History Main / PrehistoricMonster

15th May '17 12:38:59 PM chasemaddigan
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* The documentary series ''[[WalkingWithDinosaurs Walking With...]]''' played straight the trope in two cases (''Walking With [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Monsters]]'' and ''Sea [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Monsters]]''), but averted it in most part of the series: the original ''Walking With Dinosaurs'', ''Walking With Beasts'', ''Ballad of Big Al'', but above all ''Prehistoric Park''. In this spinoff prehistoric animals are described as "something which is missing in our world, amazing animals that time has left behind" and worth to be brought to life; moreover, they show up later in the park ''alongside their living relatives'' (Martha the mammoth with African elephants, dinosaurs with birds and crocodiles, sabre-toothed cat with cheetahs and so on). Here the discrimination between extinct and non-extinct animal is totally absent (a ''very'' rare example in media). The trope is even ''inverted'' in one case: keeper Bob being affectionate with the giant millipede relative ''Arthropleura'' and saying "this is not like spiders and other small modern creepy-crawlies, this is a proper animal".

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* The documentary series ''[[WalkingWithDinosaurs ''[[Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs Walking With...]]''' played straight the trope in two cases (''Walking With (''[[Series/WalkingWithMonsters Walking With]] [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Monsters]]'' and ''Sea [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Monsters]]''), but averted it in most part of the series: the original ''Walking With Dinosaurs'', ''Walking With Beasts'', ''Series/WalkingWithBeasts'', ''Ballad of Big Al'', but above all ''Prehistoric Park''. In this spinoff prehistoric animals are described as "something which is missing in our world, amazing animals that time has left behind" and worth to be brought to life; moreover, they show up later in the park ''alongside their living relatives'' (Martha the mammoth with African elephants, dinosaurs with birds and crocodiles, sabre-toothed cat with cheetahs and so on). Here the discrimination between extinct and non-extinct animal is totally absent (a ''very'' rare example in media). The trope is even ''inverted'' in one case: keeper Bob being affectionate with the giant millipede relative ''Arthropleura'' and saying "this is not like spiders and other small modern creepy-crawlies, this is a proper animal".



* The Italian documentary ''Series/PlanetOfDinosaurs'' (1993) averts this trope completely: dinosaurs here are ''never'' called monsters, and are instead genuine animals with social attitudes and colorful design (anticipating ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' six years before). At the end of the last episode (which tells about their extinction), they are described as "extraordinary animals that deserve to be remembered in their best moments, when they filled the Earth with their strength and their vitality".

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* The Italian documentary ''Series/PlanetOfDinosaurs'' (1993) averts this trope completely: dinosaurs here are ''never'' called monsters, and are instead genuine animals with social attitudes and colorful design (anticipating ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs'' six years before). At the end of the last episode (which tells about their extinction), they are described as "extraordinary animals that deserve to be remembered in their best moments, when they filled the Earth with their strength and their vitality".
25th Apr '17 1:48:05 PM Lymantria
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* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/CadillacsAndDinosaurs'', where dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures are treated as normal animals.

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* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/CadillacsAndDinosaurs'', ''[[ComicBook/XenozoicTales Cadillacs and Dinosaurs]]'', where dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures are treated as normal animals.
19th Mar '17 3:44:20 AM Morgenthaler
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* Averted by many earlier {{LEGO}} themes, such as the Duplo line that had cavemen and dinosaurs living together peacefully, or the dinosaur-related subline of [[LEGOAdventurers ''Adventurers'']], which was about saving the animals from falling into the villains' hands. It is, however, played straight in [[LEGODinoAttack ''Dino 2010'']] and especially in its American counterpart, [[LEGODinoAttack ''Dino Attack'']], which centered around destroying the evil beasts using the most over-the-top weaponry.

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* Averted by many earlier {{LEGO}} Toys/{{LEGO}} themes, such as the Duplo line that had cavemen and dinosaurs living together peacefully, or the dinosaur-related subline of [[LEGOAdventurers [[Toys/LEGOAdventurers ''Adventurers'']], which was about saving the animals from falling into the villains' hands. It is, however, played straight in [[LEGODinoAttack [[Toys/LEGODinoAttack ''Dino 2010'']] and especially in its American counterpart, [[LEGODinoAttack [[Toys/LEGODinoAttack ''Dino Attack'']], which centered around destroying the evil beasts using the most over-the-top weaponry.
5th Mar '17 10:04:40 AM nombretomado
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* The Savage Land in MarvelComics is loaded with StockDinosaurs that are these half the time.

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* The Savage Land in MarvelComics Creator/MarvelComics is loaded with StockDinosaurs that are these half the time.
1st Feb '17 12:14:05 AM PaulA
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* ''Literature/TheLostWorld1912'' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has its various prehistoric animals almost entirely united in their desire to eat the heroes. There's also a war between a society of human hunter-gatherers and a group of dryopithecoid "ape-men", and the MightyWhitey heroes side entirely with their fellow humans (the 2001 miniseries adaptation makes this conflict considerably less one-sided). It's important to mention that, to contemporary Britons like Sir Arthur, prehistoric life wasn't just monstrous; it was ''inferior'', since dinosaurs went extinct and we didn't.

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* ''Literature/TheLostWorld1912'' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has its various prehistoric animals almost entirely united in their desire to eat the heroes. There's also a war between a society of human hunter-gatherers and a group of dryopithecoid "ape-men", and the MightyWhitey heroes side entirely with their fellow humans (the 2001 miniseries adaptation makes this conflict considerably less one-sided).humans. It's important to mention that, to contemporary Britons like Sir Arthur, prehistoric life wasn't just monstrous; it was ''inferior'', since dinosaurs went extinct and we didn't.



* ZThe 2001 miniseries of ''Literature/TheLostWorld'' deconstructs a lot of the imperialistic thinking of its source material, showing the dinosaurs, and the much-maligned ape-men, to be well-adapted, often beautiful, and sometimes fairly intelligent creatures. That said, the ape-men are [[UncannyValley utterly hideous under that makeup]]. Notably, a major subplot (and one completely absent from the book), has Prof. Challenger (Bob Hoskins) preventing the natives of the plateau from exterminating the ape-men, but in doing so -- and [[MightyWhitey imposing his own values on them]] -- he inadvertently [[spoiler: brings disaster to the village when the vengeful ape-men summon a pair of ''Allosaurs'']], and the series ends with him and the other explorers deciding to [[spoiler: keep the plateau a secret]] in order to protect its inhabitants, while the book seems fairly cheerful about the possibility that they'll all go extinct, because they're monsters and that's what they deserve. This trope also shows up in-universe with Prof. Summerlee, who, representing the kind of paleontology [[ScienceMarchesOn contemporary to the 1911 setting]], refers to an ''Allosaurus'' in one scene as a "creature from Hell", and indeed, we see little of the ''Allosaurs'' beyond their hunger. On the other hand, there's a charming scene of one of the heroes befriending a ''Hypsilophodon''.

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* ZThe The 2001 miniseries of ''Literature/TheLostWorld'' ''Series/{{The Lost World|2001}}'' deconstructs a lot of the imperialistic thinking of its source material, showing the dinosaurs, and the much-maligned ape-men, to be well-adapted, often beautiful, and sometimes fairly intelligent creatures. That said, the ape-men are [[UncannyValley utterly hideous under that makeup]]. Notably, a major subplot (and one completely absent from the book), has Prof. Challenger (Bob Hoskins) preventing the natives of the plateau from exterminating the ape-men, but in doing so -- and [[MightyWhitey imposing his own values on them]] -- he inadvertently [[spoiler: brings [[spoiler:brings disaster to the village when the vengeful ape-men summon a pair of ''Allosaurs'']], and the series ends with him and the other explorers deciding to [[spoiler: keep [[spoiler:keep the plateau a secret]] in order to protect its inhabitants, while the book seems fairly cheerful about the possibility that they'll all go extinct, because they're monsters and that's what they deserve. This trope also shows up in-universe with Prof. Summerlee, who, representing the kind of paleontology [[ScienceMarchesOn contemporary to the 1911 setting]], refers to an ''Allosaurus'' in one scene as a "creature from Hell", and indeed, we see little of the ''Allosaurs'' beyond their hunger. On the other hand, there's a charming scene of one of the heroes befriending a ''Hypsilophodon''.
27th Dec '16 1:02:47 AM Smeagol17
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Of course there are also popular works which tend to avert this trope, especially in the last decades, in part thanks to the influence from popular documentaries like ''Walking With'': no doubt however the traditional "prehistoric = monstrous" thing not a DeadHorseTrope even today. It's worth noting at this point that PrehistoricMonster may be considered a subtrope of ArtisticLicensePaleontology only when anatomical inaccuracies are present as well. If extinct critters are portrayed in an unpleasant but still scientifically acceptable way ([[ScienceMarchesOn at least in respect to the knowledge of the time the work was created]]), it may be qualified more as a subtrope of RuleOfCool.

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Of course there are also popular works which tend to avert this trope, especially in the last decades, in part thanks to the influence from popular documentaries like ''Walking With'': no doubt however the traditional "prehistoric = monstrous" thing is not a DeadHorseTrope even today. It's worth noting at this point that PrehistoricMonster may be considered a subtrope of ArtisticLicensePaleontology only when anatomical inaccuracies are present as well. If extinct critters are portrayed in an unpleasant but still scientifically acceptable way ([[ScienceMarchesOn at least in respect to the knowledge of the time the work was created]]), it may be qualified more as a subtrope of RuleOfCool.
27th Dec '16 1:02:24 AM Smeagol17
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Of course there are also popular works which tend to avert this trope, especially in the last decades, in part thanks to the influence from popular documentaries like ''Walking With'': no doubt however the traditional "prehistoric = monstrous" thing is all but a DeadHorseTrope even today. It's worth noting at this point that PrehistoricMonster may be considered a subtrope of ArtisticLicensePaleontology only when anatomical inaccuracies are present as well. If extinct critters are portrayed in an unpleasant but still scientifically acceptable way ([[ScienceMarchesOn at least in respect to the knowledge of the time the work was created]]), it may be qualified more as a subtrope of RuleOfCool.

to:

Of course there are also popular works which tend to avert this trope, especially in the last decades, in part thanks to the influence from popular documentaries like ''Walking With'': no doubt however the traditional "prehistoric = monstrous" thing is all but not a DeadHorseTrope even today. It's worth noting at this point that PrehistoricMonster may be considered a subtrope of ArtisticLicensePaleontology only when anatomical inaccuracies are present as well. If extinct critters are portrayed in an unpleasant but still scientifically acceptable way ([[ScienceMarchesOn at least in respect to the knowledge of the time the work was created]]), it may be qualified more as a subtrope of RuleOfCool.
19th Dec '16 1:22:44 PM Sleeping_Beauty
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* ''Velociraptor'' ("swift thief" or "swift murderer") and all the other ''-raptor''s. Ironically, ''Gigantoraptor'' ("gigantic murderer"), despite its name was probably vegetarian. Though it would likely have entered this trope [[PapaWolf if you messed]] [[MamaBear with its eggs]].

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* ''Velociraptor'' ("swift thief" or "swift murderer") and all the other ''-raptor''s. Ironically, ''Gigantoraptor'' ("gigantic murderer"), despite its name was probably vegetarian.vegetarian and behaved like a modern-day ostrich. Though it would likely have entered this trope [[PapaWolf if you messed]] [[MamaBear with its eggs]].
4th Dec '16 1:29:37 PM nombretomado
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* In Creator/RobertEHoward's "Shadows In Iron", ConanTheBarbarian identifies the hide of a golden leopard and an enormous snake -- both of which had been extinct for years in his time -- as ways to deduce that something is very, very, very wrong.

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* In Creator/RobertEHoward's "Shadows In Iron", ConanTheBarbarian Literature/ConanTheBarbarian identifies the hide of a golden leopard and an enormous snake -- both of which had been extinct for years in his time -- as ways to deduce that something is very, very, very wrong.
27th Nov '16 8:05:22 PM nombretomado
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* Averted by the ''{{Dinotopia}}'' series, in which all the dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures are [[IntellectualAnimal Intellectual Animals]] that for the most part exist peacefully alongside humans. The exceptions are the large uncivilized theropods of the Rainy Basin and even they get portrayed as [[NobleSavage Noble Savages]] that can be bargained with. Contrast the miniseries.

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* Averted by the ''{{Dinotopia}}'' ''Literature/{{Dinotopia}}'' series, in which all the dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures are [[IntellectualAnimal Intellectual Animals]] that for the most part exist peacefully alongside humans. The exceptions are the large uncivilized theropods of the Rainy Basin and even they get portrayed as [[NobleSavage Noble Savages]] that can be bargained with. Contrast the miniseries.
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