History Main / RPGElements

10th Feb '17 8:07:20 AM superkeijikun
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* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestBuilders'' subverts this: the Builder is not a hero and thus does not gain experience from killing monsters. Instead, they get stronger by crafting better tools, weapons, and armor. Their home base, on the other hand, gains experience as you build more rooms, with some rooms providing persistent bonuses.
8th Jan '17 12:02:17 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''VideoGame/WarThunder'', a WorldWar2 multiplayer air combat game, uses these for progression. As players build up experience flying for various countries, more plane options are opened for them. Further, characters accumulate "Silver Lions" which function as currency, and any new plays must be bought. The plans themselves can be upgraded with more of this currency, with new weapons or upgrades, but only after passing certain experience thresholds for each plane. On top of that, the plan crew accumulates experience, which can then be spent improving their skills, allowing them things like greater tolerance for G forces or the ability to identify and lock onto targets at greater distances.

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* ''VideoGame/WarThunder'', a WorldWar2 UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 multiplayer air combat game, uses these for progression. As players build up experience flying for various countries, more plane options are opened for them. Further, characters accumulate "Silver Lions" which function as currency, and any new plays must be bought. The plans themselves can be upgraded with more of this currency, with new weapons or upgrades, but only after passing certain experience thresholds for each plane. On top of that, the plan crew accumulates experience, which can then be spent improving their skills, allowing them things like greater tolerance for G forces or the ability to identify and lock onto targets at greater distances.
7th Dec '16 11:38:53 PM Galacton
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You're not playing an [[RolePlayingGame RPG]]. However, your character gains [[CharacterLevel experience and levels]] as if you were. Instead of being a mere test of skill, in which the only thing that makes the game easier or harder is your ability as a player, your control over the PlayerCharacter is abstracted so that you must [[AnAdventurerIsYou build a unique path for them]]. Often their talents improve the more you practice or train, maybe there's a class system, or some sort of [[SkillSlotSystem system]] that allows for tweakable abilities.

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You're not playing an [[RolePlayingGame RPG]]. However, your character gains [[CharacterLevel experience and levels]] as if you were. Instead of being a mere test of skill, in which the only thing that makes the game easier or harder is your ability as a player, your control over the PlayerCharacter is abstracted so that you must have a [[AnAdventurerIsYou build a unique path for them]].degree of customizability]] over them. Often their talents improve the more you practice or train, maybe there's a class system, or some sort of [[SkillSlotSystem system]] that allows for tweakable abilities.



* [[CharacterClassSystem Character Classes]] and [[SkillScoresAndPerks Skill Scores]].
* EquipmentBasedProgression and [[EvolvingAttack Evolving Attacks]]

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* [[CharacterClassSystem Character Classes]] and [[SkillScoresAndPerks Skill Scores]].
Scores]]
* EquipmentBasedProgression [[PowersAsPrograms Equipable abilities]] and [[EvolvingAttack Evolving Attacks]]Attacks]]
* EquipmentBasedProgression
23rd Oct '16 2:07:39 PM JudgeSpear
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* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}} V'' deviates itself from other games in the series by throwing in MissionControl, {{roguelike}} missions, [[LifeMeter shield]] and [[EvolvingAttack ten levels of weapon upgrades each]]. [[EquipmentBasedProgression The latter being a requirement to reach the]] TrueFinalBoss.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}} V'' ''VideoGame/RaidenV'' deviates itself from other games in the series by throwing in MissionControl, {{roguelike}} missions, [[LifeMeter shield]] and [[EvolvingAttack ten levels of weapon upgrades each]]. [[EquipmentBasedProgression The latter being a requirement to reach the]] TrueFinalBoss.
26th Sep '16 5:22:43 PM Kotomikun
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* ''VideoGame/KerbalSpaceProgram'''s astronauts, in Career mode, gain experience from flying around and visiting moons or other planets. (Apparently KASA doesn't train them before launch.) Leveling up unlocks additional skills for pilots and engineers, and increases research/mining speed for scientists/engineers. They also have stats--stupidity, courage, and whether or not they're "badass"--but an individual kerbal's stats never change, and only affect their facial expressions.
19th Sep '16 10:07:44 PM AzureSeas
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* Welcome to Dream Land, where everything's made up and the points don't matter. This trope is parodied in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'', as pictured at the top of the page. In the "Great Cave Offensive" minigame, you fight Computer Virus, an "RPG-style" boss which takes the form of generic RPG enemies like a slime, witch, dark knight and dragon (as opposed to the ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series's more bizarre fare), complete with a little text box at the top of the screen that announces the player's or boss's blocks or attacks and a [[{{Retraux}} tinny, 8-bit style rendition]] of the main boss theme. Computer Virus even becomes temporarily invincible when it's his turn to attack, simulating TurnBasedCombat, though the player continues to control Kirby in the normal {{platformer}} style throughout the battle. When you win, the menu awards you various (spurious) spoils, including {{Experience Point}}s, [[BigEater "hunger points"]], [[CheerfulChild "happy smile points"]], [[PopQuiz "exam score points"]], and so on. In ''[[VideoGameRemake Super Star Ultra]]'', you are told at the end, "You gain X experience points! (Not that it matters.)" and if you're playing as Meta Knight, different stats go up at the end.

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* Welcome to Dream Land, where everything's made up and the points don't matter. This trope is parodied Parodied in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'', as pictured at the top of the page.''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''. In the "Great Cave Offensive" minigame, you fight Computer Virus, an "RPG-style" boss which takes the form of generic RPG enemies like a slime, witch, dark knight and dragon (as opposed to the ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series's more bizarre fare), complete with a little text box at the top of the screen that announces the player's or boss's blocks or attacks and a [[{{Retraux}} tinny, 8-bit style rendition]] of the main boss theme. Computer Virus even becomes temporarily invincible when it's his turn to attack, simulating TurnBasedCombat, though the player continues to control Kirby in the normal {{platformer}} style throughout the battle. When you win, the menu awards you various (spurious) spoils, including {{Experience Point}}s, [[BigEater "hunger points"]], [[CheerfulChild "happy smile points"]], [[PopQuiz "exam score points"]], and so on. In ''[[VideoGameRemake Super Star Ultra]]'', you are told at the end, "You gain X experience points! (Not that it matters.)" and if you're playing as Meta Knight, different stats go up at the end.
10th Sep '16 3:09:28 PM htuttle
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* Parodied in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'', as pictured at the top of the page. In the "Great Cave Offensive" minigame, you fight Computer Virus, an "RPG-style" boss which takes the form of generic RPG enemies like a slime, witch, dark knight and dragon (as opposed to the ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series's more bizarre fare), complete with a little text box at the top of the screen that announces the player's or boss's blocks or attacks and a [[{{Retraux}} tinny, 8-bit style rendition]] of the main boss theme. Computer Virus even becomes temporarily invincible when it's his turn to attack, simulating TurnBasedCombat, though the player continues to control Kirby in the normal {{platformer}} style throughout the battle. When you win, the menu awards you various (spurious) spoils, including {{Experience Point}}s, [[BigEater "hunger points"]], [[CheerfulChild "happy smile points"]], [[PopQuiz "exam score points"]], and so on. In ''[[VideoGameRemake Super Star Ultra]]'', you are told at the end, "You gain X experience points! (Not that it matters.)" and if you're playing as Meta Knight, different stats go up at the end.

to:

* Parodied Welcome to Dream Land, where everything's made up and the points don't matter. This trope is parodied in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'', as pictured at the top of the page. In the "Great Cave Offensive" minigame, you fight Computer Virus, an "RPG-style" boss which takes the form of generic RPG enemies like a slime, witch, dark knight and dragon (as opposed to the ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series's more bizarre fare), complete with a little text box at the top of the screen that announces the player's or boss's blocks or attacks and a [[{{Retraux}} tinny, 8-bit style rendition]] of the main boss theme. Computer Virus even becomes temporarily invincible when it's his turn to attack, simulating TurnBasedCombat, though the player continues to control Kirby in the normal {{platformer}} style throughout the battle. When you win, the menu awards you various (spurious) spoils, including {{Experience Point}}s, [[BigEater "hunger points"]], [[CheerfulChild "happy smile points"]], [[PopQuiz "exam score points"]], and so on. In ''[[VideoGameRemake Super Star Ultra]]'', you are told at the end, "You gain X experience points! (Not that it matters.)" and if you're playing as Meta Knight, different stats go up at the end.
25th Jul '16 3:18:53 AM 4444jdm
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* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}} V'' deviates itself from other games in the series by throwing MissionControl, {{roguelike}} missions, [[LifeMeter shield]] and [[EvolvingAttack ten levels of weapon upgrades each]]. [[EquipmentBasedProgression The latter being a requirement to reach the]] TrueFinalBoss.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}} V'' deviates itself from other games in the series by throwing in MissionControl, {{roguelike}} missions, [[LifeMeter shield]] and [[EvolvingAttack ten levels of weapon upgrades each]]. [[EquipmentBasedProgression The latter being a requirement to reach the]] TrueFinalBoss.
25th Jul '16 3:18:16 AM 4444jdm
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}} V'' deviates itself from other games in the series by throwing MissionControl, {{roguelike}} missions, [[LifeMeter shield]] and [[EvolvingAttack ten levels of weapon upgrades each]]. [[EquipmentBasedProgression The latter being a requirement to reach the]] TrueFinalBoss.
6th Jun '16 6:24:00 AM apm483@gmail.com
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* ''VideoGame/SwimIkachan'' has experience points earned by either killing enemies or eating a limited supply of fishes that increase player's maximum hit-points when enough is collected.

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* ''VideoGame/SwimIkachan'' has experience points earned by either killing enemies or eating a limited supply of fishes that increase player's maximum hit-points hitpoints when enough is collected.



* Strangely, Square's ''VideoGame/WorldOfMana'' series started out as a straight action-RPG, but every game since the Japanese-only ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' has had fewer RPG elements than the previous title. ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana'' manages to be a straight-out third-person action game with fewer RPG elements than ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank.''

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* Strangely, Square's ''VideoGame/WorldOfMana'' series started out as a straight action-RPG, action RPG, but every game since the Japanese-only ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' has had fewer RPG elements than the previous title. ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana'' manages to be a straight-out third-person action game with fewer RPG elements than ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank.''



* A pair of games known as the ''VideoGame/CrimeCrackers'' duology were released by Media Vision as [[NoExportForYou Japan-only]] titles for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation (one of them was even one of the first ten games ever released for that console). These games used anime-style art for the characters and environments made by Kokomai of "Akaijutsu Club" and used an engine that was more of a middle ground between ''VideoGame/{{Wolfenstein 3D}}[=/=]VideoGame/BlakeStone'' and ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'''s engines, but also allowed things like transporting elevators to give the illusion of multiple floors in the same map (like [[VideoGame/DukeNukem Duke Nukem 3D]] which included elevators that teleported you as one of its mapping effects), a specialized guarding system for blocking attacks from enemies, the ability to level up via Experience Points (the second game only), and probably one of the least used RPG elements in First Person Shooters, a multiple-characters-in-the-same-party set up (3 in the first game, 4 in the second game with the option to switch characters at the start of most levels). Some environments could even damage all of your characters simultaneously, and of course if all of them died, it was game over. The targeting system is also a bit out of place compared to other first person shooters, stopping you in place while you aim a crosshair at anything on screen and your shots will shoot towards the crosshair instead of straight ahead]. It was probably not the biggest thing since sliced bread, but it's existence was the inspiration for another FPS [[VideoGame/NaferiasReignInvasionOfTheDarkMistress modification for Duke Nukem 3D]] with far more build up on the RPG Elements (among other things) so far.

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* A pair of games known as the ''VideoGame/CrimeCrackers'' duology were released by Media Vision as [[NoExportForYou Japan-only]] titles for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation (one of them was even one of the first ten games ever released for that console). These games used anime-style art {{Animesque}} artstyles for the characters and environments made by Kokomai of "Akaijutsu Club" and used an engine that was more of a middle ground between ''VideoGame/{{Wolfenstein 3D}}[=/=]VideoGame/BlakeStone'' and ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'''s engines, but also allowed things like transporting elevators to give the illusion of multiple floors in the same map (like [[VideoGame/DukeNukem Duke Nukem 3D]] which included elevators that teleported you as one of its mapping effects), a specialized guarding system for blocking attacks from enemies, the ability to level up via Experience Points (the second game only), and probably one of the least used RPG elements in First Person Shooters, a multiple-characters-in-the-same-party multiple-character party set up (3 in the first game, 4 in the second game with the option to switch characters at the start of most levels). Some environments could even damage all of your characters simultaneously, and of course if all of them died, it was game over. The targeting system is also a bit out of place compared to other first person shooters, stopping you in place while you aim a crosshair at anything on screen and your shots will shoot towards the crosshair instead of straight ahead]. It was probably not the biggest thing since sliced bread, but it's existence was the inspiration for another FPS [[VideoGame/NaferiasReignInvasionOfTheDarkMistress modification for Duke Nukem 3D]] with far more build up on the RPG Elements (among other things) so far.



* Parodied in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'', as pictured at the top of the page. In the "Great Cave Offensive" sub-game, you fight Computer Virus, an "RPG-style" boss which takes the form of generic RPG enemies like a slime, witch, dark knight and dragon (as opposed to the ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series's more bizarre fare), complete with a little text box at the top of the screen that announces the player's or boss's blocks or attacks and a [[{{Retraux}} tinny, 8-bit style rendition]] of the main boss theme. Computer Virus even becomes temporarily invincible when it's his turn to attack, simulating TurnBasedCombat, though the player continues to control Kirby in the normal {{platformer}} style throughout the battle. When you win, the menu awards you various (spurious) spoils, including {{Experience Point}}s, [[BigEater "hunger points"]], [[CheerfulChild "happy smile points"]], [[PopQuiz "exam score points"]], and so on. In ''[[VideoGameRemake Super Star Ultra]]'', you are told at the end, "You gain X experience points! (Not that it matters.)" and if you're playing as Meta Knight, different stats go up at the end.

to:

* Parodied in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'', as pictured at the top of the page. In the "Great Cave Offensive" sub-game, minigame, you fight Computer Virus, an "RPG-style" boss which takes the form of generic RPG enemies like a slime, witch, dark knight and dragon (as opposed to the ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series's more bizarre fare), complete with a little text box at the top of the screen that announces the player's or boss's blocks or attacks and a [[{{Retraux}} tinny, 8-bit style rendition]] of the main boss theme. Computer Virus even becomes temporarily invincible when it's his turn to attack, simulating TurnBasedCombat, though the player continues to control Kirby in the normal {{platformer}} style throughout the battle. When you win, the menu awards you various (spurious) spoils, including {{Experience Point}}s, [[BigEater "hunger points"]], [[CheerfulChild "happy smile points"]], [[PopQuiz "exam score points"]], and so on. In ''[[VideoGameRemake Super Star Ultra]]'', you are told at the end, "You gain X experience points! (Not that it matters.)" and if you're playing as Meta Knight, different stats go up at the end.



** Taken to its extremes in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianTwilight'', where players have to gain experience from playing within their profiles, which is necessary to unlock new units for use in both campaign and multi-player mode. This has resulted in a need for grinding to unlock the powerful units and superweapons.

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** Taken to its extremes in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianTwilight'', where players have to gain experience from playing within their profiles, which is necessary to unlock new units for use in both campaign and multi-player multiplayer mode. This has resulted in a need for grinding to unlock the powerful units and superweapons.



* ''VideoGame/{{Spellforce}}'' walks the fine line between being an RTS with RPG elements and being an RPG with RTS elements, depending on whether one is playing Free-Roam or Story mode. (Story mode focuses mainly on the RPG angle; in the "Breath of Winter" expansion, this leads to a massive difficulty spike when the encounters suddenly become ten levels too high for your hero to effectively deal with).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Spellforce}}'' walks the fine line between being an RTS with RPG elements and being an RPG with RTS elements, depending on whether one is playing Free-Roam Free Roam or Story mode. (Story mode focuses mainly on the RPG angle; in the "Breath of Winter" expansion, this leads to a massive difficulty spike when the encounters suddenly become ten levels too high for your hero to effectively deal with).



* The UsefulNotes/{{Playstation}} port of ''VideoGame/PointBlank'' is a collection of minigames in which you use a gun controller (like Duck Hunt). It has a one-player RPG mode that replaces regular RPG battles with the minigames. The stats don't affect the actual minigames, but determine which ones you play, how many losses you can take before GameOver, etc.

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* The UsefulNotes/{{Playstation}} port of ''VideoGame/PointBlank'' is a collection of minigames in which you use a gun controller (like Duck Hunt). It has a one-player singleplayer RPG mode that replaces regular RPG battles with the minigames. The stats don't affect the actual minigames, but determine which ones you play, how many losses you can take before GameOver, etc.



* The Firaxis remake of ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' introduces soldier classes and level perks. All soldiers start at "Rookie" level with standard assault rifles and pistols but can quickly become "Squadies", as all it takes is one kill. At this point, the game randomly assigns the soldier a class ([[FriendlySniper Sniper]], [[ShortRangeShotgun Assault]], [[TheHeavy Heavy]], [[CombatMedic Support]]). Each class has its own primary weapon: Sniper has a sniper rifle, Assault has a shotgun (can use assault rifle), Heavy has a light machinegun (or heavy laser/plasma) and a one-shot bazooka (replacing a pistol), Support keeps the assault rifle. All but the Heavy class can switch to their sidearms. As the soldiers get promoted all the way to ColonelBadass, they get an ability each rank (usually one out of two) related to their class. For example, Heavy class can boost the SplashDamage of their rockets and fire twice per turn. Assault class can get the ability to dodge the first reaction shot by the enemy, as well as other defensive bonuses, so that the soldier can either get close enough for their ShortRangeShotgun, or draw fire away from others then take potshots/throw grenades. Support class's abilities can either focus on [[TheMedic healing and giving defensive buffs]] to allies, or, focus on giving excessive over-watch fire [[CombatMedic (they always get the most kills for players on the harder difficulties)]]. Once the psychic lab is unlocked, soldiers can be tested, and those with psychic potential can get PsychicPowers based on their (separate) psi-rank.

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* The Firaxis remake of ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' introduces soldier classes and level perks. All soldiers start at "Rookie" level with standard assault rifles and pistols but can quickly become "Squadies", as all it takes is one kill. At this point, the game randomly assigns the soldier a class ([[FriendlySniper Sniper]], [[ShortRangeShotgun Assault]], [[TheHeavy Heavy]], [[CombatMedic Support]]). Each class has its own primary weapon: Sniper has a sniper rifle, Assault has a shotgun (can use assault rifle), Heavy has a light machinegun machine gun (or heavy laser/plasma) and a one-shot bazooka (replacing a pistol), Support keeps the assault rifle. All but the Heavy class can switch to their sidearms. As the soldiers get promoted all the way to ColonelBadass, they get an ability each rank (usually one out of two) related to their class. For example, Heavy class can boost the SplashDamage of their rockets and fire twice per turn. Assault class can get the ability to dodge the first reaction shot by the enemy, as well as other defensive bonuses, so that the soldier can either get close enough for their ShortRangeShotgun, or draw fire away from others then take potshots/throw grenades. Support class's abilities can either focus on [[TheMedic healing and giving defensive buffs]] to allies, or, focus on giving excessive over-watch overwatch fire [[CombatMedic (they always get the most kills for players on the harder difficulties)]]. Once the psychic lab is unlocked, soldiers can be tested, and those with psychic potential can get PsychicPowers based on their (separate) psi-rank.



* Digital distribution platform UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} has introduced a leveling system, heavily tied to its Steam Trading Cards. A higher Steam level earns you [[BraggingRightsReward bragging rights]], friends-list slots (useful not only for gamers with a lot of friends, but for ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' traders who like to keep in touch with people they know are reliable buyers and sellers of metal, promos, and unusuals), and profile customization slots (again, not just for showing off - among the Profile Showcases you can earn is a display of items for trade, or an additional text box which can be used to list your services.)

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* Digital distribution platform UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} has introduced a leveling system, heavily tied to its Steam Trading Cards. A higher Steam level earns you [[BraggingRightsReward bragging rights]], friends-list friends list slots (useful not only for gamers with a lot of friends, but for ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' traders who like to keep in touch with people they know are reliable buyers and sellers of metal, promos, and unusuals), and profile customization slots (again, not just for showing off - among the Profile Showcases you can earn is a display of items for trade, or an additional text box which can be used to list your services.)
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