History Main / ProgressiveRock

20th Jul '17 7:02:43 PM DavidDelony
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** In truth, the idea of a rivalry between punk and prog ''musicians'' is somewhat a case of historical revisionism. The ''audiences'' of the two genres didn't overlap much at the time, but the musicians themselves weren't as invested in the idea as their fanbases and rock critics were. The idea that the early waves of punk featured sloppy musicianship is mostly due to the example of Music/SidVicious; the other Music/SexPistols were quite competent musicians and simply played ThreeChordsAndTheTruth material because that's what they wanted to play at the time. But, as mentioned, Music/JohnLydon was a big fan of prog bands like Music/{{Magma}}, Music/{{Can}}, and Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, and, despite his "I Hate Music/PinkFloyd" shirt, didn't even hate them (he was just using it to {{troll}} people). The same goes for a lot of other punk bands - Music/TheClash didn't learn to play their instruments with their first album, as is often claimed, and albums like ''Music/LondonCalling'' and ''Music/{{Sandinista}}'' demonstrated what truly sophisticated musicians they were. Some punk bands' music, such as Music/DeadKennedys', almost bordered on prog themselves (listen to "MTV - Get Off the Air" or "Stars and Stripes of Corruption", both of which feature a very prog-like tripartite structure), and it goes without saying that the Kennedys were very skilled musicians. (The prog influence is even more obvious on some of Music/JelloBiafra's solo work, in which he really delves into EpicRocking.) Critics to a certain extent seem to have taken Music/TheRamones' ThreeChordsAndTheTruth style and run with it a bit more than was merited. And it's probably worth mentioning that the genres even have a lot of their roots in common - Music/TheDoors, Music/TheWho, and the Music/VelvetUnderground in particular exerted unmistakable influence on both genres.

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** In truth, the idea of a rivalry between punk and prog ''musicians'' is somewhat a case of historical revisionism. The ''audiences'' of the two genres didn't overlap much at the time, but the musicians themselves weren't as invested in the idea as their fanbases and rock critics were. The idea that the early waves of punk featured sloppy musicianship is mostly due to the example of Music/SidVicious; the other Music/SexPistols were quite competent musicians and simply played ThreeChordsAndTheTruth material because that's what they wanted to play at the time. But, as mentioned, Music/JohnLydon was a big fan of prog bands like Music/{{Magma}}, Music/{{Can}}, and Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, and, despite his "I Hate Music/PinkFloyd" shirt, didn't even hate them (he was just using it to {{troll}} people). The same goes for a lot of other punk bands - Music/TheClash didn't learn to play their instruments with their first album, as is often claimed, and albums like ''Music/LondonCalling'' and ''Music/{{Sandinista}}'' demonstrated what truly sophisticated musicians they were. Some punk bands' music, such as Music/DeadKennedys', almost bordered on prog themselves (listen to "MTV - Get Off the Air" or "Stars and Stripes of Corruption", both of which feature a very prog-like tripartite structure), and it goes without saying that the Kennedys were very skilled musicians. (The prog influence is even more obvious on some of Music/JelloBiafra's solo work, in which he really delves into EpicRocking.) Critics to a certain extent seem to have taken Music/TheRamones' ThreeChordsAndTheTruth style and run with it a bit more than was merited. And it's probably worth mentioning that the genres even have a lot of their roots in common - Music/TheDoors, Music/TheWho, and the Music/VelvetUnderground in particular exerted unmistakable influence on both genres. Going the other way, some prog musicians even embraced NewWaveMusic, with Robert Fripp collaborating with Music/TalkingHeads and Music/PeterGabriel embracing the style in the early '80s.
17th Jul '17 7:13:23 AM DEIDATVM
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** The side-length piece is a staple of progressive rock; particularly acclaimed examples include "Music/SuppersReady" by Music/{{Genesis}}; "Close to the Edge" and "The Gates of Delirium" by Music/{{Yes}}; "Nine Feet Underground" by Music/{{Caravan}}: "A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers" by Music/VanDerGraafGenerator; "Lizard" by Music/KingCrimson; "2112" and "Cygnus X-1 Book II: Hemispheres" by Music/{{Rush}}; "Tarkus" and "Karn Evil 9" by Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer; "Anesthetize" by Music/PorcupineTree; "The Adventures of Greggery Peccary" by Music/FrankZappa; "Cassandra Gemini" by Music/TheMarsVolta; "A Mind Beside Itself", "Octavarium", and "A Change of Seasons" by Music/DreamTheater; "Grendel" and "Ocean Cloud" by Music/{{Marillion}}; and "Music/{{Autobahn}}" by Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. This is nowhere near a complete list of acclaimed compositions in this vein; feel free to add additional examples.

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** The side-length piece is a staple of progressive rock; particularly acclaimed examples include "Music/SuppersReady" by Music/{{Genesis}}; "Close to the Edge" and "The Gates of Delirium" by Music/{{Yes}}; "Nine Feet Underground" by Music/{{Caravan}}: Music/{{Caravan}}; "A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers" by Music/VanDerGraafGenerator; "Lizard" by Music/KingCrimson; "2112" and "Cygnus X-1 Book II: Hemispheres" by Music/{{Rush}}; "Tarkus" and "Karn Evil 9" by Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer; "Anesthetize" by Music/PorcupineTree; "The Adventures of Greggery Peccary" by Music/FrankZappa; "Cassandra Gemini" by Music/TheMarsVolta; "A Mind Beside Itself", "Octavarium", and "A Change of Seasons" by Music/DreamTheater; "Grendel" and "Ocean Cloud" by Music/{{Marillion}}; and "Music/{{Autobahn}}" by Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. This is nowhere near a complete list of acclaimed compositions in this vein; feel free to add additional examples.



* GeniusBonus[=/=]ViewersAreGeniuses: In addition to the fact that musicians are more likely to appreciate the musicianship there are often all sorts of bizarre subtexts to the lyrics that can't be easily picked up on.
** Also, frequent quotes/covers from the {{classical|music}} and traditional repertoire that might not be familiar to a casual listener.
*** Many references to obscure science fiction and fantasy works will go over the heads of most listeners.

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* GeniusBonus[=/=]ViewersAreGeniuses: In addition to the fact that musicians are more likely to appreciate the musicianship there are often all sorts of bizarre subtexts to the lyrics that can't be easily picked up on.
** Also,
on. Also existent are frequent quotes/covers from the {{classical|music}} and traditional repertoire that might not be familiar to a casual listener.
*** Many
listener, as well as many references to obscure science fiction and fantasy works that will go over the heads of most listeners.



* NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly: It's not uncommon for prog bands to incorporate multiple genres in one song, and in many cases, to incorporate them well. It's worth pointing out that the genre itself started as an example of this trope since it was an attempt to combine rock music with influences from other genres like classical and jazz, and even today, there is a sizable contingent of prog fans who feel that if you don't incorporate this trope into your music, then you're just not doing prog ''correctly''.
** Dixie Dregs in particular stand out for this.
* NeverLiveItDown: The Godley & Creme album ''Consequences'' caused one. It was a triple-disc ConceptAlbum released in 1977; despite being pretty much the only one of its kind during prog's heyday, the phrase "triple-disc concept album" comes up fairly frequently in criticisms of the genre.
** In the popular imagination, prog rock is also 20-minute Mellotron solos.

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* NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly: It's not uncommon for prog bands to incorporate multiple genres in one song, and in many cases, to incorporate them well. Dixie Dregs in particular stand out for this. It's worth pointing out that the genre itself started as an example of this trope since it was an attempt to combine rock music with influences from other genres like classical and jazz, and even today, there is a sizable contingent of prog fans who feel that if you don't incorporate this trope into your music, then you're just not doing prog ''correctly''.
** Dixie Dregs in particular stand out for this.
* NeverLiveItDown: The Godley & Creme album ''Consequences'' caused one. It was a triple-disc ConceptAlbum released in 1977; despite being pretty much the only one of its kind during prog's heyday, the phrase "triple-disc concept album" comes up fairly frequently in criticisms of the genre.
**
genre. In the popular imagination, prog rock is also 20-minute Mellotron solos.



* SpiritualSuccessor: PostRock and MathRock. While both genres draw from AlternativeRock and PostPunk, they keep the weirdness of progressive rock, including the odd time signatures and unusual instrumentation.
** Some AlternativeHipHop artists utilize elements of progressive rock as well, such as Music/{{Atmosphere}}, Music/AesopRock, Music/{{Cage}}, Music/{{Caparezza}}, Music/KidCudi, Music/LupeFiasco and Music/KanyeWest (Mainly on ''Music/MyBeautifulDarkTwistedFantasy'', but even before then he had prog elements, e.g. ''Late Registration'''s orchestra).

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* SpiritualSuccessor: PostRock and MathRock. While both genres draw from AlternativeRock and PostPunk, they keep the weirdness of progressive rock, including the odd time signatures and unusual instrumentation.
**
instrumentation. Some AlternativeHipHop artists utilize elements of progressive rock as well, such as Music/{{Atmosphere}}, Music/AesopRock, Music/{{Cage}}, Music/{{Caparezza}}, Music/KidCudi, Music/LupeFiasco and Music/KanyeWest (Mainly on ''Music/MyBeautifulDarkTwistedFantasy'', but even before then he had prog elements, e.g. ''Late Registration'''s orchestra).
14th May '17 8:22:29 PM HasturHasturHastur
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Added DiffLines:

* Exist (Progressive Metal, Jazz Fusion)


Added DiffLines:

* Zombi (Eclectic Prog, Synthwave)
13th May '17 3:51:27 PM nombretomado
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Thanks to the rise of {{New Wave|Music}} and PunkRock, the genre was mostly exhausted by the early 1980s, with the genre's most popular bands like Yes, Music/{{Genesis}}, and Rush shifting towards a more radio-friendly sound and making music videos in TheEighties, to great commercial success. The 1982 debut album of the prog supergroup Music/{{Asia}} had radio-ready singles that were huge hits and was considered the final nail in the coffin for the genre in TheEighties. Music/PinkFloyd was an exception as they continued to sell millions of records and sell out arenas/stadiums while keeping their sound intact, although even they weren't afraid to embrace {{MTV}} and all the new recording tech that developed throughout the decade. It didn't hurt that the band had already developed a distinctive visual identity through its Creator/{{Hipgnosis}} covers and [[VisualEffectsOfAwesome live shows]]. There was a sub genre that came in the mid-80s called neo-prog, which was basically bands trying to emulate the '70s progressive rock sound with '80s production and [[BlackSheepHit a few power ballads here and there]]. Music/{{Marillion}}, IQ, and [[Music/SpocksBeard Spock's Beard]] were a few examples of neo-prog.

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Thanks to the rise of {{New Wave|Music}} and PunkRock, the genre was mostly exhausted by the early 1980s, with the genre's most popular bands like Yes, Music/{{Genesis}}, and Rush shifting towards a more radio-friendly sound and making music videos in TheEighties, to great commercial success. The 1982 debut album of the prog supergroup Music/{{Asia}} had radio-ready singles that were huge hits and was considered the final nail in the coffin for the genre in TheEighties. Music/PinkFloyd was an exception as they continued to sell millions of records and sell out arenas/stadiums while keeping their sound intact, although even they weren't afraid to embrace {{MTV}} Creator/{{MTV}} and all the new recording tech that developed throughout the decade. It didn't hurt that the band had already developed a distinctive visual identity through its Creator/{{Hipgnosis}} covers and [[VisualEffectsOfAwesome live shows]]. There was a sub genre that came in the mid-80s called neo-prog, which was basically bands trying to emulate the '70s progressive rock sound with '80s production and [[BlackSheepHit a few power ballads here and there]]. Music/{{Marillion}}, IQ, and [[Music/SpocksBeard Spock's Beard]] were a few examples of neo-prog.
30th Apr '17 6:28:54 PM DavidDelony
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Notable Progressive Rock acts include and are labeled with their respective sub-genre according to the [[http://www.progarchives.com/ ProgArchives]]:

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Notable Progressive Rock acts include and are labeled with their respective sub-genre according to the [[http://www.progarchives.com/ ProgArchives]]:
ProgArchives]], as well as prog albums with their own pages:



* Music/BrianEno

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* Music/BrianEnoMusic/BrianEno (Progressive Electronic)
** ''Music/HereComeTheWarmJets'' (1974)
** ''Music/Ambient1MusicForAirports'' (1978)
** ''Music/ApolloAtmospheresAndSoundtracks'' (1982)
30th Apr '17 4:29:47 PM CassandraLeo
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* Music/{{Chicago}} (Jazz Rock/Fusion; only qualifies as prog on early material)

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* Music/{{Chicago}} (Jazz Rock/Fusion; only qualifies as prog on early material)releases and ''Chicago VII'')



* Music/FairportConvention (Progressive Folk, though Prog Archives itself lists them as Prog Related)

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* Music/FairportConvention (Progressive (Prog Folk, though Prog Archives itself lists them as Prog Related)



* Flower Travelin' Band (Heavy Prog, also arguably an UrExample for metal along with Black Sabbath)

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* Flower Travelin' Travellin' Band (Heavy Prog, also arguably an UrExample for metal along with Black Sabbath)



* [[Music/{{Frost}} Frost*]] (Neo-prog)

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* [[Music/{{Frost}} Frost*]] (Neo-prog)(Neo-Prog)



* Music/PeterGabriel (Crossover Prog)



* Music/{{Genesis}} up to Wind & Wuthering (and the occasional song afterward) (Symphonic Prog)

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* Music/{{Genesis}} up to Wind ''Wind & Wuthering Wuthering'' (and the occasional song afterward) (Symphonic Prog)Prog; probably best categorised as Crossover Prog on later material)
** "Music/SuppersReady" (from ''Foxtrot'', 1972)



* Music/HenryCow (Avant-Prog/Canterbury Scene/Rock In Opposition)

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* Music/HenryCow (Avant-Prog/Canterbury Scene/Rock In in Opposition)



* Music/JethroTull (Prog Folk)

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* Music/JethroTull (Prog Folk)Folk; sometimes overlaps with Heavy Prog, arguably)



* Music/{{Meat Loaf}} (Similar to Styx and Queen in that he's more pop oriented than most Prog artists, but with its intricate arrangements, epic song lengths, and grandiose ambition, Bat Out Of Hell is a key 70's Progressive Rock Opera)

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* Music/{{Meat Loaf}} (Similar to Styx and Queen in that he's more pop oriented than most Prog artists, but with its intricate arrangements, epic song lengths, and grandiose ambition, Bat Out Of Hell ''Music/BatOutOfHell'' is a key 70's Progressive Rock Opera)



* Music/TheNice; Keith Emerson's first group, before joining Emerson, Lake & Palmer.

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* Music/TheNice; Keith Emerson's first group, group before joining he joined Emerson, Lake & Palmer.Palmer (Symphonic Prog)



* Music/PinkFloyd (Space Rock according to Progarchives, but that only applies to the early stuff, pure prog on the later stuff)

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* Music/PinkFloyd (Space Rock according to Progarchives, but that only applies to the early stuff, pure prog on the stuff; later stuff)stuff is probably best classified as Symphonic Prog)



* Music/JordanRudess

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* Music/JordanRudessMusic/JordanRudess (PA lists him as Crossover Prog, but he's really an extreme practitioner of GenreRoulette and his sound can vary widely from release to release)



* Music/ToddRundgren, especially with Utopia (Crossover Prog)

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* Music/ToddRundgren, especially with Utopia (Crossover Prog)(PA lists Rundgren as Crossover Prog and Utopia as Eclectic Prog, but both are, again, extreme practitioners of GenreRoulette)



* Music/StevenWilson

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* Music/StevenWilsonMusic/StevenWilson (Crossover Prog)
30th Apr '17 4:16:43 PM CassandraLeo
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Added DiffLines:

* Music/FairportConvention (Progressive Folk, though Prog Archives itself lists them as Prog Related)
23rd Apr '17 5:26:47 PM nombretomado
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* [[Franchise/TalesSeries Motoi Sakuraba]]; he was part of a few bands before doing video games (Symphonic Prog)

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* [[Franchise/TalesSeries [[VideoGame/TalesSeries Motoi Sakuraba]]; he was part of a few bands before doing video games (Symphonic Prog)
31st Mar '17 4:36:19 PM CassandraLeo
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Added DiffLines:

* Music/JoannaNewsom (Progressive Folk)
12th Mar '17 1:49:41 AM TalonsofIceandFire
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A subset of rock and roll noteworthy for its intricate arrangements and experimental sound. Originating in the late [=1960s=], "Prog Rock" often combines stylistic elements from Classical, Jazz, Folk or sometimes electronic implementations, uses non-standard song structures (including complex rhythms and time signatures) and complex instrumental orchestrations, and frequently employ lyrics which are abstract or [[HeavyMithril fantasy-based]].

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A subset of rock and roll noteworthy for its intricate arrangements and experimental sound. Originating in the late [=1960s=], "Prog Rock" often combines stylistic elements from Classical, Jazz, Folk or sometimes electronic implementations, uses non-standard song structures (including complex rhythms and time signatures) and complex instrumental orchestrations, and frequently employ lyrics which are abstract [[WordSaladLyrics abstract]] or [[HeavyMithril fantasy-based]].
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