History Main / ProtagonistCenteredMorality

21st Jul '17 5:44:30 AM RareGiftFiend
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** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows,'' Bellatrix uses the [[ColdBloodedTorture Cruciatus Curse]] on Hermione to try and divulge the location of the Sword of Gryffindor. This, like all previous uses of the curse, is portrayed as morally repugnant. Later in the same book, Harry leaps from his hiding place and Cruciates Amycus Carrow when the latter spits in [=McGonagall's=] face. [=McGonagall=], rather than exhibit horror, calls Harry's actions "gallant."

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** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows,'' Bellatrix uses the [[ColdBloodedTorture Cruciatus Curse]] on Hermione to try and divulge the location of the Sword of Gryffindor. This, like all previous uses of the curse, is portrayed as morally repugnant. Later in the same book, Harry leaps from his hiding place and [[DisproportionateRetribution Cruciates Amycus Carrow when the latter spits in [=McGonagall's=] face.face]]. [=McGonagall=], rather than exhibit horror, calls Harry's actions "gallant."
18th Jul '17 11:37:28 PM ZombieAladdin
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* ''VideoGame/IggysReckinBalls'' is about a group of troublemakers whose hobby is racing against each other, with the winner getting to push the BigRedButton that will detonate the entire racetrack. The game itself takes them to the sacred towers of the Cho-Dama Kingdom, and despite what they're doing being sacrilege and can be easily interpreted as terrorism, the game very much wants you to perceive it as much fun as Iggy and his friends are having, with the Cho-Dama forces attempting to stop them PlayedForLaughs. No consequences of the destroyed towers are ever shown except for the last-place finisher getting caught in the explosion, which is also played for laughs.
18th Jul '17 9:49:01 PM LaughingGiraffe
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* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'': When penniless Lord Hepworth pursues Lady Rosamund for her money, the Dowager Countess warns her that she's a conniving fortune-hunter; the narrative also paints him as a jerk [[spoiler: who is also carrying on with Rosamund's maid]]. Meanwhile, Lord Grantham married Cora for her money in the series's backstory, presumably with the Countess's encouragement. Every so one character or another will gently rib him about this; otherwise no one seems to judge.
17th Jul '17 12:40:35 PM RareGiftFiend
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* In ''Literature/{{Worm}},'' the protagonist and narrator, Taylor, is horrifically abused by a group of bullies at school, with one incident even requiring she be admitted to the psychiatric ward and drugged to help her calm down. The effects of this bullying, and the school's cavalier attitude toward it, are shown to be far-reaching and catastrophic. However, when one of these bullies is [[spoiler:forced to destroy her relationships with friends and family, implicate herself in a crime, and forfeit her job, leaving a life of homelessness or suicide as her only options]], it is treated as a fully justifiable and satisfying comeuppance.

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* In ''Literature/{{Worm}},'' ''Literature/{{Worm}}'':
** Early on,
the protagonist and narrator, Taylor, is offered a chance to work with the Undersiders, a gang of superpowered teenage villains working for a mysterious boss. She accepts the offer with the notion of insinuating herself into their group to hand over valuable intel to the local Protectorate, a group of adult heroes, via Armsmaster, who owes her a favor. Although she does this without the approval or knowledge of the Protectorate, she still goes to Armsmaster ''after'' she's accepted the Undersiders' offer and asks him to ensure she stays out of prison should things go sour. [[spoiler:Armsmaster predictably refuses, pointing out that the favor she's calling in--allowing him to take credit for apprehending a dangerous gangster named Lung--blew up in his face due to her own recklessness. Rather than apologizing and asking what she can do to help, Taylor gets angry with Armsmaster and storms out to go her own way.]] Armsmaster is portrayed as insensitive and stubborn, with Taylor comparing him to the bullies who abuse her on a daily basis.
** Taylor is also
horrifically abused by a group of bullies at school, with one incident even requiring she be admitted to the psychiatric ward and drugged to help her calm down. The effects of this bullying, and the school's cavalier attitude toward it, are shown to be far-reaching and catastrophic. However, when one of these bullies is [[spoiler:forced to destroy her relationships with friends and family, implicate herself in a crime, and forfeit her job, leaving a life of homelessness or suicide as her only options]], it is treated as a fully justifiable and satisfying comeuppance.
17th Jul '17 4:00:44 AM ClintEastwood
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** The reboot series continually has the Doctor waver back and forth on whether or not genocide is bad, but it's always in regards to what ''he'' wants; sometimes he won't kill the invading aliens because he's worried about falling down some slippery slope, even though billions of innocents will die, while other times he's perfectly willing to wipe out a whole species to preserve the one he likes the best. In "The Parting of the Ways" he refuses to kill the Daleks because doing so would wipe out life on Earth (which the Daleks are wiping out ''anyway'' even as he thinks this, and would have killed many more if not for a DeusExMachina), and in "Journey's End" he berates his clone for killing the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity again]]) even though the latter rightly pointed out that leaving them alive would threaten the whole universe and were only narrowly stopped from destroying multiple universes, along with the fact only the Daleks were destroyed. Later just a few Daleks surviving enables them to rebuilt their race and cause more death and destruction throughout history. Meanwhile, the Doctor kills off species like the Pyroviles (along with 20,000 innocent people though this was a fixed point in time) and the Saturnynians (but he feels bad about it, so it's okay) and ''gleefully'' organises the deaths of the Silence even though, by the Doctor's own admission, the Earth is technically theirs.

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** The reboot series continually has the Doctor waver back and forth on whether or not genocide is bad, but it's always in regards to what ''he'' wants; sometimes he won't kill the invading aliens because he's worried about falling down some slippery slope, even though billions of innocents will die, while other times he's perfectly willing to wipe out a whole species to preserve the one he likes the best. In "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E13ThePartingOfTheWays The Parting of the Ways" Ways]]" he refuses to kill the Daleks because doing so would wipe out life on Earth (which the Daleks are wiping out ''anyway'' even as he thinks this, and would have killed many more if not for a DeusExMachina), and in "Journey's End" he berates his clone for killing the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity again]]) even though the latter rightly pointed out that leaving them alive would threaten the whole universe and were only narrowly stopped from destroying multiple universes, along with the fact only the Daleks were destroyed. Later just a few Daleks surviving enables them to rebuilt their race and cause more death and destruction throughout history. Meanwhile, the Doctor kills off species like the Pyroviles (along with 20,000 innocent people though this was a fixed point in time) and the Saturnynians (but he feels bad about it, so it's okay) and ''gleefully'' organises the deaths of the Silence even though, by the Doctor's own admission, the Earth is technically theirs.
8th Jul '17 2:56:22 PM RareGiftFiend
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* In ''Literature/Worm,'' the protagonist and narrator, Taylor, is horrifically abused by a group of bullies at school, with one incident even requiring she be admitted to the psychiatric ward and drugged to help her calm down. The effects of this bullying, and the school's cavalier attitude toward it, are shown to be far-reaching and catastrophic. However, when one of these bullies is [[spoiler:forced to destroy her relationships with friends and family, implicate herself in a crime, and forfeit her job, leaving a life of homelessness or suicide as her only options]], it is treated as a fully justifiable and satisfying comeuppance.

to:

* In ''Literature/Worm,'' ''Literature/{{Worm}},'' the protagonist and narrator, Taylor, is horrifically abused by a group of bullies at school, with one incident even requiring she be admitted to the psychiatric ward and drugged to help her calm down. The effects of this bullying, and the school's cavalier attitude toward it, are shown to be far-reaching and catastrophic. However, when one of these bullies is [[spoiler:forced to destroy her relationships with friends and family, implicate herself in a crime, and forfeit her job, leaving a life of homelessness or suicide as her only options]], it is treated as a fully justifiable and satisfying comeuppance.
8th Jul '17 2:54:36 PM RareGiftFiend
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* In ''Literature/Worm,'' the protagonist and narrator, Taylor, is horrifically abused by a group of bullies at school, with one incident even requiring she be admitted to the psychiatric ward and drugged to help her calm down. The effects of this bullying, and the school's cavalier attitude toward it, are shown to be far-reaching and catastrophic. However, when one of these bullies is [[spoiler:forced to destroy her relationships with friends and family, implicate herself in a crime, and forfeit her job, leaving a life of homelessness or suicide as her only options]], it is treated as a fully justifiable and satisfying comeuppance.
7th Jul '17 8:38:25 PM ColossalTapir
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* ''Webcomic/{{StrongFemaleProtagonist}}'' built up to its longest chapter to date exploring this issue in detail. Alison sees herself as a literal Social Justice Warrior, ready to battle all the problems of the world with her fists. Unfortunately, the problems of the world aren't that simple - and her heavy handed attempts to make them simple have resulted in people becoming increasingly afraid of her readiness to inflict violence, her long alliance with her former archnemesis terminated abruptly when he broke her heart and reminded her that the young man she's been so infatuated with is in fact a terrorist who changed his methods but not his goals, and she's openly admitted that she's been ignoring the rights of people she doesn't like. Not to mention that she's now guilty of kidnapping, torture, terroristic threats, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking medical fraud]] against an ex-boyfriend. Who also happens to be the son of some very powerful people who seem to have been letting her operate freely only because she wasn't important enough... until she acquired their full negative attention.
3rd Jul '17 1:15:14 AM AdamC
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** Throughout the series, Professor Snape regularly humiliates the PowerTrio and the other Gryffindors in front of their Slytherin classmates. These actions are always used to cement Snape's {{Jerkass}} status, and are shown to have a disastrous effect on Neville Longbottom's psyche. In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire,'' [[spoiler:fake!]]Moody Transfigures Draco into a ferret and forcibly bounces him around like a ball, which is PlayedForLaughs. The physical and psychological effects of this[[note]]and you know there had to be ''some;'' the guy lost control of his body, wasn't even human for a few minutes, and was humiliated in front of the whole school by a highly respected authority figure[[/note]] are never addressed. At least in this case Moody was chewed out by Professor [[=McGonagall=]], the school's local ReasonableAuthorityFigure, which is more than ever Snape ever seemed to get for the same behavior.

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** Throughout the series, Professor Snape regularly humiliates the PowerTrio and the other Gryffindors in front of their Slytherin classmates. These actions are always used to cement Snape's {{Jerkass}} status, and are shown to have a disastrous effect on Neville Longbottom's psyche. In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire,'' [[spoiler:fake!]]Moody Transfigures Draco into a ferret and forcibly bounces him around like a ball, which is PlayedForLaughs. The physical and psychological effects of this[[note]]and you know there had to be ''some;'' the guy lost control of his body, wasn't even human for a few minutes, and was humiliated in front of the whole school by a highly respected authority figure[[/note]] are never addressed. At least in this case Moody was chewed out by Professor [[=McGonagall=]], [=McGonagall=], the school's local ReasonableAuthorityFigure, which is more than ever Snape ever seemed to get for the same behavior.
3rd Jul '17 1:14:29 AM AdamC
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** Throughout the series, Professor Snape regularly humiliates the PowerTrio and the other Gryffindors in front of their Slytherin classmates. These actions are always used to cement Snape's {{Jerkass}} status, and are shown to have a disastrous effect on Neville Longbottom's psyche. In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire,'' [[spoiler:fake!]]Moody Transfigures Draco into a ferret and forcibly bounces him around like a ball, which is PlayedForLaughs. The physical and psychological effects of this[[note]]and you know there had to be ''some;'' the guy lost control of his body, wasn't even human for a few minutes, and was humiliated in front of the whole school by a highly respected authority figure[[/note]] are never addressed.

to:

** Throughout the series, Professor Snape regularly humiliates the PowerTrio and the other Gryffindors in front of their Slytherin classmates. These actions are always used to cement Snape's {{Jerkass}} status, and are shown to have a disastrous effect on Neville Longbottom's psyche. In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire,'' [[spoiler:fake!]]Moody Transfigures Draco into a ferret and forcibly bounces him around like a ball, which is PlayedForLaughs. The physical and psychological effects of this[[note]]and you know there had to be ''some;'' the guy lost control of his body, wasn't even human for a few minutes, and was humiliated in front of the whole school by a highly respected authority figure[[/note]] are never addressed. At least in this case Moody was chewed out by Professor [[=McGonagall=]], the school's local ReasonableAuthorityFigure, which is more than ever Snape ever seemed to get for the same behavior.
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