History Main / ProgressiveRock

18th Oct '17 3:51:40 PM DavidDelony
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Critics usually dismissed these bands as being [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible "pretentious"]] (Music/PinkFloyd is the only progressive rock band many rock critics will admit to liking, although even they received their fair share of critical drubbings at the time). Some people just want to have a good time, and prog bands sometimes took themselves far too seriously. Perhaps the most notorious offender was Music/{{Yes}}' ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' album: it was seen by many as a clear drop in quality from their previous efforts. By stretching a total of four songs ''over 2 [=LPs=]'', even most progressive rock listeners found it to be an exhausting experience to listen to.

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Critics usually dismissed these bands as being [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible "pretentious"]] (Music/PinkFloyd is the only progressive rock band many rock critics will admit to liking, although even they received their fair share of critical drubbings at the time). Some people just want to have a good time, and prog bands sometimes took themselves far too seriously. Perhaps the most notorious offender was Music/{{Yes}}' ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' album: it was seen by many as a clear drop in quality from their previous efforts. By stretching a total of four songs ''over 2 [=LPs=]'', [[EveryoneHasStandards even most progressive rock listeners listeners]] found it to be an exhausting experience to listen to.
4th Oct '17 6:03:17 PM DavidDelony
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* Music/TalkingHeads (Prog-related)
** ''Music/TalkingHeads77'' [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin (1977)]]
** ''Music/MoreSongsAboutBuildingsAndFood'' (1978)
** ''Music/FearOfMusic'' (1979)
** ''Music/RemainInLight'' (1980)
30th Sep '17 4:04:54 PM CassandraLeo
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* UrExample: Some will simply say Music/KingCrimson and leave it at that, but it's probably more complicated, because the genre didn't spring forth from a single source but brought together influences from a number of disparate genres previously not commonly associated with rock music, including classical and jazz. Acts frequently retroactively dubbed "proto-prog" include Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheWho, Music/TheDoors, Music/TheVelvetUnderground, Music/TheBeachBoys, Music/TheGratefulDead, Music/ProcolHarum, The Nice, Music/FrankZappa, Music/TheMoodyBlues, Music/SoftMachine, The United States of America (the band, not the country), Music/JimiHendrix, Music/DeepPurple, and Spirit. Some of these acts' influence can be felt felt more directly than others', and some of them later became prog if they didn't start out as such. (For instance, The Who are not a prog band as a whole, but ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' is usually considered to be a prog album. Similarly, Soft Machine's early work probably isn't prog, but starting from ''Third'', it is.) The strongest case for being an UrExample probably goes to Zappa (though he also may qualify as a TropeMaker), the Moody Blues (ditto), the Beatles, the Who, or Deep Purple.

to:

* UrExample: Some will simply say Music/KingCrimson and leave it at that, but it's probably more complicated, because the genre didn't spring forth from a single source but brought together influences from a number of disparate genres previously not commonly associated with rock music, including classical and jazz. Acts frequently retroactively dubbed "proto-prog" include Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheWho, Music/TheDoors, Music/TheVelvetUnderground, Music/TheBeachBoys, Music/TheGratefulDead, Music/ProcolHarum, The Nice, Music/FrankZappa, Music/TheMoodyBlues, Music/SoftMachine, The United States of America (the band, not the country), Music/JimiHendrix, Music/DeepPurple, and Spirit. Some of these acts' influence can be felt felt more directly than others', and some of them later became prog if they didn't start out as such. (For instance, The Who are not a prog band as a whole, but ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' is usually considered to be a prog album. Similarly, Soft Machine's early work probably isn't prog, but starting from ''Third'', it is.is, and cases are sometimes made for the Dead's ''Blues for Allah'' and ''Terrapin Station''; ThatOtherWiki actually categorises the latter as a prog rock album.) The strongest case for being an UrExample probably goes to Zappa (though he also may qualify as a TropeMaker), the Moody Blues (ditto), the Beatles, the Who, or Deep Purple.Purple; the Beach Boys would also have a strong claim if ''Music/SMiLE'' had been finished in 1967.
17th Sep '17 7:36:11 PM CassandraLeo
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* LimitedLyricsSong: Many prog epics have lengthy instrumental breaks, making them examples of this trope.
17th Sep '17 7:33:52 PM CassandraLeo
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Prog experienced a rebirth around the mid '90s with Music/DreamTheater, Music/PorcupineTree, and Music/TheMarsVolta being some of the new bands to emerge and the classic bands that "went pop" in the '80s started to returned to what made them famous initially. Yes reunited with the classic "Anderson, Howe, Squire, Wakeman, and White" lineup, Genesis tried to go back a more complex sound on the Phil Collins-less ''Calling All Stations'' and [[FanonDiscontinuity failed]] [[CreatorKiller miserably]], and many more bands went back to the longer songs, EpicRocking, and weird lyrics.

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Prog experienced a rebirth around the mid '90s with Music/DreamTheater, Music/PorcupineTree, and Music/TheMarsVolta being some of the new bands to emerge emerge, and the classic bands that "went pop" in the '80s started to returned return to what made them famous initially. Yes reunited with the classic "Anderson, Howe, Squire, Wakeman, and White" lineup, Genesis tried to go back a more complex sound on the Phil Collins-less ''Calling All Stations'' and [[FanonDiscontinuity failed]] [[CreatorKiller miserably]], and many more bands went back to the longer songs, EpicRocking, and weird lyrics.
17th Sep '17 7:32:52 PM CassandraLeo
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* UncommonTime: It would probably take less space to list progressive rock bands that ''don't'' use this trope than to list progressive rock bands that do. It's pretty much a requisite of the genre.

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* UncommonTime: It would probably take less space to list progressive rock bands that ''don't'' use this trope than to list progressive rock bands that do. It's pretty much a requisite of the genre.genre - in fact, it's arguably one of prog's defining characteristics, alongside EpicRocking and other aspects of the music's instrumental complexity.
5th Sep '17 7:35:24 PM CassandraLeo
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* UrExample: Some will simply say Music/KingCrimson and leave it at that, but it's probably more complicated, because the genre didn't spring forth from a single source but brought together influences from a number of disparate genres previously not commonly associated with rock music, including classical and jazz. Acts frequently retroactively dubbed "proto-prog" include Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheWho, Music/TheDoors, Music/TheVelvetUnderground, Music/TheBeachBoys, Music/ProcolHarum, The Nice, Music/FrankZappa, Music/TheMoodyBlues, Music/SoftMachine, The United States of America (the band, not the country), Music/JimiHendrix, Music/DeepPurple, and Spirit. Some of these acts' influence can be felt felt more directly than others', and some of them later became prog if they didn't start out as such. (For instance, The Who are not a prog band as a whole, but ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' is usually considered to be a prog album. Similarly, Soft Machine's early work probably isn't prog, but starting from ''Third'', it is.) The strongest case for being an UrExample probably goes to Zappa (though he also may qualify as a TropeMaker), the Moody Blues (ditto), the Beatles, the Who, or Deep Purple.

to:

* UrExample: Some will simply say Music/KingCrimson and leave it at that, but it's probably more complicated, because the genre didn't spring forth from a single source but brought together influences from a number of disparate genres previously not commonly associated with rock music, including classical and jazz. Acts frequently retroactively dubbed "proto-prog" include Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheWho, Music/TheDoors, Music/TheVelvetUnderground, Music/TheBeachBoys, Music/TheGratefulDead, Music/ProcolHarum, The Nice, Music/FrankZappa, Music/TheMoodyBlues, Music/SoftMachine, The United States of America (the band, not the country), Music/JimiHendrix, Music/DeepPurple, and Spirit. Some of these acts' influence can be felt felt more directly than others', and some of them later became prog if they didn't start out as such. (For instance, The Who are not a prog band as a whole, but ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' is usually considered to be a prog album. Similarly, Soft Machine's early work probably isn't prog, but starting from ''Third'', it is.) The strongest case for being an UrExample probably goes to Zappa (though he also may qualify as a TropeMaker), the Moody Blues (ditto), the Beatles, the Who, or Deep Purple.
22nd Aug '17 3:22:22 PM CassandraLeo
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** In truth, the idea of a rivalry between punk and prog ''musicians'' is somewhat a case of historical revisionism. The ''audiences'' of the two genres didn't overlap much at the time, but the musicians themselves weren't as invested in the idea as their fanbases and rock critics were. The idea that the early waves of punk featured sloppy musicianship is mostly due to the example of Music/SidVicious; the other Music/SexPistols were quite competent musicians and simply played ThreeChordsAndTheTruth material because that's what they wanted to play at the time. But, as mentioned, Music/JohnLydon was a big fan of prog bands like Music/{{Magma}}, Music/{{Can}}, and Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, and, despite his "I Hate Music/PinkFloyd" shirt, didn't even hate them (he was just using it to {{troll}} people). The same goes for a lot of other punk bands - Music/TheClash didn't learn to play their instruments with their first album, as is often claimed, and albums like ''Music/LondonCalling'' and ''Music/{{Sandinista}}'' demonstrated what truly sophisticated musicians they were. Some punk bands' music, such as Music/DeadKennedys', almost bordered on prog themselves (listen to "MTV - Get Off the Air" or "Stars and Stripes of Corruption", both of which feature a very prog-like tripartite structure), and it goes without saying that the Kennedys were very skilled musicians. (The prog influence is even more obvious on some of Music/JelloBiafra's solo work, in which he really delves into EpicRocking.) Critics to a certain extent seem to have taken Music/TheRamones' ThreeChordsAndTheTruth style and run with it a bit more than was merited. And it's probably worth mentioning that the genres even have a lot of their roots in common - Music/TheDoors, Music/TheWho, and the Music/VelvetUnderground in particular exerted unmistakable influence on both genres. Going the other way, some prog musicians even embraced NewWaveMusic. Robert Fripp collaborated with Music/TalkingHeads and even hired Adrien Belew, who had played on ''Music/RemainInLight'' and its supporting tour, to front the revived Music/KingCrimson. Music/PeterGabriel embraced the style in the early '80s. Before that, he had Music/{{Television}} open up for him on his debut solo tour in 1977.

to:

** In truth, the idea of a rivalry between punk and prog ''musicians'' is somewhat a case of historical revisionism. The ''audiences'' of the two genres didn't overlap much at the time, but the musicians themselves weren't as invested in the idea as their fanbases and rock critics were. The idea that the early waves of punk featured sloppy musicianship is mostly due to the example of Music/SidVicious; the other Music/SexPistols were quite competent musicians and simply played ThreeChordsAndTheTruth material because that's what they wanted to play at the time. But, as mentioned, Music/JohnLydon was a big fan of prog bands like Music/{{Magma}}, Music/{{Can}}, and Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, and, despite his "I Hate Music/PinkFloyd" shirt, didn't even hate them (he was just using it to {{troll}} people). The same goes for a lot of other punk bands - Music/TheClash didn't learn to play their instruments with their first album, as is often claimed, and albums like ''Music/LondonCalling'' and ''Music/{{Sandinista}}'' demonstrated what truly sophisticated musicians they were. Some punk bands' music, such as Music/DeadKennedys', almost bordered on prog themselves (listen to "MTV - Get Off the Air" or "Stars and Stripes of Corruption", both of which feature a very prog-like tripartite structure), and it goes without saying that the Kennedys were very skilled musicians. (The prog influence is even more obvious on some of Music/JelloBiafra's solo work, in which he really delves into EpicRocking.) Critics to a certain extent seem to have taken Music/TheRamones' ThreeChordsAndTheTruth style and run with it a bit more than was merited. And it's probably worth mentioning that the genres even have a lot of their roots in common - Music/TheDoors, Music/TheWho, and the Music/VelvetUnderground in particular exerted unmistakable influence on both genres. Going the other way, some prog musicians even embraced NewWaveMusic. Robert Fripp collaborated with Music/TalkingHeads and even hired Adrien Belew, who had played on ''Music/RemainInLight'' and its supporting tour, to front the revived Music/KingCrimson. Music/PeterGabriel embraced the style in the early '80s. Before that, he had Music/{{Television}} open up for him on his debut solo tour in 1977. (And Television themselves, despite usually being classed as a punk band, performed complex enough music that if they'd featured keyboards or performed five years earlier, they might've been grouped in with progressive rock.)
15th Aug '17 11:26:36 AM DavidDelony
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** In truth, the idea of a rivalry between punk and prog ''musicians'' is somewhat a case of historical revisionism. The ''audiences'' of the two genres didn't overlap much at the time, but the musicians themselves weren't as invested in the idea as their fanbases and rock critics were. The idea that the early waves of punk featured sloppy musicianship is mostly due to the example of Music/SidVicious; the other Music/SexPistols were quite competent musicians and simply played ThreeChordsAndTheTruth material because that's what they wanted to play at the time. But, as mentioned, Music/JohnLydon was a big fan of prog bands like Music/{{Magma}}, Music/{{Can}}, and Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, and, despite his "I Hate Music/PinkFloyd" shirt, didn't even hate them (he was just using it to {{troll}} people). The same goes for a lot of other punk bands - Music/TheClash didn't learn to play their instruments with their first album, as is often claimed, and albums like ''Music/LondonCalling'' and ''Music/{{Sandinista}}'' demonstrated what truly sophisticated musicians they were. Some punk bands' music, such as Music/DeadKennedys', almost bordered on prog themselves (listen to "MTV - Get Off the Air" or "Stars and Stripes of Corruption", both of which feature a very prog-like tripartite structure), and it goes without saying that the Kennedys were very skilled musicians. (The prog influence is even more obvious on some of Music/JelloBiafra's solo work, in which he really delves into EpicRocking.) Critics to a certain extent seem to have taken Music/TheRamones' ThreeChordsAndTheTruth style and run with it a bit more than was merited. And it's probably worth mentioning that the genres even have a lot of their roots in common - Music/TheDoors, Music/TheWho, and the Music/VelvetUnderground in particular exerted unmistakable influence on both genres. Going the other way, some prog musicians even embraced NewWaveMusic, with Robert Fripp collaborating with Music/TalkingHeads and Music/PeterGabriel embracing the style in the early '80s.

to:

** In truth, the idea of a rivalry between punk and prog ''musicians'' is somewhat a case of historical revisionism. The ''audiences'' of the two genres didn't overlap much at the time, but the musicians themselves weren't as invested in the idea as their fanbases and rock critics were. The idea that the early waves of punk featured sloppy musicianship is mostly due to the example of Music/SidVicious; the other Music/SexPistols were quite competent musicians and simply played ThreeChordsAndTheTruth material because that's what they wanted to play at the time. But, as mentioned, Music/JohnLydon was a big fan of prog bands like Music/{{Magma}}, Music/{{Can}}, and Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, and, despite his "I Hate Music/PinkFloyd" shirt, didn't even hate them (he was just using it to {{troll}} people). The same goes for a lot of other punk bands - Music/TheClash didn't learn to play their instruments with their first album, as is often claimed, and albums like ''Music/LondonCalling'' and ''Music/{{Sandinista}}'' demonstrated what truly sophisticated musicians they were. Some punk bands' music, such as Music/DeadKennedys', almost bordered on prog themselves (listen to "MTV - Get Off the Air" or "Stars and Stripes of Corruption", both of which feature a very prog-like tripartite structure), and it goes without saying that the Kennedys were very skilled musicians. (The prog influence is even more obvious on some of Music/JelloBiafra's solo work, in which he really delves into EpicRocking.) Critics to a certain extent seem to have taken Music/TheRamones' ThreeChordsAndTheTruth style and run with it a bit more than was merited. And it's probably worth mentioning that the genres even have a lot of their roots in common - Music/TheDoors, Music/TheWho, and the Music/VelvetUnderground in particular exerted unmistakable influence on both genres. Going the other way, some prog musicians even embraced NewWaveMusic, with NewWaveMusic. Robert Fripp collaborating collaborated with Music/TalkingHeads and even hired Adrien Belew, who had played on ''Music/RemainInLight'' and its supporting tour, to front the revived Music/KingCrimson. Music/PeterGabriel embracing embraced the style in the early '80s.'80s. Before that, he had Music/{{Television}} open up for him on his debut solo tour in 1977.
13th Aug '17 6:29:52 AM HasturHasturHastur
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* CHON (Instrumental Prog and Jazz Fusion, also has some minor elements of Post-Hardcore)



* CHON (Instrumental Prog and Jazz Fusion, also has some minor elements of Post-Hardcore)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ProgressiveRock