History Main / ProductFacelift

29th Jul '17 1:33:04 PM nombretomado
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[[quoteright:350:[[NintendoEntertainmentSystem http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/NES_versions.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[NintendoEntertainmentSystem [[quoteright:350:[[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/NES_versions.jpg]]]]
8th Jul '17 11:42:57 AM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/XboxOne received its first facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K video support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray, something that curiously the [=PS4=] Pro lacked, despite Sony's investment in the Blu-ray format) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements. However, aside from some marginal performance improvement, the Xbox One S was still in its core just a slimmer less expensive version of the standard Xbox One. That's where the Xbox One X comes in. Officially unveiled at E3 2017 after being teased in the previous year's show, the Xbox One X (formerly Project Scorpio) is an enhanced model designed specifically for [=4k=] gaming that features the a faster CPU, more RAM and a 6 teraflops GPU (in contrast to the 4.2 teraflops of the [=PS4=] Pro), while somehow being smaller than the Xbox One S (which itself was already smaller than the launch Xbox One). It is also much more expensive than the Xbox One S with a [=$499=] price tag, hence why the Xbox One S will still be offered as a less expensive model.

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* The UsefulNotes/XboxOne received its first facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K video support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray, something that curiously the [=PS4=] Pro lacked, despite Sony's investment in the Blu-ray format) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements. However, aside from some marginal performance improvement, the Xbox One S was still in its core just a slimmer less expensive version of the standard Xbox One. That's where the Xbox One X comes in. Officially unveiled at E3 2017 after being teased in the previous year's show, the Xbox One X (formerly Project Scorpio) is an enhanced model designed specifically for [=4k=] gaming that features the a faster CPU, more RAM and a 6 teraflops GPU (in contrast to the 4.2 teraflops of the [=PS4=] Pro), while somehow being smaller than the Xbox One S (which itself was is already smaller than the launch Xbox One). It is also much more expensive than the Xbox One S with a [=$499=] price tag, hence why the Xbox One S will still be offered as a less expensive the standard model.
27th Jun '17 1:40:50 PM Saurubiker
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* Its successor, the UsefulNotes/XboxOne also received a facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K resolution support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements.
%% More information is required for the Scorpio, so until then refrain from including it.

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* Its successor, the The UsefulNotes/XboxOne also received a its first facelift at E3 2016 as the 'Xbox One S', a white, 40% smaller system that includes 4K resolution video support (including support for Ultra HD Blu-ray) Blu-ray, something that curiously the [=PS4=] Pro lacked, despite Sony's investment in the Blu-ray format) and an internal power supply (rather than requiring a bulky power brick), among other improvements.
%% More information is required for the Scorpio, so until then refrain
improvements. However, aside from including it.some marginal performance improvement, the Xbox One S was still in its core just a slimmer less expensive version of the standard Xbox One. That's where the Xbox One X comes in. Officially unveiled at E3 2017 after being teased in the previous year's show, the Xbox One X (formerly Project Scorpio) is an enhanced model designed specifically for [=4k=] gaming that features the a faster CPU, more RAM and a 6 teraflops GPU (in contrast to the 4.2 teraflops of the [=PS4=] Pro), while somehow being smaller than the Xbox One S (which itself was already smaller than the launch Xbox One). It is also much more expensive than the Xbox One S with a [=$499=] price tag, hence why the Xbox One S will still be offered as a less expensive model.
27th Jun '17 9:57:22 AM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka Mega Drive) underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console (which has "16-BIT" written in front of the cartridge slot, with a large "Sega Genesis" logo on the American variants) and features a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design by removing the aforementioned features of the original model. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.

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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (aka [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Mega Drive) Drive/Genesis]] underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. The original 1988 console (which has "16-BIT" written in front of the cartridge slot, with a large "Sega Genesis" logo on the American variants) and features a headphone jack with volume slider for stereo sounds and a female DE-9 port on the back for additional peripherals that was never utilized. The second model, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold simply as the Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America, was launched in 1993 and featured a smaller form factor for a more compact design by removing the aforementioned features of the original model. The third model, the Genesis 3, was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even smaller form factor due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.
18th Jun '17 1:24:46 PM Prfnoff
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** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5 with the power supply and joystick expansion built in and a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany whose keyboard had the QWERTY layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including that of the eventual French version of the MO-5E.

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** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5 with the power supply and joystick expansion built in and a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany whose with a QWERTY-layout keyboard had the QWERTY layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including that of the eventual French version of the MO-5E.
18th Jun '17 1:24:09 PM Prfnoff
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** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5, with the power supply and joystick expansion built-in, as well as a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany, with a QWERTY keyboard layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including the French version of the MO-5E.

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** The MO-5E was an upgraded version of the MO-5, MO-5 with the power supply and joystick expansion built-in, as well as built in and a full-stroke keyboard instead of the MO-5's UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum-like rubber keys. The E originally stood for "export," since the model was first released in West Germany, with a QWERTY Germany whose keyboard had the QWERTY layout instead of the AZERTY layout used by most French keyboards, including that of the eventual French version of the MO-5E.
5th May '17 5:59:18 PM Saurubiker
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* The original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} underwent numerous slighty revisions, with each model having many internal and external changes, most notably the removal of the RCA output jacks in the [=SCPH-550X=] series, followed by the parallel I/O port in the [=SCPH-900X=] series. The console eventually received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply, as well as removing the reset button and the serial I/O port required for the Link Cable (which was supported primarily by racing games). This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.

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* The original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} underwent numerous slighty revisions, with each model having many internal and external changes, most notably the removal of the RCA output jacks in the [=SCPH-550X=] [=SCPH-5500=] series, followed by the parallel I/O port in the [=SCPH-900X=] [=SCPH-9000=] series. The console eventually received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply, as well as removing the reset button and the serial I/O port required for the Link Cable (which was supported primarily by racing games). This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.
5th May '17 5:58:19 PM Saurubiker
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* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply. This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.

to:

* The original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} underwent numerous slighty revisions, with each model having many internal and external changes, most notably the removal of the RCA output jacks in the [=SCPH-550X=] series, followed by the parallel I/O port in the [=SCPH-900X=] series. The console eventually received a smaller model in 2000, rechristened the PS one (aka the SCPH-100 series), that was designed to reduce the overheating issues that the previous models occasionally ran into. This was done so by replacing the internal power supply that the original SCPH-1000 series used with an external power supply.supply, as well as removing the reset button and the serial I/O port required for the Link Cable (which was supported primarily by racing games). This resulted in the PS one becoming so small (only slightly larger than a CD case) that, with a portable LCD screen add-on, it makes for a decent portable system, assuming you can find an outlet for the AC adapter.



* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP-2000 (aka the "Slim & Lite"), gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight. The PSP-3000 was later announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. PSP Go, which removed the UMD slot, making it the first portable gaming console that does not use physical media. But after a couple years of lackluster sales, PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short.

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* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP-2000 (aka the "Slim & Lite"), gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight. The PSP-3000 was later announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. PSP Go, which Go (the [=N1000=] model) removed the UMD slot, slot in order to reduce cost and push downloadable media, making it the first portable gaming console that does not use physical media. But after a couple years of lackluster sales, PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short. Another cost-reduced model that was exclusive to Europe, the PSP Street (the [=E1000=] model) took the opposite approach in the sense that it retained the UMD slot, but removed its wi-fi capabilities, making it a strictly offline device.
28th Apr '17 6:57:15 PM IAmNotAFunguy
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* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). They then went on to the New Nintendo [=3DS=], which is like the [=DSi=] in that it has some better tech under the hood, specifically a faster processor (which helps cut down on load times), stereoscopic 3D that can be viewed at a wider amount of angles, a C-stick to accompany the circle pad, and ZL & ZR triggers. Because of the New 3DS's faster CPU, some games (both at retail and on the [=eShop=]) are able to run on it, but not on the original 3DS, or have certain features disabled when played on the original model (such as ''Hyrule Warriors Legends'', which can only display 3D on the New 3DS).

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* UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS has also gone through this, first with a bigger version called the 3DS XL and then with a kid-friendlier, hingeless version called the 2DS, as it removes the capability for the 3D effect (and regarding kids whose eyes could be damaged by staring at the effect for too long, [[NeverNeedsSharpening yes, that's a feature]]). They then went on to the New Nintendo [=3DS=], [=3DS=] and the New [=3DS=] XL, which is are like the [=DSi=] in that it has they hav some better tech under the hood, specifically a faster processor (which helps cut down on load times), stereoscopic 3D that can be viewed at a wider amount of angles, a C-stick to accompany the circle pad, and ZL & ZR triggers. Because of the New 3DS's faster CPU, some games (both at retail and on the [=eShop=]) are able to run on it, but not on the original 3DS, or have certain features disabled when played on the original model (such as ''Hyrule Warriors Legends'', which can only display 3D on the New 3DS). The latest to come out was the New [=2DS=] XL which goes back to a clamshell design and has all the enhancements of the New [=3DS=] minus the 3D features.
22nd Apr '17 9:14:17 AM Saurubiker
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** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players with its spaceship-like design and unique variant of the [=TurboPad=] controller, but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design).
** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent a revision as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in the U.S. in 1990), consisted of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. But PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System instead, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one convenient unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. alongside the Super System Card in 1992), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had a headphone jack and a battery port that allowed the console to be turned into a portable game machine with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which had a different chassis (colored white instead of black), updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot to reduce manufacturing cost. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final model of the PC Engine ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes, an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with a 6-button joypad in lieu of the standard 2-button pad (as fighting games were becoming more prevalent by that point).

to:

** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players with its spaceship-like design and unique variant of the [=TurboPad=] controller, but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design).
design and an expansion port for CD-ROM support).
** The CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on also underwent a revision as well. The original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System launched in 1988 (and later released redesigned as the [=TurboGrafx-CD=] in for the U.S. in 1990), consisted consists of three main components: the actual CD-ROM drive (which could function functioned as a portable audio CD player when used by itself), the interface unit that connected connects the CD drive to the console[[note]]The Japanese version is compatible with the aforementioned variations of the PC Engine except for the Shuttle and GT (an adapter is required for [=SuperGrafx=] support). The U.S. version of the interface unit has a different design in order to accommodate the different shape of the [=TG16=] console.[[/note]] and the System Card (a [=HuCard=] that contained the BIOS required to play CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] games). NEC later released the Super System Card upgrade for the CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System in 1991, which featured additional RAM and an updated BIOS required for Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] discs. But PC Engine owners who didn't already own the original CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] add-on could purchase the Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] System instead, which combined the CD-ROM drive, interface unit and Super System Card into one convenient unit.
** This culminated with the PC Engine Duo also launched in 1991 (released as the Turbo Duo in the U.S. alongside the Super System Card in 1992), a PC Engine console with built-in Super CD-ROM[[superscript:2]] unit. The original model had has a headphone jack and a battery port slot that allowed the console allows it to be turned into a portable game machine console with a separately available chargeable battery and a mini-LCD monitor. The PC Engine Duo-R was then released in 1993, which had has a different chassis (colored white instead of black), updated the NEC logo and removed the headphone jack and battery slot to reduce manufacturing cost. The final model of the Duo (and consequently, the final model of the PC Engine ever), the PC Engine Duo-RX released in 1994, has some minor coloring changes, changes from the Duo-R, an improved CD-ROM drive, and came packaged with a 6-button joypad in lieu of the standard 2-button pad (as fighting games were becoming more pretty prevalent by that point).
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