History Main / PowerupLetdown

17th Oct '17 7:52:32 AM MBG
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Many other RUM-based cards fit this trope, with few being outright upgrades over their starting counterparts and many being situational improvements at best. Mechquipped Angineer is probably the second biggest example, upgrading into CXyz Mechquipped Djinn Angeneral - it gains 800 ATK, but swaps out its extremely useful protective abilities (able to save any of your monsters from destruction for a turn) for wholly unimpressive position-switching and burn effects.
17th Oct '17 6:38:25 AM CyberTiger88
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Eats too much valuable resources when there's something else just as powerful with a better output vs input ratio.
15th Oct '17 4:21:40 PM MBG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** To say that Number C92: Heart-eartH Chaos Dragon was hit hard with this trope is a sheer understatement, as for starters, it requires 4 Level 10 monsters be overlaid to summon it, a step up from the 3 Level 9 monsters its previous form, the already difficult to summon Number 92: Heart-eartH Dragon, requires. Therefore, the only practical way to summon Number C92 is to use a Rank-Up-Magic Spell Card on Number 92. Effect-wise, Number C92 cannot be destroyed by battle, gives you Life Points equal to any battle damage your monsters inflict on your opponent, and lets you negate the effects of all face-up cards your opponent controls if you detach an Xyz Material from it, ''but only if Number 92 is attached to it as an Xyz Material''. To even use that last effect, you have to summon Number C92 with a Rank-Up-Magic Spell Card, making its own printed summoning conditions pointless. Compare Number C92's effects with those of its previous form, which also has the battle destruction immunity effect, but also when it battles, ''it redirects the battle damage you would have taken to your opponent'' on top of that. Additionally, during the opponent's End Phase, Number 92 can, at the cost of detaching an Xyz Material, banish all monsters your opponent Normal or Special Summons, or Sets, that turn. Finally, if even it would be destroyed while it has Xyz Materials, Number 92 [[CameBackStrong returns]] returns from the Graveyard and gains 1000 ATK ''for each card that was banished at the time''. Considering all that Number 92 can do, why would anyone consider looking at its "upgrade" with anything but disdain?

to:

** To say that Number C92: Heart-eartH Chaos Dragon was hit hard with this trope is a sheer understatement, as for starters, it requires 4 Level 10 monsters be overlaid to summon it, a step up from the 3 Level 9 monsters its previous form, the already difficult to summon Number 92: Heart-eartH Dragon, requires. Therefore, Dragon is considered to be one of the only practical way most DifficultButAwesome Xyz monsters in the game, requiring either three Level 9 monsters or the effect of Heart-eartH to be summoned. In exchange for that, it has 0 ATK, but can't be killed in battle and has an AttackReflector ability, can detach a material at the end of your opponent's turn to banish all cards they played that turn, and can summon Number C92 is to use itself again when destroyed with a hefty powerboost. So when it gets a NextTierPowerUp through a Rank-Up-Magic Spell Card on Number 92. Effect-wise, Number C92 cannot be destroyed by battle, gives you Life Points equal to any battle damage your monsters inflict on your opponent, and lets you negate the effects of becomes Heart-eartH Chaos Dragon, it... loses all face-up cards your opponent controls if you detach an Xyz Material from it, ''but only if Number 92 is attached to it as an Xyz Material''. To even use that last effect, you have to summon Number C92 with a Rank-Up-Magic Spell Card, making its own printed summoning conditions pointless. Compare Number C92's effects with those of its previous form, which also has above abilities bar the battle destruction immunity effect, but also when it battles, ''it redirects protection, in favor of 1000 more ATK (which is still awful), a mediocre LifeDrain ability, and the battle damage you would have taken ability to detach a material to negate your opponent'' on top of that. Additionally, during the opponent's End Phase, Number 92 can, at the cost of detaching an Xyz Material, banish all monsters your opponent Normal or Special Summons, or Sets, that cards for a turn. Finally, if even To say it's not worth it would be destroyed while it has Xyz Materials, Number 92 [[CameBackStrong returns]] returns from the Graveyard and gains 1000 ATK ''for each card that was banished at the time''. Considering all that Number 92 can do, why would anyone consider looking at its "upgrade" with anything but disdain?is a massive understatement.
9th Oct '17 11:31:05 PM MBG
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Particularly shown in ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' with Type: Null. You catch this new Pokémon and find that it has surprisingly high stats, with a somewhat-above-average 95 in everything [[MightyGlacier except Speed.]] And what's more, it has an okay ability in Battle Armor and can use Eviolite, making it a fine MightyGlacier. And then, in a touching scene, Type: Null breaks off its control helmet and evolves into Silvally... and then drops three viability grades. Silvally's only stat gain is bringing Speed up to [[MasterOfNone the same okay-ish tier]] as all its other stats. Its ability changes from Battle Armor to RKS System, which allows it to change its type to correspond with special held items. Problem? Those special held items do nothing besides change its type, meaning that all it allows Silvally to do is be a mediocre Pokémon of ''any'' typing. And obviously, it can't use Eviolite anymore. This evolution singlehandedly drops it from being one of the best unevolved Pokémon to one of the worst fully-evolved Pokémon in the game.
** Surskit possesses a unique design (a water strider), a typing (Bug/Water) that was completely unique for four generations, and pretty good stats for an unevolved Pokémon. When it evolves, it becomes Masquerain, which changes its design into a fairly generic moth and alters its typing to the fairly common and competitively awful Bug/Flying. Its stats do increase somewhat, but to a level outclassed by [[CrutchCharacter Butterfree]], and until Generation VII, it actually ''lost'' a few points of Speed.
3rd Oct '17 5:35:15 PM thatother1dude
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** The Bruiser trait increases Strength by 2 at the cost of 2 Action Points. Since stat points are interchangeable at character creation, and you get 1 Action Point for every other point of Agility, you can get the same benefit at half the cost by relocating two points from Agility to Strength (and even that's not a great idea given Agility is the OneStatToRuleThemAll).
25th Sep '17 2:15:40 PM MBG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Light/Heavy Metal as Hidden Abilities are relatively useless for the aforementioned reasons- the only Pokemon who have the Ability usually don't worry about Heavy Slam, Heat Crash, Grass Knot, and Low Kick, since they're heavy enough that it doesn't matter much and those moves are too gimmicky to use reliably. Bronzong also suffers because both of its regular Abilities remove one of its weaknesses (especially Levitate, against the omnipresent Ground-type moves). Aggron doesn't really benefit anyways, as it already has the maximum weight for Grass Knot/Low Kick to do most damage, and Heavy Slam gets full power + STAB even without Aggron's Ability; its original Abilities (Sturdy lets it get in at least one move without dying to Earthquake or a Fighting-type move, and Rock Head has only three recoil moves to work with, one of which is at least STAB Head Smash) are okay, but better than Heavy Metal.

to:

*** Light/Heavy Metal as Hidden Abilities are relatively useless for the aforementioned reasons- the only Pokemon who have the Ability usually don't worry about Heavy Slam, Heat Crash, Grass Knot, and Low Kick, since they're heavy enough that it doesn't matter much and those moves are too gimmicky to use reliably. Several of them, including Metagross, are so heavy that they still take maximum damage from Low Kick and Grass Knot, even with halved weight. Bronzong also suffers because both of its regular Abilities remove one of its weaknesses (especially Levitate, against the omnipresent Ground-type moves). Aggron doesn't really benefit anyways, as it already has the maximum weight for Grass Knot/Low Kick to do most damage, and Heavy Slam gets full power + STAB even without Aggron's Ability; its original Abilities (Sturdy lets it get in at least one move without dying to Earthquake or a Fighting-type move, and Rock Head has only three recoil moves to work with, one of which is at least STAB Head Smash) are okay, but better than Heavy Metal.Metal.
*** Scizor is particularly bad in this regard - while, unlike some of its brethren, it actually is light enough for Light Metal to be factored into the damage it takes, it's already so light that Low Kick and Grass Knot weren't doing anything much to it in the first place (both moves would have a power of 80, and Scizor resists Grass Knot and is neutral to Low Kick). For the most part, all the ability does is make Scizor take more damage when it gets hit by Heat Crash or Heavy Slam. Meanwhile, one of its standard abilities is the phenomenally good Technician, which enables the powered-up Bullet Punches and U-Turns that make Scizor worth using to begin with.
24th Sep '17 10:58:00 AM N8han11
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/SummonNight: Swordcraft Story 2'' introduces a fishing game. The top prize at 1500 points is a Luxury Fishing Rod which... doesn't seem to do diddly. [[spoiler:[[GuideDangIt It lets you catch slightly better fish, including the best fish]].]] If you've been painstakingly grinding for 5 hours, accumulating 30-40 points per go, hoping for a DiscOneNuke, it's a complete letdown.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SummonNight: Swordcraft Story 2'' introduces a fishing game. The top prize at 1500 points is a Luxury Fishing Rod which... doesn't seem to do diddly. [[spoiler:[[GuideDangIt It lets you catch slightly better fish, including the best fish]].]] If you've been painstakingly grinding for 5 hours, accumulating 30-40 points per go, hoping for a DiscOneNuke, it's a complete letdown.
11th Sep '17 5:59:11 AM Sunflorazumarill
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles2'', Cosette has the Klutz Potential, which causes her firing accuracy to be lowered. However, after the Yuell Mission, it gets replaced with Blood Trauma, which ''reduces her AP to 0 when fired at'', making it the worst Potential in the game. [[spoiler: After the Doerfein Mission, however, this gets replaced with Beautiful World, allowing Cosette to take another turn.]]
10th Sep '17 11:06:34 AM MBG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/{{Seanbaby}} pointed out several of these on his ''[[http://www.seanbaby.com/nes/nes/useless.htm Useless Power-Ups]]'' page.

to:

* Creator/{{Seanbaby}} pointed out several of these on his ''[[http://www.seanbaby.com/nes/nes/useless.htm Useless Power-Ups]]'' page.page - though the Feather is more of a particularly nonsensical {{Plot Coupon}}, others include [[UselessUsefulSpell a defensive spell that protects against an attack no enemies use]], an invisibility power that makes it impossible for you to see where you're going but [[TheAllSeeingAI doesn't impede the enemies]], and an attack that requires you to touch the enemies in a game with CollisionDamage.



* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3.5 features around 800 prestige classes - special classes that can only be taken after reaching a certain qualification. It should be no surprise, then, that a good number of these fall into this trope. In particular, any casting-based class that provides less than full advancement is rarely worth taking, because it's rare for any class features to make up for being behind. Even worse is if the prestige class fails to provide any casting advancement in favor of either adding bonus spells per day or providing a completely new spellcasting progression (both of which ensure that you'll be saddled with a lot of weak spells that aren't able to accomplish nearly as much as the more powerful spells you'd have had access to without the prestige class). Other examples include the arcane archer, whose primary ability can be duplicated by a regular magic weapon, the duelist, who gets locked into an extremely poor fighting style to make use of any of their skills, and the reaping mauler, a [[ScrappyMechanic grapple-centric]] class where qualifying for it means being a subpar grappler. (The class requires Clever Wrestling, which requires being being Small or Medium and therefore locks you out of most of the best grappling races, and its class features key off Wisdom, giving it MAD, and require you to wear light or no armor when you lose your Dexterity while grappling and need all the armor you can get.)

to:

* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3.5 features around 800 prestige classes {{Prestige Class}}es - special classes that can only be taken after reaching a certain qualification. It should be no surprise, then, that a good number of these fall into this trope. In particular, any casting-based class that provides less than full advancement is rarely worth taking, because it's rare for any class features to make up for being behind. Even worse is if the prestige class fails to provide any casting advancement in favor of either adding bonus spells per day or providing a completely new spellcasting progression (both of which ensure that you'll be saddled with a lot of weak spells that aren't able to accomplish nearly as much as the more powerful spells you'd have had access to without the prestige class). Other examples include the arcane archer, whose primary ability can be duplicated by a regular magic weapon, the duelist, who gets locked into an extremely poor fighting style to make use of any of their skills, and the reaping mauler, a [[ScrappyMechanic grapple-centric]] class where qualifying for it means being a subpar grappler. (The class requires Clever Wrestling, which requires being being Small or Medium and therefore locks you out of most of the best grappling races, and its class features key off Wisdom, giving it MAD, and require you to wear light or no armor when you lose your Dexterity while grappling and need all the armor you can get.)
28th Aug '17 9:14:48 PM Octorok103
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** E-Tech weapons from ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'' are a particularly notorious example. According to the lore, Hyperion research into Eridium and Eridian tech led to the development of guns that could shoot projectiles other than bullets, which Hyperion then licensed out to the other weapons manufacturers. Their rarity and stats make them competitive to purple-quality weapons on paper, so you'd be forgiven for assuming that they offer a viable alternative to conventional guns. Sure, the extra damage sounds nice, but they consume multiple ammo per shot, and they generally have reduced or no ability to crit, which means you'll end up using more ammo to do less damage in the long run.
** If you thought the skill trees were exempt from this, you'd be wrong; there are quite a few skills throughout the series that are either ineffective or counterproductive. Gaige from ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'' gets hit by this the worst: just about every skill that's meant to upgrade the killing power of her pet robot Deathtrap ends up decreasing its DPS in some way.
This list shows the last 10 events of 375. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PowerupLetdown