History Main / RandomDrop

14th Aug '17 3:29:34 AM Koopacooper
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** So for example, if there are say 4 of the top-tier prize available to win in the game, then there will be exactly 4 of the rare item in play for the top-tier prize. But if someone who is not playing the game gets one of the rare items, they are just as likely as not to unknowingly throw it away with the trash from their meal...meaning that one of those top-tier prizes is now unwinnable.


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** Such a method of selling creates fake rarity, useful to encourage buyers to buy more in the hopes of completing their set (of figures), but not really allowing them to increase their price point per item purchased. It does however allow for a massive increase in item prices on the secondary reseller markets (such as auction sites)
13th Aug '17 1:00:34 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' is the {{FPS}} equivalent of this (its initial pitch: "[[XMeetsY Halo meets Diablo]]"). It, too, has a list of super-rare ({{DLC}}-exclusive) weapons known as "Pearlescents". These [[InfinityPlusOneSword super-strong]] firearms drop at a rate of 1 for every 60 orange (the previous highest-level category) items. Of course, they're a ''little'' more prevalent than you might think, thanks to a [[GoodBadBug multiplayer glitch]] that allows for easy item duplication. Gets to the point of ridiculousness in the sequel, with drop rates so low some players have to farm bosses ''over a hundred times'' just to get a specific item drop.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' is the {{FPS}} equivalent of this (its initial pitch: "[[XMeetsY "[[JustForFun/XMeetsY Halo meets Diablo]]"). It, too, has a list of super-rare ({{DLC}}-exclusive) weapons known as "Pearlescents". These [[InfinityPlusOneSword super-strong]] firearms drop at a rate of 1 for every 60 orange (the previous highest-level category) items. Of course, they're a ''little'' more prevalent than you might think, thanks to a [[GoodBadBug multiplayer glitch]] that allows for easy item duplication. Gets to the point of ridiculousness in the sequel, with drop rates so low some players have to farm bosses ''over a hundred times'' just to get a specific item drop.
11th Jul '17 12:59:41 PM HeroicJay
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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' has special items dropped by certain monsters that are stored in your Spoils Bag. These are specific to each monster (i.e. Big Moblins only drop Skull Necklaces), and usually drop randomly. However, the Grappling Hook can be used to [[VideoGameStealing steal their item]] with 100% success if it hits. Each type of item is useful in a different SideQuest.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' has special items dropped by certain monsters that are stored in your Spoils Bag. These are specific to each monster (i.e. Big Moblins only drop Skull Necklaces), and usually drop randomly. However, the Grappling Hook can be used to [[VideoGameStealing steal their item]] with 100% success if it hits. Each type of item is useful in a different SideQuest.
11th Jul '17 12:53:56 PM TheDocCC
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** Generally, modules averted this trope by explaining at length how the treasure got there. The GameMaster today is generally advised to do his or her homework and avert this trope. Even when he can't, it's usually possible to improvise an answer before the players think to ask the question ("Inside the giant spider's lair there is the desiccated corpse of an earlier victim, wrapped in cocoon and dangling a dozen feet above the cavern floor. He bears a scabbard fouled by the spider's ichors that still holds a glittering sword.")

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** Generally, modules averted this trope by explaining at length how the treasure got there. The GameMaster today is generally advised to do his or her homework and avert this trope. Even when he can't, it's usually possible to improvise an answer before the players think to ask the question ("Inside the giant spider's lair there is the desiccated corpse of an earlier victim, wrapped in a cocoon and dangling a dozen feet above the cavern floor. He bears a scabbard fouled by the spider's ichors that still holds a glittering sword.")
11th Jul '17 12:53:21 PM TheDocCC
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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' ''mostly'' averts this trope, but since the game's inception has had random treasure tables for the GameMaster who doesn't want to hand-pick every monster's equipment or treasure hoard, meaning there's a tiny chance for some ogre to be carrying a magic sword. Combined with the RandomEncounter tables for wilderness travel, you can effectively get the same experience as in a video game: rolling up a random treasure takes long enough that most will kick it back to after the fight, leading enemies to suddenly have gear they should have used or which they might have not reasonably carried. Of course, a GameMaster can also mitigate the FridgeLogic nature of the situation - the enemy might not have known they were carrying healing potions as opposed to poison, having just scavenged them off another kill, for example.
** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned Game Masters about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D Dungeon Masters and ''TabletopGame/PathFinder'' Game Masters today will avert this trope entirely instead.
** Intelligent adversaries will use treasure intelligently and generally care about it - hiding it from enemies, using it if they can, and so on. For example, a giant stuck with a wand it can't use may offer to trade it with the party for something more useful to it. A ghost who knows of a treasure (and has no use for it in most cases) may agree to tell the party about the treasure in exchange for a service, such as setting right whatever caused the ghost to rise. Most unintelligent adversaries don't drop the treasure suddenly when bested (completely averting this trope). It's usually (not always) the remains of past victims, strewn about the location of their kills and feeds, and the creature won't miss it if the treasure is stolen without a fight, or it's equipment given to mindless guardians like skeletons or golems who have no inherent care for their treasure.

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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' and ''TabletopGame/PathFinder'' ''mostly'' averts avert this trope, but since the game's inception has had random treasure tables for the GameMaster who doesn't want to hand-pick every monster's equipment or treasure hoard, meaning hoard. Thus, there's a tiny chance for some ogre to be carrying a magic sword. Combined with the RandomEncounter tables for wilderness travel, you can effectively get the same experience as in a video game: rolling up a random treasure takes long enough that most will kick it back to after the fight, leading enemies to suddenly have gear they should have used or which they might have not reasonably carried. Of course, a A GameMaster can also mitigate the FridgeLogic nature of the situation - for example, the enemy might not have known they were carrying healing potions as opposed to poison, having just scavenged them off another kill, for example.
kill.
** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned Game Masters about making Generally, modules averted this trope by explaining at length how the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D Dungeon Masters and ''TabletopGame/PathFinder'' Game Masters there. The GameMaster today will is generally advised to do his or her homework and avert this trope entirely instead.
** Intelligent adversaries will use treasure intelligently and generally care about it - hiding it from enemies, using it if they can, and so on. For example, a giant stuck with a wand it can't use may offer to trade it with the party for something more useful to it. A ghost who knows of a treasure (and has no use for it in most cases) may agree to tell the party about the treasure in exchange for a service, such as setting right whatever caused the ghost to rise. Most unintelligent adversaries don't drop the treasure suddenly
trope. Even when bested (completely averting this trope). It's usually (not always) the remains of past victims, strewn about the location of their kills and feeds, and the creature won't miss it if the treasure is stolen without a fight, or he can't, it's equipment given usually possible to mindless guardians like skeletons or golems who have no inherent care for their treasure. improvise an answer before the players think to ask the question ("Inside the giant spider's lair there is the desiccated corpse of an earlier victim, wrapped in cocoon and dangling a dozen feet above the cavern floor. He bears a scabbard fouled by the spider's ichors that still holds a glittering sword.")
11th Jul '17 12:42:31 PM TheDocCC
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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' has random treasure tables for the GameMaster who doesn't want to hand-pick every monster's equipment or treasure hoard, meaning there's a tiny chance for some ogre to be carrying a magic sword. Combined with the RandomEncounter tables for wilderness travel, you can effectively get the same experience as in a video game: rolling up a random treasure takes long enough that most will kick it back to after the fight, leading enemies to suddenly have gear they should have used or which they might have not reasonably carried. Of course, a GameMaster can also mitigate the FridgeLogic nature of the situation - the enemy might not have known they were carrying healing potions as opposed to poison, having just scavenged them off another kill, for example.
** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned Game Masters about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D Dungeon Masters and ''TabletopGame/PathFinder'' Game Masters today will avert this trope entirely instead. Intelligent adversaries will carry appropriate gear, use it effectively, and only relinquish it if defeated, offered a decent trade, or magically compelled to do so. Monsters who would only collect treasure incidentally, like a giant, unintelligent spider whose treasure consists of the things prior victims had when the spider killed them, will just have it strewn about their lairs as detritus. Monsters that can't use most treasure (like a ghost, which can't even pick up most objects) usually don't have treasure at all, and treasure won't mysteriously appear just because the players defeated the ghost.
** Intelligent adversaries will use treasure intelligently and generally care about it - hiding it from enemies, using it if they can, and so on. For example, a giant stuck with a wand it can't use may offer to trade it with the party for something else. A ghost who knows of a treasure may agree to reveal its location in exchange for a service, such as setting right whatever caused the ghost to rise. Most unintelligent adversaries don't drop the treasure suddenly when bested (completely averting this trope). It's usually (not always) the remains of past victims, strewn about the location of their kills and feeds, and the creature won't miss it if the treasure is stolen without a fight, or it's equipment given to mindless guardians like skeletons or golems who have no inherent care for their treasure.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' ''mostly'' averts this trope, but since the game's inception has had random treasure tables for the GameMaster who doesn't want to hand-pick every monster's equipment or treasure hoard, meaning there's a tiny chance for some ogre to be carrying a magic sword. Combined with the RandomEncounter tables for wilderness travel, you can effectively get the same experience as in a video game: rolling up a random treasure takes long enough that most will kick it back to after the fight, leading enemies to suddenly have gear they should have used or which they might have not reasonably carried. Of course, a GameMaster can also mitigate the FridgeLogic nature of the situation - the enemy might not have known they were carrying healing potions as opposed to poison, having just scavenged them off another kill, for example.
** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned Game Masters about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D Dungeon Masters and ''TabletopGame/PathFinder'' Game Masters today will avert this trope entirely instead. Intelligent adversaries will carry appropriate gear, use it effectively, and only relinquish it if defeated, offered a decent trade, or magically compelled to do so. Monsters who would only collect treasure incidentally, like a giant, unintelligent spider whose treasure consists of the things prior victims had when the spider killed them, will just have it strewn about their lairs as detritus. Monsters that can't use most treasure (like a ghost, which can't even pick up most objects) usually don't have treasure at all, and treasure won't mysteriously appear just because the players defeated the ghost.\n
** Intelligent adversaries will use treasure intelligently and generally care about it - hiding it from enemies, using it if they can, and so on. For example, a giant stuck with a wand it can't use may offer to trade it with the party for something else. more useful to it. A ghost who knows of a treasure (and has no use for it in most cases) may agree to reveal its location tell the party about the treasure in exchange for a service, such as setting right whatever caused the ghost to rise. Most unintelligent adversaries don't drop the treasure suddenly when bested (completely averting this trope). It's usually (not always) the remains of past victims, strewn about the location of their kills and feeds, and the creature won't miss it if the treasure is stolen without a fight, or it's equipment given to mindless guardians like skeletons or golems who have no inherent care for their treasure.
11th Jul '17 12:38:24 PM TheDocCC
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** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned Game Masters about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D Dungeon Masters and ''TabletopGame/Pathfinder'' Game Masters today will avert this trope entirely instead. Intelligent adversaries will carry appropriate gear, use it effectively, and only relinquish it if defeated, offered a decent trade, or magically compelled to do so. Monsters who would only collect treasure incidentally, like a giant, unintelligent spider whose treasure consists of the things prior victims had when the spider killed them, will just have it strewn about their lairs as detritus. Monsters that can't use most treasure (like a ghost, which can't even pick up most objects) usually don't have treasure at all, and treasure won't mysteriously appear just because the players defeated the ghost.

to:

** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned Game Masters about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D Dungeon Masters and ''TabletopGame/Pathfinder'' ''TabletopGame/PathFinder'' Game Masters today will avert this trope entirely instead. Intelligent adversaries will carry appropriate gear, use it effectively, and only relinquish it if defeated, offered a decent trade, or magically compelled to do so. Monsters who would only collect treasure incidentally, like a giant, unintelligent spider whose treasure consists of the things prior victims had when the spider killed them, will just have it strewn about their lairs as detritus. Monsters that can't use most treasure (like a ghost, which can't even pick up most objects) usually don't have treasure at all, and treasure won't mysteriously appear just because the players defeated the ghost.
11th Jul '17 12:37:55 PM TheDocCC
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** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned GMs about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D DMs and ''TabletopGame/Pathfinder'' GMs today will avert this trope entirely instead. Intelligent adversaries will carry appropriate gear, use it effectively, and only relinquish it if defeated, offered a decent trade, or magically compelled to do so. Monsters who would only collect treasure incidentally, like a giant, unintelligent spider whose treasure consists of the things prior victims had when the spider killed them, will just have it strewn about their lairs as detritus. Monsters that can't use most treasure (like a ghost, which can't even pick up most objects) usually don't have treasure at all, and treasure won't mysteriously appear just because the players defeated the ghost.

to:

** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned GMs Game Masters about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D DMs Dungeon Masters and ''TabletopGame/Pathfinder'' GMs Game Masters today will avert this trope entirely instead. Intelligent adversaries will carry appropriate gear, use it effectively, and only relinquish it if defeated, offered a decent trade, or magically compelled to do so. Monsters who would only collect treasure incidentally, like a giant, unintelligent spider whose treasure consists of the things prior victims had when the spider killed them, will just have it strewn about their lairs as detritus. Monsters that can't use most treasure (like a ghost, which can't even pick up most objects) usually don't have treasure at all, and treasure won't mysteriously appear just because the players defeated the ghost.
11th Jul '17 12:36:59 PM TheDocCC
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** DungeonsAndDragons even from its earliest editions cautioned GMs about making the treasure make sense and thus heavily averted this trope. Most modules make a significant effort to explain how and why the treasure that is there got there. Most D&D DMs and ''TabletopGame/Pathfinder'' GMs today will avert this trope entirely instead. Intelligent adversaries will carry appropriate gear, use it effectively, and only relinquish it if defeated, offered a decent trade, or magically compelled to do so. Monsters who would only collect treasure incidentally, like a giant, unintelligent spider whose treasure consists of the things prior victims had when the spider killed them, will just have it strewn about their lairs as detritus. Monsters that can't use most treasure (like a ghost, which can't even pick up most objects) usually don't have treasure at all, and treasure won't mysteriously appear just because the players defeated the ghost.
** Intelligent adversaries will use treasure intelligently and generally care about it - hiding it from enemies, using it if they can, and so on. For example, a giant stuck with a wand it can't use may offer to trade it with the party for something else. A ghost who knows of a treasure may agree to reveal its location in exchange for a service, such as setting right whatever caused the ghost to rise. Most unintelligent adversaries don't drop the treasure suddenly when bested (completely averting this trope). It's usually (not always) the remains of past victims, strewn about the location of their kills and feeds, and the creature won't miss it if the treasure is stolen without a fight, or it's equipment given to mindless guardians like skeletons or golems who have no inherent care for their treasure.
20th Jun '17 3:03:52 AM Piterpicher
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* Beaten to death in ''AnarchyOnline'', an {{MMORPG}} where you will find that some of the most powerful and sought after items in the whole game (and since this game deals also in quality levels per any given item, in that as well) are so rare, they could be the poster child for this trope. The number of times that one specific item, the Sparkling Scimitar of Spetses (a stupidly rare item dropping from a semi-boss from the 2nd hardest area in the known game) is so ridiculously rare that it is counted among the forums. The numbers are kept as to which dimension (of the 3 this game has) has dropped how many... at last count, it was STILL IN THE SINGLE DIGITS for dropping after at least 3-4 (maybe longer) years of play in the game that allowed the zone. Though if you want similar horror stories, ask hardened, end-game players about the Spirit Shroud, anything regarding Alien boss drops, or really anything valuable in the game in question. As a result of this, of course, AdamSmithHatesYourGuts.

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* Beaten to death in ''AnarchyOnline'', ''VideoGame/AnarchyOnline'', an {{MMORPG}} where you will find that some of the most powerful and sought after items in the whole game (and since this game deals also in quality levels per any given item, in that as well) are so rare, they could be the poster child for this trope. The number of times that one specific item, the Sparkling Scimitar of Spetses (a stupidly rare item dropping from a semi-boss from the 2nd hardest area in the known game) is so ridiculously rare that it is counted among the forums. The numbers are kept as to which dimension (of the 3 this game has) has dropped how many... at last count, it was STILL IN THE SINGLE DIGITS for dropping after at least 3-4 (maybe longer) years of play in the game that allowed the zone. Though if you want similar horror stories, ask hardened, end-game players about the Spirit Shroud, anything regarding Alien boss drops, or really anything valuable in the game in question. As a result of this, of course, AdamSmithHatesYourGuts.
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