History Main / ProductFacelift

8th Aug '16 3:06:05 PM Saurubiker
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** The CECH-2000 series was eventually launched in 2009, which featured a smaller form factor (hence the "[=PS3=] Slim" nickname) and added support for Dolby [=TrueHD=] and DTS-HD Master Audio bitstreaming, as well as synchronization with BRAVIA TV sets with the XMB. It most notably replaced the original ''Film/{{Spider-Man}}''-style logo with the uppercase "PLAYSTATION 3" writing in favor of the abbreviated [=PS3=] logo that newer game packaging ended up using from this point on.

to:

** The CECH-2000 series was eventually launched in 2009, which featured a smaller form factor (hence the "[=PS3=] Slim" nickname) and added support for Dolby [=TrueHD=] and DTS-HD Master Audio bitstreaming, as well as synchronization with BRAVIA TV sets with the XMB. It most notably replaced the original "PLAYSTATION 3" logo with the uppercase spelling and ''Film/{{Spider-Man}}''-style logo with the uppercase "PLAYSTATION 3" writing fonts in favor of the abbreviated [=PS3=] logo that newer game packaging ended up using from this point on.
8th Aug '16 3:03:36 PM Saurubiker
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* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, the NES-101 model launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading VCR pastiche to a top-loading console with dogbone controllers. The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" problem caused by bent connector pins (though the video quality is somewhat poorer, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7hKoh9MCo faint vertical lines]] covering the screen), but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.

to:

* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, the NES-101 model launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading VCR pastiche to a top-loading console with Super NES-style controllers (also known as the dogbone controllers.controllers). The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" problem caused by bent connector pins (though the video quality is somewhat poorer, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7hKoh9MCo faint vertical lines]] covering the screen), but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.



** The Famicom AV, a redesign of the Famicom released near the end of the system's lifespan, has the same design as the NES top-loader, but features a flatter surface on the cartridge port (allowing the Disk System's adapter to be plugged in), an expansion port next to the standard controller ports for specialized peripherals and controllers, and AV output ports instead of RF (a huge selling point, as the original Famicom only used RF). The fact that the controllers were detachable instead of wired to the console was also a plus and added the unintended side-effect of making the console compatible with NES controllers due to having the same ports. On the other hand, this also meant the second controller lost its microphone functionality, which a few games supported.



* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables (well, digital-to-analog component cables... [=CRTs=] were still the norm, mind you), due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second version of the Gamecube known as the Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this control deck featured the ability to play both [=GameCube=] mini-discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately; because of its failure, it never made it to international shores, much to the west's derision (as the ability to play DVD videos was a big selling point for the highly-popular rival [=PS2=]).

to:

* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables (well, digital-to-analog component cables... [=CRTs=] were still the norm, mind you), due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second third-party version of the Gamecube [=GameCube=] by Panasonic known as the Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this control deck featured the ability to play both [=GameCube=] mini-discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately; because of its failure, it never made it to international shores, much to the west's derision (as the ability to play DVD videos was a big selling point for the highly-popular rival [=PS2=]).



* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} received a smaller model, rechristened the PS One, that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the original model occasionally ran into. It was so small (it was just barely large enough to fit in a CD) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}} received a slim version as well, which was even smaller than the PS One, but didn't have a portable screen add-on. And in Japan, it also got a "media hub" makeover as the [=PSX=] (no relation to how to the original [=PlayStation=] was abbreviated before it was numbered).
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} had numerous models. Successive models upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, and USB ports, among others.
** After 2 months as the industry's worst-kept secret, the slimmer, cheaper [=PlayStation 3=] was officially announced. Then a few years later, an even ''slimmer'' (dubbed Super Slim) version came out. This includes a cheaper version of the Super Slim model that drops the hard drive in favor of 12 GB of flash memory, but a hard drive may be installed and used in place of said flash memory.

to:

* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} received a smaller model, model in 2000, rechristened the PS One, one, that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the original model previous models occasionally ran into. It was so small (it was just barely large enough to fit in a CD) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}} received a slim version slimmer redesign as well, well starting with the SCPH-70000 series launched on 2004, which was even smaller than the PS One, one, but didn't have a portable screen add-on. And in Japan, In Japan it also got a "media hub" makeover as the [=PSX=] (no relation to how to the original [=PlayStation=] was abbreviated before it was numbered).
numbered), which featured an internal hard drive, digital video recording capabilities, and an early version of the XMB (the same OS later used for the PSP and [=PS3=]).
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} had numerous models. Successive models following the launch [=CECHA00=] model upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some users didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, and USB ports, among others.
** After 2 months as The CECH-2000 series was eventually launched in 2009, which featured a smaller form factor (hence the industry's worst-kept secret, "[=PS3=] Slim" nickname) and added support for Dolby [=TrueHD=] and DTS-HD Master Audio bitstreaming, as well as synchronization with BRAVIA TV sets with the slimmer, cheaper [=PlayStation 3=] was officially announced. Then a few years later, an even ''slimmer'' (dubbed Super Slim) version came out. This includes a cheaper version XMB. It most notably replaced the original ''Film/{{Spider-Man}}''-style logo with the uppercase "PLAYSTATION 3" writing in favor of the abbreviated [=PS3=] logo that newer game packaging ended up using from this point on.
** The CECH-4000 series was even smaller than the Slim models (hence the "[=PS3=]
Super Slim model that drops Slim" nickname) and replaced the hard motorized disc drive in favor of 12 GB a top loading design with a sliding disc cover. Some versions of the super slim (specifically the [=CECH-4XXXA=] models) feature [=12GB=] of flash memory, but memory instead of a hard drive may be installed and used in place of said flash memory.as its default memory storage.



* The [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Genesis/Mega Drive]] underwent through three basic designs, including a third design exclusive to North America (the Genesis 3) manufactured by Majesco. That's not counting the hybrid X'Eye and Genesis CDX models, which had built-in CD players, nor the Sega CD add-on itself, which had two models.

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* The [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Genesis/Mega Drive]] Mega Drive/Genesis]] underwent through three basic designs, including a third design exclusive to North America (the Genesis 3) manufactured by Majesco. That's not counting the hybrid X'Eye and Genesis CDX models, which had built-in CD players, nor the Sega CD add-on itself, which had two models.
6th Aug '16 9:54:49 PM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP Slim & Lite, gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight. A second revision was announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. PSP Go, which removed the UMD slot, making it the first portable console that does not use physical games. But after a couple years of lackluster sales, PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short.

to:

* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP Slim PSP-2000 (aka the "Slim & Lite, Lite"), gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight. A second revision The PSP-3000 was later announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. PSP Go, which removed the UMD slot, making it the first portable console that does not use physical games. But after a couple years of lackluster sales, PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short.
6th Aug '16 8:54:43 PM Saurubiker
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** Three years after its debut in Japan, the Famicom got a facelift of its own: developed by Sharp and licensed by Nintendo, the Twin Famicom was a console that combined the Famicom and the Famicom Disk System into a single device. It had greater audiovisual quality than the original Famicom due to it trading in the RF adaptor for RCA connectors, and had extra controller ports to allow certain games to support more than two players. [[NoExportForYou It was only released in Japan]].

to:

** Three years after its debut in Japan, the Famicom got a facelift of its own: developed produced by Sharp and licensed by under license from Nintendo, the Twin Famicom was a console that combined the Famicom and the Famicom its Disk System add-on into a single device. It had greater audiovisual quality than the original Famicom due to it trading in the RF adaptor for RCA connectors, and had extra controller ports to allow certain games to support more than two players.connectors. [[NoExportForYou It was only released in Japan]].



* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables (well, digital-to-analog component cables... [=CRTs=] were still the norm, mind you), due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second version of the Gamecube known as the Panasonic Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this control deck featured the ability to play both [=GameCube=] mini-discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately; because of its failure, it never made it to international shores, much to the west's derision (as the ability to play DVD videos was a big selling point for the highly-popular rival [=PS2=]).

to:

* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables (well, digital-to-analog component cables... [=CRTs=] were still the norm, mind you), due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second version of the Gamecube known as the Panasonic Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this control deck featured the ability to play both [=GameCube=] mini-discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately; because of its failure, it never made it to international shores, much to the west's derision (as the ability to play DVD videos was a big selling point for the highly-popular rival [=PS2=]).



* UsefulNotes/GameBoy - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket, which was thinner than the regular Game Boy (allowing it to more easily fit in pants pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than 4 AA ones, and featured a grayscale screen rather than a greenscale one. Two years later, the Game Boy Light came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou only Japan]]; this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on.

to:

* UsefulNotes/GameBoy - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket, which was thinner than the regular Game Boy (allowing it to more easily fit in pants pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than 4 four AA ones, and featured a grayscale screen rather than a greenscale one. Two years later, the Game Boy Light came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou only Japan]]; this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on.
28th Jul '16 2:24:04 PM bowserbros
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* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables, due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second version of the Gamecube known as the Panasonic Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this model featured the ability to play both Gamecube discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately; because of its flopping, it never made it to international shores.
* The UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} has been updated to a black version with the Wii Motion Plus integrated into the Wii Remotes. Led to a UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars gag on ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' where Sony says the [=PlayStation=] Move [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial is nothing like the Wii]] because it's black, only to be informed that black Wiis exist now. "WHEN DID THAT HAPPEN?!"

to:

* Sharp, the company responsible for the Twin Famicom, also released two types of CRT televisions licensed by Nintendo: one with a built-in Famicom, and another with a built-in Super Famicom.
* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables, cables (well, digital-to-analog component cables... [=CRTs=] were still the norm, mind you), due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second version of the Gamecube known as the Panasonic Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this model control deck featured the ability to play both Gamecube discs [=GameCube=] mini-discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately; because of its flopping, failure, it never made it to international shores.
shores, much to the west's derision (as the ability to play DVD videos was a big selling point for the highly-popular rival [=PS2=]).
* The UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} has been got updated to a black version with the Wii Motion Plus integrated into the Wii Remotes. Led This led to a UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars gag on ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' where Sony says the [=PlayStation=] Move [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial is nothing like the Wii]] because it's black, only to be informed that black Wiis exist now. "WHEN DID THAT HAPPEN?!"



** Eventually, after the UsefulNotes/WiiU was released, there was a new version of the Wii called the "Wii Mini" released in certain markets, which in addition to not being backwards-compatible also had no online capabilities (However, as of the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection's shutdown, the latter technically only means a lack of ability to download games).
* The UsefulNotes/WiiU quickly received a black "deluxe" model with four times the storage space of the original white model; this version often comes bundled with a digital download code for a single retail game, usually a first-party one.

to:

** Eventually, after the UsefulNotes/WiiU was released, there was a new version of the Wii called the "Wii Mini" released in certain markets, which in markets; this red and black model was, appropriately enough, significantly smaller than the original Wii and was a top-loading console rather than a slot-loader. In addition to not being backwards-compatible backwards-compatible, the Wii Mini also had no online capabilities (However, as of the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection's shutdown, the latter technically only means a lack of ability to download games).
games). This budget-model version of the Wii is often overlooked due to its late release date and minimal quantity of features.
* The UsefulNotes/WiiU quickly received a black "deluxe" model with four times the storage space of the original white model; this version often comes bundled with a digital download code for a single retail game, usually a first-party one.one, but standalone deluxe models are purchasable on their own. The white model was quickly discontinued in mid-2015, less than three years after its release, leaving the deluxe model the only one on the market. Given the deluxe model's significantly larger internal memory, this is somewhat beneficial for the console.



* UsefulNotes/GameBoy - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket, which was smaller in size (allowing it to more easily fit in pants pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than 4 AA ones, and featured a grayscale screen rather than a greenscale one. Two years later, the Game Boy Light came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou only Japan]]; this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on.

to:

* UsefulNotes/GameBoy - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket, which was smaller in size thinner than the regular Game Boy (allowing it to more easily fit in pants pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than 4 AA ones, and featured a grayscale screen rather than a greenscale one. Two years later, the Game Boy Light came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou only Japan]]; this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on.



* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} received a smaller model, rechristened the PS One, that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the original model occasionally ran into. It was so small that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system.
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}} received a slim version as well, which was even smaller than the [=PSOne=], but didn't have a portable screen add-on. And in Japan, it also got a "media hub" makeover as the [=PSX=] (no relation to how to the original [=PlayStation=] was abbreviated before it was numbered).
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} had numerous models. Successive models upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, USB ports, among others.

to:

* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} received a smaller model, rechristened the PS One, that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the original model occasionally ran into. It was so small (it was just barely large enough to fit in a CD) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system.
system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}} received a slim version as well, which was even smaller than the [=PSOne=], PS One, but didn't have a portable screen add-on. And in Japan, it also got a "media hub" makeover as the [=PSX=] (no relation to how to the original [=PlayStation=] was abbreviated before it was numbered).
* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} had numerous models. Successive models upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, and USB ports, among others.
18th Jul '16 5:16:22 PM bowserbros
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* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, the NES-101 model launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading toaster to a top-loading console with Dogbone controllers. The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" problem caused by bent connector pins (though the video quality is somewhat poorer, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7hKoh9MCo faint vertical lines]] covering the screen), but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.

to:

* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, the NES-101 model launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading toaster VCR pastiche to a top-loading console with Dogbone dogbone controllers. The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" problem caused by bent connector pins (though the video quality is somewhat poorer, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7hKoh9MCo faint vertical lines]] covering the screen), but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.discontinued.
** Three years after its debut in Japan, the Famicom got a facelift of its own: developed by Sharp and licensed by Nintendo, the Twin Famicom was a console that combined the Famicom and the Famicom Disk System into a single device. It had greater audiovisual quality than the original Famicom due to it trading in the RF adaptor for RCA connectors, and had extra controller ports to allow certain games to support more than two players. [[NoExportForYou It was only released in Japan]].



* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables, due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second version known as the Panasonic Q was released in Japan several months after the original Gamecube; this model featured the ability to play both Gamecube discs and [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately.

to:

* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the plug for digital component cables, due to the low demand for them among Nintendo's consumers. A second version of the Gamecube known as the Panasonic Q was also released in Japan several months after the original Gamecube; console; this model featured the ability to play both Gamecube discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately.separately; because of its flopping, it never made it to international shores.



** The "Family Edition" of the Wii is smaller and designed to sit horizontally, but all [[UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube GameCube]] backward compatibility is absent.
** Eventually, after the UsefulNotes/WiiU was released, there was a new version of the Wii called the "Wii Mini" released in certain markets, which in addition to not being backward-compatible also had no online capabilities. (However, as of the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection's shutdown, the latter technically only means a lack of ability to download games.)

to:

** The "Family Edition" of the Wii is smaller and designed to sit horizontally, but all [[UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube GameCube]] backward backwards compatibility is absent.
** Eventually, after the UsefulNotes/WiiU was released, there was a new version of the Wii called the "Wii Mini" released in certain markets, which in addition to not being backward-compatible backwards-compatible also had no online capabilities. capabilities (However, as of the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection's shutdown, the latter technically only means a lack of ability to download games.)games).



* UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy SP, which utilized a 700[=mAh=] Lithium Ion battery rather than requiring 2 [=AAs=] and featured a clamshell design similar to dual-screen Game & Watch titles and the Nintendo DS. The SP also brought back the backlight and introduced it to the West for the first time in Nintendo's history; unlike the Game Boy Light's backlight, this one had both a frontlight and a backlight, both of which could be toggled. However, similarly to the Game Boy Light, activating these lights would shorten the SP's runtime from 18 hours to a mere 10. Two years later, the Game Boy Micro would come out. Unlike the GBA and SP, the Micro lacked backwards compatibility with Game Boy and Game Boy Color game paks, utilized a 460 [=mAh=] Lithium Ion battery that ran for 10 hours, and featured a backlight that could be toggled between five different brightness levels. As the name implies, it was also significantly smaller than the original GBA, being roughly the size of an NES controller.
* UsefulNotes/NintendoDS - The original NTR-001 mode was followed DS Lite, which was a smaller version of the same thing. Then came the [=DSi=], which was about the same size as the DS Lite but had different features and lacked backwards-compatibility with Game Boy Advance game paks -- and finally the [=DSi=] XL, which is a ''larger'' version of the [=DSi=], which was made predominantly for use by [[CoolOldGuy seniors who could benefit from a bigger screen, and different lighting]]. It's an interesting sign of the change in Nintendo's target demographic from the time of the DS Lite release to the XL's.
* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). They then went on to the New 3DS, which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood, specifically a faster processor (which helps cut down on load times), stereoscopic 3D that can be viewed at a wider amount of angles, a C-stick to accompany the circle pad, and ZL & ZR triggers. Because of the New 3DS's faster CPU, some games are able to be run on it, but not on the original 3DS.

to:

* UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy SP, which utilized a 700[=mAh=] Lithium Ion battery rather than requiring 2 [=AAs=] and featured a clamshell design similar to dual-screen Game & Watch titles and the Nintendo DS. The SP also brought back the backlight and introduced it to the West for the first time in Nintendo's history; unlike the Game Boy Light's backlight, this one had both a frontlight and a backlight, both of which could be toggled.toggled (a model with just the frontlight was released first, then followed by a dual-light revision). However, similarly to the Game Boy Light, activating these lights would shorten the SP's runtime from 18 hours to a mere 10. Two years later, the Game Boy Micro would come out. Unlike the GBA and SP, the Micro lacked backwards compatibility with Game Boy and Game Boy Color game paks, utilized a 460 [=mAh=] Lithium Ion battery that ran for 10 hours, and featured a backlight that could be toggled between five different brightness levels. As the name implies, it was also significantly smaller than the original GBA, being roughly the size of an NES controller.
controller. Aside from the lack of backwards compatibility, the Micro's main issue was that its design made it incompatible with most GBA add-ons and accessories; most of these devices had to be redesigned in order to work with the Micro.
* UsefulNotes/NintendoDS - The original NTR-001 mode was followed by the DS Lite, which was a smaller version of the same thing. Then came the [=DSi=], which was about the same size as the DS Lite but had different features and lacked backwards-compatibility with Game Boy Advance game paks -- and finally the [=DSi=] XL, which is a ''larger'' version of the [=DSi=], which was made predominantly for use by [[CoolOldGuy seniors who could benefit from a bigger screen, screen and different lighting]]. It's an interesting sign of the change in Nintendo's target demographic from the time of the DS Lite release to the XL's.
* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). They then went on to the New 3DS, which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood, specifically a faster processor (which helps cut down on load times), stereoscopic 3D that can be viewed at a wider amount of angles, a C-stick to accompany the circle pad, and ZL & ZR triggers. Because of the New 3DS's faster CPU, some games (both at retail and on the [=eShop=]) are able to be run on it, but not on the original 3DS.



* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} (rechristened PS one) was so small that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system.

to:

* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} (rechristened received a smaller model, rechristened the PS one) One, that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the original model occasionally ran into. It was so small that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system.
14th Jul '16 11:52:56 AM TheBuddy26
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Added DiffLines:

%% Do not include anything about the PS Neo until more information is revealed on the system.


Added DiffLines:

* Its successor, the UsefulNotes/XboxOne was also announced to receive a facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', which decreases the size of the system by 40%, includes 4K resolution support, an internal power supply; among other improvements.
%% More information is required for the Scorpio, so until then refrain from including it.
11th Jul '16 6:42:09 PM bowserbros
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* UsefulNotes/GameBoy - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket, which was smaller in size (allowing it to more easily fit in pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than 4 AA ones, and featured a grayscale screen rather than a greenscale one. Two years later, the Game Boy Light came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou only Japan]]; this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on.

to:

* UsefulNotes/GameBoy - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket, which was smaller in size (allowing it to more easily fit in pants pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than 4 AA ones, and featured a grayscale screen rather than a greenscale one. Two years later, the Game Boy Light came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou only Japan]]; this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on.



* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). It also comes in a block design rather than a clamshell one, due to the hinges on the 3DS being somewhat susceptible to breaking. They then went on to the New 3DS, which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood, specifically a faster processor (which helps cut down on load times), stereoscopic 3D that can be viewed at a wider amount of angles, a C-stick to accompany the circle pad, and ZL & ZR triggers. Because of the New 3DS's faster CPU, some games are able to be run on it, but not on the original 3DS.

to:

* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). It also comes in a block design rather than a clamshell one, due to the hinges on the 3DS being somewhat susceptible to breaking. They then went on to the New 3DS, which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood, specifically a faster processor (which helps cut down on load times), stereoscopic 3D that can be viewed at a wider amount of angles, a C-stick to accompany the circle pad, and ZL & ZR triggers. Because of the New 3DS's faster CPU, some games are able to be run on it, but not on the original 3DS.
11th Jul '16 6:40:01 PM bowserbros
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[[folder:Nintendo]]
* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, the NES-101 model launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading toaster to a top-loading console with Dogbone controllers. The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" problem caused by bent connector pins, but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.

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[[folder:Nintendo]]
[[folder:Nintendo (home consoles)]]
* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, the NES-101 model launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading toaster to a top-loading console with Dogbone controllers. The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" problem caused by bent connector pins, pins (though the video quality is somewhat poorer, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7hKoh9MCo faint vertical lines]] covering the screen), but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.



* UsefulNotes/NintendoDS - The original NTR-001 mode was followed DS Lite, which was a smaller version of the same thing. Then came the [=DSi=], which was about the same size as the DS Lite but with different features -- and finally the [=DSi=] XL, which is a ''larger'' version of the [=DSi=], which was made predominately for use by [[CoolOldGuy seniors who could benefit from a bigger screen, and different lighting]]. It's an interesting sign of the change in Nintendo's target demographic from the time of the DS Lite release to the XL's.
* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). They then went on to the New 3DS, which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood.

to:

* UsefulNotes/NintendoDS - The original NTR-001 mode was followed DS Lite, which was a smaller version Later releases of the same thing. Then came UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube removed the [=DSi=], which was about plug for digital component cables, due to the same size as the DS Lite but with different features -- and finally the [=DSi=] XL, which is a ''larger'' version of the [=DSi=], which was made predominately low demand for use by [[CoolOldGuy seniors who could benefit from a bigger screen, and different lighting]]. It's an interesting sign of the change in them among Nintendo's target demographic from the time of the DS Lite release to the XL's.
* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger
consumers. A second version called known as the 3DS XL Panasonic Q was released in Japan several months after the original Gamecube; this model featured the ability to play both Gamecube discs and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's costing much more than buying a feature]]). They then went on to the New 3DS, which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood.regular Gamecube and DVD player separately.


Added DiffLines:

* The UsefulNotes/WiiU quickly received a black "deluxe" model with four times the storage space of the original white model; this version often comes bundled with a digital download code for a single retail game, usually a first-party one.


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Nintendo (handhelds)]]
* UsefulNotes/GameBoy - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket, which was smaller in size (allowing it to more easily fit in pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than 4 AA ones, and featured a grayscale screen rather than a greenscale one. Two years later, the Game Boy Light came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou only Japan]]; this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on.
* UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance - The original model was succeeded by the Game Boy SP, which utilized a 700[=mAh=] Lithium Ion battery rather than requiring 2 [=AAs=] and featured a clamshell design similar to dual-screen Game & Watch titles and the Nintendo DS. The SP also brought back the backlight and introduced it to the West for the first time in Nintendo's history; unlike the Game Boy Light's backlight, this one had both a frontlight and a backlight, both of which could be toggled. However, similarly to the Game Boy Light, activating these lights would shorten the SP's runtime from 18 hours to a mere 10. Two years later, the Game Boy Micro would come out. Unlike the GBA and SP, the Micro lacked backwards compatibility with Game Boy and Game Boy Color game paks, utilized a 460 [=mAh=] Lithium Ion battery that ran for 10 hours, and featured a backlight that could be toggled between five different brightness levels. As the name implies, it was also significantly smaller than the original GBA, being roughly the size of an NES controller.
* UsefulNotes/NintendoDS - The original NTR-001 mode was followed DS Lite, which was a smaller version of the same thing. Then came the [=DSi=], which was about the same size as the DS Lite but had different features and lacked backwards-compatibility with Game Boy Advance game paks -- and finally the [=DSi=] XL, which is a ''larger'' version of the [=DSi=], which was made predominantly for use by [[CoolOldGuy seniors who could benefit from a bigger screen, and different lighting]]. It's an interesting sign of the change in Nintendo's target demographic from the time of the DS Lite release to the XL's.
* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). It also comes in a block design rather than a clamshell one, due to the hinges on the 3DS being somewhat susceptible to breaking. They then went on to the New 3DS, which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood, specifically a faster processor (which helps cut down on load times), stereoscopic 3D that can be viewed at a wider amount of angles, a C-stick to accompany the circle pad, and ZL & ZR triggers. Because of the New 3DS's faster CPU, some games are able to be run on it, but not on the original 3DS.
[[/folder]]
28th Jun '16 8:54:30 AM Pichu-kun
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[[folder:Atari]]
* The original UsefulNotes/Atari2600 had a wood look to it that was popular in the 1970s. Throughout the 1980s it had various versions that kept the design intact while having slight differences. In 1986 the 2600 was modernized as a smaller, black looking system similar to the UsefulNotes/Atari7800 and marketed as a budget console that could play classic games. This model has been given the FanNickname of the "Atari Jr".
[[/folder]]



* The [=PlayStation=] (rechristened PS one) was so small that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system.
* The [=PlayStation 2=] received a slim version as well, which was even smaller than the [=PSOne=], but didn't have a portable screen add-on. And in Japan, it also got a "media hub" makeover as the [=PSX=] (no relation to how to the original [=PlayStation=] was abbreviated before it was numbered).
* The [=PlayStation 3=] had numerous models. Successive models upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, USB ports, among others.

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* The [=PlayStation=] UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} (rechristened PS one) was so small that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system.
* The [=PlayStation 2=] UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}} received a slim version as well, which was even smaller than the [=PSOne=], but didn't have a portable screen add-on. And in Japan, it also got a "media hub" makeover as the [=PSX=] (no relation to how to the original [=PlayStation=] was abbreviated before it was numbered).
* The [=PlayStation 3=] UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} had numerous models. Successive models upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, USB ports, among others.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ProductFacelift