History Main / ProgrammingGame

30th Jan '16 12:04:58 PM Morgenthaler
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* The Avalon Hill board game ''VideoGame/{{Gunslinger}}''. The players program action sequences much like in RoboRally, but different actions take different time. You can spend actions totalling up to 5 segments, representing two seconds of game time.

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* The Avalon Hill board game ''VideoGame/{{Gunslinger}}''. The players program action sequences much like in RoboRally, TabletopGame/RoboRally, but different actions take different time. You can spend actions totalling up to 5 segments, representing two seconds of game time.
27th Jan '16 9:39:32 AM hyphz
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* ''TabletopGame/RoboRally'' is all about programming robots, and even the cards resemble instructions from LOGO.
* The Board Game ''Pony Express'', although not obviously computer themed, has the players programming actions for bandits raiding a train.
17th Jan '16 5:33:28 AM RxF
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* The lesser-known boardgame ''TabletopGame/{{Robotanks]]'' has you controlling a team of four tanks, setting each with its own stack of order cards and having limited ability to reprogram them. Normally you're reprogramming one a turn while the others go around doing whatever you last told them to do.

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* The lesser-known boardgame ''TabletopGame/{{Robotanks]]'' ''TabletopGame/{{Robotanks}}'' has you controlling a team of four tanks, setting each with its own stack of order cards and having limited ability to reprogram them. Normally you're reprogramming one a turn while the others go around doing whatever you last told them to do.
5th Jan '16 6:24:10 PM Someoneman
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* ''VideoGame/PonyIsland'' has this as a large part of the game. The goal is to get a key icon to the end command by placing command blocks to make it go down, left, right, back to the start (which means failure in most cases), or more advanced things like portal blocks (if the key reaches one, it skips to the other) or a "splitter" that makes the key go down, but creates a second one on the right. Later puzzles also require passing through certain bits of code enough times to bring variables to a correct value, while avoiding code that will reset the values.One portion also mixes things up by [[spoiler:forcing you to pick the commands in a certain order while also having a demon automatically place one command for each you place or move ]].
18th Nov '15 1:17:13 PM henke37
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* ''TheIncredibleMachine'' was one of the first such games and the TropeCodifier for many of the common elements of the genre (no characters, using an array of items that react to each other in various ways to set up a field to achieve a certain goal upon activation, steep difficulty curve).
* ''ArmadilloRun'', that makes use of a physics engine. Set up a bunch of platforms and ropes of varying material, start the process, and hope your armadillo (actually a ball) finds its way to the portal.
* Every game by [[http://www.zachtronicsindustries.com/ Zachtronics Industries]] (former tagline “games for engineers”). Most notably:
** ''[[http://www.kongregate.com/games/krispykrem/the-codex-of-alchemical-engineering The Codex of Alchemical Engineering]]''. Quoting the description, 'As an Alchemical Engineer, you must build machines out of mechanical arms and magical glyphs that transform and combine atoms in order to create the compounds required for each level.'
** ''KOHCTPYKTOP: Engineer of the People'': design integrated circuits to meet set tasks by laying out doped silicon.

to:

* ''TheIncredibleMachine'' ''VideoGame/TheIncredibleMachine'' was one of the first such games and the TropeCodifier for many of the common elements of the genre (no characters, using an array of items that react to each other in various ways to set up a field to achieve a certain goal upon activation, steep difficulty curve).
* ''ArmadilloRun'', ''VideoGame/ArmadilloRun'', that makes use of a physics engine. Set up a bunch of platforms and ropes of varying material, start the process, and hope your armadillo (actually a ball) finds its way to the portal.
* Every game by [[http://www.zachtronicsindustries.com/ Zachtronics Industries]] Creator/ZachtronicsIndustries (former tagline “games for engineers”). Most notably:
** ''[[http://www.kongregate.com/games/krispykrem/the-codex-of-alchemical-engineering The Codex of Alchemical Engineering]]''.''VideoGame/TheCodexOfAlchemicalEngineering''. Quoting the description, 'As an Alchemical Engineer, you must build machines out of mechanical arms and magical glyphs that transform and combine atoms in order to create the compounds required for each level.'
** ''KOHCTPYKTOP: Engineer of the People'': ''VideoGame/{{KOHCTPYKTOPEngineerOfThePeople}}'': design integrated circuits to meet set tasks by laying out doped silicon.



* VideoGame/ElseHeartbreak has a programming language, Sprak, which the computers, and other various things, run on. The player can use a modifier to change the code within various objects.

to:

* VideoGame/ElseHeartbreak ''VideoGame/ElseHeartbreak'' has a programming language, Sprak, which the computers, and other various things, run on. The player can use a modifier to change the code within various objects.



* The lesser-known boardgame ''Robotanks'' has you controlling a team of four tanks, setting each with its own stack of order cards and having limited ability to reprogram them. Normally you're reprogramming one a turn while the others go around doing whatever you last told them to do.

to:

* The lesser-known boardgame ''Robotanks'' ''TabletopGame/{{Robotanks]]'' has you controlling a team of four tanks, setting each with its own stack of order cards and having limited ability to reprogram them. Normally you're reprogramming one a turn while the others go around doing whatever you last told them to do.



* ''Fire Pro Wrestling G'' had an Edit Ranking mode, where you design the AI for a Create-A-Wrestler and pit him against a ladder of opponents, the objective being to design a character who can make it all the way through. ''Fire Pro Wrestling D'' goes one better, allowing you to have the AI play through the game's season mode, essentially turning the whole game into a Programming Game.
* ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Core_War Core Wars]]'' is frickin' hardcore. Hoo-ah. HOO-AH!

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* ''Fire Pro Wrestling G'' ''VideoGame/FireProWrestlingG'' had an Edit Ranking mode, where you design the AI for a Create-A-Wrestler and pit him against a ladder of opponents, the objective being to design a character who can make it all the way through. ''Fire Pro Wrestling D'' goes one better, allowing you to have the AI play through the game's season mode, essentially turning the whole game into a Programming Game.
* ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Core_War Core Wars]]'' ''VideoGame/CoreWars'' is frickin' hardcore. Hoo-ah. HOO-AH!



* Origin (of ''Ultima'' and ''Syndicate'' fame) published a game called ''Omega'' where you programmed robotic tanks using a structured form of BASIC, then set them battling each other.
* ''Globulation 2'' is a partial example. It's freeware game which doesn't let you directly control your units; instead, you give various "orders" to all of your units of a certain type, and the game's AI takes over. For example, instead of leading your soldiers directly into an enemy base, you drop an "invasion flag," which attracts soldiers to come and knock stuff over. Workers are controlled by clicking on the building you want staffed and assigning more workers to it. You set a "forbidden zone" where you don't want the to go and "clear area" where you want workers to collect crops or wood. And units will automatically check out any new upgrade building you make. This concept wouldn't work if it weren't for the game's aversion of ArtificialStupidity.
* The Neo Geo Pocket Color game ''{{Faselei}}!'' was played by loading commands into the CPU of your [[AMechByAnyOtherName Toy Soldier]]. Naturally, upgrades included the amount of commands you could execute in a turn, the amount of commands you could store in your CPU, and the quality and versatility of the commands themselves.
* The strategy game ''Spartan'' is like this. In an effort to simulate the difficulty of communicating over the din of battle on ancient battlefields and the rarity of complex tactics, it gives you a limited number of commands you can issue at the start of battle and only three options (all charge, rally, and all retreat) for modifying your army's behavior in the midst of combat. ''The History Channel: Great Battles of Rome'' uses a modified version of the same engine which allows a limited degree of direct control over your units during battle, but it remains a partial example.
* ''The Experiment'' is an adventure game with the premise that you aren't actually the one doing the exploration in the game. You're trapped in a room from which you use an advanced surveillance system to enable another character's exploration of the wrecked ship/lab the game is set in.
* An old [=PlayStation=] RealTimeStrategy game called ''Carnage Heart'' involved programming an army of mecha, essentially constructing flowcharts to determine their actions.
* ''Toribash'' somewhat fits into this category. Two players fight each other with 3D stickmen, but they have to control all limbs individually. Each player gets about 20 seconds to make adjustments, then the fight advances slightly, adjust again until pre-determined victory conditions are set.
* ''{{Colobot}}'' allows you to write your very own AI for the titular bots.

to:

* Origin Creator/{{Origin}} (of ''Ultima'' and ''Syndicate'' fame) published a game called ''Omega'' ''VideoGame/{{Omega}}'' where you programmed robotic tanks using a structured form of BASIC, then set them battling each other.
* ''Globulation 2'' ''VideoGame/{{Globulation2}}'' is a partial example. It's freeware game which doesn't let you directly control your units; instead, you give various "orders" to all of your units of a certain type, and the game's AI takes over. For example, instead of leading your soldiers directly into an enemy base, you drop an "invasion flag," which attracts soldiers to come and knock stuff over. Workers are controlled by clicking on the building you want staffed and assigning more workers to it. You set a "forbidden zone" where you don't want the to go and "clear area" where you want workers to collect crops or wood. And units will automatically check out any new upgrade building you make. This concept wouldn't work if it weren't for the game's aversion of ArtificialStupidity.
* The Neo Geo Pocket Color game ''{{Faselei}}!'' ''VideoGame/{{Faselei}}'' was played by loading commands into the CPU of your [[AMechByAnyOtherName Toy Soldier]]. Naturally, upgrades included the amount of commands you could execute in a turn, the amount of commands you could store in your CPU, and the quality and versatility of the commands themselves.
* The strategy game ''Spartan'' ''VideoGame/{{Spartan}}'' is like this. In an effort to simulate the difficulty of communicating over the din of battle on ancient battlefields and the rarity of complex tactics, it gives you a limited number of commands you can issue at the start of battle and only three options (all charge, rally, and all retreat) for modifying your army's behavior in the midst of combat. ''The History Channel: Great Battles of Rome'' uses a modified version of the same engine which allows a limited degree of direct control over your units during battle, but it remains a partial example.
* ''The Experiment'' ''VideoGame/TheExperiment'' is an adventure game with the premise that you aren't actually the one doing the exploration in the game. You're trapped in a room from which you use an advanced surveillance system to enable another character's exploration of the wrecked ship/lab the game is set in.
* An old [=PlayStation=] RealTimeStrategy game called ''Carnage Heart'' ''VideoGame/CarnageHeart'' involved programming an army of mecha, essentially constructing flowcharts to determine their actions.
* ''Toribash'' ''VideoGame/{{Toribash}}'' somewhat fits into this category. Two players fight each other with 3D stickmen, but they have to control all limbs individually. Each player gets about 20 seconds to make adjustments, then the fight advances slightly, adjust again until pre-determined victory conditions are set.
* ''{{Colobot}}'' ''{{VideoGame/Colobot}}'' allows you to write your very own AI for the titular bots.



* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4'' has the B-Spec mode, where the AI controls the car and you specify how hard it should be with the throttle (which affects the life of your tires and your fuel tank), as well as when it should pass or pit-stop. You can also control the simulation speed. While it's not very impressive, it becomes quite useful to clear the endurance races, which can be as long as ''24 simulated hours''.
* ''VideoGame/RobotOdyssey: Escape from Robotropolis'' was a game created by TheLearningCompany using the engine from ''Adventure'', the famous Atari game where you had to program and coordinate the efforts of a handful of robots to complete specific goals to escape the titular city. The method used for programming? [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logic_gate Logic gates]]. There's a reason that the game was at one time considered a good tutorial for Digital Logic college courses.

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* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4'' ''VideoGame/{{GranTurismo4}}'' has the B-Spec mode, where the AI controls the car and you specify how hard it should be with the throttle (which affects the life of your tires and your fuel tank), as well as when it should pass or pit-stop. You can also control the simulation speed. While it's not very impressive, it becomes quite useful to clear the endurance races, which can be as long as ''24 simulated hours''.
* ''VideoGame/RobotOdyssey: Escape from Robotropolis'' ''VideoGame/RobotOdysseyEscapefromRobotropolis'' was a game created by TheLearningCompany Creator/TheLearningCompany using the engine from ''Adventure'', the famous Atari game where you had to program and coordinate the efforts of a handful of robots to complete specific goals to escape the titular city. The method used for programming? [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logic_gate Logic gates]]. There's a reason that the game was at one time considered a good tutorial for Digital Logic college courses.



* ''VideoGame/{{Zork}} 2'' has a robot that follows the same sort of English commands you use to control your own character.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Zork}} 2'' ''VideoGame/{{Zork2}}'' has a robot that follows the same sort of English commands you use to control your own character.



* ''A.I. Wars'' is an interesting game where you write the AI of either robotic bugs in Insect Wars or tanks in Armor Commander using a special programming language for the game, available [[http://www.tacticalneuronics.com/content/aiw3dnew.asp here]].

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* ''A.I. Wars'' ''VideoGame/AIWars'' is an interesting game where you write the AI of either robotic bugs in Insect Wars or tanks in Armor Commander using a special programming language for the game, available [[http://www.tacticalneuronics.com/content/aiw3dnew.asp here]].



* The Avalon Hill board game ''Gunslinger''. The players program action sequences much like in RoboRally, but different actions take different time. You can spend actions totalling up to 5 segments, representing two seconds of game time.

to:

* The Avalon Hill board game ''Gunslinger''.''VideoGame/{{Gunslinger}}''. The players program action sequences much like in RoboRally, but different actions take different time. You can spend actions totalling up to 5 segments, representing two seconds of game time.



* A series of two burglary-based games called ''The Clue'' and ''The Sting'' went a step further with this. You had to plan an entire burglary from start to finish, by issuing exact orders and timings to each of your burglars. Then, you'd watch the heist take place and hope your plan would work out as well as it did in the training.
* ''[[http://www.brothersoft.com/games/mindrover.html MindRover: The Europa Project]]'' is a vehicle-based 3rd-person shooter where you preprogram the vehicles to fight each other using a visual programming interface. (There are also race and 'sumo' modes). The premise is also pretty entertaining: basically there are a bunch of scientists working on Jupiter's moon Europa and they're boooooored. Programming the miniature vehicles called 'Rovers' to fight each other is just their way of killing time...
* ''[[http://galaxyhack.sourceforge.net/screenshots.php Galaxy Hack]]'' sets entire fleets of spaceships against each other, helpless except for the AI you write and assign them. Oh, and their weapons.

to:

* A series of two burglary-based games called ''The Clue'' ''VideoGame/TheClue'' and ''The Sting'' ''VideoGame/TheSting'' went a step further with this. You had to plan an entire burglary from start to finish, by issuing exact orders and timings to each of your burglars. Then, you'd watch the heist take place and hope your plan would work out as well as it did in the training.
* ''[[http://www.%% http://www.brothersoft.com/games/mindrover.html MindRover: The Europa Project]]'' html
* ''VideoGame/MindRoverTheEuropaProject''
is a vehicle-based 3rd-person shooter where you preprogram the vehicles to fight each other using a visual programming interface. (There are also race and 'sumo' modes). The premise is also pretty entertaining: basically there are a bunch of scientists working on Jupiter's moon Europa and they're boooooored. Programming the miniature vehicles called 'Rovers' to fight each other is just their way of killing time...
* ''[[http://galaxyhack.%% http://galaxyhack.sourceforge.net/screenshots.php Galaxy Hack]]'' php
* ''VideoGame/GalaxyHack''
sets entire fleets of spaceships against each other, helpless except for the AI you write and assign them. Oh, and their weapons.



%%* The dojo missions in ''VideoGame/WarioWare DIY''.

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%%* * The dojo missions in ''VideoGame/WarioWare DIY''.DIY'' have you finishing the programing for microgames. While usually only one or two instructions are needed, the coding is quite dependent on understanding the tricks used to dodge engine limits.



* ''Pac-Man 2: The New Adventures'' swapped out traditional Pac-Man gameplay for a combination of this and EscortMission. The player gives directions to Pac-Man... who may or may not actually choose to follow them, depending on his mood.
* ''[[http://cosmicsupremacy.com/ Cosmic Supremacy]]'' Fixes the micromanagement bloat of 4X games and the requirement to be online at all times in a persistent real time strategy by letting the player script almost all the economy management and much of the combat.

to:

* ''Pac-Man 2: The New Adventures'' ''VideoGame/PacMan2TheNewAdventures'' swapped out traditional Pac-Man gameplay for a combination of this and EscortMission. The player gives directions to Pac-Man... who may or may not actually choose to follow them, depending on his mood.
%%http://cosmicsupremacy.com/
* ''[[http://cosmicsupremacy.com/ Cosmic Supremacy]]'' ''VideoGame/CosmicSupremacy'' Fixes the micromanagement bloat of 4X games and the requirement to be online at all times in a persistent real time strategy by letting the player script almost all the economy management and much of the combat.



* The game ''Lightbot'' by CoolioNiato features a robot that the player has to program with "command blocks" such as "right" or "jump" in order to light up all the tiles in a given level. The game was featured in CSEdWeek's Hour of Code.
* As a partial example, [[ArmoredCore Armored Core Verdict Day]] has this in the form of [=UNACs=] (Short for [=UNmanned=] [=ACs=]). Not only you get to determine their loadouts, you get to create their own AI via an full-blown in-game logic programming system [[note]]The same programming which has been evolved by FROM Software themselves as ''the'' AI programming for every enemy behavior since the very first Armored Core game in 1997, according to WordOfGod [[/note]].

to:

* The game ''Lightbot'' ''VideoGame/{{Lightbot}}'' by CoolioNiato features a robot that the player has to program with "command blocks" such as "right" or "jump" in order to light up all the tiles in a given level. The game was featured in CSEdWeek's Hour of Code.
* As a partial example, [[ArmoredCore [[VideoGame/ArmoredCore Armored Core Verdict Day]] has this in the form of [=UNACs=] (Short for [=UNmanned=] [=ACs=]). Not only you get to determine their loadouts, you get to create their own AI via an full-blown in-game logic programming system [[note]]The same programming which has been evolved by FROM Software themselves as ''the'' AI programming for every enemy behavior since the very first Armored Core game in 1997, according to WordOfGod [[/note]].



* ''Scriptarians'' is an unusual example: it's a fantasy game about two teams of adventurers fighting each other, but the gameplay consists entirely of programming your adventurers' AI in a C-like language, then just sitting back and watching them duke it out.
* ''[[http://alexnisnevich.github.io/untrusted/ Untrusted]]'' exaggerates this trope. Though initially the game looks like a roguelike, the main draw of the game is using Javascript to edit each level. Beginning tasks include removing obstacles, creating walls to block an attack drone, and revealing the locations of hidden mines.

to:

* ''Scriptarians'' ''VideoGame/{{Scriptarians}}'' is an unusual example: it's a fantasy game about two teams of adventurers fighting each other, but the gameplay consists entirely of programming your adventurers' AI in a C-like language, then just sitting back and watching them duke it out.
* ''[[http://alexnisnevich.
out.
%%http://alexnisnevich.
github.io/untrusted/ Untrusted]]'' io/untrusted/
* ''VideoGame/{{Untrusted}}''
exaggerates this trope. Though initially the game looks like a roguelike, the main draw of the game is using Javascript to edit each level. Beginning tasks include removing obstacles, creating walls to block an attack drone, and revealing the locations of hidden mines.



* ''Robugs'' was a freeware Atari-ST game where the logic "Circuits" defined the physical appearance of the "Robug"; you could design various teams and have them have at it. There appears to be a new [[http://robugs3d.sourceforge.net/ Robugs 3D]] beta on Sourceforge, but it has been some time since it was updated.

to:

* ''Robugs'' ''VideoGame/{{Robugs}}'' was a freeware Atari-ST game where the logic "Circuits" defined the physical appearance of the "Robug"; you could design various teams and have them have at it. There appears to be a new [[http://robugs3d.sourceforge.net/ Robugs 3D]] beta on Sourceforge, but it has been some time since it was updated.updated.
* ''VideoGame/HumanResourceMachine'' has you program the actions of an office worker. Tasks are rather abstract and include math computations, array lookups, string sorting and similar problems.
15th Nov '15 7:52:47 AM gamemanj
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Added DiffLines:

* VideoGame/ElseHeartbreak has a programming language, Sprak, which the computers, and other various things, run on. The player can use a modifier to change the code within various objects.
2nd Oct '15 3:02:40 AM Roxor
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** ''VideoGame/SpaceChem''. Each 'reactor' is effectively a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finite-state_machine finite-state machine.]] (Arguably a refinement of Codex.)



** ''TIS-100'' is the purest example of this trope, since it involves you literally programming an emulated fictional microprocessor using ''Assembly language''.

to:

** ''TIS-100'' ''VideoGame/SpaceChem''. Each 'reactor' is effectively a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finite-state_machine finite-state machine.]] (Arguably a refinement of Codex.)
** ''VideoGame/{{Infinifactory}}'' has you designing manufacturing processes to take inputs and manipulate them to produce outputs. It's often described as a 3D version of ''VideoGame/SpaceChem'', though it does have a different tool set and is considerably easier.
** ''VideoGame/{{TIS-100}}''
is the purest example of this trope, since it involves you literally programming an emulated fictional microprocessor using ''Assembly language''.
26th Jul '15 6:35:01 AM Jonnan001
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Robugs'' was a freeware Atari-ST game where the logic "Circuits" defined the physical appearance of the "Robug"; you could design various teams and have them have at it. There appears to be a new [[http://robugs3d.sourceforge.net/ Robugs 3D]] beta on Sourceforge, but it has been some time since it was updated.
16th Jul '15 12:36:17 PM DaibhidC
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* The "See the Dalek from a different angle" minigames in ''TheDoctor and the Dalek'', since it was intended as an EdutainmentGame to teach kids the basics of programming.

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* The "See the Dalek from a different angle" minigames in ''TheDoctor ''The Doctor and the Dalek'', since it was intended as an EdutainmentGame to teach kids the basics of programming.
16th Jul '15 12:36:05 PM DaibhidC
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* The "See the Dalek from a different angle" minigames in ''TheDoctor and the Dalek'', since it was intended as an EducationalGame to teach kids the basics of programming.

to:

* The "See the Dalek from a different angle" minigames in ''TheDoctor and the Dalek'', since it was intended as an EducationalGame EdutainmentGame to teach kids the basics of programming.
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