History Main / PunkRock

2nd Nov '16 7:57:01 PM RampinUp46
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* Music/ChokingVictim
17th Oct '16 10:27:15 PM MarkLungo
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Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Creator/FactoryRecords and Rough Trade. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.

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Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Creator/FactoryRecords and Creator/FourADRecords, Creator/FactoryRecords, Rough Trade.Trade and Creator/SubPop. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.
14th Oct '16 9:03:49 AM darkchiefy
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Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Factory Records and Rough Trade. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.

to:

Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Factory Records Creator/FactoryRecords and Rough Trade. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.
19th Aug '16 2:47:53 PM Josef5678
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It all started in the mid-seventies with punk scenes growing in the US, thanks to Music/TheRamones, and the UK, thanks to the Music/SexPistols, the Music/{{Buzzcocks}}, and Music/TheClash. While the scene had been fomenting for a while, the big push of punk started, most say, in 1976 with the release of The Damned's first single and The Sex Pistols' first appearances. Out of all the first wave of punk bands, The Sex Pistols, in particular, were highly influential due to Malcolm McLaren's clever marketing and their high visibility, even though they weren't that talented a band (not that this matters, because they're punk). They (Sex Pistols) caused quite a fair bit of controversy on several notes: [[ClusterFBomb swearing]] [[RefugeInAudacity during a live TV interview]]; releasing an anti-monarchy song named "God Save the Queen" for the Queen's silver jubilee; [[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle being called]] "[[PhallicWeapon the Sex Pistols]]". This controversy also [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity resulted in the punk scene exploding into success]], causing the creation of the punk subculture and, by extension, the emo and goth subcultures, too.

to:

It all started in the mid-seventies with punk scenes growing in the US, thanks to Music/TheRamones, and the UK, thanks to the Music/SexPistols, the Music/{{Buzzcocks}}, and Music/TheClash. While the scene had been fomenting for a while, the big push of punk started, most say, in 1976 with the release of The Damned's first single and The Sex Pistols' first appearances. Out of all the first wave of punk bands, The Sex Pistols, in particular, were highly influential due to Malcolm McLaren's [=McLaren=]'s clever marketing and their high visibility, even though they weren't that talented a band (not that this matters, because they're punk). They (Sex Pistols) caused quite a fair bit of controversy on several notes: [[ClusterFBomb swearing]] [[RefugeInAudacity during a live TV interview]]; releasing an anti-monarchy song named "God Save the Queen" for the Queen's silver jubilee; [[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle being called]] "[[PhallicWeapon the Sex Pistols]]". This controversy also [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity resulted in the punk scene exploding into success]], causing the creation of the punk subculture and, by extension, the emo and goth subcultures, too.
21st Jun '16 1:16:08 PM gewunomox
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* Music/GenerationX (notable for being [[BillyIdol Billy Idol's]] first band)

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* Music/GenerationX (notable for being [[BillyIdol Billy Idol's]] Music/BillyIdol's first band)
13th Jun '16 5:30:29 AM malifee
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It all started in the mid-seventies with punk scenes growing in the US, thanks to Music/TheRamones, and the UK, thanks to the Music/SexPistols, the Music/{{Buzzcocks}}, and Music/TheClash. The Sex Pistols, in particular, were highly influential, even though they weren't that talented a band (not that this matters, because they're punk). They (Sex Pistols) caused quite a fair bit of controversy on several notes: [[ClusterFBomb swearing]] [[RefugeInAudacity during a live TV interview]]; releasing an anti-monarchy song named "God Save the Queen" for the Queen's silver jubilee; [[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle being called]] "[[PhallicWeapon the Sex Pistols]]". This controversy also [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity resulted in the punk scene exploding into success]], causing the creation of the punk subculture and, by extension, the emo and goth subcultures, too.

By the early-eighties, standard punk rock started to get replaced by harder, faster and more aggressive styles, in particular HardcorePunk. PostPunk, a less aggressive style that focused on more complex and experimental music, also evolved out of this initial punk explosion. This gave way to PostPunk and GothRock bands such as Music/JoyDivision and Music/TheCure, respectively, as well as {{New Wave|Music}} bands like Music/{{Blondie}} and Music/TalkingHeads. These genres incorporated elements from other genres such as Jamaican dub and {{Krautrock}}. Other notable(?) subgenres of punk include Music/{{Emo}} and PopPunk.

In addition, there is the subgenre of Oi!/street punk; nominally apolitical and the self-proclaimed music of the working class. Popular among punks and skins of all races and political stripes, the genre was formed in reaction to the percieved invasion of the punk scene by college hipsters and corporate fat cats. Famous bands include: the Cockney Rejects, the Oppressed, Angelic Upstarts, Cocksparrer, Iron Cross, and many others. Special note: there are a small number of fascist/white power affiliated groups who emulate the Oi! style. They are currently locked in a decades long battle with SHARP and redskins, as well as AFA affiliated punks. In summation, most connected to the Oi! scene are not racist, and to label them as such is a good way to get a boot to the head. Most people just refer to neo-Nazi/far-right bands as Rock Against Communism/RAC, and following suit is probably the safest way to avoid pissing anyone off.

Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elabourate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians.

to:

It all started in the mid-seventies with punk scenes growing in the US, thanks to Music/TheRamones, and the UK, thanks to the Music/SexPistols, the Music/{{Buzzcocks}}, and Music/TheClash. While the scene had been fomenting for a while, the big push of punk started, most say, in 1976 with the release of The Damned's first single and The Sex Pistols' first appearances. Out of all the first wave of punk bands, The Sex Pistols, in particular, were highly influential, influential due to Malcolm McLaren's clever marketing and their high visibility, even though they weren't that talented a band (not that this matters, because they're punk). They (Sex Pistols) caused quite a fair bit of controversy on several notes: [[ClusterFBomb swearing]] [[RefugeInAudacity during a live TV interview]]; releasing an anti-monarchy song named "God Save the Queen" for the Queen's silver jubilee; [[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle being called]] "[[PhallicWeapon the Sex Pistols]]". This controversy also [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity resulted in the punk scene exploding into success]], causing the creation of the punk subculture and, by extension, the emo and goth subcultures, too.

By the early-eighties, with the increased diversity of influences and backlash against the cardboard-cutout punk bands starting to clog the scene, standard punk rock started to get replaced by harder, faster and more aggressive styles, in particular HardcorePunk. PostPunk, a less aggressive style that focused on more complex and experimental music, also evolved out of this initial punk explosion. This gave way to PostPunk and GothRock bands such as Music/JoyDivision and Music/TheCure, respectively, as well as {{New Wave|Music}} bands like Music/{{Blondie}} and Music/TalkingHeads.Music/TalkingHeads, both of which existed during the punk explosion, but only came to prominence after it had keeled over. These genres incorporated elements from other genres such as Jamaican dub and {{Krautrock}}. Other notable(?) subgenres of punk include Music/{{Emo}} and PopPunk.

In addition, there is the subgenre of Oi!/street punk; nominally apolitical and the self-proclaimed music of the working class. Popular among punks and skins of all races and political stripes, the genre was formed in reaction to the percieved perceived invasion of the punk scene by college hipsters hipsters, art school students and corporate fat cats. Famous bands include: the Cockney Rejects, the Oppressed, Angelic Upstarts, Cocksparrer, Cock Sparrer, Iron Cross, and many others. Special note: there are a small number of fascist/white power affiliated groups who emulate the Oi! style. They are currently locked in a decades long battle with SHARP and redskins, as well as AFA affiliated punks. In summation, most connected to the Oi! scene are not racist, and to label them as such is a good way to get a boot to the head. Most people just refer to neo-Nazi/far-right bands as Rock Against Communism/RAC, and following suit is probably the safest way to avoid pissing anyone off.

off. Then again, they are literal fascists, and who's in Oi! to keep things calm? Punk's early use of fascist imagery resulted in a proliferation of genuinely racist, rather than latently racist, bands, resulting again in increased violence and waves of action and reaction on both sides, although fascists on the scene were decried by bands ranging from The Clash to the Dead Kennedys, whose single "Nazi Punks Fuckk Off" was a seminal example.

Throughout its history, Punk has been at odds with ProgressiveRock, which is considered by many to be the epitome of technical rock. Many punk musicians decried its greatly elabourate elaborate and exhibitionist nature, claiming that these characteristics were stifling and discouraging to amateur musicians.
musicians. Punk has been described as the democratisation of music, since prior to its deconstruction of rock, rock had been becoming ever-more idolatrous and money-focused. Punk also helped create the next generation of independent record labels, including, most notably, Factory Records and Rough Trade. Interestingly, the punk ethos and fandom intersect in the early eighties, when punk 'zines were the inspiration for modern, home-produced fanzines, which eventually led to today's internet communities.
26th Jan '16 4:21:43 PM hamza678
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24th Jan '16 1:48:34 PM RampinUp46
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* Music/LeftoverCrack
2nd Jan '16 8:18:05 AM CassandraLeo
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* Music/{{Crass}} (co-UrExample for HardcorePunk)


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* Music/FluxOfPinkIndians
25th Dec '15 3:48:20 PM mrnickname
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* Music/OnkelKonkelAndHisKonkelbar
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