History Main / PoweredByaForsakenChild

29th Apr '17 11:28:18 AM nombretomado
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* In TimothyZahn's ''Deadman Switch'', a planetary system is discovered that's full of extremely valuable minerals, but there's a field around it that shuts off FTL travel, so there's no practical way to get in. Unless, as it turns out, you have a freshly dead corpse in the navigator's seat. No, this doesn't cause people to write the place off, don't be silly. They just start using convicted criminals.

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* In TimothyZahn's Creator/TimothyZahn's ''Deadman Switch'', a planetary system is discovered that's full of extremely valuable minerals, but there's a field around it that shuts off FTL travel, so there's no practical way to get in. Unless, as it turns out, you have a freshly dead corpse in the navigator's seat. No, this doesn't cause people to write the place off, don't be silly. They just start using convicted criminals.
22nd Apr '17 1:57:58 PM nombretomado
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* In the original ''{{Suikoden}}'', the Rune that Governs Life and Death works like this - it's pretty powerful even at the worst of times, but it grows stronger by devouring the souls of people loved by the wielder. Friends, family, 's all good. He doesn't have to kill them directly, but nor does he get to choose - the Rune itself seems to employ some form of [[WindsOfDestinyChange probability manipulation]] to bring about the death of the loved ones so it can grow stronger. On the bright side, it's literally the most fearsomely powerful Rune that has ever appeared in any of the games, so hey, at least you got something OUT of all those tragically dead family-members and close, long-time friends...

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* In the original ''{{Suikoden}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden|I}}'', the Rune that Governs Life and Death works like this - it's pretty powerful even at the worst of times, but it grows stronger by devouring the souls of people loved by the wielder. Friends, family, 's all good. He doesn't have to kill them directly, but nor does he get to choose - the Rune itself seems to employ some form of [[WindsOfDestinyChange probability manipulation]] to bring about the death of the loved ones so it can grow stronger. On the bright side, it's literally the most fearsomely powerful Rune that has ever appeared in any of the games, so hey, at least you got something OUT of all those tragically dead family-members and close, long-time friends...
17th Apr '17 9:17:54 AM SullenFrog
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* In ''VisualNovel/{{Sunrider}}'', the [[AbusivePrecursors ancient Ryuvians]] had a DoomsdayDevice called the Sharr’Lac which could obliterate everything within a half-lightyear radius. To prevent the abuse of such destructive power, it was designed so that it can only be piloted by the Sharr (or crown princess) of Ryuvia, and can only be activated at the cost of her life. Thus, the Ryuvian God-Emperors would have to decide whether using the Sharr’Lac was worth the sacrifice of their daughters.
16th Apr '17 11:34:32 PM WillBGood
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* '''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' -- and most other vampires since him -- have to drain the blood, or life force depending on variation, of living people just to survive.
* Lightbringer, Azor Ahai's sword from '''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', which the smith tempered by plunging it into the heart of his beloved, killing her horribly.

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* '''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' -- and most other vampires since him -- have to drain the blood, or life force depending on variation, of living people just to survive.
* Lightbringer, Azor Ahai's sword from '''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', which the smith tempered by plunging it into the heart of his beloved, killing her horribly.
16th Apr '17 11:34:09 PM WillBGood
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* The science fiction novella [[http://www.davidbrin.com/thor1.html ''Thor Meets Captain America'']], by Creator/DavidBrin, is not about {{Superhero}}es. It proposes that the [[{{Ghostapo}} Nazi death camps were an attempt to practice Necromancy on an industrial scale]], and it is set in an alternate world where it worked; the unprecedented amount of deliberately imposed death and suffering has brought the [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse gods]] to reality, [[OhCrap on the Nazi side]]. The invasion of Normandy was completely destroyed and a stalemate ensued. Fortunately for the Allies, the invocation was so authentic that Loki the Ever Contrary defected. The most depressing part is that this still makes more sense than the real version.
** This same theme is used in ''[['Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Atrocity Archives]]'', by Creator/CharlesStross. In this case, the Holocaust was part of a SummoningRitual to bring an EldritchAbomination to the aid of the Nazis. In true CosmicHorrorStory style, the thing they were trying to bind to their will was just a teeny, weeny, eensy bit more [[UltimateEvil powerful]] than they had suspected. They were stopped, but a modern day cultist opens a portal to a reality where they succeeded. [[EarthShatteringKaboom Hilarity fails to ensue]].

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* The science fiction novella [[http://www.davidbrin.com/thor1.html ''Thor "Thor Meets Captain America'']], America"]], by Creator/DavidBrin, is not about {{Superhero}}es. It proposes that the [[{{Ghostapo}} Nazi death camps were an attempt to practice Necromancy on an industrial scale]], and it is set in an alternate world where it worked; the unprecedented amount of deliberately imposed death and suffering has brought the [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse gods]] to reality, [[OhCrap on the Nazi side]]. The invasion of Normandy was completely destroyed and a stalemate ensued. Fortunately for the Allies, the invocation was so authentic that Loki the Ever Contrary defected. The most depressing part is that this still makes more sense than the real version.
** This same theme is used in ''[['Literature/TheLaundrySeries ''[[Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Atrocity Archives]]'', by Creator/CharlesStross. In this case, the Holocaust was part of a SummoningRitual to bring an EldritchAbomination to the aid of the Nazis. In true CosmicHorrorStory style, the thing they were trying to bind to their will was just a teeny, weeny, eensy bit more [[UltimateEvil powerful]] than they had suspected. They were stopped, but a modern day cultist opens a portal to a reality where they succeeded. [[EarthShatteringKaboom Hilarity fails to ensue]].
16th Apr '17 9:24:17 AM nombretomado
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* The ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Doublemeat Palace" leads the viewer to believe Buffy has encountered a ''SoylentGreen''-type situation -- only to move on to a more realistically plausible, but equally strange-feeling twist.

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* The ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Doublemeat Palace" leads the viewer to believe Buffy has encountered a ''SoylentGreen''-type ''Film/SoylentGreen''-type situation -- only to move on to a more realistically plausible, but equally strange-feeling twist.



** In the Literature/CiaphasCain novels, there is [[ShoutOut a mention of]] "tasty, nutritious [[SoylentGreen Soylens Viridians]]."

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** In the Literature/CiaphasCain novels, there is [[ShoutOut a mention of]] "tasty, nutritious [[SoylentGreen [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylens Viridians]]."
8th Apr '17 10:23:13 PM nombretomado
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* In the SecretHistories series by Simon R. Green, specifically in ''The Man With the Golden Torc'', Edwin Drood uncovers his family's greatest secret: [[spoiler: each Drood's magical armor was created through the sacrifice of his or her twin sibling as a baby.]]

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* In the SecretHistories Literature/SecretHistories series by Simon R. Green, specifically in ''The Man With the Golden Torc'', Edwin Drood uncovers his family's greatest secret: [[spoiler: each Drood's magical armor was created through the sacrifice of his or her twin sibling as a baby.]]
21st Mar '17 6:47:21 PM nombretomado
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* In the {{Nightside}}, Forsaken Children are fairly standard-issue sources of power for villains. In ''Nightingale's Lament'', for example, John Taylor discovers that [[spoiler: the Nightside's electrical grid is running off energies from a murdered man's spirit, who'd had solar powers in life. As he'd also been a close friend of John's, Taylor sets the spirit free, blacking out most of the Nightside.]] Passing references to ambulances powered by human pain are used simply ''to set the mood of the neighborhood''.

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* In the {{Nightside}}, {{Literature/Nightside}}, Forsaken Children are fairly standard-issue sources of power for villains. In ''Nightingale's Lament'', for example, John Taylor discovers that [[spoiler: the Nightside's electrical grid is running off energies from a murdered man's spirit, who'd had solar powers in life. As he'd also been a close friend of John's, Taylor sets the spirit free, blacking out most of the Nightside.]] Passing references to ambulances powered by human pain are used simply ''to set the mood of the neighborhood''.
13th Mar '17 12:32:40 PM BeerBaron
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* While by no means a required facet of gameplay, ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series allows such behaviour. In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', soul gems can be used to eternally trap the souls of defeated monsters, and the resulting soul can then be used to fuel a magical weapon. However, ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' lets you take the same concept [[MoralEventHorizon that little bit further]], with the use of "black soul gems", a variant favoured by Necromancers that allows the trapping and fusing of human souls. In fact, human souls create the most powerful enchantments in the game. Not that every magical item could be eternaly fueled by an innocent animal's soul such as elks, foxes or even rabbits is any comfort.
** The Shivering Isles takes this a step further with Dawnfang/Duskfang. To start with, it's a magical weapon and so must be recharged with soul gems (although see below). What's worse, it changes damage type with the day/night cycle (fire by day, frost by night), and each time it switches it can become (for the next 12 hours) a stronger version of itself... if the other form was "fed" 12 souls. So in order to keep the blade perpetually in its Superior state, one has to let it claim 24 souls EVERY DAY * and* make sure the enchantment itself is charged with souls. Add that to the rather disconcerting toothy maw of the blade, and one begins to wonder what sane hero would willingly carry this on her person.
*** You find it in the Shivering Isles, also known as the Realm of Madness. [[FridgeBrilliance What did you expect?]]
*** One advantage of Dawnfang/Duskfang is that it refills its charges every 12 hours, when it changes form. This, technically, makes it the only magic weapon in the game which ''doesn't'' have to be recharged with soul gems, and some players use it for this reason.

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* While by no means a required facet of gameplay, ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series allows such behaviour. In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', soul gems can be ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** Throughout the series, Soul Gems. They are
used to eternally trap the souls of defeated monsters, and the resulting soul can then be used to fuel a magical weapon. However, Black Soul Gems take this even further. They are a variant of soul gem, favored by Necromancers, which allows the trapping and fusing of sapient (men, mer, beast races) souls. In fact, sapient souls create some of the most powerful enchantments in the game.
** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', due to the weakening state of [[PhysicalGod the Tribunal]] as a result of being [[DeityOfHumanOrigin cut off from their divine power source]], they were no longer able to sustain the [[TheGreatWall Ghost Fence]] around [[{{Mordor}} Red Mountain]] by their power alone. As a result, [[spoiler: the Dunmer began interring the bones of their dead in such a way that their spirits would power the Ghost Fence. That's why it's called the "Ghost" Fence and not the "God" Fence]].
** The ''Shivering Isles'' expansion to
''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' lets you take the same concept [[MoralEventHorizon that little bit further]], with the use of "black soul gems", a variant favoured by Necromancers that allows the trapping and fusing of human souls. In fact, human souls create the most powerful enchantments in the game. Not that every magical item could be eternaly fueled by an innocent animal's soul such as elks, foxes or even rabbits is any comfort.
** The Shivering Isles
takes this a step further with Dawnfang/Duskfang. To start with, it's a magical weapon and so must be recharged with soul gems (although see below). What's worse, it changes damage type with the day/night cycle (fire by day, frost by night), and each time it switches it can become (for the next 12 hours) a stronger version of itself... if the other form was "fed" 12 souls. So in order to keep the blade perpetually in its Superior state, one has to let it claim 24 souls EVERY DAY * and* make sure the enchantment itself is charged with souls. Add that to the rather disconcerting toothy maw of the blade, and one begins to wonder what sane hero would willingly carry this on her person.
*** You
person. (You find it in the Shivering Isles, also known as the Realm of Madness. [[FridgeBrilliance What did you expect?]]
***
expect?]]) One advantage of Dawnfang/Duskfang is that it refills its charges every 12 hours, when it changes form. This, technically, makes it the only magic weapon in the game which ''doesn't'' have to be recharged with soul gems, and some players use it exactly for this reason.



** The Dwemer who are a dwarf/gnome combo even though in game they're elves did SOMETHING to the Snow Elves to turn them into Falmer. Snow Elves as sentient beings would require a very rare black soul gem to put their souls into soul gems but as Falmer much cheaper soul gems work. A lot of Dwemer technology relies on soul gems.
** The Daedric equipment is this by default: each piece of Daedric armor and weapons is Ebony with a Daedra soul infused into it at creation. In ''Skyrim'', the first installment that actually lets you craft Daedric equipment, this manifests in having to spend a Daedra Heart (an alchemical ingredient gained from killing certain Daedra) on each crafted piece.

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** The Dwemer who are a dwarf/gnome combo even though in game they're elves In the backstory, [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent the Dwemer]] did SOMETHING ''something'' to the Snow Elves to turn them into the modern Falmer. Snow Elves as sentient beings would require a very rare black soul gem to put their souls into soul gems but as Falmer much cheaper soul gems work. [[{{Magitek}} A lot of Dwemer technology relies on soul gems.
gems]], in fact.
** The Daedric equipment is this by default: each piece of Daedric armor and weapons is Ebony with a Daedra soul infused into it at creation. In ''Skyrim'', the first installment that actually lets you craft Daedric equipment, this manifests in having to spend a Daedra Heart (an (a rare alchemical ingredient gained from killing certain Daedra) on each crafted piece.
12th Mar '17 1:40:45 AM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/StargateSG1'' had tretonin, a drug that granted the user perfect health-but had a side effect: the drug destroys the immune system, rendering the user dependent on the drug forever. The SG-1 team, after beginning negotiation for some of the drug, learn that the drug is actually created from the offspring of a Goa'uld queen the Pangarans discovered in a stasis jar. Normally this would not be so bad considering the Goa'uld are the series' BigBad, parasites that force their way into humans' brains and take over their bodies while most likely applying eternal mental torture to the host mind and are literally born evil since they inherit the memories of their parents. Unfortunately, much later, after the Tok'ra (the rebel faction of the Goa'uld who were allies with Earth) are brought to help analyze the drug, it is discovered the Goa'uld queen is actually the Tokra's long lost queen (and their last hope of reproducing as their number are dwindling and she was the only known Tok'ra queen). Naturally the Tok'ra object to such treatment of their queen.
** Eventually subverted when, later that season, the Tok'ra are able to synthesize tretonin without the need for live symbiotes. Because said Tok'ra queen showed them how before dying.

to:

* ''Series/StargateSG1'' had tretonin, a drug that granted On ''Series/{{The 100}}'', the user perfect health-but had a side effect: the drug destroys the immune system, rendering the user dependent on the drug forever. The SG-1 team, after beginning negotiation for some of the drug, learn that the drug is actually created from the offspring of a Goa'uld queen the Pangarans discovered in a stasis jar. Normally this would not be so bad considering the Goa'uld are the series' BigBad, parasites that force Mountain Men cure their way into humans' brains periodic radiation poisoning through "blood treatments": they kidnap Grounders (who are naturally resistant to radiation) and take over use them as human dialysis machines, pumping their bodies while most likely applying eternal mental torture to radiation resistant blood into the host mind Mountain Men, and are literally born evil since they inherit the memories of their parents. Mountain Men's contaminated blood into the Grounders. This makes the Grounders incredibly ill, and if done often enough will eventually kill them.
** Later, the Mountain Men discover a way to make themselves permanently resistant to radiation, removing the need for the blood treatments.
Unfortunately, much later, after the Tok'ra (the rebel faction of the Goa'uld who were allies with Earth) are brought to help analyze the drug, it is discovered the Goa'uld queen is actually the Tokra's long lost queen (and their last hope of reproducing as their number are dwindling and she was the only known Tok'ra queen). Naturally the Tok'ra object to such this new treatment requires taking lethal quantities of their queen.
** Eventually subverted when, later that season, the Tok'ra are able to synthesize tretonin without the need for live symbiotes. Because said Tok'ra queen showed them how before dying.
bone marrow from captured Sky People.



* In ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'', President Roslin's cancer is cured by [[spoiler: injecting her with the blood of Helo and Sharon's unborn daughter]]. Thankfully, they don't need all of it.
** The source of the treatment is in fact scheduled to be terminated, but the efficacy of the treatment means that she gets a stay of execution. There's no actual risk from the small amount of blood extracted. It's more a case of Powered By An Unharmed Child.



** In the sadly-lost story ''The Savages'', the inhabitants of a technologically-advanced city extended their productivity and lifespans by draining "life force" from the people who lived outside the city. While they admittedly tried not to take enough to kill anybody, it was more because they didn't want to lose their supply than for humanitarian reasons.
** In "Revelation of the Daleks", Dalek creator [[MadScientist Davros]] offers to help solve a galactic famine problem. How convenient that he's set up shop on a cemetery planet...
** In "Remembrance of the Daleks", [[spoiler: a young girl is [[MindRape kidnapped and mind-controlled]] to augment the Supreme Dalek's rational and logical battle computer with human imagination and emotion.]]
** Played with in ''Silence in the Library/Forest of the Dead'': [[spoiler: the library's computers are run by a terminally-ill child who was inserted into the mainframe to keep her alive and entertained with every book in the universe. Powered-by, but hardly forsaken.]]
** The [[HiveMind Toclafane]] in ''The Sound of Drums / Last of the Time Lords'', who the Master uses as his personal army of {{Happy Fun Ball}}s, can be considered part of this trope. [[spoiler: Martha Jones pries one of them open and discovers, to her horror, that the Toclafane were created from the final remnants of humanity. Instead of traveling to the fabled Utopia, they end up in the reaches of space, gradually turning on each other, cannibalizing their own bodies, and becoming more childlike.]]
** "The Girl in the Fireplace" has a spaceship that uses stolen body parts from its crew to replace its broken parts.
** The Controller in "Bad Wolf", a WetwareCPU wired into the DeadlyGame space station--although she's an adult when we see her, one of the minor characters explains she was "installed" when she was five years old.

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** In the sadly-lost story ''The Savages'', [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E9TheSavages "The Savages"]], the inhabitants of a technologically-advanced city extended their productivity and lifespans by draining "life force" from the people who lived outside the city. While they admittedly tried not to take enough to kill anybody, it was more because they didn't want to lose their supply than for humanitarian reasons.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E5WarriorsGate "Warriors' Gate"]]: Rorvik's culture has spaceflight dependent on wiring a time-sensitive slave into the navigation systems and hitting that slave with [[ElectricTorture high voltages]].
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E6RevelationOfTheDaleks "Revelation of the Daleks", Daleks"]], Dalek creator [[MadScientist Davros]] offers to help solve a galactic famine problem. How convenient that he's set up shop on a cemetery planet...
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks "Remembrance of the Daleks", Daleks"]], [[spoiler: a young girl is [[MindRape kidnapped and mind-controlled]] to augment the Supreme Dalek's rational and logical battle computer with human imagination and emotion.]]
** Played with in ''Silence in the Library/Forest of the Dead'': [[spoiler: the library's computers are run by a terminally-ill child who was inserted into the mainframe to keep her alive and entertained with every book in the universe. Powered-by, but hardly forsaken.]]
** The [[HiveMind Toclafane]] in ''The Sound of Drums / Last of the Time Lords'', who the Master uses as his personal army of {{Happy Fun Ball}}s, can be considered part of this trope. [[spoiler: Martha Jones pries one of them open and discovers, to her horror, that the Toclafane were created from the final remnants of humanity. Instead of traveling to the fabled Utopia, they end up in the reaches of space, gradually turning on each other, cannibalizing their own bodies, and becoming more childlike.]]
** "The Girl in the Fireplace" has a spaceship that uses stolen body parts from its crew to replace its broken parts.
** The Controller in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E12BadWolf "Bad Wolf", Wolf"]], a WetwareCPU wired into the DeadlyGame space station--although station -- although she's an adult when we see her, one of the minor characters explains she was "installed" when she was five years old.



** In "The Beast Below", [[spoiler:the Starship UK is propelled by torturing a SpaceWhale. No, really. And in a "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" parallel, every citizen of Starship UK is told just what their megaship relies on for power at age 16 as part of the "elections." They are then given the choice to Forget or Protest; most choose to Forget via LaserGuidedAmnesia, whereas those who Protest end up food for the Whale.]]

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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E1NewEarth "New Earth"]]: The hospital has the cure for every known disease through infecting thousands of expendable {{Artificial Human}}s with those diseases.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E4TheGirlInTheFireplace "The Girl in the Fireplace"]]: The Doctor and co. come across a spaceship whose crew was taken apart to be used as spare parts by the clockwork repair droids.
** The [[HiveMind Toclafane]] in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums "The Sound of Drums"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E13LastOfTheTimeLords "Last of the Time Lords"]], who the Master uses as his personal army of {{Happy Fun Ball}}s, can be considered partly this trope. [[spoiler: Martha Jones pries one of them open and discovers, to her horror, that the Toclafane were created from the final remnants of humanity. Instead of traveling to the fabled Utopia, they end up in the reaches of space, gradually turning on each other, cannibalizing their own bodies, and becoming more childlike.]]
** Played with in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E8SilenceInTheLibrary "Silence in the Library"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E9ForestOfTheDead "Forest of the Dead"]]: [[spoiler: the Library's computers are run by a terminally-ill child who was inserted into the mainframe to keep her alive and entertained with every book in the universe. Powered-by, but hardly forsaken.]]
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E2TheBeastBelow "The Beast Below", Below"]], [[spoiler:the Starship UK is propelled by torturing a SpaceWhale. No, really. And in a "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" parallel, every citizen of Starship UK is told just what their megaship relies on for power at age 16 as part of the "elections." They are then given the choice to Forget or Protest; most choose to Forget via LaserGuidedAmnesia, whereas those who Protest end up food for the Whale.]]



** House, from "The Doctor's Wife". By extension, its servants Aunt and Uncle.
** There's also the hospital on New Earth that has the cure to every known disease...and it finds these cures by experimenting on human {{Expendable Clone}}s.
** Classic Who, Fourth Doctor, "Warriors' Gate": Rorvik's culture has spaceflight dependent on wiring a time-sensitive slave into the navigation systems and hitting that slave with [[ElectricTorture high voltages]].

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** House, from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E4TheDoctorsWife "The Doctor's Wife".Wife"]]. By extension, its servants Aunt and Uncle.
** There's also the hospital on New Earth that has the cure to every known disease...and * The Attic from ''{{Series/Dollhouse}}'' is first introduced as a classic AndIMustScream scenario. What it finds these cures by experimenting on actually is, however, is much worse: [[spoiler: It's a super-computer with human {{Expendable Clone}}s.
** Classic Who, Fourth Doctor, "Warriors' Gate": Rorvik's culture has spaceflight dependent on wiring a time-sensitive slave
brains as processors, where each "component" is [[LotusEaterMachine locked into an infinite loop of their worst nightmare]] in order to keep the navigation systems and hitting that slave with [[ElectricTorture high voltages]].brain running at adrenaline-inspired top speed.]]
* An episode of ''Series/FirstWave'' had [[TheChosenOne Cade]] stumble upon a Gua-run hospital, where they were helping some people... by giving them parts from other people's bodies. None of this was altruism, of course, but merely just another experiment.
* Almost all the cursed artifacts in ''Series/FridayThe13thTheSeries''.



* In ''Series/{{Torchwood}}: [[Series/TorchwoodChildrenOfEarth Children of Earth]]'', [[spoiler:the Four-Five-Six incorporate prepubescent human children into their physiology, keeping them eternally [[AndIMustScream alive, childlike, and fully aware]], because their bodies produce hormones that act as ''euphoric drugs'' on them.]]
-->"''You mean... you're shooting up on'' '''[[spoiler:children]]?'''"
** The way Torchwood fights back [[spoiler:is literally this trope, they re-route the Four-Five-Six's psychic MindRape wave back at them through a forsaken child. Specifically Jack's grandson Stephen who was the only child near when the solution was discovered with minutes left to save the day. Stephen screamed himself to death.]]
*** And it happens just when you think things [[FromBadToWorse can't get any darker]].
* Almost all the cursed artifacts in ''Series/FridayThe13thTheSeries.''



* In an episode of ''Series/TheInvisibleMan'', an eminent neurologist is removing pieces of homeless people's brains in order to cure those he considers more worthy who've suffered brain injuries.
** He gets [[LaserGuidedKarma proper justice in the end]] - he falls off the stairs to his death. Since he's an organ donor, his own brain serves to cure one of his victims.



* In the MadeForTVMovie ''The Night Strangler'' (sequel to ''The Night Stalker'' and followed by ''Series/KolchakTheNightStalker''), the killer slays exotic dancers and uses just a little of each one's blood to whip up a batch of his special [[ImmortalityInducer life-extension serum]], which he must do every 21 years or die.



* In an episode of ''Series/MastersOfHorror'' entitled "The Fair-Haired Child", the plot involves a grieving couple appealing to an otherworldly force to resurrect their dead son. They in turn, have to feed him ten children. The child shows his um...gratitude to them in a similar way.



* In one episode of ''{{Series/Sliders}}'', the characters stumble upon a village with its own FountainOfYouth. Which is the excretions of a gigantic mutant worm...whose primary diet is people.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'' had tretonin, a drug that granted the user perfect health-but had a side effect: the drug destroys the immune system, rendering the user dependent on the drug forever. The SG-1 team, after beginning negotiation for some of the drug, learn that the drug is actually created from the offspring of a Goa'uld queen the Pangarans discovered in a stasis jar. Normally this would not be so bad considering the Goa'uld are the series' BigBad, parasites that force their way into humans' brains and take over their bodies while most likely applying eternal mental torture to the host mind and are literally born evil since they inherit the memories of their parents. Unfortunately, much later, after the Tok'ra (the rebel faction of the Goa'uld who were allies with Earth) are brought to help analyze the drug, it is discovered the Goa'uld queen is actually the Tokra's long lost queen (and their last hope of reproducing as their number are dwindling and she was the only known Tok'ra queen). Naturally the Tok'ra object to such treatment of their queen.
** Eventually subverted when, later that season, the Tok'ra are able to synthesize tretonin without the need for live symbiotes. Because said Tok'ra queen showed them how before dying.



* In an episode of ''Series/MastersOfHorror'' entitled "The Fair-Haired Child", the plot involves a grieving couple appealing to an otherworldly force to resurrect their dead son. They in turn, have to feed him ten children. The child shows his um...gratitude to them in a similar way.
* The Attic from ''{{Series/Dollhouse}}'' is first introduced as a classic AndIMustScream scenario. What it actually is, however, is much worse: [[spoiler: It's a super-computer with human brains as processors, where each "component" is [[LotusEaterMachine locked into an infinite loop of their worst nightmare]] in order to keep the brain running at adrenaline-inspired top speed.]]
* In an episode of ''Series/TheInvisibleMan'', an eminent neurologist is removing pieces of homeless people's brains in order to cure those he considers more worthy who've suffered brain injuries.
** He gets [[LaserGuidedKarma proper justice in the end]] - he falls off the stairs to his death. Since he's an organ donor, his own brain serves to cure one of his victims.
* In one episode of ''{{Series/Sliders}}'', the characters stumble upon a village with its own FountainOfYouth. Which is the excretions of a gigantic mutant worm...whose primary diet is people.
* An episode of ''TheWorstWitch'' has Sybill turning a torch into a magic lamp that will grant any wish. The catch is however that it'll absorb energy from other things to grant each wish. When it runs out of plants to absorb, it starts to drain the girls and the teachers instead.
* In ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'', President Roslin's cancer is cured by [[spoiler: injecting her with the blood of Helo and Sharon's unborn daughter]]. Thankfully, they don't need all of it.
** The source of the treatment is in fact scheduled to be terminated, but the efficacy of the treatment means that she gets a stay of execution. There's no actual risk from the small amount of blood extracted. It's more a case of Powered By An Unharmed Child.
* An episode of ''Series/FirstWave'' had [[TheChosenOne Cade]] stumble upon a Gua-run hospital, where they were helping some people... by giving them parts from other people's bodies. None of this was altruism, of course, but merely just another experiment.



* On ''Series/{{The 100}}'', the Mountain Men cure their periodic radiation poisoning through "blood treatments": they kidnap Grounders (who are naturally resistant to radiation) and use them as human dialysis machines, pumping their radiation resistant blood into the Mountain Men, and the Mountain Men's contaminated blood into the Grounders. This makes the Grounders incredibly ill, and if done often enough will eventually kill them.
** Later, the Mountain Men discover a way to make themselves permanently resistant to radiation, removing the need for the blood treatments. Unfortunately, this new treatment requires taking lethal quantities of bone marrow from captured Sky People.

to:

* On ''Series/{{The 100}}'', the Mountain Men cure In ''Series/{{Torchwood}}: [[Series/TorchwoodChildrenOfEarth Children of Earth]]'', [[spoiler:the Four-Five-Six incorporate prepubescent human children into their periodic radiation poisoning physiology, keeping them eternally [[AndIMustScream alive, childlike, and fully aware]], because their bodies produce hormones that act as ''euphoric drugs'' on them.]]
-->"''You mean... you're shooting up on'' '''[[spoiler:children]]?'''"
** The way Torchwood fights back [[spoiler:is literally this trope, they re-route the Four-Five-Six's psychic MindRape wave back at them
through "blood treatments": they kidnap Grounders (who are naturally resistant to radiation) and use them as human dialysis machines, pumping their radiation resistant blood into a forsaken child. Specifically Jack's grandson Stephen who was the Mountain Men, and only child near when the Mountain Men's contaminated blood into solution was discovered with minutes left to save the Grounders. This makes the Grounders incredibly ill, and if done often enough will eventually kill them.
** Later, the Mountain Men discover a way
day. Stephen screamed himself to make themselves permanently resistant to radiation, removing the need for the blood treatments. Unfortunately, this new treatment requires taking lethal quantities of bone marrow from captured Sky People.death.]]
*** And it happens just when you think things [[FromBadToWorse can't get any darker]].



* In the MadeForTVMovie ''The Night Strangler'' (sequel to ''The Night Stalker'' and followed by ''Series/KolchakTheNightStalker''), the killer slays exotic dancers and uses just a little of each one's blood to whip up a batch of his special [[ImmortalityInducer life-extension serum]], which he must do every 21 years or die.

to:

* In the MadeForTVMovie ''The Night Strangler'' (sequel An episode of ''TheWorstWitch'' has Sybill turning a torch into a magic lamp that will grant any wish. The catch is however that it'll absorb energy from other things to ''The Night Stalker'' and followed by ''Series/KolchakTheNightStalker''), the killer slays exotic dancers and uses just a little of grant each one's blood wish. When it runs out of plants to whip up a batch of his special [[ImmortalityInducer life-extension serum]], which he must do every 21 years or die.absorb, it starts to drain the girls and the teachers instead.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PoweredByaForsakenChild