History Main / ProductFacelift

22nd Apr '17 9:14:17 AM Saurubiker
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** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players with its spaceship-like design and unique variant of the [=TurboPad=] controller, but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design).
** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent a revision as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. But PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System instead, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one convenient unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. alongside the Super System Card in 1992), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had a headphone jack and a battery port that allowed the console to be turned into a portable game machine with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which had a different chassis (colored white instead of black), updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot to reduce manufacturing cost. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final model of the PC Engine ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes, an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with a 6-button joypad in lieu of the standard 2-button pad (as fighting games were becoming more prevalent by that point).

to:

** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players with its spaceship-like design and unique variant of the [=TurboPad=] controller, but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design).
design and an expansion port for CD-ROM support).
** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent a revision as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released redesigned as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in for the U.S. in 1990), consisted consists of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function functioned as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected connects the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. But PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System instead, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one convenient unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. alongside the Super System Card in 1992), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had has a headphone jack and a battery port slot that allowed the console allows it to be turned into a portable game machine console with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which had has a different chassis (colored white instead of black), updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot to reduce manufacturing cost. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final model of the PC Engine ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes, changes from the Duo-R, an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with a 6-button joypad in lieu of the standard 2-button pad (as fighting games were becoming more pretty prevalent by that point).
21st Apr '17 9:34:59 PM Saurubiker
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** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players and had a spaceship-like design and came with a unique variant of the [=TurboPad=], but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design).
** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent a revision as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. But PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System instead, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. alongside the Super System Card in 1992), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had a headphone jack and a battery port that allowed the console to be turned into a portable game machine with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which had a different chassis (colored white instead of black), updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot to reduce manufacturing cost. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final model of the console ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes, an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with a 6-button joypad in lieu of the standard 2-button pad (as fighting games were becoming more prevalent by that point).

to:

** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players and had a with its spaceship-like design and came with a unique variant of the [=TurboPad=], [=TurboPad=] controller, but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design).
** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent a revision as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. But PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System instead, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one convenient unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. alongside the Super System Card in 1992), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had a headphone jack and a battery port that allowed the console to be turned into a portable game machine with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which had a different chassis (colored white instead of black), updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot to reduce manufacturing cost. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final model of the console PC Engine ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes, an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with a 6-button joypad in lieu of the standard 2-button pad (as fighting games were becoming more prevalent by that point).
21st Apr '17 9:28:39 PM Saurubiker
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** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent through numerous variations as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System released the same year, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (and then released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. in 1992 alongside the Super System Card), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had a headphone jack and a battery port that allowed the console to be turned into a portable game machine with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The cost-reduced PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which changed the design of the chassis, recoloring it from black to white, updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final PC Engine console ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes and an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with the Arcade Pad 6 controller (as fighting games were becoming more prevalent by that point).

to:

** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent through numerous variations a revision as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. But PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System released the same year, instead, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (and then released (released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. in 1992 alongside the Super System Card), Card in 1992), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had a headphone jack and a battery port that allowed the console to be turned into a portable game machine with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The cost-reduced PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which changed the design had a different chassis (colored white instead of the chassis, recoloring it from black to white, black), updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot. slot to reduce manufacturing cost. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final PC Engine model of the console ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes and changes, an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with a 6-button joypad in lieu of the Arcade Pad 6 controller standard 2-button pad (as fighting games were becoming more prevalent by that point).
21st Apr '17 9:09:42 PM Saurubiker
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** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent through numerous variations as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=]) that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System released the same year, which combined the functionalities of the CD-ROM drive, the interface unit and the Super System Card all into one unit.

to:

** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent through numerous variations as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=]) [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System released the same year, which combined the functionalities of the CD-ROM drive, the interface unit and the Super System Card all into one unit.
21st Apr '17 7:28:12 PM Saurubiker
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* The Turbo Duo was launched in 1992 after NEC's U.S. subsidiary failed to market the UsefulNotes/{{TurboGrafx 16}} in a satisfactory matter. The Duo was essentially a [=TG16=] with built-in CD-ROM drive and extra RAM required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs, which were both sold separately for the [=TG16=]. Despite launching at a relatively low price for a CD-based console ($299, the launch price of the Sega CD add-on by itself) and being bundled with a four-in-one game disc, the console unfortunately came out too late during the 16-bit console war to make much of a difference in changing the [=TG16=]'s sealed fate.
* The [[UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 PC Engine]], the [=TG16=]'s Japanese counterpart, never had much trouble finding success in its native country (where it actually outsold the [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Mega Drive]]), and thus the console was blessed with numerous redesigns throughout its lifespan. In fact it got not one, not two, but three redesigns two years after its launch in 1989: the [=CoreGrafx=] was essentially a recolored version of the launch PC Engine that replaced the RF output port with the now standardized A/V composite (a recolored version of the [=CoreGrafx=] was released known as the [=CoreGrafx=] II in 1991, which was functionally identical, but had a lower retail price); while the Shuttle was a budget-priced model aimed at kids that removed the CD-ROM expansion port and was shaped like a spaceship (it was even bundled with a futuristic-themed joypad unique to the console); but the third and most noticeable redesign was the [=SuperGrafx=], intended to be an enhanced PC Engine with more RAM and an extra graphic processor aimed at hardcore players, only a total of five [=SuperGrafx=]-exclusive [=HuCards=] were produced, and the console was otherwise treated as just another model of the PC Engine. There were also two portable models as well: PC Engine GT (which was released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and PC Engine LT.
** The PC Engine Duo, the Japanese version of Turbo Duo, also got two redesigns as well: the PC Engine Duo R was a recolored cost-reduced version of the same console that removed the headphone jack port, and the PC Engine Duo RX, which had a different chassis and came bundled with a six-button controller (as fighting games were becoming more popular at the time).

to:

* The Turbo Duo was [[UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 PC Engine]], launched in 1992 after NEC's 1987, was one of the most successful game consoles in Japan. A far cry from its American counterpart, the [=TurboGrafx-16=], which held a distant third place during the Super NES vs. Sega Genesis console war. As a result, it enjoyed a variety of redesigns exclusive to the region along with expandibility options.
** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players and had a spaceship-like design and came with a unique variant of the [=TurboPad=], but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the
U.S. subsidiary failed to market ) and the UsefulNotes/{{TurboGrafx 16}} in a satisfactory matter. The Duo was essentially a [=TG16=] PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with built-in CD-ROM drive and extra RAM required for Super a laptop-inspired design).
** The
CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs, which were both sold separately for the [=TG16=]. Despite launching at a relatively low price for a CD-based console ($299, the launch price of the Sega CD add-on by itself) and being bundled with a four-in-one game disc, the console unfortunately came out too late during the 16-bit console war to make much of a difference in changing the [=TG16=]'s sealed fate.
* The [[UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 PC Engine]], the [=TG16=]'s Japanese counterpart, never had much trouble finding success in its native country (where it actually outsold the [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Mega Drive]]), and thus the console was blessed with
also underwent through numerous redesigns throughout its lifespan. In fact it got not one, not two, but three redesigns two years after its launch variations as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1989: the [=CoreGrafx=] was essentially a recolored version of the launch PC Engine that replaced the RF output port with the now standardized A/V composite (a recolored version of the [=CoreGrafx=] was released known as the [=CoreGrafx=] II in 1991, which was functionally identical, but had a lower retail price); while the Shuttle was a budget-priced model aimed at kids that removed the CD-ROM expansion port and was shaped like a spaceship (it was even bundled with a futuristic-themed joypad unique to the console); but the third and most noticeable redesign was the [=SuperGrafx=], intended to be an enhanced PC Engine with more RAM and an extra graphic processor aimed at hardcore players, only a total of five [=SuperGrafx=]-exclusive [=HuCards=] were produced, and the console was otherwise treated as just another model of the PC Engine. There were also two portable models as well: PC Engine GT (which was 1988 (and later released as the Turbo Express [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S.) and PC Engine LT.
** The PC Engine Duo,
in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of Turbo Duo, also got two redesigns as well: the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=]) that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System released the same year, which combined the functionalities of the CD-ROM drive, the interface unit and the Super System Card all into one unit.
** This culminated with
the PC Engine Duo R was also launched in 1991 (and then released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. in 1992 alongside the Super System Card), a recolored PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had a headphone jack and a battery port that allowed the console to be turned into a portable game machine with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The cost-reduced version PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which changed the design of the same console that chassis, recoloring it from black to white, updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack port, and battery slot. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final PC Engine console ever), the PC Engine Duo RX, which had a different chassis Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes and an improved CD-ROM drive, and came bundled packaged with a six-button the Arcade Pad 6 controller (as fighting games were becoming more popular at the time).prevalent by that point).
21st Apr '17 9:54:54 AM Saurubiker
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* The [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]], Sega's very first game console launched in 1983, is itself a consolized version of their SC-3000 personal computer. The main difference between the two is that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired Atari-style joystick. Otherwise, both hardware are essentially identical internally and the SG-1000 can be turned into a personal computer with the SK-1000 keyboard, allowing it to utilize the same peripherals and computing software as the SC-3000 in addition to playing gaming software. A second model of the console was released in 1984 known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II), which replaced the hardwired joystick with a pair of detachable Famicom-style joypads that can be stored on the side. The outer design of the SG-1000 II would end up being used (with slight changes) for Sega's succeeding console in 1985, the Sega Mark III, which is basically an enhanced SG-1000 with an upgraded video processing unit and a built-in IC card slot (for Sega My Card games that required the Card Catcher adapter on the prior consoles), which in turn would go on to be remodeled for the west as the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem in 1986.
** Incidentally the Master System itself would be released in Japan as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III in 1987. This domestic version of the Master System differed from the earlier export models by replacing the reset button on the console with a turbo fire switch (which eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to hit pause, a much welcomed benefit) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for games that supported it (which was sold separately as an upgrade module for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).
** The Master System itself would be relaunched as well in North America and Europe with a budget-priced model known as the Master System II. This model featured a more compact design, but at the expense of a lot of features from the original model such as the (admittedly unused) expansion port, the card slot (making it incompatible with Sega Card games and the aforementioned [=3D=] glasses) and support for A/V output (only RF output was allowed).
* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka Mega Drive) underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console has "16-BIT" written in front of the cartridge slot and features a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design by removing the aforementioned features of the original model. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]], Sega's very first game console launched in 1983, is itself a consolized version of their SC-3000 personal computer. The main difference between the two is that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired Atari-style joystick. Otherwise, both hardware are essentially identical internally and the SG-1000 can be turned into a personal computer with the SK-1000 SK-1100 keyboard, allowing it to utilize the same peripherals and computing software as the SC-3000 in addition to playing gaming software.games. A second model of the console was released in 1984 known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II), which replaced the hardwired joystick with a pair of detachable Famicom-style joypads that can be stored on the side. The outer design of the SG-1000 II would end up being used (with slight changes) for Sega's succeeding console in 1985, the Sega Mark III, III (a.k.a. the SG-1000 [=M3=]), which is basically an enhanced SG-1000 with an upgraded video processing unit and a built-in IC card slot (for Sega My Card games that required the Card Catcher adapter on the prior consoles), models), which in turn would go on to be remodeled for the west as the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem in 1986.
** Incidentally the Master System itself would be released in Japan as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III in 1987. This domestic However, this Japanese version of the Master System differed console differs from the earlier export western models by replacing the reset button on the console power base with a turbo fire switch (which eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to hit pause, a much welcomed benefit) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for games that supported it (which was sold separately as an upgrade module for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).
** The Master System itself would be relaunched as well in North America and Europe with a budget-priced model known as the Master System II. This model featured a more compact design, but at the expense of a lot of features from the original model such as the (admittedly unused) expansion port, the card slot (making it incompatible with Sega Card games and the aforementioned [=3D=] glasses) and support for A/V output (only RF output was allowed).
supported).
* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka Mega Drive) underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console (which has "16-BIT" written in front of the cartridge slot slot, with a large "Sega Genesis" logo on the American variants) and features a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design by removing the aforementioned features of the original model. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.
18th Apr '17 12:26:13 AM Saurubiker
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* The [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]], Sega's very first game console launched in 1983, was itself a consolized version of their SC-3000 personal computer. The main difference between the two was that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired Atari-style joystick. Otherwise, both hardware were essentially identical internally and the SG-1000 could be turned into a personal computer with the SK-1000 keyboard, allowing it to utilize the same peripherals and computing software as the SC-3000 in addition to playing games. The console would later receive a facelift in 1984 known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II), which replaced the hardwired joystick with a pair of detachable Famicom-style joypads that could be stored on the side. The outer design of the SG-1000 II would end up being used (with slight changes) for Sega's succeeding console in 1985, the Sega Mark III, which was essentially an SG-1000 with an upgraded video processing unit and a built-in IC card slot, which in turn would go on to be remodeled for the western market as the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem in 1986.
** Incidentally the Master System itself would be released in Japan as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III in 1987. This domestic version of the Master System differed from the earlier export models by replacing the reset button on the console with a turbo fire switch (which also eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to hit pause) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for games that supported it (which was sold separately as an upgrade module for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).
** The Master System itself would be relaunched as well in North America and Europe with a budget-priced model known as the Master System II. The Master System II featured a more compact design, but at the expense of a lot of features from the original model such as the (admittedly unused) expansion port, the IC card slot (making the console incompatible with Sega Card games and the aforementioned [=3D=] glasses) and support for A/V output (only RF output was allowed).

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]], Sega's very first game console launched in 1983, was is itself a consolized version of their SC-3000 personal computer. The main difference between the two was is that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired Atari-style joystick. Otherwise, both hardware were are essentially identical internally and the SG-1000 could can be turned into a personal computer with the SK-1000 keyboard, allowing it to utilize the same peripherals and computing software as the SC-3000 in addition to playing games. The gaming software. A second model of the console would later receive a facelift was released in 1984 known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II), which replaced the hardwired joystick with a pair of detachable Famicom-style joypads that could can be stored on the side. The outer design of the SG-1000 II would end up being used (with slight changes) for Sega's succeeding console in 1985, the Sega Mark III, which was essentially is basically an enhanced SG-1000 with an upgraded video processing unit and a built-in IC card slot, slot (for Sega My Card games that required the Card Catcher adapter on the prior consoles), which in turn would go on to be remodeled for the western market west as the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem in 1986.
** Incidentally the Master System itself would be released in Japan as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III in 1987. This domestic version of the Master System differed from the earlier export models by replacing the reset button on the console with a turbo fire switch (which also eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to hit pause) pause, a much welcomed benefit) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for games that supported it (which was sold separately as an upgrade module for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).
** The Master System itself would be relaunched as well in North America and Europe with a budget-priced model known as the Master System II. The Master System II This model featured a more compact design, but at the expense of a lot of features from the original model such as the (admittedly unused) expansion port, the IC card slot (making the console it incompatible with Sega Card games and the aforementioned [=3D=] glasses) and support for A/V output (only RF output was allowed).
17th Apr '17 8:57:15 PM Saurubiker
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** Incidentally the Master System itself would be released in Japan in 1987 as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III. This domestic version of the Master System differed from the export models by replacing the reset button with a turbo fire switch (which also eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to pause) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for the games that supported it (which was sold separately for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).

to:

** Incidentally the Master System itself would be released in Japan in 1987 as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III. III in 1987. This domestic version of the Master System differed from the earlier export models by replacing the reset button on the console with a turbo fire switch (which also eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to hit pause) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for the games that supported it (which was sold separately as an upgrade module for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).
17th Apr '17 8:54:06 PM Saurubiker
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* [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] - Likewise, Nintendo's 16-bitter got the SNS-101 redesign late during its lifespan (known as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan and simply marketed as the Super NES in the U.S.). Besides its smaller compact design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the unreleased Super NES CD-ROM Drive and the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up using) and the fact that the SNS-101 only accepted composite video.

to:

* [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] - Likewise, Nintendo's 16-bitter got the SNS-101 redesign late during its lifespan (known as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan and simply marketed as the Super NES in the U.S.). Besides its smaller compact design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the unreleased Super NES CD-ROM Drive and the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up using) and the fact that the SNS-101 only accepted composite video.has no support for S-Video and RGB output.



* The SG-1000, Sega's first game console, received a facelift known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II). It had a design much closer the later released Sega Mark III, replacing the hardwired first-player joystick controller with a detachable Famicom-style joypads. The SG-1000 itself was consolized version of Sega's short-lived SC-3000 range of personal computers.
* The UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem was relaunched in 1989 in North America and Europe as a budget priced alternative to the Genesis. This cheaper model, known as the Master System II, featured a much more compact design, but removed a lot of functionalities from the original model such as the expansion port (which was never actually utilized), the reset button (which admittedly made pausing games a lot less confusing), the IC card slot (which consequently made the console incompatible with the [=SegaScope 3-D=] glasses), the internal BIOS and A/V output support (only RF output was supported). Incidentally the original Master System itself was released in Japan in 1987 as a redesigned version of its predecessor, the Sega Mark III, but this model differed from its foreign counterparts by having a turbo fire switch, a port for the aforementioned [=3D glasses=] and built-in FM sound support (which was sold separately for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).

to:

* The SG-1000, [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]], Sega's very first game console, received console launched in 1983, was itself a consolized version of their SC-3000 personal computer. The main difference between the two was that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired Atari-style joystick. Otherwise, both hardware were essentially identical internally and the SG-1000 could be turned into a personal computer with the SK-1000 keyboard, allowing it to utilize the same peripherals and computing software as the SC-3000 in addition to playing games. The console would later receive a facelift in 1984 known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II). It had a design much closer the later released Sega Mark III, replacing II), which replaced the hardwired first-player joystick controller with a pair of detachable Famicom-style joypads. joypads that could be stored on the side. The outer design of the SG-1000 itself was consolized version of II would end up being used (with slight changes) for Sega's short-lived SC-3000 range of personal computers.
* The
succeeding console in 1985, the Sega Mark III, which was essentially an SG-1000 with an upgraded video processing unit and a built-in IC card slot, which in turn would go on to be remodeled for the western market as the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem was relaunched in 1989 in North America and Europe as a budget priced alternative to the Genesis. This cheaper model, known as the Master System II, featured a much more compact design, but removed a lot of functionalities from the original model such as the expansion port (which was never actually utilized), the reset button (which admittedly made pausing games a lot less confusing), the IC card slot (which consequently made the console incompatible with the [=SegaScope 3-D=] glasses), the internal BIOS and A/V output support (only RF output was supported). 1986.
**
Incidentally the original Master System itself was would be released in Japan in 1987 as a redesigned relaunched version of its predecessor, the Sega Mark III, but this model III. This domestic version of the Master System differed from its foreign counterparts the export models by having replacing the reset button with a turbo fire switch, a port for switch (which also eliminated the aforementioned [=3D glasses=] possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to pause) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound support chip for the games that supported it (which was sold separately for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).west).
** The Master System itself would be relaunched as well in North America and Europe with a budget-priced model known as the Master System II. The Master System II featured a more compact design, but at the expense of a lot of features from the original model such as the (admittedly unused) expansion port, the IC card slot (making the console incompatible with Sega Card games and the aforementioned [=3D=] glasses) and support for A/V output (only RF output was allowed).
17th Apr '17 5:00:36 PM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem had three versions. The first was the original Sega Mark III model launched in Japan. It was restyled into the Master System (for the international market and re-released in Japan in attempt to reinvent the system's image. The third model, the Master System II, was released specifically for the western market as a budget alternative to the Genesis during its launch.
* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka Mega Drive) underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console featured the words "16-BIT" printed in large letters in front of the cartridge slot and had a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.

to:

* The UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem had three versions. The first UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem was relaunched in 1989 in North America and Europe as a budget priced alternative to the original Sega Mark III model launched in Japan. It was restyled into the Master System (for the international market and re-released in Japan in attempt to reinvent the system's image. The third Genesis. This cheaper model, known as the Master System II, featured a much more compact design, but removed a lot of functionalities from the original model such as the expansion port (which was never actually utilized), the reset button (which admittedly made pausing games a lot less confusing), the IC card slot (which consequently made the console incompatible with the [=SegaScope 3-D=] glasses), the internal BIOS and A/V output support (only RF output was supported). Incidentally the original Master System itself was released specifically in Japan in 1987 as a redesigned version of its predecessor, the Sega Mark III, but this model differed from its foreign counterparts by having a turbo fire switch, a port for the western market as a budget alternative to aforementioned [=3D glasses=] and built-in FM sound support (which was sold separately for the Genesis during its launch.
Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).
* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka Mega Drive) underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console featured the words has "16-BIT" printed in large letters written in front of the cartridge slot and had features a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design.design by removing the aforementioned features of the original model. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.



** In addition to the stand-alone Mega Drive/Genesis consoles, there were also a few hybrid models that have an integrated Mega CD/Sega CD unit, similar to the aforementioned Duo models of the PC Engine/[=TurboGrafx-16=]. The first of these hybrid consoles was the Wondermega, released exclusively in Japan in 1992 by both, Sega and JVC, with the Sega-branded version being the rarer of the two variants. The original Wondermega featured a built-in MIDI and microphone ports, allowing it to function as a MIDI synthesizer and as a karaoke machine as well. This was followed by the Wondermega [=M2=] in 1993, which featured a more compact design and removed the MIDI support, but still retained the karaoke functionality. This was the same model that was released in the U.S. as the [=X'Eye=] the same year. Afterward came the Sega-produced Genesis [=CDX=] (or Multi-Mega), released in North America and Europe in 1994, which lacks the karaoke support of the X'Eye, but has a much more compact design and an LED display, allowing to function as a portable CD player. The last (and rarest) of these hybrid units, the Aiwa [=CSD-GM1=], released in limited quantities in 1994 in Japan, features an integrated an audio cassette player and functions as a portable radio.

to:

** In addition to the stand-alone Mega Drive/Genesis consoles, there were also a few hybrid models that have an integrated Mega CD/Sega CD unit, similar to the aforementioned Duo models of the PC Engine/[=TurboGrafx-16=]. The first of these hybrid consoles was the Wondermega, released exclusively in Japan in 1992 by both, Sega and JVC, with the Sega-branded version being the rarer of the two variants. The original Wondermega featured a built-in MIDI and microphone ports, allowing it to function as a MIDI synthesizer and as a karaoke machine as well. This was followed by the Wondermega [=M2=] in 1993, which featured a more compact design and removed the MIDI support, but still retained the karaoke functionality. This was the same model that was released in the U.S. as the [=X'Eye=] the same year. Afterward came the Sega-produced Genesis [=CDX=] (or Multi-Mega), released in North America and Europe in 1994, which lacks the karaoke support of the X'Eye, but has a much more compact design and an LED display, allowing it to function as a portable CD player. The last (and rarest) of these hybrid units, the Aiwa [=CSD-GM1=], released in limited quantities in 1994 in Japan, features an integrated an audio cassette player and functions as a portable radio.
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