ''MOTHER 1'' is ridiculous... when you didn't want to level up. You'd fight every two or three steps.

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* There's a reason why ''VideoGame/MOTHER1'' is considered the [[OddballInTheSeries black sheep]] in the ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER}}'' trilogy, and that's due largely in part to the numerous (almost never-ending) random encounters thrust upon the player. Combine that with generally being NintendoHard, and...\n** The random encounter rate in ''MOTHER 1'' is ridiculous... when you didn't want to level up. You'd fight every two or three steps.



* ''The7thSaga'' has a variant: you can see random encounters in a crystal ball located in the upper left of the screen, allowing you to dodge them in theory. In practice, they're so fast and numerous that you can't avoid them, and [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard they move through walls to catch you]].

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* ''The7thSaga'' ''VideoGame/The7thSaga'' has a variant: you can see random encounters in a crystal ball located in the upper left of the screen, allowing you to dodge them in theory. In practice, they're so fast and numerous that you can't avoid them, and [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard they move through walls to catch you]].



* In ''KingdomHearts'', random encounters are justified by having TheHeartless drawn irresistibly towards keyblades and their wielders. They are then subverted entirely, because on any given world, TheHeartless always appear in exactly the same place every time. What kinds of Heartless appear, however, changes as you progress.

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* In ''KingdomHearts'', ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'', random encounters are justified by having TheHeartless drawn irresistibly towards keyblades and their wielders. They are then subverted entirely, because on any given world, TheHeartless always appear in exactly the same place every time. What kinds of Heartless appear, however, changes as you progress.



* ''{{Suikoden}}'' games are fairly reasonable with the Random Encounters in general, but the [[SuikodenIV fourth game]] has rather high encounter rate to the point of frustrating. The encounter rate in ''SuikodenTierkreis'' is nowhere as bad as the former, but it can be annoying as well.

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* ''{{Suikoden}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' games are fairly reasonable with the Random Encounters in general, but the [[SuikodenIV fourth game]] ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' has rather high encounter rate to the point of frustrating. The encounter rate in ''SuikodenTierkreis'' is nowhere as bad as the former, but it can be annoying as well.



* ''{{Quest64}}'' had a great many of these, to the point of a battle every few steps.

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* ''{{Quest64}}'' ''VideoGame/Quest64'' had a great many of these, to the point of a battle every few steps.



* ''CrisisCore'' has random battle hot spots - locations on the map where random battles occur. In narrow areas with defined rooms they usually trigger once per room assuming you enter and leave the area immediately. If you stay in one of these rooms, they don't stop. In locations without rooms (like outside), they can trigger as often as once every other step.
* ''PhantasyStarIV'' actually subverted the "Timmy gets missed by all the dangerous monsters" bit when you take a sidequest to find a lost child. One actually ''got'' him, but you fortunately manage to beat the monster and rescue him before he gets digested.

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* ''CrisisCore'' ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'' has random battle hot spots - locations on the map where random battles occur. In narrow areas with defined rooms they usually trigger once per room assuming you enter and leave the area immediately. If you stay in one of these rooms, they don't stop. In locations without rooms (like outside), they can trigger as often as once every other step.
* ''PhantasyStarIV'' ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarIV'' actually subverted the "Timmy gets missed by all the dangerous monsters" bit when you take a sidequest to find a lost child. One actually ''got'' him, but you fortunately manage to beat the monster and rescue him before he gets digested.



* ''DigimonWorld3'''s encounter rate doesn't have any balance at all, to the point where you may be able to run across an entire sector without encountering a single enemy, only to encounter an enemy every two steps in the next sector.
* The original [[{{BreathOfFire}} Breath of Fire]] has a pretty ridiculous encounter rate, even when held against other similar games. The developers must have realized this, since they included a merchant in the ''very first town'' that sells [[{{EncounterRepellant}} Monster-repelling marbles]]. Smart players should stock up immediately for the sake of their sanity.
* ''VideoGame/GargoylesQuest'' had a small but interesting twist - it was a typical role-playing game, but walking around in the world during overhead view had a chance to throw you into an action/platforming battle sequence with some mooks. Significant because it was more engaging than the typical turn-based battles, and not many [[{{RPG}} RPGs]] at the time had a system like this. Being a spin-off of Ghosts and Goblins, the platformer levels played in the same way as those games.

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* ''DigimonWorld3'''s ''VideoGame/DigimonWorld3'''s encounter rate doesn't have any balance at all, to the point where you may be able to run across an entire sector without encountering a single enemy, only to encounter an enemy every two steps in the next sector.
* The original [[{{BreathOfFire}} Breath of Fire]] ''VideoGame/BreathOfFireI'' has a pretty ridiculous encounter rate, even when held against other similar games. The developers must have realized this, since they included a merchant in the ''very first town'' that sells [[{{EncounterRepellant}} [[EncounterRepellant Monster-repelling marbles]]. Smart players should stock up immediately for the sake of their sanity.
* ''VideoGame/GargoylesQuest'' had a small but interesting twist - it was a typical role-playing game, but walking around in the world during overhead view had a chance to throw you into an action/platforming battle sequence with some mooks. Significant because it was more engaging than the typical turn-based battles, and not many [[{{RPG}} RPGs]] {{RPG}}s at the time had a system like this. Being a spin-off of Ghosts and Goblins, the platformer levels played in the same way as those games.



* ''Byteria Saga: Heroine Iysayana'' has random battles on the world map and in a few special dungeons. Version 1.0 of Chapter One (the game had originally been [[EpisodicGame episodic]]) had them in all dungeons, but a new version with enemy sprites appeared some months later.

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* ''Byteria Saga: Heroine Iysayana'' has random battles on the world map and in a few special dungeons. Version 1.0 of Chapter One (the game had originally been [[EpisodicGame episodic]]) {{episodic|Game}}) had them in all dungeons, but a new version with enemy sprites appeared some months later.



* ''SlaveMaker'' has random encounters whenever your slave went for a walk. There are some determining factors, such as stats and time of day, but for the most part, who you encounter and what happens is pretty random.

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* ''SlaveMaker'' ''Slave Maker'' has random encounters whenever your slave went for a walk. There are some determining factors, such as stats and time of day, but for the most part, who you encounter and what happens is pretty random.






* ''SwordOfTheStars'' has the Unknown Menaces. Some, such as Von Neumans, Silicoids, and System Killers are persistent once randomly generated and will attack multiple systems until destroyed.

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* ''SwordOfTheStars'' ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars'' has the Unknown Menaces. Some, such as Von Neumans, Silicoids, and System Killers are persistent once randomly generated and will attack multiple systems until destroyed.



* ''SilentStorm'' has these on the map in real-time. The frequency and types of encounters are dependent on the current region. Some appear for up to a minute, while others show up for only a few seconds. Two of the rarer kind of encounters are of note. One pits you against an enemy squad, commanded by a Japanese officer (in Western Europe!). Killing him nets you his shurikens and [[KatanasAreBetter katana]]. Another encounter involves a [=UFO=], surrounded by [=THO=] troops in [[PoweredArmor Panzerkleins]]. Additionally, an [[GameBreaker energy rifle]] can be found near the craft that is the über version of the single-shot energy weapon carried by some [=THO=] troops, as it has [[MoreDakka full auto]] and a 50-shot power cell. That cell can then be taken back to the base and replicated for use by the said rifle, as well as energy cannon Panzerkleins. The energy rifle is an obvious ShoutOut to ''{{X-Com}}''.

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* ''SilentStorm'' ''VideoGame/SilentStorm'' has these on the map in real-time. The frequency and types of encounters are dependent on the current region. Some appear for up to a minute, while others show up for only a few seconds. Two of the rarer kind of encounters are of note. One pits you against an enemy squad, commanded by a Japanese officer (in Western Europe!). Killing him nets you his shurikens and [[KatanasAreBetter katana]]. Another encounter involves a [=UFO=], surrounded by [=THO=] troops in [[PoweredArmor Panzerkleins]]. Additionally, an [[GameBreaker energy rifle]] can be found near the craft that is the über version of the single-shot energy weapon carried by some [=THO=] troops, as it has [[MoreDakka full auto]] and a 50-shot power cell. That cell can then be taken back to the base and replicated for use by the said rifle, as well as energy cannon Panzerkleins. The energy rifle is an obvious ShoutOut to ''{{X-Com}}''.



** ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' Magazine had a legendary AprilFools Edition with an innovative alternative to RandomEncounters: the "Wandering Damage" table. Since the wandering monsters are the indirect means for a Dungeon Master to deal damage to the player party, [[YouFailLogicForever why not cut out the middleman]] and [[KillerGameMaster deal damage to them directly?]] ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' reproduces the rules [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0524.html here]].

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** ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' Magazine had a legendary AprilFools Edition with an innovative alternative to RandomEncounters: the "Wandering Damage" table. Since the wandering monsters are the indirect means for a Dungeon Master to deal damage to the player party, [[YouFailLogicForever why not cut out the middleman]] middleman and [[KillerGameMaster deal damage to them directly?]] ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' reproduces the rules [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0524.html here]].
28th Aug '16 2:38:10 PM LentilSandEater
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** It should be noted the ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia'' not only had an item to reduce random encounters (called the White Map), but also a "Black Map" that ''increased'' them as well. One wonders why...
*** The Black Map had a special ability that prevented any enemies in battle from running away. Needless to say, this was essential if you wanted to fight Loopers. Other then that though....
** However, it's somewhat averted later, once you get a special upgrade for your CoolShip you can fly above or below the clouds, thus ''completely'' eliminating random encounters.

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** It should be noted the ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia'' not only had an item to reduce random encounters (called the White Map), but also a "Black Map" that ''increased'' them as well. One wonders why...\n*** The Black Map had a special ability that prevented any enemies in battle from running away. Needless to say, this was essential if you wanted to fight Loopers. Other then that though....\n** However, it's somewhat averted later, once you get a special upgrade for your CoolShip you can fly above or below the clouds, thus ''completely'' eliminating random encounters.
7th Aug '16 1:29:41 PM erforce
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* The ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' series played with this now and then, particularly in ''Wing Commander Privateer'', and in the {{F|ullMotionVideo}}MV-based games.

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* The ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' series played with this now and then, particularly in ''Wing Commander Privateer'', ''VideoGame/WingCommanderPrivateer'', and in the {{F|ullMotionVideo}}MV-based games.
31st Jul '16 11:57:10 AM eroock
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-->--'''''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'''''

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-->--'''''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'''''
-->-- '''''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'''''
3rd Jul '16 2:11:38 PM Malady
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Subtrope of RandomEvent. Contrast PreExistingEncounters, a specific aversion where enemies can be seen (and avoided) on the field, and FairyBattle, a variation where the random encounter isn't hostile but actually helps the player along. See also EncounterBait and EncounterRepellant for the mechanics of adjusting the rate of encounters, as well as EscapeBattleTechnique, for the mechanics of avoiding them once they've started. Compare BigLippedAlligatorMoment, where as that trope is about a single random occurrence that goes unmentioned, this trope covers repeating events that are rarely, if ever, mentioned by the story. Has a pinch of ButThouMust, because players trying to EnjoyTheStorySkipTheGame can find this infuriating.

to:

Subtrope of RandomEvent. Contrast PreExistingEncounters, PreexistingEncounters, a specific aversion where enemies can be seen (and avoided) on the field, and FairyBattle, a variation where the random encounter isn't hostile but actually helps the player along. See also EncounterBait and EncounterRepellant for the mechanics of adjusting the rate of encounters, as well as EscapeBattleTechnique, for the mechanics of avoiding them once they've started. Compare BigLippedAlligatorMoment, where as that trope is about a single random occurrence that goes unmentioned, this trope covers repeating events that are rarely, if ever, mentioned by the story. Has a pinch of ButThouMust, because players trying to EnjoyTheStorySkipTheGame can find this infuriating.
This list shows the last 10 events of 64. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RandomEncounters