History Main / PunkRock

15th Oct '17 3:14:13 PM nombretomado
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+ {{Rockabilly}}, Surf Music, BritishInvasion, HardRock, sometimes KrautRock

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+ {{Rockabilly}}, Surf Music, BritishInvasion, UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion, HardRock, sometimes KrautRock
13th Sep '17 11:00:06 PM SheldonDinkleburg
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* Music/{{BiS}}
1st Jul '17 9:47:58 PM Flaunt
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* Music/TheMenzingers
2nd May '17 2:06:20 PM bt8257
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{{Ahem}}. Punk bands tended to eschew the [[strike:perceived]] excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. They also embraced a DIY aesthetic, with many bands self-producing their recordings and distributing them through informal channels.

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{{Ahem}}. Punk bands tended to eschew the [[strike:perceived]] excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. They also embraced a DIY aesthetic, with many bands self-producing their recordings and distributing them through informal channels.


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* Music/{{Jawbreaker}}
4th Apr '17 10:47:04 PM Origamidragons
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** ''Music/RevolutionRadio'' (2016)
3rd Feb '17 11:45:53 AM Noisynoisy56
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** {{Crossover Thrash}}


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** {{Powerviolence}}
2nd Nov '16 7:57:01 PM RampinUp46
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* Music/ChokingVictim
17th Oct '16 10:27:15 PM MarkLungo
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Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Creator/FactoryRecords and Rough Trade. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.

to:

Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Creator/FactoryRecords and Creator/FourADRecords, Creator/FactoryRecords, Rough Trade.Trade and Creator/SubPop. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.
14th Oct '16 9:03:49 AM darkchiefy
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Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Factory Records and Rough Trade. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.

to:

Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Factory Records Creator/FactoryRecords and Rough Trade. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.
19th Aug '16 2:47:53 PM Josef5678
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It all started in the mid-seventies with punk scenes growing in the US, thanks to Music/TheRamones, and the UK, thanks to the Music/SexPistols, the Music/{{Buzzcocks}}, and Music/TheClash. While the scene had been fomenting for a while, the big push of punk started, most say, in 1976 with the release of The Damned's first single and The Sex Pistols' first appearances. Out of all the first wave of punk bands, The Sex Pistols, in particular, were highly influential due to Malcolm McLaren's clever marketing and their high visibility, even though they weren't that talented a band (not that this matters, because they're punk). They (Sex Pistols) caused quite a fair bit of controversy on several notes: [[ClusterFBomb swearing]] [[RefugeInAudacity during a live TV interview]]; releasing an anti-monarchy song named "God Save the Queen" for the Queen's silver jubilee; [[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle being called]] "[[PhallicWeapon the Sex Pistols]]". This controversy also [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity resulted in the punk scene exploding into success]], causing the creation of the punk subculture and, by extension, the emo and goth subcultures, too.

to:

It all started in the mid-seventies with punk scenes growing in the US, thanks to Music/TheRamones, and the UK, thanks to the Music/SexPistols, the Music/{{Buzzcocks}}, and Music/TheClash. While the scene had been fomenting for a while, the big push of punk started, most say, in 1976 with the release of The Damned's first single and The Sex Pistols' first appearances. Out of all the first wave of punk bands, The Sex Pistols, in particular, were highly influential due to Malcolm McLaren's [=McLaren=]'s clever marketing and their high visibility, even though they weren't that talented a band (not that this matters, because they're punk). They (Sex Pistols) caused quite a fair bit of controversy on several notes: [[ClusterFBomb swearing]] [[RefugeInAudacity during a live TV interview]]; releasing an anti-monarchy song named "God Save the Queen" for the Queen's silver jubilee; [[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle being called]] "[[PhallicWeapon the Sex Pistols]]". This controversy also [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity resulted in the punk scene exploding into success]], causing the creation of the punk subculture and, by extension, the emo and goth subcultures, too.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PunkRock