History Main / PredatorsAreMean

21st Jun '16 7:41:36 AM Shadowgazer
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This is a common way to deal with predators in talking animal fiction. This trope may be one of TheOldestOnesInTheBook, despite predators serving a vital ecological role (no apex predators=too many herbivores=ecosystem completely collapses), or needing to eat meat to live. On the other hand, to the mouse, what the owl is like inside isn't as relevant as that it's trying to eat you. When the story focuses on a prey animal, there's not a lot of ways to keep predators from being monstrous.

This can overlap with HumansAreTheRealMonsters, and maybe even HumansAreCthulhu (particularly in {{Xenofiction}}). Goes hand-in-hand with HerbivoresAreFriendly. May be one of the reasons why ReptilesAreAbhorrent, since most lizards (including ''all'' snakes) and all modern crocodilians are carnivores.

A notable exception is that fish-eating characters are often spared sympathy (see NoCartoonFish for more about that trope).

This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision. Very few predators have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.

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This is a common way to deal with predators in talking animal fiction. This trope may be one of TheOldestOnesInTheBook, despite predators serving a vital ecological role (no apex predators=too many herbivores=ecosystem completely collapses), or needing to eat meat to live. On the other hand, to the mouse, what the owl is like inside isn't as relevant as that it's trying to eat you. When the story focuses on a prey animal, there's not a lot of ways to keep predators from being monstrous.

monstrous. SapientEatSapient is a justified case of this, since there are sapient predators that know what they are doing and sapient prey that has a right to live. There are still a few ways to avoid this though, the most famous being with the fish-eating characters who are often spared sympathy thanks to their targets being non-sapient (see NoCartoonFish for more about that trope).

This can overlap with HumansAreTheRealMonsters, and maybe even HumansAreCthulhu (particularly in {{Xenofiction}}). Goes hand-in-hand with HerbivoresAreFriendly. May be one of the reasons why ReptilesAreAbhorrent, since most lizards (including ''all'' snakes) and all modern crocodilians are carnivores.

A notable exception is that fish-eating characters are often spared sympathy (see NoCartoonFish for more about that trope).

carnivores.

This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision.TruthInTelevision obviously enough. Very few predators have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.
16th Jun '16 11:15:45 PM AnotherDuck
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* Played straight than subverted with the weasel in ''Animation/LeafieAHenIntoTheWild''. It seems like a normal, antagonistic predator ([[GoodScarsEvilScars scar]] and all). [[spoiler:Later we learn she's a starving mother who's just trying to eat and can barely produce milk for her young.]] In the end, [[spoiler: Leafie allows the weasel to eat her in order to feed her young.]]



* Played straight then subverted in ''Animation/LeafieAHenIntoTheWild''. The closest thing to a BigBad the film has is the one eyed-weasel who nearly kills Leafie and kills both of Greenie's biological parents. The film subverts this near the end [[spoiler:as Leafie learns the weasel isn't any worse than she is. The one-eyed weasel s a mother who needs to feed her newly borns. Leafie [[HeroicSacrifice lets the weasel]] [[TheHeroDies eat her]] so her children can live.]]

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* Played straight then subverted in ''Animation/LeafieAHenIntoTheWild''. The In ''Animation/LeafieAHenIntoTheWild'', the closest thing to a BigBad the film has is the one eyed-weasel who nearly kills Leafie and kills both of Greenie's biological parents. The [[spoiler:The film subverts this near the end [[spoiler:as as Leafie learns the weasel isn't any worse than she is. The one-eyed weasel s a mother who needs to feed her newly borns. Leafie [[HeroicSacrifice lets the weasel]] [[TheHeroDies eat her]] so her children can live.]]
15th Jun '16 9:27:38 PM H2SO4
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* Played straight with Soto, Cretaceous, Marlstrom and Rudy, but averted with Diego and the Mamma Rex in the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge''-series.

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* Played straight with Soto, Cretaceous, Marlstrom and Rudy, but averted with Diego and the Mamma Rex in the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge''-series. It is important to note, however, that the latter two made a HeelFaceTurn.
19th May '16 5:48:44 AM Morgenthaler
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* The Redwall series tends to do this a lot, with the villains almost always being predatory or omnivorous species such as weasles, foxes, stoats, snakes, rats, hawks and other 'vermin' species, and explicitly eat meat-often making comments about eating the hero or hero's friends. The heroes, however, are never said to eat any kind of meat, fish being the only animal they will consume, otherwise being completely vegetarian, even though mice, badgers, hedgehogs and otters, commonly featured among the heroes, are omnivores, domestic cats (which are carnivores), rabbits (herbivores), and dormice (herbivores) don't take sides, bees (herbivores) are bad, and many normal, non-sapient herbivores have been seen. This does bring morality into question as there has been at least one talking, intelligent fish.
* Brilliantly handled in ''WatershipDown'', where the the rabbits refer to their multitude of predators as "''u embleer hrair''" -- "The Stinking Thousand." The rabbits live in constant fear and hatred of their predators, casting them as demon-like entities in their mythology. But when confronted with the wanton destruction that humans inflict [[HumansAreCthulhu for no comprehensible reason]], they acknowledge that their predators only kill because they have to and that they are struggling for survival not unlike themselves.

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* The Redwall ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'' series tends to do this a lot, with the villains almost always being predatory or omnivorous species such as weasles, foxes, stoats, snakes, rats, hawks and other 'vermin' species, and explicitly eat meat-often making comments about eating the hero or hero's friends. The heroes, however, are never said to eat any kind of meat, fish being the only animal they will consume, otherwise being completely vegetarian, even though mice, badgers, hedgehogs and otters, commonly featured among the heroes, are omnivores, domestic cats (which are carnivores), rabbits (herbivores), and dormice (herbivores) don't take sides, bees (herbivores) are bad, and many normal, non-sapient herbivores have been seen. This does bring morality into question as there has been at least one talking, intelligent fish.
* Brilliantly handled in ''WatershipDown'', ''Literature/WatershipDown'', where the the rabbits refer to their multitude of predators as "''u embleer hrair''" -- "The Stinking Thousand." The rabbits live in constant fear and hatred of their predators, casting them as demon-like entities in their mythology. But when confronted with the wanton destruction that humans inflict [[HumansAreCthulhu for no comprehensible reason]], they acknowledge that their predators only kill because they have to and that they are struggling for survival not unlike themselves.



* In Larry Niven's ''KnownSpace'' novels, the carnivorous alien Kzinti are aggressive conquerors who nearly defeat humanity.

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* In Larry Niven's ''KnownSpace'' ''Literature/KnownSpace'' novels, the carnivorous alien Kzinti are aggressive conquerors who nearly defeat humanity.



* Averted in the ''HarryPotter'' series. Owls are an integral part of wizarding society (being a huge part of their postal service, at least in Britain), and the lead character even has his own, very beloved pet owl, who's shown to be affectionate -- if not a bit haughty and standoffish when she's mad. Ron also has a very friendly, excitable owl that can be described as downright adorable.

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* Averted in the ''HarryPotter'' ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series. Owls are an integral part of wizarding society (being a huge part of their postal service, at least in Britain), and the lead character even has his own, very beloved pet owl, who's shown to be affectionate -- if not a bit haughty and standoffish when she's mad. Ron also has a very friendly, excitable owl that can be described as downright adorable.
15th May '16 3:34:31 AM Shadowgazer
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* ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'': This stereotype plays a major role in the movie. The rabbit Judy Hopps stands up to a fox bully in her EstablishingCharacterMoment and her parents express serious prejudice against predators. [[spoiler: Ultimately averted, as predators are just as diverse as prey. The main villain is a sheep politician trying to exploit this stereotype for power.]]

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* ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'': This stereotype plays a major role in the movie. The rabbit Judy Hopps stands up to a fox bully in her EstablishingCharacterMoment and her parents express serious prejudice against predators. [[spoiler: Ultimately averted, as predators are just as diverse as prey. It doesn't matter what their origins as true animals were, predators do NOT eat other citizens and are just as likely to attack and use violence as prey is. The main villain is a sheep politician trying to exploit this stereotype for power.]]
11th May '16 7:18:06 AM Eyorecomedy
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This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision. Very predators have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.

to:

This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision. Very few predators have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.
11th May '16 7:17:13 AM Eyorecomedy
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This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision. Very few animals have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty, and those that have tend to be animals humans actually like - such as [[FriendlyPlayfulDolphin dolphins]] and [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys chimpanzees]]. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.

to:

This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision. Very few animals predators have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty, and those that have tend to be animals humans actually like - such as [[FriendlyPlayfulDolphin dolphins]] and [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys chimpanzees]].cruelty. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.
11th May '16 7:12:35 AM Eyorecomedy
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This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision, with the obvious exception of [[HumansAreBastards humans themselves]]. Very few animals have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty, and those that have tend to be animals humans actually like - such as [[FriendlyPlayfulDolphin dolphins]] and [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys chimpanzees]]. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.

to:

This trope is practically never TruthInTelevision, with the obvious exception of [[HumansAreBastards humans themselves]].TruthInTelevision. Very few animals have ever been observed to engage in apparently deliberate cruelty, and those that have tend to be animals humans actually like - such as [[FriendlyPlayfulDolphin dolphins]] and [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys chimpanzees]]. Please do not list RealLife aversions - nature averts this by default, playing it straight is by far the more remarkable.
9th May '16 9:45:51 AM FawFayQ8
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* Considering most of the characters are either carnivores or omnivores, this is averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheLionGuard''. The pilot however portrays ''scavengers'' as abhorrent, despite the fact real life lions will readily scavenge too if given the chance. Vultures and hyenas are the villains in the pilot, and the later are not even considered scavengers in real life anymore than lions are. It's true hyenas will scavenge, but they hunt most of what they eat. This fact is later shown in the series itself, where a hyena named Jasiri mentions that hyenas serve as scavengers in the Circle of Life and tells Kion that not all hyenas are bad.
1st May '16 3:09:52 PM CJCroen1393
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* There are a fair amount of "intense" or "edgy" nature documentaries that will often play up the scare factor of carnivorous animals.



* ''Film/JurassicWorld's'' website lists most of its carnivorous dinosaurs, pterosaurs and sea lizard as having high "Aggression Indexes" (in layman's terms, the carnivores have {{Hair Trigger Temper}}s). Plot relevant ones include the infamously carnivorous ''TyrannosaurusRex'', long-time villains ''[[RaptorAttack Velociraptor]]'', the fish-eating pterosaur ''[[PteroSoarer Pteranodon]]'' and [[{{Badass}} SHARK-eating]] sea lizard ''[[SeaMonster Mosasaurus]]''. Given what Jurassic World is like, it's possible that they did this on purpose so the animals could live up to the expectations of the public, as most of these animals would have been relatively docile in real life[[note]]Amusingly, ''Pteranodon'' is the one that would most likely have a bad temper in reality, though this would have had less to do with it being a carnivore and more to do with it being a polygynous breeder (and all of the park's specimens are female)[[/note]]. There are exceptions, though; the fish-eating ''Baryonyx'' and ''Suchomimus'' have a medium Aggression Index, as does the opportunistic pterosaur ''Dimorphodon''. ''Gallimimus'', the one omnivore of the mix, has a low Aggression Index.

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* ''Film/JurassicWorld's'' website lists most of its carnivorous dinosaurs, pterosaurs and sea lizard as having high "Aggression Indexes" (in layman's terms, the carnivores have {{Hair Trigger Temper}}s). Plot relevant ones include the infamously carnivorous ''TyrannosaurusRex'', long-time villains ''[[RaptorAttack Velociraptor]]'', the fish-eating pterosaur ''[[PteroSoarer Pteranodon]]'' and [[{{Badass}} SHARK-eating]] sea lizard ''[[SeaMonster Mosasaurus]]''. Given what Jurassic World is like, it's possible that they did this on purpose so the animals could live up to the expectations of the public, as most of these animals would have been relatively docile in real life[[note]]Amusingly, ''Pteranodon'' is the one that would most likely have had a bad temper in reality, though this would have had less to do with it being a carnivore and more to do with it being a polygynous breeder (and all of the park's specimens are female)[[/note]].female)[[/note]]. In the raptors' case this is consistent with how they were depicted in the previous films and the ''Pteranodons''' high aggression level is a plot point in the film, seeing as the saurian BigBad of the film frightens them into a maddened frenzy and sics them on a helicopter that was pursuing her. There are exceptions, though; the fish-eating ''Baryonyx'' and ''Suchomimus'' have a medium Aggression Index, as does the opportunistic pterosaur ''Dimorphodon''. ''Gallimimus'', the one omnivore of the mix, has a low Aggression Index.
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