History Main / ProductFacelift

14th Feb '18 9:26:56 AM rjd1922
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[[quoteright:350:[[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/NES_versions.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/NES_versions.org/pmwiki/pub/images/nes_console_set.jpg]]]]
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31st Dec '17 7:41:52 PM Saurubiker
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* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, the NES-101 model launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading VCR pastiche to a top-loading console with Super NES-style controllers (also known as the dogbone controllers). The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" problem caused by bent connector pins (though the video quality is somewhat poorer, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7hKoh9MCo faint vertical lines]] covering the screen), but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.
** Three years after its debut in Japan, the Famicom got a facelift of its own: produced by Sharp under license from Nintendo, the Twin Famicom was a console that combined the Famicom and its Disk System add-on into a single device. It had greater audiovisual quality than the original Famicom due to it trading in the RF adaptor for RCA connectors. [[NoExportForYou It was only released in Japan]].
** The Famicom AV (also known as the New Famicom), a redesign of the Famicom released near the end of the system's lifespan, has the same design as the NES top-loader, but features a flatter surface on the cartridge port (allowing the Disk System's adapter to be plugged in), an expansion port next to the standard controller ports for specialized peripherals and controllers, and AV output ports instead of RF (a huge selling point, as the original Famicom only used RF). The fact that the controllers were detachable instead of wired to the console was also a plus and added the unintended side-effect of making the console compatible with NES controllers due to having the same ports. On the other hand, this also meant the second controller lost its microphone functionality, which a few games supported (most notably ''VideoGame/{{The Legend of Zelda|I}}'', which required the microphone to kill Pol Voices).
* [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] - Likewise, Nintendo's 16-bitter got the SNS-101 redesign late during its lifespan (known as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan and simply marketed as the Super NES in the U.S.). Besides its smaller compact design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the unreleased Super NES CD-ROM Drive and the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up using) and the fact that the SNS-101 has no support for S-Video and RGB output.

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* UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem - Pictured above, above is the NES-101 model [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem NES]] [[FanNickname top loader]] (aka the NES-101) launched in 1993, which converted the system from a side-loading front-loading VCR pastiche to a top-loading console with Super NES-style controllers (also known as the dogbone controllers). The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light'" light" problem caused by bent connector pins (though the video quality is somewhat poorer, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7hKoh9MCo faint vertical lines]] covering the screen), but the Nintendo's poor timing in releasing it so late in the console's lifespan meant that the new design saw little success and was soon discontinued.
** Three years after its debut in Japan, A Japanese counterpart to the Famicom got a facelift of its own: produced by Sharp under license from Nintendo, top loader was also made around the Twin Famicom was a console that combined the Famicom and its Disk System add-on into a single device. It had greater audiovisual quality than the original Famicom due to it trading in the RF adaptor for RCA connectors. [[NoExportForYou It was only released in Japan]].
** The
same period. Officially known as Famicom AV (also known as the or New Famicom), a redesign of the Famicom released near the end of the system's lifespan, Famicom, it has the same design as the NES top-loader, but features a flatter surface on around the cartridge port (allowing the Disk System's RAM adapter to be plugged in), an expansion port next to the standard controller ports for specialized peripherals and controllers, and AV output ports instead of RF (a huge selling point, as the original Famicom only used RF). The fact that the controllers were detachable instead of wired to the console was also a an added plus and added gave the console the unintended side-effect of making the console compatible it cross-compatible with NES controllers due to having the same ports.controllers. On the other hand, this also meant the second controller lost its microphone functionality, which a few games supported (most notably ''VideoGame/{{The Legend of Zelda|I}}'', which required the microphone to kill Pol Voices).
** The Famicom also got an earlier third-party facelift of its own three years into its lifespan: produced by Sharp under license from Nintendo, the Twin Famicom was a console that combined the Famicom and its Disk System add-on into a single unit. Like the later Famicom AV, it traded the RF output of the original for RCA connectors.
* Likewise, the [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] - Likewise, Nintendo's 16-bitter got the SNS-101 a redesign of its own late during its lifespan (known as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan and simply marketed as the Super NES without any special name change in the U.S.). Besides its smaller compact design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model models was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the unreleased Super NES CD-ROM Drive and the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up using) and the fact that the SNS-101 has no support for S-Video and RGB output.



* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube removed the plug for digital component cables (well, digital-to-analog component cables... [=CRTs=] were still the norm, mind you), due to the low demand for them (resulting in these cables highly sought after among collectors in the secondhand market). A third-party version of the [=GameCube=] by Panasonic known as the Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this control deck featured the ability to play both [=GameCube=] discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube and DVD player separately; because of its failure, it never made it to international shores, much to the west's derision (as the ability to play DVD videos was a big selling point for the highly-popular rival [=PS2=]).

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* Later releases of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube removed the plug for digital component cables (well, digital-to-analog component cables... [=CRTs=] were still the norm, mind you), due to the low demand for them (resulting in these cables highly sought after among collectors in the secondhand market). A third-party version of the [=GameCube=] by Panasonic known as the Q was also released in Japan several months after the original console; this control deck featured the ability to play both [=GameCube=] discs and video [=DVDs=] (among other hardware revisions), but was commercially unsuccessful due to it costing much more than buying a regular Gamecube [=GameCube=] and DVD player separately; because of its failure, it never made it to international shores, much to the west's derision (as the ability to play DVD videos was a big selling point for the highly-popular rival [=PS2=]).
29th Jul '17 1:33:04 PM nombretomado
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[[quoteright:350:[[NintendoEntertainmentSystem http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/NES_versions.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[NintendoEntertainmentSystem [[quoteright:350:[[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/NES_versions.jpg]]]]
8th Jul '17 11:42:57 AM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/XboxOne received its first facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K video support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray, something that curiously the [=PS4=] Pro lacked, despite Sony's investment in the Blu-ray format) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements. However, aside from some marginal performance improvement, the Xbox One S was still in its core just a slimmer less expensive version of the standard Xbox One. That's where the Xbox One X comes in. Officially unveiled at E3 2017 after being teased in the previous year's show, the Xbox One X (formerly Project Scorpio) is an enhanced model designed specifically for [=4k=] gaming that features the a faster CPU, more RAM and a 6 teraflops GPU (in contrast to the 4.2 teraflops of the [=PS4=] Pro), while somehow being smaller than the Xbox One S (which itself was already smaller than the launch Xbox One). It is also much more expensive than the Xbox One S with a [=$499=] price tag, hence why the Xbox One S will still be offered as a less expensive model.

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* The UsefulNotes/XboxOne received its first facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K video support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray, something that curiously the [=PS4=] Pro lacked, despite Sony's investment in the Blu-ray format) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements. However, aside from some marginal performance improvement, the Xbox One S was still in its core just a slimmer less expensive version of the standard Xbox One. That's where the Xbox One X comes in. Officially unveiled at E3 2017 after being teased in the previous year's show, the Xbox One X (formerly Project Scorpio) is an enhanced model designed specifically for [=4k=] gaming that features the a faster CPU, more RAM and a 6 teraflops GPU (in contrast to the 4.2 teraflops of the [=PS4=] Pro), while somehow being smaller than the Xbox One S (which itself was is already smaller than the launch Xbox One). It is also much more expensive than the Xbox One S with a [=$499=] price tag, hence why the Xbox One S will still be offered as a less expensive the standard model.
27th Jun '17 1:40:50 PM Saurubiker
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* Its successor, the UsefulNotes/XboxOne also received a facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K resolution support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements.
%% More information is required for the Scorpio, so until then refrain from including it.

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* Its successor, the The UsefulNotes/XboxOne also received a its first facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K resolution video support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray) Blu-ray, something that curiously the [=PS4=] Pro lacked, despite Sony's investment in the Blu-ray format) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements.
%% More information is required for the Scorpio, so until then refrain
improvements. However, aside from including it.some marginal performance improvement, the Xbox One S was still in its core just a slimmer less expensive version of the standard Xbox One. That's where the Xbox One X comes in. Officially unveiled at E3 2017 after being teased in the previous year's show, the Xbox One X (formerly Project Scorpio) is an enhanced model designed specifically for [=4k=] gaming that features the a faster CPU, more RAM and a 6 teraflops GPU (in contrast to the 4.2 teraflops of the [=PS4=] Pro), while somehow being smaller than the Xbox One S (which itself was already smaller than the launch Xbox One). It is also much more expensive than the Xbox One S with a [=$499=] price tag, hence why the Xbox One S will still be offered as a less expensive model.
27th Jun '17 9:57:22 AM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka Mega Drive) underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console (which has "16-BIT" written in front of the cartridge slot, with a large "Sega Genesis" logo on the American variants) and features a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design by removing the aforementioned features of the original model. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.

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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Mega Drive) Drive/Genesis]] underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console (which has "16-BIT" written in front of the cartridge slot, with a large "Sega Genesis" logo on the American variants) and features a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design by removing the aforementioned features of the original model. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.
18th Jun '17 1:24:46 PM Prfnoff
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** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5 with the power supply and joystick expansion built in and a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany whose keyboard had the QWERTY layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including that of the eventual French version of the MO-5E.

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** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5 with the power supply and joystick expansion built in and a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany whose with a QWERTY-layout keyboard had the QWERTY layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including that of the eventual French version of the MO-5E.
18th Jun '17 1:24:09 PM Prfnoff
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** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5, with the power supply and joystick expansion built-in, as well as a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany, with a QWERTY keyboard layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including the French version of the MO-5E.

to:

** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5, MO-5 with the power supply and joystick expansion built-in, as well as built in and a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany, with a QWERTY Germany whose keyboard had the QWERTY layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including that of the eventual French version of the MO-5E.
5th May '17 5:59:18 PM Saurubiker
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* The original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} underwent numerous slighty revisions, with each model having many internal and external changes, most notably the removal of the RCA output jacks in the [=SCPH-550X=] series, followed by the parallel I/O port in the [=SCPH-900X=] series. The console eventually received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply, as well as removing the reset button and the serial I/O port required for the Link Cable (which was supported primarily by racing games). This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.

to:

* The original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} underwent numerous slighty revisions, with each model having many internal and external changes, most notably the removal of the RCA output jacks in the [=SCPH-550X=] [=SCPH-5500=] series, followed by the parallel I/O port in the [=SCPH-900X=] [=SCPH-9000=] series. The console eventually received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply, as well as removing the reset button and the serial I/O port required for the Link Cable (which was supported primarily by racing games). This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.
5th May '17 5:58:19 PM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply. This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.

to:

* The original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} underwent numerous slighty revisions, with each model having many internal and external changes, most notably the removal of the RCA output jacks in the [=SCPH-550X=] series, followed by the parallel I/O port in the [=SCPH-900X=] series. The console eventually received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply.supply, as well as removing the reset button and the serial I/O port required for the Link Cable (which was supported primarily by racing games). This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.



* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP-2000 (aka the "Slim & Lite"), gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight. The PSP-3000 was later announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. PSP Go, which removed the UMD slot, making it the first portable gaming console that does not use physical media. But after a couple years of lackluster sales, PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short.

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* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP-2000 (aka the "Slim & Lite"), gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight. The PSP-3000 was later announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. PSP Go, which Go (the [=N1000=] model) removed the UMD slot, slot in order to reduce cost and push downloadable media, making it the first portable gaming console that does not use physical media. But after a couple years of lackluster sales, PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short. Another cost-reduced model that was exclusive to Europe, the PSP Street (the [=E1000=] model) took the opposite approach in the sense that it retained the UMD slot, but removed its wi-fi capabilities, making it a strictly offline device.
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