History Main / Railroading

10th Apr '17 7:10:33 PM nombretomado
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* In a certain sick way, the MontrealScrewjob could count, VinceMcMahon and ShawnMichaels basically forcing events onto their chosen path in defiance of BretHart.

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* In a certain sick way, the MontrealScrewjob could count, VinceMcMahon Wrestling/VinceMcMahon and ShawnMichaels Wrestling/ShawnMichaels basically forcing events onto their chosen path in defiance of BretHart.Wrestling/BretHart.
12th Mar '17 12:34:01 PM Dark_Lord_
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** Largely averted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', since you can kill any NPC in the game, including those integral to the main plot. The downside of this, is that you can render the game UnwinnableByDesign. Fortunately, the game gives you a warning when killing an important NPC, allowing you to reload to a point before killing said NPC, and an alternative, but [[GuideDangIt rather obscure]] path to still finish the main quest.
** Played straight in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion''. This game introduces the concept of "Essential" NPCs. Characters who are flagged as Essential can't be killed through combat. Whenever you defeat them, they merely fall unconscious and stand up a few seconds later. This is done to protect NPCs integral to the multiple questlines so you won't accidentally kill an NPC you later need in a quest. This does mean that you are forced play the quests exactly as the developers intended.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' takes its railroading a step further. The PlayerCharacter in this game is the Dragonborn, a PhysicalGod and RealityWarper with the potential to become a OneManArmy, capable of easily killing dragons. Yet the characters in the game always treat the Dragonborn as a mere human and there is nothing to make them respect (or even fear) you as the PhysicalGod you are. A specific example is the Forsworn Conspiracy questline in Markarth. After a while, the Dragonborn gets arrested by three corrupt guards. Despite being perfectly able to kill them and the rest of Markarth's army and pressure the Jarl into stopping the corruption, the only way to truly continue this quest is by meekly surrendering to the corrupt guards.

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** Largely averted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', since you can kill any NPC in the game, including those integral to the main plot. The downside of this, is that you can render the game UnwinnableByDesign. Fortunately, the game gives you a warning when killing an important NPC, allowing you to reload to a point before killing said NPC, and an alternative, but [[GuideDangIt rather obscure]] path to still finish the main quest.
quest, unless you kill [=NPCs=] required for that path, in which case you are forced to reload, should you want to finish the main quest. Also, ''Morrowind'' allows you to drop and sell items required to finish certain quests. Losing these items like this is another way to render the game unwinnable.
** Played straight in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion''. This game introduces the concept of "Essential" NPCs.[=NPCs=]. Characters who are flagged as Essential can't be killed through combat. Whenever you defeat them, they merely fall unconscious and stand up a few seconds later. This is done to protect NPCs [=NPCs=] integral to the multiple questlines so you won't accidentally kill an NPC you later need in a quest. This does mean that you are forced play the quests exactly as the developers intended.
intended. ''Oblivion'' also prevents the player from removing and selling important quest-related items from their inventory, as a precaution to losing them and thus rendering the game unwinnable.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' does both things ''Oblivion'' did before it did and takes its railroading a step further. The PlayerCharacter in this game is the Dragonborn, a PhysicalGod and RealityWarper with the potential to become a OneManArmy, capable of easily killing dragons. Yet the characters in the game always treat the Dragonborn as a mere human and there is nothing to make them respect (or even fear) you as the PhysicalGod you are. A specific example is the Forsworn Conspiracy questline in Markarth. After a while, the Dragonborn gets arrested by three corrupt guards. Despite being perfectly able to kill them and the rest of Markarth's army and pressure the Jarl into stopping the corruption, the only way to truly continue this quest is by meekly surrendering to the corrupt guards.
12th Mar '17 4:45:13 AM Nyame
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* ''FanFic/{{Fade}}'': No matter how hard Light and L try, someone will rise up to become Kira, like in the story. While Light succeeds in subverting his fate as canon!Kira, another Kira, arguably worse than what he would've become, takes his place -- L, [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillainy who succumbs to the darkness in his pursuit to stop canon!Kira and his death using his own Death Note]]. It's implied that there was always meant to be a Kira and that Light and L's efforts were for naught -- if it hadn't been one of them, someone else would've gotten the notebook and fallen into temptation instead.

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* ''FanFic/{{Fade}}'': No matter how hard Light and L try, someone will rise up to become Kira, like in the story. While Light succeeds in subverting his fate as canon!Kira, another Kira, arguably worse than what he would've become, takes his place -- L, [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillainy [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain who succumbs to the darkness in his pursuit to stop canon!Kira and his death using his own Death Note]]. It's implied that there was always meant to be a Kira and that Light and L's efforts were for naught -- if it hadn't been one of them, someone else would've gotten the notebook and fallen into temptation instead.
12th Mar '17 4:44:42 AM Nyame
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* ''FanFic/{{Fade}}'': No matter how hard Light and L try, someone will rise up to become Kira, like in the story. While Light succeeds in subverting his fate as canon!Kira, another Kira, arguably worse than what he would've become, takes his place -- L, [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillainy who succumbs to the darkness in his pursuit to stop canon!Kira and his death using his own Death Note]]. It's implied that there was always meant to be a Kira and that Light and L's efforts were for naught -- if it hadn't been one of them, someone else would've gotten the notebook and fallen into temptation nstead.

to:

* ''FanFic/{{Fade}}'': No matter how hard Light and L try, someone will rise up to become Kira, like in the story. While Light succeeds in subverting his fate as canon!Kira, another Kira, arguably worse than what he would've become, takes his place -- L, [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillainy who succumbs to the darkness in his pursuit to stop canon!Kira and his death using his own Death Note]]. It's implied that there was always meant to be a Kira and that Light and L's efforts were for naught -- if it hadn't been one of them, someone else would've gotten the notebook and fallen into temptation nstead.instead.
12th Mar '17 4:44:28 AM Nyame
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* ''FanFic/{{Fade}}'': No matter how hard Light and L try, someone will rise up to become Kira, like in the story. While Light succeeds in subverting his fate as canon!Kira, another Kira, arguably worse than what he would've become, takes his place -- L, [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillainy who succumbs to the darkness in his pursuit to stop canon!Kira and his death using his own Death Note]]. It's implied that there was always meant to be a Kira and that Light and L's efforts were for naught -- if it hadn't been one of them, someone else would've gotten the notebook and fallen into temptation nstead.
20th Feb '17 12:10:01 AM legendaryweredragon
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[[folder:Films -- Other]]
* In the obscure part live action, part {{Claymation}} Christian kids film ''Film/{{Hoomania}}'', a boy is [[TheGameComeToLife trapped in a board game]] after being warned [[StayOnThePath not to go off the path]]. He goes off the path twice and gets punished brutally both times. The point of this was to [[{{Anvilicious}} teach him an unsubtle lesson about making wise choices.]] This may have been inspired by ''Literature/ThePilgrimsProgress''.
[[/folder]]
15th Feb '17 7:56:33 PM Narrator1
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** At the climax of the penultimate chapter of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'', the party is surrounded by an infinitely respawning horde of monsters, and [[PlayerCharacter Noctis's]] TrueCompanions tell him to go on ahead to the elevator leading to the Crystal Chamber and reach the Crystal. The player can ignore this and continue to fight, but only up to a minute later, when a female electronic voice announces that the hangar in which the players are fighting will be sealed shut. To punctuate this, a [[TimedMission timer appears counting down to the door closing]], and if Noctis doesn't make it, it's NonstandardGameOver time.



* At the climax of the penultimate chapter of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'', the party is surrounded by an infinitely respawning horde of monsters, and [[PlayerCharacter Noctis's]] TrueCompanions tell him to go on ahead to the elevator leading to the Crystal Chamber. The player can ignore this and continue to fight, but only up to a minute later, when a female electronic voice announces that the hangar in which the players are fighting will be sealed shut. To punctuate this, a timer appears counting down to the door closing, and if Noctis doesn't make it, it's NonstandardGameOver time.
15th Feb '17 7:53:11 PM Narrator1
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* At the climax of the penultimate chapter of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'', the party is surrounded by an infinitely respawning horde of monsters, and [[PlayerCharacter Noctis's]] TrueCompanions tell him to go on ahead to the elevator leading to the Crystal Chamber. The player can ignore this and continue to fight, but only up to a minute later, when a female electronic voice announces that the hangar in which the players are fighting will be sealed shut. To punctuate this, a timer appears counting down to the door closing, and if Noctis doesn't make it, it's NonstandardGameOver time.
30th Jan '17 11:02:50 AM StFan
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[[folder:Fanfic]]

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[[folder:Fanfic]][[folder:Fan Works]]






[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Live Action Television]]
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has had numerous episodes (often involving the holodecks) where the characters attempt to [[OffTheRails escape]] the plot of the simulation/ shared dream/ NegativeSpaceWedgie only to be transported away and forced to finish the story.

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[[folder:Live Action Television]]
[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The series have
had numerous episodes (often involving the holodecks) where the characters attempt to [[OffTheRails escape]] the plot of the simulation/ shared dream/ NegativeSpaceWedgie only to be transported away and forced to finish the story.



* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' has an episode where Paige and her beau of the arc are sucked into a book written by two magic students, based on ''TheMalteseFalcon''. They have to play along to find the way out. The book itself railroads them occasionally, but Phoebe and Piper do their share as well. At one point Paige is heading for a trap; Piper writes in a piano falling in her path to send her the other way.

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* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' has an episode where Paige and her beau of the arc are sucked into a book written by two magic students, based on ''TheMalteseFalcon''.''Film/TheMalteseFalcon''. They have to play along to find the way out. The book itself railroads them occasionally, but Phoebe and Piper do their share as well. At one point Paige is heading for a trap; Piper writes in a piano falling in her path to send her the other way.



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* This is of course a common trap many novice GM's fall into running their first TableTopRPG. Excited by the (to them) wonderful story they have set up, they can get flustered, irritated and downright stuck when their players either miss what they think are obvious markers on how to proceed next or just plain choose to do something the GM did not account for. While an experienced GM can subtly guide a party back on path, the novice often (and in-game wise illogically) ham-fistedly forces the players back on the "correct" path, either in story or fourth wall yelling/whining at the PC s.

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* This is of course a common trap many novice GM's [=GMs=] fall into running their first TableTopRPG. Excited by the (to them) wonderful story they have set up, they can get flustered, irritated and downright stuck when their players either miss what they think are obvious markers on how to proceed next or just plain choose to do something the GM did not account for. While an experienced GM can subtly guide a party back on path, the novice often (and in-game wise illogically) ham-fistedly forces the players back on the "correct" path, either in story or fourth wall yelling/whining at the PC s.[=PCs=].



* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''

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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':



*** The notorious [=WG7=] ''Castle Greyhawk,'' a blatant joke module, teaches the DM how to properly lure players to adventure:
---> Culum’s goal is to get the adventurers to go down into the dungeon. To this end, he’ll continually use phrases like “presumed dead,” and “assume the worst,” in an attempt to get the characters to volunteer to search the dungeon for his dad. If that doesn’t work, Culum pathetically offers them his one battered copper, (actually he has 15 silver stashed in his boot) to look for dad. If the adventurers still won’t go to rescue dear dad then Culum will flat out ask them. Continued refusal means that you have no adventure this evening - close the book, fold up the screen, and stare at your players until they get the hint.

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*** ** The notorious [=WG7=] ''Castle Greyhawk,'' a blatant joke module, teaches the DM how to properly lure players to adventure:
---> Culum’s --->''Culum's goal is to get the adventurers to go down into the dungeon. To this end, he’ll he'll continually use phrases like “presumed dead,” "presumed dead," and “assume "assume the worst,” worst," in an attempt to get the characters to volunteer to search the dungeon for his dad. If that doesn’t doesn't work, Culum pathetically offers them his one battered copper, (actually he has 15 silver stashed in his boot) to look for dad. If the adventurers still won’t won't go to rescue dear dad then Culum will flat out ask them. Continued refusal means that you have no adventure this evening - -- close the book, fold up the screen, and stare at your players until they get the hint.



* An early edition of ''Magazine/WhiteDwarf'' magazine carried an article on how GM's could do this for ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'' in which it advised four steps: (1) Subtlety (2) Emotional Blackmail (3) Bribery with loot, and (4) Just dropping the plot and encounter in at the very next opportunity. It advised that the first three options rarely worked and that sometimes it was best just to skip straight to step four.

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* An early edition of ''Magazine/WhiteDwarf'' magazine carried an article on how GM's [=GMs=] could do this for ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'' in which it advised four steps: (1) Subtlety (2) Emotional Blackmail (3) Bribery with loot, and (4) Just dropping the plot and encounter in at the very next opportunity. It advised that the first three options rarely worked work and that sometimes it was is best just to skip straight to step four.



** In perhaps the most obnoxious example, in the ending of ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy XIII-2}}'', much is made of the following decision: [[spoiler: whether Noel should go through with killing Caius or spare his life]]. The game even provides a button-press option to choose between the two. But this is frustratingly betrayed by the plot in an example of [[ButThouMust But Thou Must]], because [[spoiler: even if you choose to "spare" Caius, he commits suicide anyway and the exact same events unfold]]; this is doubly frustrating because [[spoiler: according to the plot, Caius has a death wish and only Noel can kill him, but suddenly he can commit suicide using Noel's sword without Noel's volition - a sword that was never at any point in the plot described as having special Caius-killing power - raising the obvious question: why didn't Caius just off himself years ago if he didn't need Noel to kill him? Argh!]]

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** In perhaps the most obnoxious example, in the ending of ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy XIII-2}}'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII2'', much is made of the following decision: [[spoiler: whether Noel should go through with killing Caius or spare his life]]. The game even provides a button-press option to choose between the two. But this is frustratingly betrayed by the plot in an example of [[ButThouMust But Thou Must]], because [[spoiler: even if you choose to "spare" Caius, he commits suicide anyway and the exact same events unfold]]; this is doubly frustrating because [[spoiler: according to the plot, Caius has a death wish and only Noel can kill him, but suddenly he can commit suicide using Noel's sword without Noel's volition - a sword that was never at any point in the plot described as having special Caius-killing power - raising the obvious question: why didn't Caius just off himself years ago if he didn't need Noel to kill him? Argh!]]



* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'': After the players' (somewhat off-base) version of ''StarWars Episode I'' is finished, [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0206.html the GM's original plot]] is shown. So during an ArchiveBinge, you get to see how the GM accommodated his original plot points after ''severe'' derailing by the players. This actually shows that the Darths and Droids game master may not be perfect, but is a really good GM, changing his planned plot around the flow of the game and the choices of his players rather than the other way around. As of Episode III it is becoming increasingly obvious that he is becoming tired of the players taking their own paths, and he vigorously attempts to steer them back onto the rails. When Pete (R2's player) [=GMs=], however, the railroading stick hits ''hard''. It is highly possible that [[spoiler:the destruction of Naboo]] is the GM's way of making sure that they ''don't'' go off the rails.

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* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'': After the players' (somewhat off-base) version of ''StarWars ''Franchise/StarWars Episode I'' is finished, [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0206.html the GM's original plot]] is shown. So during an ArchiveBinge, you get to see how the GM accommodated his original plot points after ''severe'' derailing by the players. This actually shows that the Darths and Droids ''Darths & Droids'' game master may not be perfect, but is a really good GM, changing his planned plot around the flow of the game and the choices of his players rather than the other way around. As of Episode III it is becoming increasingly obvious that he is becoming tired of the players taking their own paths, and he vigorously attempts to steer them back onto the rails. When Pete (R2's player) [=GMs=], however, the railroading stick hits ''hard''. It is highly possible that [[spoiler:the destruction of Naboo]] is the GM's way of making sure that they ''don't'' go off the rails.



** In one comic, the group attempts to interrupt Gandalf's conversation with Théoden...only for the DM to start over from the beginning, causing them to compare it to a video game cutscene. In another, they ask why he even bothers running an RPG if he already knows the exact story he wants to tell. His response is because they chip in for pizza.

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** In one comic, the group attempts to interrupt Gandalf's conversation with Théoden... only for the DM to start over from the beginning, causing them to compare it to a video game cutscene. In another, they ask why he even bothers running an RPG if he already knows the exact story he wants to tell. His response is because they chip in for pizza.
19th Jan '17 3:58:08 AM Dark_Lord_
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* Despite its open and non-linear nature, games from ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' are sometimes guilty of this.
** Largely averted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', since you can kill any NPC in the game, including those integral to the main plot. The downside of this, is that you can render the game UnwinnableByDesign. Fortunately, the game gives you a warning when killing an important NPC, allowing you to reload to a point before killing said NPC, and an alternative, but [[GuideDangIt rather obscure]] path to still finish the main quest.
** Played straight in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion''. This game introduces the concept of "Essential" NPCs. Characters who are flagged as Essential can't be killed through combat. Whenever you defeat them, they merely fall unconscious and stand up a few seconds later. This is done to protect NPCs integral to the multiple questlines so you won't accidentally kill an NPC you later need in a quest. This does mean that you are forced play the quests exactly as the developers intended.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' takes its railroading a step further. The PlayerCharacter in this game is the Dragonborn, a PhysicalGod and RealityWarper with the potential to become a OneManArmy, capable of easily killing dragons. Yet the characters in the game always treat the Dragonborn as a mere human and there is nothing to make them respect (or even fear) you as the PhysicalGod you are. A specific example is the Forsworn Conspiracy questline in Markarth. After a while, the Dragonborn gets arrested by three corrupt guards. Despite being perfectly able to kill them and the rest of Markarth's army and pressure the Jarl into stopping the corruption, the only way to truly continue this quest is by meekly surrendering to the corrupt guards.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Railroading