History Main / PortingDisaster

26th Feb '17 5:15:59 PM Jake18
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* ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes: Heroes' Paradise'' has almost hilariously bad motion controls compared to the Wii version, [[FakeDifficulty which makes the game harder than it was originally]] when it comes to recharging your beam katana, as it takes much longer and in boss fights can get you killed. Seeing as how the [=PlayStation=] Move normally has much more responsive motion controls compared to the Wii. Thankfully, the [=PS3=] port does give you the option to play with a standard controller.

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* ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes: Heroes' Paradise'' has almost hilariously bad motion controls compared to the Wii version, [[FakeDifficulty which makes the game harder than it was originally]] when it comes to recharging your beam katana, as it takes much longer and in boss fights can get you killed. Seeing It's especially frustrating seeing as how the [=PlayStation=] Move normally has much more responsive motion controls compared to the Wii. Thankfully, the [=PS3=] port does give you the option to play with a standard controller.
21st Feb '17 8:27:52 PM MyFinalEdits
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** ''Splinter Cell Trilogy'' is a compilation of the first three games that omits fundamental features like the option to invert look controls - which had been in almost every prior release of the same games. After initially claiming that [[NeverMyFault inverted controls were not an industry standard]] - and following a lengthy outcry from frustrated customers -- Ubisoft patched it. Several months later.

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** * ''Splinter Cell Trilogy'' is a compilation of the first three games that omits fundamental features like the option to invert look controls - which had been in almost every prior release of the same games. After initially claiming that [[NeverMyFault inverted controls were not an industry standard]] - and following a lengthy outcry from frustrated customers -- Ubisoft patched it. Several months later.



** The HD version of the original ''VideoGame/SlyCooperAndTheThieviusRaccoonus'' is missing some music from the original version. For example, in the [=PS2=] version's prologue, a saxophone and accordion would join the background music once you made it inside the police headquarters. The HD version, for some inexplicable reason, removes this dynamic element from its soundtrack -- instead, playing the same music loop through the whole mission. Also, the music often gets infinitesimally out of sync. Very hard to pick up on and easy to ignore ''except'' for the Mz. Ruby boss fight. The notes can play a millisecond before ''or'' after when you need to press it, and how badly they are out of sync can change from section-to-section, so there's no adapting. Easiest way to win is to mute the YV and go by visuals.
** The HD version of ''VideoGame/JakIIRenegade'' is also missing some music cues from the original version.

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** * The HD version of the original ''VideoGame/SlyCooperAndTheThieviusRaccoonus'' is missing some music from the original version. For example, in the [=PS2=] version's prologue, a saxophone and accordion would join the background music once you made it inside the police headquarters. The HD version, for some inexplicable reason, removes this dynamic element from its soundtrack -- instead, playing the same music loop through the whole mission. Also, the music often gets infinitesimally out of sync. Very hard to pick up on and easy to ignore ''except'' for the Mz. Ruby boss fight. The notes can play a millisecond before ''or'' after when you need to press it, and how badly they are out of sync can change from section-to-section, so there's no adapting. Easiest way to win is to mute the YV and go by visuals.
** * The HD version of ''VideoGame/JakIIRenegade'' is also missing some music cues from the original version.



* The first two ''Splinter Cell'' games [[TechnologyMarchesOn eventually]] became this. They were directly ported from the original Xbox versions, and as such were optimised for a number of Nvidia and ATI cards that supported a form of shadow mapping called "shadow buffers", first suppor

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* The first two ''Splinter Cell'' games [[TechnologyMarchesOn eventually]] became this. They were directly ported from the original Xbox versions, and as such were optimised for a number of Nvidia and ATI cards that supported a form of shadow mapping called "shadow buffers", first supporsupported on the [=GeForce 3=] and the [=NV2A=] GPU used on the console. While it did work on most hardware at the time, later graphics cards, driver versions and [=DirectX=] [=APIs=] broke functionality for the said buffers, causing spotlights and other projected shadows to no longer work. As shadows are a key gameplay element, playing the original ''Splinter Cell'' and ''Pandora Tomorrow'' would be nigh impossible on modern hardware. ''Splinter Cell 1'' did have a fallback mode for ATI video cards and other systems that are incapable of rendering shadow buffers, but ''Pandora Tomorrow'' lacks it, which may have accounted for why the latter is unavailable on Steam. [[http://www.jiri-dvorak.cz/scellpt/ There is a fan-made fix for that game, though]].
* ''VideoGame/StarTrekLegacy'' lags badly on the lowest settings even on the ''menu screen'', even with a good graphics card. None of the controls can be remapped -- in fact, there isn't even an in-game guide to the controls. This is horrible because the default control set up forces an {{egregious}} use of the mouse in situations where buttons should be (and in the 360 version, were) used.
* ''Franchise/StarWars: VideoGame/TheForceUnleashed'' had a long-awaited/delayed Windows version that was inexplicably over 30 gigabytes, and has very few options for scaling the game down. It runs fine on a fairly decent rig, but there are no options to tone down the graphics for older machines. The game isn't very well optimized, so while a decent computer will run it with few problems, a mid-range system will choke. The keyboard and mouse controls are also extremely clunky and cumbersome, and the only gamepad supported is the Xbox 360 controller.
** The game did allow you to rebind the keyboard and mouse controls, so you could pick a setup that was more logical. However, the game wouldn't update the on-screen prompts for quicktime events from the default bindings. Good luck trying to remember what you rebound 'F' to before you die.
* ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'': The PC port on Steam has the internal resolution locked at 720p, the framerate locked at 30fps (when the Gamecube version released ''over a decade ago'' ran at 60fps), the game crashes often or doesn't start, lagged at the options, config and save menus, has new typos, has the wrong fonts and broken or missing text when selecting languages other than English, and had incorrect button displays for the controls showing [=PlayStation=] 3 prompts. The port also had additional [=VMProtect=] DRM software and had only six save slots on launch, though some of these problems were patched out and [=VMProtect=] was removed entirely while the latter has been fixed.
* ''VideoGame/{{Toukiden}}: Kiwami'''s PC port has been met with heavy backlash. Video options are sparse (e.g. cannot go beyond 1080p, no 16:10 resolutions) and does little to make the game look any better. The game is locked at 30 FPS, and if you try to unlock the frame-rate, the game becomes unplayable as the animations and physics are tied to the frame-rate which results in the game running faster than it should, nor does its Steam page warns customers about this. The game is poorly optimized with demanding system requirements (an [=i7=] for both minimum ''and'' recommended) and will sometimes slow down in certain areas even if your machine meets the ''recommended'' system requirements. Certain video cards and Windows 8/8.1 combinations cannot run the game at all and crashes if you try to play it. Keyboard controls are poorly implemented, using the mouse will sometimes freeze the game when there's no mouse support at all, and despite recommending a gamepad and uses Xbox 360 prompts, only a few are supported and analog sticks doesn't work properly.
* Although not quite as bad as the aforementioned Game Boy port of ''VideoGame/ToyStory'', the Windows 95 port still is far outclassed by the SNES and Genesis versions. On top of already missing many of the graphical effects and the level "Really Inside the Claw Machine", the controls are heavily mangled from the console versions, with Woody's jumping being much more floaty and less realistic than the console counterparts. His whip also has extremely strict collision detection, making it very hard to actually aim at enemies and adding a ton of FakeDifficulty to an already NintendoHard game, and making the bosses nearly unplayable. By far, though, the biggest offender has to go to the RC stages -- they were already notorious enough for being difficult due to being hard to control in the console versions, but they are outright ''unplayable'' in the PC port, with the controls being so overly sensitive that it's impossible to aim at anything. It ''does'' get a red book soundtrack on the plus side, but that's far from enough reason to pull it out of this territory.
* ''VideoGame/VirtualOn: Operation Moongate'' was a decent port but it unfortunately became this over time due to a horrible game-breaking bug where the game crushes after getting a Game Over with any Virtuaroid other than Fei-Yen for some reason and ending a match on Versus Mode due compatibility issues on Windows Vista and later.
* ''VideoGame/VivaPinata'' has a PC version notorious for slowness and occasional crashes. The worst part of the game is that the coveted Chewnicorn, the game's rare Unicorn Piñata, is colored incorrectly and, due to a lighting glitch, ''glows black'' every three seconds.
* ''VideoGame/WatchDogs'' was purposely made to run on [=nVidia=] hardware, and [=nVidia=] hardware only[[note]]The 8th-gen console versions were optimized for AMD hardware since that's what they have[[/note]]. If you don't have [=nVidia=] hardware, then you're screwed. You will experience framerate drops and crashing/freezing galore, even if you have a computer that can run games on their highest setting flawlessly. Also, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking the game requires the use of UPlay regardless of where you buy it from]]. Another problem is that modders found that the coding for the absolutely ''amazing'' graphics configuration settings shown in the E3 demo were in the game and performed absolutely fine if they were added back into the game, leading to backlash and widespread allegations that the quality was tuned down so [=PCs=] didn't overtake the Xbox One and [=PS4=] in graphics fidelity.
* ''Wipeout 2097'' lacks a speed limiter in PC versions, causing the game to run out of control on top of the line [=PCs=] back in '97, never mind today (this can be fixed with a CPU-killer program, but then you will find out the hard way that Windows Vista/7 require a lot more CPU to run properly than the game!). The game also has a different soundtrack that's nowhere near as good as the original's.
* It's ultimately generous of Blizzard release several of their old games for free on Windows, but the ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' release was a major mess up, period. The classic songs were removed and replaced with a generic grunge metal soundtrack, and to make things worse, it was actually the ''SNES'' version of the game patched to disable the songs and then run on a modified emulator that also provided the grunge soundtrack on it's own[[note]]loading the ROM into a proper emulator resulted in the game missing it's music, but sound effects are intact[[/note]]. This also meant that the game had one long soundtrack that doesn't change through the game and gets annoying quickly enough. Another thing to note is that the game is a demo version. While the free releases of ''Blackthorne'' and ''The Lost Vikings'' were the full games, for ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' the people at Blizzard decided to give out a severely cut-down version that, after just three races, unceremoniously dumps you back to the title screen, with no fanfare or anything.
* The PC version of ''VideoGame/ZombiU'', titled ''Zombi''. Despite coming out 3 years later it somehow manages to have more bugs than the [[ObviousBeta WiiU version did at launch]].
* ''VideoGame/HomefrontTheRevolution'' had many bugs and performance issues on all platforms at launch. The PC version was no exception with constant framerate drops.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Macintosh (Mac)]]
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic IV'' had its AI lobotomized at some point during the porting process from the PC, and the computer would send out one day's worth of troops to try to kill a horde of mid-to-high level monsters. This was somewhat amusing in maps where you weren't tasked with the defeat of a specific hero, but when you ''were''... well, you just had to hope that said hero wasn't allowed to move from his starting position, because you didn't get credit for the kill if you weren't involved in the fight.
* ''VideoGame/MafiaII'', ported by Feral Interactive was just as disastrous as the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 version, not because of the lack of grass and blood but because it was ill-optimised compared to the PC version, churning out 15-20 fps even on a reasonably powerful Macintosh.
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 3000'' was not made in-house by Maxis, and its quality reflects this. It was ported by a Ukrainian company which left the entire PC interface (such as the file hierarchy system) intact, all while leaving out other features (such as the Building Architect Tool).
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 4'' was also outsourced and was released months after the PC version. It was terribly slow to the point of unplayability, left off the official tools that PC users got, and exhibited behaviors that PC gamers would only get if they had a plug-in conflict. In fact, for owners of Intel-based Macs, running the Windows version via a compatibility layer such as Wine or Crossover Games is preferable in every way.
* The OS X version of ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'' was apparently a direct port from the [=iPad=] version. This means it has an interface meant for touch screens for a keyboard instead, as well as the [=iPad=]'s resolution. While some of the issues (but not all) have been fixed, a few specific tables would also exhibit strange behavior--for instance, if one App Store review is to be believed, the ball will occasionally fly right off the ''Pinball/WhiteWater'' table, never to return.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Amiga]]
* ''VideoGame/SmashTV'' has badly redrawn graphics, nearly all of the music cut out of the game, and horribly muffled sound effects.
* ''VideoGame/TestDrive'' didn't do justice to the Amiga's graphical capabilities, had the engines sounding more like 8-bit jets than cars, and there are few other sound effects to speak of. By comparison, the technologically less advanced Commodore 64 managed to pull it off a lot better. As with ''Defender of the Crown'', the inferiority of the Amiga version is likely attributable to inexperience and [[ChristmasRushed ludicrous deadlines]].
* Creator/{{Sierra}}'s Amiga ports of its classic games were notorious for failing to take advantage of the machine's graphics and sound capabilities.
[[/folder]]

!!'''Disastrous versions of multi-platform releases:'''

[[folder:Consoles]]
* The UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/WiiU versions of ''VideoGame/AngryBirds Trilogy'' were developed later than the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} versions. While the latter versions at least change up the presentation quite a bit, the Wii and Wii U versions have no such effort, looking more like the mobile versions (complete with the pigs still having their outdated character design). The Wii U is an HD console, so in all likelihood the devs ''could have'' just ported over the graphics from the [=PS3=] or 360 versions. For whatever reason, they chose not to.
* ''Congo Bongo'' had bad graphics or missing levels in all ports. As the game is presented in 3/4 isometric perspective, it was actually put on consoles that could not handle that view such as the Atari 2600. The sole exception was the SG-1000 conversion handled by Sega themselves, which ditched the isometric perspective completely in favor of a semi top-down view.
* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was screwed up horribly in some way in most ports (excluding ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong94'', which is more of a remake), ranging from awful controls, to completely messed up graphics and music, to even cutting out the cement factory or elevator stages (or both). [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErdZEOTpKL8 These]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVcKjBBuKIE videos]] show several different versions of the game. One of them is the NES version, and another is a graphics hack of the NES version, both of which are very good despite lacking the cement factory stage -- and even that was re-added to a limited rerelease during the '[=10s=]. The rest? They all suck horribly, though special mention goes to the ZX Spectrum version, which is especially bad. When the UsefulNotes/{{Intellivision}} version was released, people at Mattel suspected it to be an act of sabotage on the part of Coleco.
* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'''s many console ports suffered in one way or another:
** While the SNES version is indeed a marvelous achievement, the pros are ''far'' outweighed by the cons. The graphics of the original were greatly downgraded; enemies are no longer [[LudicrousGibs gibbed]] when suffering from close-range explosions, many textures have been simplified or removed outright (and enemy sprites, leading the infamous "crab-walking" baddies that always faced you), the framerate is rather uneven, and the frames can even skip some sprite animations if more than three enemies are on-screen at close-range. The lighting was also significantly altered, making certain lit walls where secrets are hidden like any other wall, which can cause frustration if you're trying to remember which freaking panel that upgrade was put behind. To make it worse, they even had the '''gall''' to add EasyModeMockery; if you're playing the easy difficulty levels, it only lets you play the first episode, ''Knee-Deep in the Dead''. If you want to play the third episode ''Inferno'' and see the FinalBoss, you were forced to play on Ultra-Violence or Nightmare!, the two hardest difficulties. The Super Famicom version fixes this.\\
\\
The sound effects are muffled as well, a good portion of the levels have been excised, and [[FakeDifficulty it's impossible to turn and sidestep at the same time]]--something that even the SNES port of ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' could manage. The only truly good part of the game is its soundtrack, which is fun to listen to because the SNES's sampler makes the MIDI soundtrack sound much more like real instruments than the Sound Blaster's FM synth ever could[[note]]Unless you cut your teeth with the PC version of Doom on a PC with a Gravis Ultrasound, then the SNES version sounds absolutely muffled compared to the glory that is the Ultrasound. Because, like the SNES' [=SPC700=], the Ultrasound was a sampler-based sound card, which Doom had full support for and would load its own custom soundfonts if one is used, and unlike the SNES' [=SPC700=], it had ''at least'' '''four''' times the amount of memory compared to the [=SPC700=] (256kb upgradable to 1MB, vs 64kb). And the [=AWE32=] (another sampler-based card) ain't too far behind either.[[/note]].
** The Sega [=32X=] port was inexplicably inferior to the SNES version despite being on a superior hardware. Despite the graphics being better, the entire third episode was missing along with the bosses and BFG-9000, beating the game would load up a DOS prompt if the player cheated or used the level select and the soundtrack was ''butchered''. Especially unforgivable because the FM chip in the Genesis[[note]]the [=YM2612=]; the 32X uses 2 PWM channels[[/note]] is very similar to the [=YM2608=] (the FM chip used on later versions of the UsefulNotes/{{PC88}} and UsefulNotes/{{PC98}}), and it even has an additional PSG chip for sound effects.
** Art Data Interactive's port on the 3DO. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msfL7XRe6DQ Small screen and low frame-rate ahoy!]] When put next to Interplay's port of ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' on the same console, this is inexcusable. The single bright spot, picked up on pretty much every review, was the awesome music, rerecorded specifically for this version. Just a shame that there were so few levels that some of the original songs were not present. The port was frequently rumoured to have been accidentally mastered from an earlier build, but as [[https://github.com/Olde-Skuul/doom3do it turns out]], it was programmed by ''one person'' in ten weeks.
** The American Sega Saturn port is an absolute mess. Jerky, unresponsive controls are mapped to a decidedly questionable control scheme. There are completely random bouts of slowdown -- it sometimes happens when looking at a blank wall! Supposedly, this is because John Carmack was very strict about not allowing them to use hardware rendering due to texture warping, although few would argue that unplayable lag is the better option. The non-musical sound effects are of low quality. And there is no multiplayer, which takes half the fun out of ''Doom''. It's been compared to the 32X port in quality, and the Saturn has more advanced specs than the 32X. The Japanese version, on the other hand, fared much better although both versions lacked the colored lighting the [=PlayStation=] version had.
* ''VideoGame/EnemyTerritoryQuakeWars'' on Xbox 360 and [=PS3=] had badly downgraded graphics, missing features (including permanent stat growth, one of the main feature of the original version), was limited to 16 players instead of 32 and had ridiculously strong auto-aim. At least one ID Software employee called it a textbook example of how not to port a game.
* ''VideoGame/{{Gauntlet}}: Dark Legacy'' was ported to the Xbox from the [=PS2=] version and gained some new features (such as the ability to store powerups and use them later), but also gained new glitches. The [=GameCube=] version was even worse, having glitches, slowdown, and missing health meters on bosses, though a later release fixed these.
* ''VideoGame/LichdomBattlemage'' on [=PlayStation 4=] and Xbox One has two huge problems: ''atrocious'' performance, with the game always staying between 10-20 frames per second, and ''atrocious'' loading times, clocking in at several minutes, while having the audacity of still needing to stream in textures afterwards. But on the bright side, a patch was later released, showing astronomical improvements in performance over the earlier build. The Xbox One version stays at a near constant 30FPS with vertical sync. However, the PlayStation 4 version has an unlocked framerate up to 60FPS, making it inconsistent but still playable, especially compared to the stock version. The only sacrifice made was a drop from a native 1080p to 900p on both consoles.
* ''VideoGame/TheLionKing'' for the NES was a disaster, with sluggish and unresponsive controls, physics and jumping mechanics that are broken beyond belief, and short levels (the game can be completed in under 20 minutes) which are presented without any kind of story context. On top of that, the game only covers the young Simba levels from the 16-bit games, meaning that not only do you not play as the eponymous Lion King, but ''the film's villain Scar is completely absent from gameplay'' (outside of the EasyModeMockery ending screen). What's sad about this port is even the ''bootleg port'' created by Super Game is superior to it both gameplay-wise and aesthetically (musically as well, since all of Super Game's ports are done with the Konami sound engine) and even resembles the original game more. North American and Japanese gamers were at least spared from seeing this exist in their region, as it was only released in PAL territories. There's evidence pointing towards this port being [[ObviousBeta an unfinished release]], as the Game Boy version of the game manages to include every level from its 16-bit counterparts except Be Prepared while polishing up some of the rough spots.
** The UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows port was cited by some to have been the reason why game developers initially stuck to MS-DOS, and as one of the reasons for [=DirectX=]'s inception. The game used [=WinG=], a graphics backend library Microsoft developed in an attempt to address issues with game development on Windows, as the latter operating system added unnecessary overhead and did not allow for close-to-metal access to hardware unlike DOS. While the Windows port did work to an extent, it caused quite a PR disaster when millions of Compaq Presarios came shipped with incompatible graphics drivers, leading to [=BSODs=], tantrums among children, and thus disgruntled parents.
* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed: Hot Pursuit 2'' was a completely different game on the the Xbox, PC, and [=GameCube=], all designed by a different development house from the [=PlayStation=] 2 version. While there are some track similarities, the sense of speed is all but gone, the handling is worse, the game in general is far more boring, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking the menus don't look as nice]]. These versions of the game aren't "bad", ''per se'' (as games they're fundamentally sound and could even be fun if you didn't ever get to play the "good" one), but they are considerably inferior to the [=PlayStation=] 2 version.
* ''VideoGame/RevolutionX''. Half of the reason for its checkered reputation comes from its abysmal SNES and Genesis ports, which are better-known than the original coin-op light gun game.[[note]]The other half is because of [[WidgetSeries its sheer absurdity]], [[SoBadItsGood but that's not for this page]].[[/note]] The arcade game had digitized graphics of higher resolution than what those two consoles could handle ([[http://www.sydlexia.com/revcomp.htm here's a comparison]]) and actual Music/{{Aerosmith}} songs for BGM. Also, the ports lacked support for the consoles' respective light gun controllers for no reason whatsoever.
* While ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheRobots'' is abysmal on any console, some ports managed to make it even worse. The two only elements of the game that people generally agree are good are a well-done techno soundtrack (and depending on which port you're playing, an alternate soundtrack by Music/{{Queen}}'s Brian May) and very fluid pre-rendered graphics. While the Genesis and SNES ports had lower quality music, the Amiga and MS-DOS port had ''no music at all'', the Game Gear port completely tanked all of the game's only redeeming qualities, with understandably the worst graphics and musical quality of them all, while somehow managing to play even ''worse'' than the other ports (it's stuck on permanent hard mode, which in the other ports meant that [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the game resorted to blatant cheating and button-reading to win]]).
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 2000'' has the same issues in every single console version. Control responsiveness is unbelievably bad, and for something that stores data on flash or battery-backed RAM instead of magnetic media, the save game loading times are incredibly slow. Also, looking for help? [[ObviousBeta You're instructed to press shift + enter!]]
* ''Franchise/SilentHill HD Collection'':
** The remastering of ''VideoGame/SilentHill2'' and ''VideoGame/SilentHill3'' for UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}, was outsourced to Hijinx Studios, a mobile/handheld game developer that had never done a console game before, using source code from [[http://www.1up.com/features/the-problem-with-preservation the unfinished betas]] of both games due to poor archiving. It shows, with both games suffering from many bugs major and minor and overall being noticeably worse than the originals on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox}}. There is rampant slowdown to the point of rendering the games (particularly ''[=SH3=]'') virtually unplayable, the voices fall out of sync with the characters' lips, poor lighting makes navigation almost impossible in some parts, some of the texture work looks unfinished and recycled from the original versions (clashing badly with the redone sections), and most damningly, ''[=SH2=]''[='=]s famous fog effects are so broken as to render certain parts of the game laughable. What makes that all even worse is that source code is not even required to produce an HD version of a [=PS2=] game. All you need is a retail copy, and a team of programmers savvy in the [=PS2=] language. It was how the HD versions of ''VideoGame/{{ICO}}'' and ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheColossus'' were made. Thankfully, Konami patched the [=PS3=] version, and ''[=SH2=]'' works pretty well now with minor issues. (They mostly fixed the fog effect, though it's still somewhat less impressive than the original.) Xbox 360 owners, however, were screwed as they didn't get that patch. All told, the InternetBackdraft from the whole debacle was so bad that many ''Silent Hill'' fans boycotted the collection out of spite.
** And all of that doesn't even get into the creative decisions, the biggest one being that both games came with redone voice acting that quickly proved controversial among fans of the series. In ''[=SH3=]'', for instance, the teenage protagonist Heather suffered a dramatic case of DawsonCasting, sounding like a forty-year-old woman imitating a teenage girl. (Comparisons between the originals and the remasters can be seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV_NC4JGntM here]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pu0JUqrZoYM here]].) Fortunately, with ''[=SH2=]'' the original voice track is still available as an option, but because Konami couldn't clear all the original voice actors for ''[=SH3=]'' in time for release (the VA for Heather turned out to be working in China and the VA for Douglas [[AuthorExistenceFailure died just before the original game was released]]), only the new voice track is available in that game.
* ''Starfighter 3000'', the Saturn and [=PlayStation=] ports of the 3DO game ''Starfighter'', has terrible draw distance and less graphical detail than the original, quite baffling considering how much weaker the 3DO is. The original version made heavy use of the 3DO's ARM RISC processors, but even there the port could have turned out much better than it did. The Saturn version is [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJYLjHgelPI especially bad]].
* Ports by High Voltage Studios:
** ''[[VideoGame/ZoneOfTheEnders Zone of the Enders HD Collection]]'' had its problems on both [=PlayStation=] 3 and Xbox 360, but the former got the raw end of the stick, even more so with ''The 2nd Runner''. It had very inconsistent frame-rate issues that were never present in the [=PlayStation=] 2 originals (at most it ran only about 30 FPS) and visual effects went missing, all of which is inexcusable running on superior hardware. As it turns out, Konami hired High Voltage Studios to handle the porting job rather than doing it in-house or hiring Bluepoint, the studio that handled the HD ports of the ''Metal Gear Solid'' games. And to put icing on the cake, due to the negative reception the ''Zone of the Enders HD Collection'' received, [[http://www.siliconera.com/2013/05/02/we-might-have-to-wait-a-little-longer-for-a-zone-of-the-enders-sequel/ Ender's Project has been put off indefinitely and the dev team dismantled as a result]]. Thankfully they worked on a patch with Hexa Drive, the same team behind the HD port of ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', for the [=PlayStation=] 3 roughly a year later that [[PolishedPort inverts this trope]], running in full 1080p with much smoother frame-rate. Unfortunately, like the ''Silent Hill HD Collection'', Xbox 360 owners were screwed over AGAIN as the patch was released only for [=PlayStation=] 3.
** The studio has been responsible for a number of other terrible ports since then: ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'', ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' and ''VideoGame/MortalKombatX'' were all optimisation disasters. Their [=PlayStation=] 4 and Xbox One ports of ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'' were missing several effects and possessed a janky frame rate. Their [=PlayStation=] 4 port of ''Injustice'', however, left the game completely intact with no noted issues.
* All three console versions of the game ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins'' suffer from some form of issues. Both the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 versions suffer from some nasty [[GameBreakingBug Game-Breaking Bugs]] that apparently Warner Bros. simply has no interest in patching, which involves the game randomly crashing when trying to enter certain areas, along with both versions having a somewhat inconsistent framerate. The 360 suffers from even more freezing issues, occasional black screens, and even save data corruption. The Wii U version seemed to not be hit as hard, as its main issues mainly just involve a somewhat choppy framerate like the other versions, and the gamepad features feel a bit bare bones compared to the Wii U port of ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' (likely the result of the Wii U version being handled by Human Head Studios, the people behind ''VideoGame/Prey2006'', instead of the game's primary developer, WB Montreal, who were the studio behind the Wii U port of ''Arkham City'' in the first place), but otherwise the Wii U game actually seems better by comparison due to higher quality graphics and much less game-breaking bugs.
* While not a "disaster" in the "this utterly shames the original product" sense, ''VideoGame/PrimalRage'' has a unique issue: It ''cannot'' be ported correctly. The original game has a very strange encryption scheme and it's never been decoded and all related parties who created it have never been willing to help out with breaking it. So all the ports are based on code that has been [=DRM'd=] by this encryption, resulting in various glitches, missing effects (such as blood color) and being unable to perform certain combos and fatalities properly.
* The "HD Remasters" of ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Prototype 2}}'' for the [=PlayStation=] 4 and Xbox One, which were uneventfully churned out by Activision, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGqkhkS4fqI actually run worse]] than their [=PlayStation=] 3 and Xbox 360 counterparts. Seeing how the games run worse on more powerful hardware is inexcusable and it shows that these are just lazy ports rather than actual remasters.
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'' is a trainwreck on every console. Occasional lag refusing to blow up cars one by one on Veteran Child's boss fight will inevitably cause him to create a chain reaction of exploding cars that will 99% of the time freeze the game, it will lock up more often on the crazier end-game missions, (really any over the top usage of the black hole gun or tons of explosions cause a hard lock) and to top it off if you're an achievement/trophy hunter/completionist all versions have the achievement/trophy ''Where is my Cape?'' glitched to a point that if that glitch happens you must start a new game and follow a specific set of requirements while recollecting all 1,255 Data Clusters just to be able to buy every single super power to qualify for it and even if you followed those requirements the game more often than not won't give it to you. Have fun replaying the game over and over just for 100% or a Platinum Trophy!
* ''VideoGame/SuperMonkeyBall: Deluxe'' on the [=PS2=] and Xbox may have levels and content from both the original games in one DVD, plus more, but both versions suffer from the controls not being anywhere as good from the UsefulNotes/GameCube versions. Worse yet for the [=PS2=] version having some framerate issues and, with the [=PS2=]'s hardware not being as powerful as the [=GameCube=], graphics that don't look as good as the original.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:PC Operating Systems]]
* ''[=BreakThru=]'', a jeep-based ShootEmUp by Creator/DataEast, had three computer ports published by US Gold. The UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} version had dishwater-ugly backgrounds, stupid sound effects, terrible hit detection and enemy vehicles that did things like drive over water. The UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum version had awkward keyboard controls, barely any sound, bad collision detection, and a lack of enemies, though the graphics weren't terrible for the system. The UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC version had programming similar to the Spectrum version, but the game window was inexplicably much smaller; it received the lowest score for any game reviewed in ''AMTIX!'' magazine.
* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonI'':
** The game was ported by UK-based Binary Design to home computer platforms in 1988, who were ordered by Mastertronic (the publisher that commissioned them) to finish these ports under a strict deadline, resulting in most of them turning out to be total rushjobs. A common problem all of these ports shared was the fact that the developers attempted to adapt the arcade game's three-button combat system to work on one-button joysticks that were standard for PC gaming back then. This meant that instead of having dedicated buttons for kicking, jumping and punching, players only had a single fire button for everything and performing anything other than a standing punch required rather counter-intuitive joystick/button combinations (e.g. Down-Away+Fire for a backward whirlwind kick, Down-Forward+Fire for a jump kicks). The uppercut and roundhouse kicks were also missing in these versions, since enemies lacked their stunned animations -- instead they simply fall down to the floor after a few hits. On top of all that, these versions had non-existent music and sound effects due to the floppy disk format they were released on.
** The Amiga and Atari ST versions, with both of them running on 16-bit hardware, could've theoretically reproduced the arcade version's visuals -- instead they feature laughably amateurish art assets in which all the male character (except the Abobos and Machine Gun Willy) are recolors of the same generic guy. The IBM PC version looked even worse, as it only supported the already dated CGA and EGA graphic cards. ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonII'' and ''3'' fared better visually on these platforms (especially ''3'', which resembled the arcade version pretty closely), but still suffered from the aforementioned controls and sound issues.
** The Commodore 64 version used a sprite stacking technique for its graphics that resulted in all the characters having an invisible waist. The manual for this version actually featured an apology and explanation from the developers for using this technique. When Ocean Software got the rights to re-release ''Double Dragon'' on the [=C64=], they chose to create their own conversion instead of re-releasing the Binary Design one, which was considerably better looking, but was one-player only and lacked the final boss battle against Machine Gun Willy.
** The Amstrad CPC actually had two versions of ''Double Dragon''. The version distributed in the UK was based on the ZX Spectrum version, while the version distributed in other European countries such as France and Spain used art assets similar to the Amiga version and is generally regarded to be the better of the two versions, although it's only compatible with CPC 6128 models.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Gradius}} Salamander]]'' for the UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum and UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC (the latter being a cheap conversion of the former, as was all too often the case). The majority of the screen was taken up with the HUD. The action was slow -- you don't get a speed up until halfway into the first level, and need it well before then. There are [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMcvCM5Rw_8 one or two bugs]] that make one of the {{boss battle}}s a LuckBasedMission. Only the first stage has an actual layout; the rest of them just have the odd enemy floating across the screen.
* ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'' received home computer ports of the original ''World Warrior'' for the western market in 1993.
** Aside from the fact that ''World Warrior'' was already considered vestigial by that time (the 16-bit consoles were already receiving ports of the previous year's ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' editions), the conversions were all being handled by U.S. Gold, a company with a spotty track record when it came to porting arcade games to home computers.
** [[http://www.scary-crayon.com/games/sf2pc/ The IBM PC port]] was a total trainwreck. Everybody moved like they were paralyzed, combos were impossible (the sprites were invincible while taking damage), if you won while in mid-air your character would stop and do his/her victory pose defying all rules of gravity, and there were only three songs -- Ken's theme (which became the title theme), the character select theme (which was the only theme to play during gameplay '''at all''') and Zangief's ending theme (which was now everyone's ending theme).
** The [=C64=] version had the large, detailed character sprites became tiny, unrecognizable messes of pixels and five-minute loads to move on to the next stage. On top of all that, instead of three-punch and three-kick buttons, it was played with a joystick which only had one button.
* ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' qualifies in every 8-bit computer version '''not''' on the C64 (the computer it was originally programmed for). Broken controls, choppy scrolling, and missing level features abound, and the graphics take strange liberties with the original material. Of course, this is probably more due to the computers' lack of hardware-accelerated sprites and scrolling (which the C64 had) than the programmers' incompetence, but one wonders why they attempted it at all. The exception is the Amstrad CPC version, which is well regarded and highly playable. Despite the scrolling and smaller game screen, the graphics are far better than the C64 graphics (but then the C64 has a horrendously drab palette to pick colors from). Still not sure why Turrican is green though when perfectly usable blues are available in the Amstrad palette and were used elsewhere in the games.
* Rare non-game example: Ports of the Clam antivirus program to UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows still do not have a real-time scanner. The original UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} versions started including a real-time scanner some years back, and the [[UsefulNotes/MacOS OS X]] version, while unable to get the original real-time scanner working, compensated with a completely rewritten real-time scanner called ''[=ClamXAV=] Sentry''. However, the Windows version lacked this basic amenity, because apparently the devs lack the manpower to make a port and no one else cared.
* While not a "disaster", per se, certain PC games around the early and mid-[=2000s=] (the ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheSandsOfTime'' trilogy and ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted'' 2005 spring to mind) have process threading issues on multi-core systems, which can cause jerky performance. This is because these games buffer information for preprocessing on the assumption of operating on a single-core system. In a multi-core environment, the process scheduler will grab queued threads and assign them to the cores for simultaneous processing. This in turn screws up things like order of execution and output scheduling, which the games aren't coded to handle, hence the jerkiness due to having to compensate for possible out of order data (and can occasionally cause crashes if the engine doesn't handle it right). The solution is to typically shut off all but one core for the game's executable to run its requests through (this can be done at runtime in the Task Manager or by using a hex patcher to modify the game executable directly).
* The Steam releases of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' are direct ports of the mobile versions, which have clunky interfaces that weren't meant for PC gaming. Entire chunks of the battle screen are taken up by needlessly huge menu options, and although the "run" and "fast-forward battle" icons had their functionality removed and assigned to keys/buttons, they inexplicably weren't removed from the interface. On top of that, ''Final Fantasy VI'' had bad lag, sound problems, and it couldn't even be played in offline mode. The issues were resolved quickly, but the clunky interface remained.
* ''VideoGame/JetSetRadio'''s Steam port only lets you configure keyboard controls, and it was a straight port of the [=X360=] port (a port of a port), thus using the 360 buttons as reference (e.g. "Hold down LT to center the camera"). You can, in fact, use a controller, but the controls will most likely be screwed up (for example, if using a [=PS3=] controller, the A button will be Triangle, or the Start button will be R2), and there is no option to configure them anywhere. If you want to have proper gamepad support, you will either have to download a controller program like [=MotionInJoy=] or you will have to download [[http://steamcommunity.com/app/205950/discussions/0/864946409163562007/ a fan-made patch]]. Emphasis on ''fan-made patch''. The Steam version of the game also infamously and inexplicably ''refuses to save'' on some copies. Re-downloading it... doesn't really help, and the main way of fixing it is to use a hex editor to modify the executable file. Even ''that'' doesn't always work.
* A tie-in for the film ''Film/BeverlyHillsCop'' was released on 4 platforms: UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}}, UsefulNotes/AtariST, UsefulNotes/Commodore64, and PC. The Amiga version has smashing music due to the Paula audio chip. The Atari ST and [=C64=] version was bearable thanks to the PSG sound system. The PC version, however, is this trope play straight. Using only EGA graphics and PC speaker sound, despite the [=AdLib=] and Game Blaster, and indeed the first generation Sound Blaster, being already released when the game came out and VGA was already picking up steam. And even then the PC music was often described as someone strangling an ice cream truck.
[[/folder]]
21st Feb '17 8:08:35 PM MyFinalEdits
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* The iOS and Android ports of VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys run fine, but the problem is that the map in the game is so big that it obstructs the view, making it very difficult to check the animatronics before you kick the bucket.
** The port for VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys4 is even worse! It suffers some framerate issues in certain smartphones and the controls feel pretty jerky, which makes beating the game a bitch.

to:

* The iOS and Android ports of VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys run fine, but the problem is that the map in the game is so big that it obstructs the view, making it very difficult to check the animatronics before you kick the bucket.
**
The port for VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys4 is even worse! It ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys4'' suffers some framerate issues in certain smartphones and the controls feel pretty jerky, which makes beating the game a bitch.



* The resolution problems the 2010 Steam port of ''Sonic Adventure DX'' had were also repeated in the Steam releases of ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4: Episodes I & II'' as well--the game's native resolution for both titles was ''always'' fixed at 1280x720p, and when the user selected a higher or lower resolution, the game's native resolution was actually upscaled or downscaled to the set resolution, rather than rendering the game at the set resolution. It was especially bad in the case of these titles as unlike the SA:DX 2010 port, both games were made with HD resolutions and graphics in mind (the [=PS3=] and 360 versions of these games can run at 1080p with no issue), ''and'' they even lacked anti-aliasing options, resulting in the games looking like a very jaggy mess of graphics. It came to a head when the complaints concerning the resolution problems in ''Episode II'' [[http://forums.sega.com/showthread.php?411044-I-have-come-to-request-a-refund-for-this-awful-and-lazy-port were raised in the official Sega Forums]] when the game was released, upon which the PR manager for the game claimed that a fix to allow the game to be properly display the game at different resolutions would not possible due to the image "breaking down" if forced to a higher resolution. [[TemptingFate Within hours of that statement]], a fan made and presented a patch that showed that not only ''could'' the game be run at a higher resolution than its intended native resolution, the result looked '''much''' better than the original upscaling method. '''''And all he did was change a single line of code in order to do it.''''' Another fan similarly made their own patch that allowed the game to support anti-aliasing features based on the user's local graphics cards. Needless to say, an official patch for ''Episode II'' was soon released that addressed the former issue not long afterwards.

to:

* The resolution problems the 2010 Steam port of ''Sonic Adventure DX'' had were also repeated in the Steam releases of ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4: Episodes I & II'' as well--the game's native resolution for both titles was ''always'' fixed at 1280x720p, and when the user selected a higher or lower resolution, the game's native resolution was actually upscaled or downscaled to the set resolution, rather than rendering the game at the set resolution. It was especially bad in the case of these titles as unlike the SA:DX 2010 port, both games were made with HD resolutions and graphics in mind (the [=PS3=] and 360 versions of these games can run at 1080p with no issue), ''and'' they even lacked anti-aliasing options, resulting in the games looking like a very jaggy mess of graphics. It came to a head when the complaints concerning the resolution problems in ''Episode II'' [[http://forums.sega.com/showthread.php?411044-I-have-come-to-request-a-refund-for-this-awful-and-lazy-port were raised in the official Sega Forums]] when the game was released, upon which the PR manager for the game claimed that a fix to allow the game to be properly display the game at different resolutions would not possible due to the image "breaking down" if forced to a higher resolution. [[TemptingFate Within hours of that statement]], a fan made and presented a patch that showed that not only ''could'' the game be run at a higher resolution than its intended native resolution, the result looked '''much''' better than the original upscaling method. '''''And ''And all he did was change a single line of code in order to do it.''''' '' Another fan similarly made their own patch that allowed the game to support anti-aliasing features based on the user's local graphics cards. Needless to say, an official patch for ''Episode II'' was soon released that addressed the former issue not long afterwards.



** The game supports a pathetically low selection of resolutions, not even including full HD or 16:10 resolutions. This is remedied by editing the game's .ini file. Ubisoft's entire team of programmers apparently couldn't figure this out.
*** Some allege that the PC version is prohibited from maximum graphical detail to make the 360 version appear better, as editing the .ini files can also result in improved graphics. Until a patch, it was not even possible to enable anti-aliasing (mind you, that's ''all'' that patch did).

to:

** The game supports a pathetically low selection of resolutions, not even including full HD or 16:10 resolutions. This is remedied by editing the game's .ini file. Ubisoft's entire team of programmers apparently couldn't figure this out.
***
out. Some allege that the PC version is prohibited from maximum graphical detail to make the 360 version appear better, as editing the .ini files can also result in improved graphics. Until a patch, it was not even possible to enable anti-aliasing (mind you, that's ''all'' that patch did).



* The first two ''Splinter Cell'' games [[TechnologyMarchesOn eventually]] became this. They were directly ported from the original Xbox versions, and as such were optimised for a number of Nvidia and ATI cards that supported a form of shadow mapping called "shadow buffers", first supported on the [=GeForce 3=] and the [=NV2A=] GPU used on the console. While it did work on most hardware at the time, later graphics cards, driver versions and [=DirectX=] [=APIs=] broke functionality for the said buffers, causing spotlights and other projected shadows to no longer work. As shadows are a key gameplay element, playing the original ''Splinter Cell'' and ''Pandora Tomorrow'' would be nigh impossible on modern hardware. ''Splinter Cell 1'' did have a fallback mode for ATI video cards and other systems that are incapable of rendering shadow buffers, but ''Pandora Tomorrow'' lacks it, which may have accounted for why the latter is unavailable on Steam. [[http://www.jiri-dvorak.cz/scellpt/ There is a fan-made fix for that game, though]].
* ''VideoGame/StarTrekLegacy'' lags badly on the lowest settings even on the ''menu screen'', even with a good graphics card. None of the controls can be remapped -- in fact, there isn't even an in-game guide to the controls. This is horrible because the default control set up forces an {{egregious}} use of the mouse in situations where buttons should be (and in the 360 version, were) used.
* ''Franchise/StarWars: VideoGame/TheForceUnleashed'' had a long-awaited/delayed Windows version that was inexplicably over 30 gigabytes, and has very few options for scaling the game down. It runs fine on a fairly decent rig, but there are no options to tone down the graphics for older machines. The game isn't very well optimized, so while a decent computer will run it with few problems, a mid-range system will choke. The keyboard and mouse controls are also extremely clunky and cumbersome, and the only gamepad supported is the Xbox 360 controller.
** The game did allow you to rebind the keyboard and mouse controls, so you could pick a setup that was more logical. However, the game wouldn't update the on-screen prompts for quicktime events from the default bindings. Good luck trying to remember what you rebound 'F' to before you die.
* ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'': The PC port on Steam has the internal resolution locked at 720p, the framerate locked at 30fps (when the Gamecube version released ''over a decade ago'' ran at 60fps), the game crashes often or doesn't start, lagged at the options, config and save menus, has new typos, has the wrong fonts and broken or missing text when selecting languages other than English, and had incorrect button displays for the controls showing [=PlayStation=] 3 prompts. The port also had additional [=VMProtect=] DRM software and had only six save slots on launch, though some of these problems were patched out and [=VMProtect=] was removed entirely while the latter has been fixed.
* ''VideoGame/{{Toukiden}}: Kiwami'''s PC port has been met with heavy backlash. Video options are sparse (e.g. cannot go beyond 1080p, no 16:10 resolutions) and does little to make the game look any better. The game is locked at 30 FPS, and if you try to unlock the frame-rate, the game becomes unplayable as the animations and physics are tied to the frame-rate which results in the game running faster than it should, nor does its Steam page warns customers about this. The game is poorly optimized with demanding system requirements (an [=i7=] for both minimum ''and'' recommended) and will sometimes slow down in certain areas even if your machine meets the ''recommended'' system requirements. Certain video cards and Windows 8/8.1 combinations cannot run the game at all and crashes if you try to play it. Keyboard controls are poorly implemented, using the mouse will sometimes freeze the game when there's no mouse support at all, and despite recommending a gamepad and uses Xbox 360 prompts, only a few are supported and analog sticks doesn't work properly.
* Although not quite as bad as the aforementioned Game Boy port of ''VideoGame/ToyStory'', the Windows 95 port still is far outclassed by the SNES and Genesis versions. On top of already missing many of the graphical effects and the level "Really Inside the Claw Machine", the controls are heavily mangled from the console versions, with Woody's jumping being much more floaty and less realistic than the console counterparts. His whip also has extremely strict collision detection, making it very hard to actually aim at enemies and adding a ton of FakeDifficulty to an already NintendoHard game, and making the bosses nearly unplayable. By far, though, the biggest offender has to go to the RC stages -- they were already notorious enough for being difficult due to being hard to control in the console versions, but they are outright ''unplayable'' in the PC port, with the controls being so overly sensitive that it's impossible to aim at anything. It ''does'' get a red book soundtrack on the plus side, but that's far from enough reason to pull it out of this territory.
* ''VideoGame/VirtualOn: Operation Moongate'' was a decent port but it unfortunately became this over time due to a horrible game-breaking bug where the game crushes after getting a Game Over with any Virtuaroid other than Fei-Yen for some reason and ending a match on Versus Mode due compatibility issues on Windows Vista and later.
* ''VideoGame/VivaPinata'' has a PC version notorious for slowness and occasional crashes. The worst part of the game is that the coveted Chewnicorn, the game's rare Unicorn Piñata, is colored incorrectly and, due to a lighting glitch, ''glows black'' every three seconds.
* ''VideoGame/WatchDogs'' was purposely made to run on [=nVidia=] hardware, and [=nVidia=] hardware only[[note]]The 8th-gen console versions were optimized for AMD hardware since that's what they have[[/note]]. If you don't have [=nVidia=] hardware, then you're screwed. You will experience framerate drops and crashing/freezing galore, even if you have a computer that can run games on their highest setting flawlessly. Also, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking the game requires the use of UPlay regardless of where you buy it from]]. Another problem is that modders found that the coding for the absolutely ''amazing'' graphics configuration settings shown in the E3 demo were in the game and performed absolutely fine if they were added back into the game, leading to backlash and widespread allegations that the quality was tuned down so [=PCs=] didn't overtake the Xbox One and [=PS4=] in graphics fidelity.
* ''Wipeout 2097'' lacks a speed limiter in PC versions, causing the game to run out of control on top of the line [=PCs=] back in '97, never mind today (this can be fixed with a CPU-killer program, but then you will find out the hard way that Windows Vista/7 require a lot more CPU to run properly than the game!). The game also has a different soundtrack that's nowhere near as good as the original's.
* It's ultimately generous of Blizzard release several of their old games for free on Windows, but the ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' release was a major mess up, period. The classic songs were removed and replaced with a generic grunge metal soundtrack, and to make things worse, it was actually the ''SNES'' version of the game patched to disable the songs and then run on a modified emulator that also provided the grunge soundtrack on it's own[[note]]loading the ROM into a proper emulator resulted in the game missing it's music, but sound effects are intact[[/note]]. This also meant that the game had one long soundtrack that doesn't change through the game and gets annoying quickly enough. Another thing to note is that the game is a demo version. While the free releases of ''Blackthorne'' and ''The Lost Vikings'' were the full games, for ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' the people at Blizzard decided to give out a severely cut-down version that, after just three races, unceremoniously dumps you back to the title screen, with no fanfare or anything.
* The PC version of ''VideoGame/ZombiU'', titled ''Zombi''. Despite coming out 3 years later it somehow manages to have more bugs than the [[ObviousBeta WiiU version did at launch]].
* ''VideoGame/HomefrontTheRevolution'' had many bugs and performance issues on all platforms at launch. The PC version was no exception with constant framerate drops.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Macintosh (Mac)]]
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic IV'' had its AI lobotomized at some point during the porting process from the PC, and the computer would send out one day's worth of troops to try to kill a horde of mid-to-high level monsters. This was somewhat amusing in maps where you weren't tasked with the defeat of a specific hero, but when you ''were''... well, you just had to hope that said hero wasn't allowed to move from his starting position, because you didn't get credit for the kill if you weren't involved in the fight.
* ''VideoGame/MafiaII'', ported by Feral Interactive was just as disastrous as the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 version, not because of the lack of grass and blood but because it was ill-optimised compared to the PC version, churning out 15-20 fps even on a reasonably powerful Macintosh.
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 3000'' was not made in-house by Maxis, and its quality reflects this. It was ported by a Ukrainian company which left the entire PC interface (such as the file hierarchy system) intact, all while leaving out other features (such as the Building Architect Tool).
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 4'' was also outsourced and was released months after the PC version. It was terribly slow to the point of unplayability, left off the official tools that PC users got, and exhibited behaviors that PC gamers would only get if they had a plug-in conflict. In fact, for owners of Intel-based Macs, running the Windows version via a compatibility layer such as Wine or Crossover Games is preferable in every way.
* The OS X version of ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'' was apparently a direct port from the [=iPad=] version. This means it has an interface meant for touch screens for a keyboard instead, as well as the [=iPad=]'s resolution. While some of the issues (but not all) have been fixed, a few specific tables would also exhibit strange behavior--for instance, if one App Store review is to be believed, the ball will occasionally fly right off the ''Pinball/WhiteWater'' table, never to return.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Amiga]]
* ''VideoGame/SmashTV'' has badly redrawn graphics, nearly all of the music cut out of the game, and horribly muffled sound effects.
* ''VideoGame/TestDrive'' didn't do justice to the Amiga's graphical capabilities, had the engines sounding more like 8-bit jets than cars, and there are few other sound effects to speak of. By comparison, the technologically less advanced Commodore 64 managed to pull it off a lot better. As with ''Defender of the Crown'', the inferiority of the Amiga version is likely attributable to inexperience and [[ChristmasRushed ludicrous deadlines]].
* Creator/{{Sierra}}'s Amiga ports of its classic games were notorious for failing to take advantage of the machine's graphics and sound capabilities.
[[/folder]]

!!'''Disastrous versions of multi-platform releases:'''

[[folder:Consoles]]
* The UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/WiiU versions of ''VideoGame/AngryBirds Trilogy'' were developed later than the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} versions. While the latter versions at least change up the presentation quite a bit, the Wii and Wii U versions have no such effort, looking more like the mobile versions (complete with the pigs still having their outdated character design). The Wii U is an HD console, so in all likelihood the devs ''could have'' just ported over the graphics from the [=PS3=] or 360 versions. For whatever reason, they chose not to.
* ''Congo Bongo'' had bad graphics or missing levels in all ports. As the game is presented in 3/4 isometric perspective, it was actually put on consoles that could not handle that view such as the Atari 2600. The sole exception was the SG-1000 conversion handled by Sega themselves, which ditched the isometric perspective completely in favor of a semi top-down view.
* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was screwed up horribly in some way in most ports (excluding ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong94'', which is more of a remake), ranging from awful controls, to completely messed up graphics and music, to even cutting out the cement factory or elevator stages (or both). [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErdZEOTpKL8 These]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVcKjBBuKIE videos]] show several different versions of the game. One of them is the NES version, and another is a graphics hack of the NES version, both of which are very good despite lacking the cement factory stage -- and even that was re-added to a limited rerelease during the '[=10s=]. The rest? They all suck horribly, though special mention goes to the ZX Spectrum version, which is especially bad. When the UsefulNotes/{{Intellivision}} version was released, people at Mattel suspected it to be an act of sabotage on the part of Coleco.
* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'''s many console ports suffered in one way or another:
** While the SNES version is indeed a marvelous achievement, the pros are ''far'' outweighed by the cons. The graphics of the original were greatly downgraded; enemies are no longer [[LudicrousGibs gibbed]] when suffering from close-range explosions, many textures have been simplified or removed outright (and enemy sprites, leading the infamous "crab-walking" baddies that always faced you), the framerate is rather uneven, and the frames can even skip some sprite animations if more than three enemies are on-screen at close-range. The lighting was also significantly altered, making certain lit walls where secrets are hidden like any other wall, which can cause frustration if you're trying to remember which freaking panel that upgrade was put behind. To make it worse, they even had the '''gall''' to add EasyModeMockery; if you're playing the easy difficulty levels, it only lets you play the first episode, ''Knee-Deep in the Dead''. If you want to play the third episode ''Inferno'' and see the FinalBoss, you were forced to play on Ultra-Violence or Nightmare!, the two hardest difficulties. The Super Famicom version fixes this.\\
\\
The sound effects are muffled as well, a good portion of the levels have been excised, and [[FakeDifficulty it's impossible to turn and sidestep at the same time]]--something that even the SNES port of ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' could manage. The only truly good part of the game is its soundtrack, which is fun to listen to because the SNES's sampler makes the MIDI soundtrack sound much more like real instruments than the Sound Blaster's FM synth ever could[[note]]Unless you cut your teeth with the PC version of Doom on a PC with a Gravis Ultrasound, then the SNES version sounds absolutely muffled compared to the glory that is the Ultrasound. Because, like the SNES' [=SPC700=], the Ultrasound was a sampler-based sound card, which Doom had full support for and would load its own custom soundfonts if one is used, and unlike the SNES' [=SPC700=], it had ''at least'' '''four''' times the amount of memory compared to the [=SPC700=] (256kb upgradable to 1MB, vs 64kb). And the [=AWE32=] (another sampler-based card) ain't too far behind either.[[/note]].
** The Sega [=32X=] port was inexplicably inferior to the SNES version despite being on a superior hardware. Despite the graphics being better, the entire third episode was missing along with the bosses and BFG-9000, beating the game would load up a DOS prompt if the player cheated or used the level select and the soundtrack was ''butchered''. Especially unforgivable because the FM chip in the Genesis[[note]]the [=YM2612=]; the 32X uses 2 PWM channels[[/note]] is very similar to the [=YM2608=] (the FM chip used on later versions of the UsefulNotes/{{PC88}} and UsefulNotes/{{PC98}}), and it even has an additional PSG chip for sound effects.
** Art Data Interactive's port on the 3DO. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msfL7XRe6DQ Small screen and low frame-rate ahoy!]] When put next to Interplay's port of ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' on the same console, this is inexcusable. The single bright spot, picked up on pretty much every review, was the awesome music, rerecorded specifically for this version. Just a shame that there were so few levels that some of the original songs were not present. The port was frequently rumoured to have been accidentally mastered from an earlier build, but as [[https://github.com/Olde-Skuul/doom3do it turns out]], it was programmed by ''one person'' in ten weeks.
** The American Sega Saturn port is an absolute mess. Jerky, unresponsive controls are mapped to a decidedly questionable control scheme. There are completely random bouts of slowdown -- it sometimes happens when looking at a blank wall! Supposedly, this is because John Carmack was very strict about not allowing them to use hardware rendering due to texture warping, although few would argue that unplayable lag is the better option. The non-musical sound effects are of low quality. And there is no multiplayer, which takes half the fun out of ''Doom''. It's been compared to the 32X port in quality, and the Saturn has more advanced specs than the 32X. The Japanese version, on the other hand, fared much better although both versions lacked the colored lighting the [=PlayStation=] version had.
* ''VideoGame/EnemyTerritoryQuakeWars'' on Xbox 360 and [=PS3=] had badly downgraded graphics, missing features (including permanent stat growth, one of the main feature of the original version), was limited to 16 players instead of 32 and had ridiculously strong auto-aim. At least one ID Software employee called it a textbook example of how not to port a game.
* ''VideoGame/{{Gauntlet}}: Dark Legacy'' was ported to the Xbox from the [=PS2=] version and gained some new features (such as the ability to store powerups and use them later), but also gained new glitches. The [=GameCube=] version was even worse, having glitches, slowdown, and missing health meters on bosses, though a later release fixed these.
* ''VideoGame/LichdomBattlemage'' on [=PlayStation 4=] and Xbox One has two huge problems: ''atrocious'' performance, with the game always staying between 10-20 frames per second, and ''atrocious'' loading times, clocking in at several minutes, while having the audacity of still needing to stream in textures afterwards. But on the bright side, a patch was later released, showing astronomical improvements in performance over the earlier build. The Xbox One version stays at a near constant 30FPS with vertical sync. However, the PlayStation 4 version has an unlocked framerate up to 60FPS, making it inconsistent but still playable, especially compared to the stock version. The only sacrifice made was a drop from a native 1080p to 900p on both consoles.
* ''VideoGame/TheLionKing'' for the NES was a disaster, with sluggish and unresponsive controls, physics and jumping mechanics that are broken beyond belief, and short levels (the game can be completed in under 20 minutes) which are presented without any kind of story context. On top of that, the game only covers the young Simba levels from the 16-bit games, meaning that not only do you not play as the eponymous Lion King, but ''the film's villain Scar is completely absent from gameplay'' (outside of the EasyModeMockery ending screen). What's sad about this port is even the ''bootleg port'' created by Super Game is superior to it both gameplay-wise and aesthetically (musically as well, since all of Super Game's ports are done with the Konami sound engine) and even resembles the original game more. North American and Japanese gamers were at least spared from seeing this exist in their region, as it was only released in PAL territories. There's evidence pointing towards this port being [[ObviousBeta an unfinished release]], as the Game Boy version of the game manages to include every level from its 16-bit counterparts except Be Prepared while polishing up some of the rough spots.
** The UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows port was cited by some to have been the reason why game developers initially stuck to MS-DOS, and as one of the reasons for [=DirectX=]'s inception. The game used [=WinG=], a graphics backend library Microsoft developed in an attempt to address issues with game development on Windows, as the latter operating system added unnecessary overhead and did not allow for close-to-metal access to hardware unlike DOS. While the Windows port did work to an extent, it caused quite a PR disaster when millions of Compaq Presarios came shipped with incompatible graphics drivers, leading to [=BSODs=], tantrums among children, and thus disgruntled parents.
* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed: Hot Pursuit 2'' was a completely different game on the the Xbox, PC, and [=GameCube=], all designed by a different development house from the [=PlayStation=] 2 version. While there are some track similarities, the sense of speed is all but gone, the handling is worse, the game in general is far more boring, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking the menus don't look as nice]]. These versions of the game aren't "bad", ''per se'' (as games they're fundamentally sound and could even be fun if you didn't ever get to play the "good" one), but they are considerably inferior to the [=PlayStation=] 2 version.
* ''VideoGame/RevolutionX''. Half of the reason for its checkered reputation comes from its abysmal SNES and Genesis ports, which are better-known than the original coin-op light gun game.[[note]]The other half is because of [[WidgetSeries its sheer absurdity]], [[SoBadItsGood but that's not for this page]].[[/note]] The arcade game had digitized graphics of higher resolution than what those two consoles could handle ([[http://www.sydlexia.com/revcomp.htm here's a comparison]]) and actual Music/{{Aerosmith}} songs for BGM. Also, the ports lacked support for the consoles' respective light gun controllers for no reason whatsoever.
* While ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheRobots'' is abysmal on any console, some ports managed to make it even worse. The two only elements of the game that people generally agree are good are a well-done techno soundtrack (and depending on which port you're playing, an alternate soundtrack by Music/{{Queen}}'s Brian May) and very fluid pre-rendered graphics. While the Genesis and SNES ports had lower quality music, the Amiga and MS-DOS port had ''no music at all'', the Game Gear port completely tanked all of the game's only redeeming qualities, with understandably the worst graphics and musical quality of them all, while somehow managing to play even ''worse'' than the other ports (it's stuck on permanent hard mode, which in the other ports meant that [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the game resorted to blatant cheating and button-reading to win]]).
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 2000'' has the same issues in every single console version. Control responsiveness is unbelievably bad, and for something that stores data on flash or battery-backed RAM instead of magnetic media, the save game loading times are incredibly slow. Also, looking for help? [[ObviousBeta You're instructed to press shift + enter!]]
* ''Franchise/SilentHill HD Collection'':
** The remastering of ''VideoGame/SilentHill2'' and ''VideoGame/SilentHill3'' for UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}, was outsourced to Hijinx Studios, a mobile/handheld game developer that had never done a console game before, using source code from [[http://www.1up.com/features/the-problem-with-preservation the unfinished betas]] of both games due to poor archiving. It shows, with both games suffering from many bugs major and minor and overall being noticeably worse than the originals on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox}}. There is rampant slowdown to the point of rendering the games (particularly ''[=SH3=]'') virtually unplayable, the voices fall out of sync with the characters' lips, poor lighting makes navigation almost impossible in some parts, some of the texture work looks unfinished and recycled from the original versions (clashing badly with the redone sections), and most damningly, ''[=SH2=]''[='=]s famous fog effects are so broken as to render certain parts of the game laughable. What makes that all even worse is that source code is not even required to produce an HD version of a [=PS2=] game. All you need is a retail copy, and a team of programmers savvy in the [=PS2=] language. It was how the HD versions of ''VideoGame/{{ICO}}'' and ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheColossus'' were made. Thankfully, Konami patched the [=PS3=] version, and ''[=SH2=]'' works pretty well now with minor issues. (They mostly fixed the fog effect, though it's still somewhat less impressive than the original.) Xbox 360 owners, however, were screwed as they didn't get that patch. All told, the InternetBackdraft from the whole debacle was so bad that many ''Silent Hill'' fans boycotted the collection out of spite.
** And all of that doesn't even get into the creative decisions, the biggest one being that both games came with redone voice acting that quickly proved controversial among fans of the series. In ''[=SH3=]'', for instance, the teenage protagonist Heather suffered a dramatic case of DawsonCasting, sounding like a forty-year-old woman imitating a teenage girl. (Comparisons between the originals and the remasters can be seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV_NC4JGntM here]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pu0JUqrZoYM here]].) Fortunately, with ''[=SH2=]'' the original voice track is still available as an option, but because Konami couldn't clear all the original voice actors for ''[=SH3=]'' in time for release (the VA for Heather turned out to be working in China and the VA for Douglas [[AuthorExistenceFailure died just before the original game was released]]), only the new voice track is available in that game.
* ''Starfighter 3000'', the Saturn and [=PlayStation=] ports of the 3DO game ''Starfighter'', has terrible draw distance and less graphical detail than the original, quite baffling considering how much weaker the 3DO is. The original version made heavy use of the 3DO's ARM RISC processors, but even there the port could have turned out much better than it did. The Saturn version is [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJYLjHgelPI especially bad]].
* Ports by High Voltage Studios:
** ''[[VideoGame/ZoneOfTheEnders Zone of the Enders HD Collection]]'' had its problems on both [=PlayStation=] 3 and Xbox 360, but the former got the raw end of the stick, even more so with ''The 2nd Runner''. It had very inconsistent frame-rate issues that were never present in the [=PlayStation=] 2 originals (at most it ran only about 30 FPS) and visual effects went missing, all of which is inexcusable running on superior hardware. As it turns out, Konami hired High Voltage Studios to handle the porting job rather than doing it in-house or hiring Bluepoint, the studio that handled the HD ports of the ''Metal Gear Solid'' games. And to put icing on the cake, due to the negative reception the ''Zone of the Enders HD Collection'' received, [[http://www.siliconera.com/2013/05/02/we-might-have-to-wait-a-little-longer-for-a-zone-of-the-enders-sequel/ Ender's Project has been put off indefinitely and the dev team dismantled as a result]]. Thankfully they worked on a patch with Hexa Drive, the same team behind the HD port of ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', for the [=PlayStation=] 3 roughly a year later that [[PolishedPort inverts this trope]], running in full 1080p with much smoother frame-rate. Unfortunately, like the ''Silent Hill HD Collection'', Xbox 360 owners were screwed over AGAIN as the patch was released only for [=PlayStation=] 3.
** The studio has been responsible for a number of other terrible ports since then: ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'', ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' and ''VideoGame/MortalKombatX'' were all optimisation disasters. Their [=PlayStation=] 4 and Xbox One ports of ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'' were missing several effects and possessed a janky frame rate. Their [=PlayStation=] 4 port of ''Injustice'', however, left the game completely intact with no noted issues.
* All three console versions of the game ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins'' suffer from some form of issues. Both the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 versions suffer from some nasty [[GameBreakingBug Game-Breaking Bugs]] that apparently Warner Bros. simply has no interest in patching, which involves the game randomly crashing when trying to enter certain areas, along with both versions having a somewhat inconsistent framerate. The 360 suffers from even more freezing issues, occasional black screens, and even save data corruption. The Wii U version seemed to not be hit as hard, as its main issues mainly just involve a somewhat choppy framerate like the other versions, and the gamepad features feel a bit bare bones compared to the Wii U port of ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' (likely the result of the Wii U version being handled by Human Head Studios, the people behind ''VideoGame/Prey2006'', instead of the game's primary developer, WB Montreal, who were the studio behind the Wii U port of ''Arkham City'' in the first place), but otherwise the Wii U game actually seems better by comparison due to higher quality graphics and much less game-breaking bugs.
* While not a "disaster" in the "this utterly shames the original product" sense, ''VideoGame/PrimalRage'' has a unique issue: It ''cannot'' be ported correctly. The original game has a very strange encryption scheme and it's never been decoded and all related parties who created it have never been willing to help out with breaking it. So all the ports are based on code that has been [=DRM'd=] by this encryption, resulting in various glitches, missing effects (such as blood color) and being unable to perform certain combos and fatalities properly.
* The "HD Remasters" of ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Prototype 2}}'' for the [=PlayStation=] 4 and Xbox One, which were uneventfully churned out by Activision, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGqkhkS4fqI actually run worse]] than their [=PlayStation=] 3 and Xbox 360 counterparts. Seeing how the games run worse on more powerful hardware is inexcusable and it shows that these are just lazy ports rather than actual remasters.
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'' is a trainwreck on every console. Occasional lag refusing to blow up cars one by one on Veteran Child's boss fight will inevitably cause him to create a chain reaction of exploding cars that will 99% of the time freeze the game, it will lock up more often on the crazier end-game missions, (really any over the top usage of the black hole gun or tons of explosions cause a hard lock) and to top it off if you're an achievement/trophy hunter/completionist all versions have the achievement/trophy ''Where is my Cape?'' glitched to a point that if that glitch happens you must start a new game and follow a specific set of requirements while recollecting all 1,255 Data Clusters just to be able to buy every single super power to qualify for it and even if you followed those requirements the game more often than not won't give it to you. Have fun replaying the game over and over just for 100% or a Platinum Trophy!
* ''VideoGame/SuperMonkeyBall: Deluxe'' on the [=PS2=] and Xbox may have levels and content from both the original games in one DVD, plus more, but both versions suffer from the controls not being anywhere as good from the UsefulNotes/GameCube versions. Worse yet for the [=PS2=] version having some framerate issues and, with the [=PS2=]'s hardware not being as powerful as the [=GameCube=], graphics that don't look as good as the original.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:PC Operating Systems]]
* ''[=BreakThru=]'', a jeep-based ShootEmUp by Creator/DataEast, had three computer ports published by US Gold. The UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} version had dishwater-ugly backgrounds, stupid sound effects, terrible hit detection and enemy vehicles that did things like drive over water. The UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum version had awkward keyboard controls, barely any sound, bad collision detection, and a lack of enemies, though the graphics weren't terrible for the system. The UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC version had programming similar to the Spectrum version, but the game window was inexplicably much smaller; it received the lowest score for any game reviewed in ''AMTIX!'' magazine.
* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonI'':
** The game was ported by UK-based Binary Design to home computer platforms in 1988, who were ordered by Mastertronic (the publisher that commissioned them) to finish these ports under a strict deadline, resulting in most of them turning out to be total rushjobs. A common problem all of these ports shared was the fact that the developers attempted to adapt the arcade game's three-button combat system to work on one-button joysticks that were standard for PC gaming back then. This meant that instead of having dedicated buttons for kicking, jumping and punching, players only had a single fire button for everything and performing anything other than a standing punch required rather counter-intuitive joystick/button combinations (e.g. Down-Away+Fire for a backward whirlwind kick, Down-Forward+Fire for a jump kicks). The uppercut and roundhouse kicks were also missing in these versions, since enemies lacked their stunned animations -- instead they simply fall down to the floor after a few hits. On top of all that, these versions had non-existent music and sound effects due to the floppy disk format they were released on.
** The Amiga and Atari ST versions, with both of them running on 16-bit hardware, could've theoretically reproduced the arcade version's visuals -- instead they feature laughably amateurish art assets in which all the male character (except the Abobos and Machine Gun Willy) are recolors of the same generic guy. The IBM PC version looked even worse, as it only supported the already dated CGA and EGA graphic cards. ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonII'' and ''3'' fared better visually on these platforms (especially ''3'', which resembled the arcade version pretty closely), but still suffered from the aforementioned controls and sound issues.
** The Commodore 64 version used a sprite stacking technique for its graphics that resulted in all the characters having an invisible waist. The manual for this version actually featured an apology and explanation from the developers for using this technique. When Ocean Software got the rights to re-release ''Double Dragon'' on the [=C64=], they chose to create their own conversion instead of re-releasing the Binary Design one, which was considerably better looking, but was one-player only and lacked the final boss battle against Machine Gun Willy.
** The Amstrad CPC actually had two versions of ''Double Dragon''. The version distributed in the UK was based on the ZX Spectrum version, while the version distributed in other European countries such as France and Spain used art assets similar to the Amiga version and is generally regarded to be the better of the two versions, although it's only compatible with CPC 6128 models.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Gradius}} Salamander]]'' for the UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum and UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC (the latter being a cheap conversion of the former, as was all too often the case). The majority of the screen was taken up with the HUD. The action was slow -- you don't get a speed up until halfway into the first level, and need it well before then. There are [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMcvCM5Rw_8 one or two bugs]] that make one of the {{boss battle}}s a LuckBasedMission. Only the first stage has an actual layout; the rest of them just have the odd enemy floating across the screen.
* ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'' received home computer ports of the original ''World Warrior'' for the western market in 1993.
** Aside from the fact that ''World Warrior'' was already considered vestigial by that time (the 16-bit consoles were already receiving ports of the previous year's ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' editions), the conversions were all being handled by U.S. Gold, a company with a spotty track record when it came to porting arcade games to home computers.
** [[http://www.scary-crayon.com/games/sf2pc/ The IBM PC port]] was a total trainwreck. Everybody moved like they were paralyzed, combos were impossible (the sprites were invincible while taking damage), if you won while in mid-air your character would stop and do his/her victory pose defying all rules of gravity, and there were only three songs -- Ken's theme (which became the title theme), the character select theme (which was the only theme to play during gameplay '''at all''') and Zangief's ending theme (which was now everyone's ending theme).
** The [=C64=] version had the large, detailed character sprites became tiny, unrecognizable messes of pixels and five-minute loads to move on to the next stage. On top of all that, instead of three-punch and three-kick buttons, it was played with a joystick which only had one button.
* ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' qualifies in every 8-bit computer version '''not''' on the C64 (the computer it was originally programmed for). Broken controls, choppy scrolling, and missing level features abound, and the graphics take strange liberties with the original material. Of course, this is probably more due to the computers' lack of hardware-accelerated sprites and scrolling (which the C64 had) than the programmers' incompetence, but one wonders why they attempted it at all. The exception is the Amstrad CPC version, which is well regarded and highly playable. Despite the scrolling and smaller game screen, the graphics are far better than the C64 graphics (but then the C64 has a horrendously drab palette to pick colors from). Still not sure why Turrican is green though when perfectly usable blues are available in the Amstrad palette and were used elsewhere in the games.
* Rare non-game example: Ports of the Clam antivirus program to UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows still do not have a real-time scanner. The original UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} versions started including a real-time scanner some years back, and the [[UsefulNotes/MacOS OS X]] version, while unable to get the original real-time scanner working, compensated with a completely rewritten real-time scanner called ''[=ClamXAV=] Sentry''. However, the Windows version lacked this basic amenity, because apparently the devs lack the manpower to make a port and no one else cared.
* While not a "disaster", per se, certain PC games around the early and mid-[=2000s=] (the ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheSandsOfTime'' trilogy and ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted'' 2005 spring to mind) have process threading issues on multi-core systems, which can cause jerky performance. This is because these games buffer information for preprocessing on the assumption of operating on a single-core system. In a multi-core environment, the process scheduler will grab queued threads and assign them to the cores for simultaneous processing. This in turn screws up things like order of execution and output scheduling, which the games aren't coded to handle, hence the jerkiness due to having to compensate for possible out of order data (and can occasionally cause crashes if the engine doesn't handle it right). The solution is to typically shut off all but one core for the game's executable to run its requests through (this can be done at runtime in the Task Manager or by using a hex patcher to modify the game executable directly).
* The Steam releases of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' are direct ports of the mobile versions, which have clunky interfaces that weren't meant for PC gaming. Entire chunks of the battle screen are taken up by needlessly huge menu options, and although the "run" and "fast-forward battle" icons had their functionality removed and assigned to keys/buttons, they inexplicably weren't removed from the interface. On top of that, ''Final Fantasy VI'' had bad lag, sound problems, and it couldn't even be played in offline mode. The issues were resolved quickly, but the clunky interface remained.
* ''VideoGame/JetSetRadio'''s Steam port only lets you configure keyboard controls, and it was a straight port of the [=X360=] port (a port of a port), thus using the 360 buttons as reference (e.g. "Hold down LT to center the camera"). You can, in fact, use a controller, but the controls will most likely be screwed up (for example, if using a [=PS3=] controller, the A button will be Triangle, or the Start button will be R2), and there is no option to configure them anywhere. If you want to have proper gamepad support, you will either have to download a controller program like [=MotionInJoy=] or you will have to download [[http://steamcommunity.com/app/205950/discussions/0/864946409163562007/ a fan-made patch]]. Emphasis on ''fan-made patch''. The Steam version of the game also infamously and inexplicably ''refuses to save'' on some copies. Re-downloading it... doesn't really help, and the main way of fixing it is to use a hex editor to modify the executable file. Even ''that'' doesn't always work.
* A tie-in for the film ''Film/BeverlyHillsCop'' was released on 4 platforms: UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}}, UsefulNotes/AtariST, UsefulNotes/Commodore64, and PC. The Amiga version has smashing music due to the Paula audio chip. The Atari ST and [=C64=] version was bearable thanks to the PSG sound system. The PC version, however, is this trope play straight. Using only EGA graphics and PC speaker sound, despite the [=AdLib=] and Game Blaster, and indeed the first generation Sound Blaster, being already released when the game came out and VGA was already picking up steam. And even then the PC music was often described as someone strangling an ice cream truck.
[[/folder]]
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* The first two ''Splinter Cell'' games [[TechnologyMarchesOn eventually]] became this. They were directly ported from the original Xbox versions, and as such were optimised for a number of Nvidia and ATI cards that supported a form of shadow mapping called "shadow buffers", first supported on the [=GeForce 3=] and the [=NV2A=] GPU used on the console. While it did work on most hardware at the time, later graphics cards, driver versions and [=DirectX=] [=APIs=] broke functionality for the said buffers, causing spotlights and other projected shadows to no longer work. As shadows are a key gameplay element, playing the original ''Splinter Cell'' and ''Pandora Tomorrow'' would be nigh impossible on modern hardware. ''Splinter Cell 1'' did have a fallback mode for ATI video cards and other systems that are incapable of rendering shadow buffers, but ''Pandora Tomorrow'' lacks it, which may have accounted for why the latter is unavailable on Steam. [[http://www.jiri-dvorak.cz/scellpt/ There is a fan-made fix for that game, though]].
* ''VideoGame/StarTrekLegacy'' lags badly on the lowest settings even on the ''menu screen'', even with a good graphics card. None of the controls can be remapped -- in fact, there isn't even an in-game guide to the controls. This is horrible because the default control set up forces an {{egregious}} use of the mouse in situations where buttons should be (and in the 360 version, were) used.
* ''Franchise/StarWars: VideoGame/TheForceUnleashed'' had a long-awaited/delayed Windows version that was inexplicably over 30 gigabytes, and has very few options for scaling the game down. It runs fine on a fairly decent rig, but there are no options to tone down the graphics for older machines. The game isn't very well optimized, so while a decent computer will run it with few problems, a mid-range system will choke. The keyboard and mouse controls are also extremely clunky and cumbersome, and the only gamepad supported is the Xbox 360 controller.
** The game did allow you to rebind the keyboard and mouse controls, so you could pick a setup that was more logical. However, the game wouldn't update the on-screen prompts for quicktime events from the default bindings. Good luck trying to remember what you rebound 'F' to before you die.
* ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'': The PC port on Steam has the internal resolution locked at 720p, the framerate locked at 30fps (when the Gamecube version released ''over a decade ago'' ran at 60fps), the game crashes often or doesn't start, lagged at the options, config and save menus, has new typos, has the wrong fonts and broken or missing text when selecting languages other than English, and had incorrect button displays for the controls showing [=PlayStation=] 3 prompts. The port also had additional [=VMProtect=] DRM software and had only six save slots on launch, though some of these problems were patched out and [=VMProtect=] was removed entirely while the latter has been fixed.
* ''VideoGame/{{Toukiden}}: Kiwami'''s PC port has been met with heavy backlash. Video options are sparse (e.g. cannot go beyond 1080p, no 16:10 resolutions) and does little to make the game look any better. The game is locked at 30 FPS, and if you try to unlock the frame-rate, the game becomes unplayable as the animations and physics are tied to the frame-rate which results in the game running faster than it should, nor does its Steam page warns customers about this. The game is poorly optimized with demanding system requirements (an [=i7=] for both minimum ''and'' recommended) and will sometimes slow down in certain areas even if your machine meets the ''recommended'' system requirements. Certain video cards and Windows 8/8.1 combinations cannot run the game at all and crashes if you try to play it. Keyboard controls are poorly implemented, using the mouse will sometimes freeze the game when there's no mouse support at all, and despite recommending a gamepad and uses Xbox 360 prompts, only a few are supported and analog sticks doesn't work properly.
* Although not quite as bad as the aforementioned Game Boy port of ''VideoGame/ToyStory'', the Windows 95 port still is far outclassed by the SNES and Genesis versions. On top of already missing many of the graphical effects and the level "Really Inside the Claw Machine", the controls are heavily mangled from the console versions, with Woody's jumping being much more floaty and less realistic than the console counterparts. His whip also has extremely strict collision detection, making it very hard to actually aim at enemies and adding a ton of FakeDifficulty to an already NintendoHard game, and making the bosses nearly unplayable. By far, though, the biggest offender has to go to the RC stages -- they were already notorious enough for being difficult due to being hard to control in the console versions, but they are outright ''unplayable'' in the PC port, with the controls being so overly sensitive that it's impossible to aim at anything. It ''does'' get a red book soundtrack on the plus side, but that's far from enough reason to pull it out of this territory.
* ''VideoGame/VirtualOn: Operation Moongate'' was a decent port but it unfortunately became this over time due to a horrible game-breaking bug where the game crushes after getting a Game Over with any Virtuaroid other than Fei-Yen for some reason and ending a match on Versus Mode due compatibility issues on Windows Vista and later.
* ''VideoGame/VivaPinata'' has a PC version notorious for slowness and occasional crashes. The worst part of the game is that the coveted Chewnicorn, the game's rare Unicorn Piñata, is colored incorrectly and, due to a lighting glitch, ''glows black'' every three seconds.
* ''VideoGame/WatchDogs'' was purposely made to run on [=nVidia=] hardware, and [=nVidia=] hardware only[[note]]The 8th-gen console versions were optimized for AMD hardware since that's what they have[[/note]]. If you don't have [=nVidia=] hardware, then you're screwed. You will experience framerate drops and crashing/freezing galore, even if you have a computer that can run games on their highest setting flawlessly. Also, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking the game requires the use of UPlay regardless of where you buy it from]]. Another problem is that modders found that the coding for the absolutely ''amazing'' graphics configuration settings shown in the E3 demo were in the game and performed absolutely fine if they were added back into the game, leading to backlash and widespread allegations that the quality was tuned down so [=PCs=] didn't overtake the Xbox One and [=PS4=] in graphics fidelity.
* ''Wipeout 2097'' lacks a speed limiter in PC versions, causing the game to run out of control on top of the line [=PCs=] back in '97, never mind today (this can be fixed with a CPU-killer program, but then you will find out the hard way that Windows Vista/7 require a lot more CPU to run properly than the game!). The game also has a different soundtrack that's nowhere near as good as the original's.
* It's ultimately generous of Blizzard release several of their old games for free on Windows, but the ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' release was a major mess up, period. The classic songs were removed and replaced with a generic grunge metal soundtrack, and to make things worse, it was actually the ''SNES'' version of the game patched to disable the songs and then run on a modified emulator that also provided the grunge soundtrack on it's own[[note]]loading the ROM into a proper emulator resulted in the game missing it's music, but sound effects are intact[[/note]]. This also meant that the game had one long soundtrack that doesn't change through the game and gets annoying quickly enough. Another thing to note is that the game is a demo version. While the free releases of ''Blackthorne'' and ''The Lost Vikings'' were the full games, for ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' the people at Blizzard decided to give out a severely cut-down version that, after just three races, unceremoniously dumps you back to the title screen, with no fanfare or anything.
* The PC version of ''VideoGame/ZombiU'', titled ''Zombi''. Despite coming out 3 years later it somehow manages to have more bugs than the [[ObviousBeta WiiU version did at launch]].
* ''VideoGame/HomefrontTheRevolution'' had many bugs and performance issues on all platforms at launch. The PC version was no exception with constant framerate drops.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Macintosh (Mac)]]
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic IV'' had its AI lobotomized at some point during the porting process from the PC, and the computer would send out one day's worth of troops to try to kill a horde of mid-to-high level monsters. This was somewhat amusing in maps where you weren't tasked with the defeat of a specific hero, but when you ''were''... well, you just had to hope that said hero wasn't allowed to move from his starting position, because you didn't get credit for the kill if you weren't involved in the fight.
* ''VideoGame/MafiaII'', ported by Feral Interactive was just as disastrous as the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 version, not because of the lack of grass and blood but because it was ill-optimised compared to the PC version, churning out 15-20 fps even on a reasonably powerful Macintosh.
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 3000'' was not made in-house by Maxis, and its quality reflects this. It was ported by a Ukrainian company which left the entire PC interface (such as the file hierarchy system) intact, all while leaving out other features (such as the Building Architect Tool).
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 4'' was also outsourced and was released months after the PC version. It was terribly slow to the point of unplayability, left off the official tools that PC users got, and exhibited behaviors that PC gamers would only get if they had a plug-in conflict. In fact, for owners of Intel-based Macs, running the Windows version via a compatibility layer such as Wine or Crossover Games is preferable in every way.
* The OS X version of ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'' was apparently a direct port from the [=iPad=] version. This means it has an interface meant for touch screens for a keyboard instead, as well as the [=iPad=]'s resolution. While some of the issues (but not all) have been fixed, a few specific tables would also exhibit strange behavior--for instance, if one App Store review is to be believed, the ball will occasionally fly right off the ''Pinball/WhiteWater'' table, never to return.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Amiga]]
* ''VideoGame/SmashTV'' has badly redrawn graphics, nearly all of the music cut out of the game, and horribly muffled sound effects.
* ''VideoGame/TestDrive'' didn't do justice to the Amiga's graphical capabilities, had the engines sounding more like 8-bit jets than cars, and there are few other sound effects to speak of. By comparison, the technologically less advanced Commodore 64 managed to pull it off a lot better. As with ''Defender of the Crown'', the inferiority of the Amiga version is likely attributable to inexperience and [[ChristmasRushed ludicrous deadlines]].
* Creator/{{Sierra}}'s Amiga ports of its classic games were notorious for failing to take advantage of the machine's graphics and sound capabilities.
[[/folder]]

!!'''Disastrous versions of multi-platform releases:'''

[[folder:Consoles]]
* The UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/WiiU versions of ''VideoGame/AngryBirds Trilogy'' were developed later than the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} versions. While the latter versions at least change up the presentation quite a bit, the Wii and Wii U versions have no such effort, looking more like the mobile versions (complete with the pigs still having their outdated character design). The Wii U is an HD console, so in all likelihood the devs ''could have'' just ported over the graphics from the [=PS3=] or 360 versions. For whatever reason, they chose not to.
* ''Congo Bongo'' had bad graphics or missing levels in all ports. As the game is presented in 3/4 isometric perspective, it was actually put on consoles that could not handle that view such as the Atari 2600. The sole exception was the SG-1000 conversion handled by Sega themselves, which ditched the isometric perspective completely in favor of a semi top-down view.
* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was screwed up horribly in some way in most ports (excluding ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong94'', which is more of a remake), ranging from awful controls, to completely messed up graphics and music, to even cutting out the cement factory or elevator stages (or both). [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErdZEOTpKL8 These]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVcKjBBuKIE videos]] show several different versions of the game. One of them is the NES version, and another is a graphics hack of the NES version, both of which are very good despite lacking the cement factory stage -- and even that was re-added to a limited rerelease during the '[=10s=]. The rest? They all suck horribly, though special mention goes to the ZX Spectrum version, which is especially bad. When the UsefulNotes/{{Intellivision}} version was released, people at Mattel suspected it to be an act of sabotage on the part of Coleco.
* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'''s many console ports suffered in one way or another:
** While the SNES version is indeed a marvelous achievement, the pros are ''far'' outweighed by the cons. The graphics of the original were greatly downgraded; enemies are no longer [[LudicrousGibs gibbed]] when suffering from close-range explosions, many textures have been simplified or removed outright (and enemy sprites, leading the infamous "crab-walking" baddies that always faced you), the framerate is rather uneven, and the frames can even skip some sprite animations if more than three enemies are on-screen at close-range. The lighting was also significantly altered, making certain lit walls where secrets are hidden like any other wall, which can cause frustration if you're trying to remember which freaking panel that upgrade was put behind. To make it worse, they even had the '''gall''' to add EasyModeMockery; if you're playing the easy difficulty levels, it only lets you play the first episode, ''Knee-Deep in the Dead''. If you want to play the third episode ''Inferno'' and see the FinalBoss, you were forced to play on Ultra-Violence or Nightmare!, the two hardest difficulties. The Super Famicom version fixes this.\\
\\
The sound effects are muffled as well, a good portion of the levels have been excised, and [[FakeDifficulty it's impossible to turn and sidestep at the same time]]--something that even the SNES port of ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' could manage. The only truly good part of the game is its soundtrack, which is fun to listen to because the SNES's sampler makes the MIDI soundtrack sound much more like real instruments than the Sound Blaster's FM synth ever could[[note]]Unless you cut your teeth with the PC version of Doom on a PC with a Gravis Ultrasound, then the SNES version sounds absolutely muffled compared to the glory that is the Ultrasound. Because, like the SNES' [=SPC700=], the Ultrasound was a sampler-based sound card, which Doom had full support for and would load its own custom soundfonts if one is used, and unlike the SNES' [=SPC700=], it had ''at least'' '''four''' times the amount of memory compared to the [=SPC700=] (256kb upgradable to 1MB, vs 64kb). And the [=AWE32=] (another sampler-based card) ain't too far behind either.[[/note]].
** The Sega [=32X=] port was inexplicably inferior to the SNES version despite being on a superior hardware. Despite the graphics being better, the entire third episode was missing along with the bosses and BFG-9000, beating the game would load up a DOS prompt if the player cheated or used the level select and the soundtrack was ''butchered''. Especially unforgivable because the FM chip in the Genesis[[note]]the [=YM2612=]; the 32X uses 2 PWM channels[[/note]] is very similar to the [=YM2608=] (the FM chip used on later versions of the UsefulNotes/{{PC88}} and UsefulNotes/{{PC98}}), and it even has an additional PSG chip for sound effects.
** Art Data Interactive's port on the 3DO. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msfL7XRe6DQ Small screen and low frame-rate ahoy!]] When put next to Interplay's port of ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' on the same console, this is inexcusable. The single bright spot, picked up on pretty much every review, was the awesome music, rerecorded specifically for this version. Just a shame that there were so few levels that some of the original songs were not present. The port was frequently rumoured to have been accidentally mastered from an earlier build, but as [[https://github.com/Olde-Skuul/doom3do it turns out]], it was programmed by ''one person'' in ten weeks.
** The American Sega Saturn port is an absolute mess. Jerky, unresponsive controls are mapped to a decidedly questionable control scheme. There are completely random bouts of slowdown -- it sometimes happens when looking at a blank wall! Supposedly, this is because John Carmack was very strict about not allowing them to use hardware rendering due to texture warping, although few would argue that unplayable lag is the better option. The non-musical sound effects are of low quality. And there is no multiplayer, which takes half the fun out of ''Doom''. It's been compared to the 32X port in quality, and the Saturn has more advanced specs than the 32X. The Japanese version, on the other hand, fared much better although both versions lacked the colored lighting the [=PlayStation=] version had.
* ''VideoGame/EnemyTerritoryQuakeWars'' on Xbox 360 and [=PS3=] had badly downgraded graphics, missing features (including permanent stat growth, one of the main feature of the original version), was limited to 16 players instead of 32 and had ridiculously strong auto-aim. At least one ID Software employee called it a textbook example of how not to port a game.
* ''VideoGame/{{Gauntlet}}: Dark Legacy'' was ported to the Xbox from the [=PS2=] version and gained some new features (such as the ability to store powerups and use them later), but also gained new glitches. The [=GameCube=] version was even worse, having glitches, slowdown, and missing health meters on bosses, though a later release fixed these.
* ''VideoGame/LichdomBattlemage'' on [=PlayStation 4=] and Xbox One has two huge problems: ''atrocious'' performance, with the game always staying between 10-20 frames per second, and ''atrocious'' loading times, clocking in at several minutes, while having the audacity of still needing to stream in textures afterwards. But on the bright side, a patch was later released, showing astronomical improvements in performance over the earlier build. The Xbox One version stays at a near constant 30FPS with vertical sync. However, the PlayStation 4 version has an unlocked framerate up to 60FPS, making it inconsistent but still playable, especially compared to the stock version. The only sacrifice made was a drop from a native 1080p to 900p on both consoles.
* ''VideoGame/TheLionKing'' for the NES was a disaster, with sluggish and unresponsive controls, physics and jumping mechanics that are broken beyond belief, and short levels (the game can be completed in under 20 minutes) which are presented without any kind of story context. On top of that, the game only covers the young Simba levels from the 16-bit games, meaning that not only do you not play as the eponymous Lion King, but ''the film's villain Scar is completely absent from gameplay'' (outside of the EasyModeMockery ending screen). What's sad about this port is even the ''bootleg port'' created by Super Game is superior to it both gameplay-wise and aesthetically (musically as well, since all of Super Game's ports are done with the Konami sound engine) and even resembles the original game more. North American and Japanese gamers were at least spared from seeing this exist in their region, as it was only released in PAL territories. There's evidence pointing towards this port being [[ObviousBeta an unfinished release]], as the Game Boy version of the game manages to include every level from its 16-bit counterparts except Be Prepared while polishing up some of the rough spots.
** The UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows port was cited by some to have been the reason why game developers initially stuck to MS-DOS, and as one of the reasons for [=DirectX=]'s inception. The game used [=WinG=], a graphics backend library Microsoft developed in an attempt to address issues with game development on Windows, as the latter operating system added unnecessary overhead and did not allow for close-to-metal access to hardware unlike DOS. While the Windows port did work to an extent, it caused quite a PR disaster when millions of Compaq Presarios came shipped with incompatible graphics drivers, leading to [=BSODs=], tantrums among children, and thus disgruntled parents.
* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed: Hot Pursuit 2'' was a completely different game on the the Xbox, PC, and [=GameCube=], all designed by a different development house from the [=PlayStation=] 2 version. While there are some track similarities, the sense of speed is all but gone, the handling is worse, the game in general is far more boring, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking the menus don't look as nice]]. These versions of the game aren't "bad", ''per se'' (as games they're fundamentally sound and could even be fun if you didn't ever get to play the "good" one), but they are considerably inferior to the [=PlayStation=] 2 version.
* ''VideoGame/RevolutionX''. Half of the reason for its checkered reputation comes from its abysmal SNES and Genesis ports, which are better-known than the original coin-op light gun game.[[note]]The other half is because of [[WidgetSeries its sheer absurdity]], [[SoBadItsGood but that's not for this page]].[[/note]] The arcade game had digitized graphics of higher resolution than what those two consoles could handle ([[http://www.sydlexia.com/revcomp.htm here's a comparison]]) and actual Music/{{Aerosmith}} songs for BGM. Also, the ports lacked support for the consoles' respective light gun controllers for no reason whatsoever.
* While ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheRobots'' is abysmal on any console, some ports managed to make it even worse. The two only elements of the game that people generally agree are good are a well-done techno soundtrack (and depending on which port you're playing, an alternate soundtrack by Music/{{Queen}}'s Brian May) and very fluid pre-rendered graphics. While the Genesis and SNES ports had lower quality music, the Amiga and MS-DOS port had ''no music at all'', the Game Gear port completely tanked all of the game's only redeeming qualities, with understandably the worst graphics and musical quality of them all, while somehow managing to play even ''worse'' than the other ports (it's stuck on permanent hard mode, which in the other ports meant that [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the game resorted to blatant cheating and button-reading to win]]).
* ''VideoGame/SimCity 2000'' has the same issues in every single console version. Control responsiveness is unbelievably bad, and for something that stores data on flash or battery-backed RAM instead of magnetic media, the save game loading times are incredibly slow. Also, looking for help? [[ObviousBeta You're instructed to press shift + enter!]]
* ''Franchise/SilentHill HD Collection'':
** The remastering of ''VideoGame/SilentHill2'' and ''VideoGame/SilentHill3'' for UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}, was outsourced to Hijinx Studios, a mobile/handheld game developer that had never done a console game before, using source code from [[http://www.1up.com/features/the-problem-with-preservation the unfinished betas]] of both games due to poor archiving. It shows, with both games suffering from many bugs major and minor and overall being noticeably worse than the originals on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 and UsefulNotes/{{Xbox}}. There is rampant slowdown to the point of rendering the games (particularly ''[=SH3=]'') virtually unplayable, the voices fall out of sync with the characters' lips, poor lighting makes navigation almost impossible in some parts, some of the texture work looks unfinished and recycled from the original versions (clashing badly with the redone sections), and most damningly, ''[=SH2=]''[='=]s famous fog effects are so broken as to render certain parts of the game laughable. What makes that all even worse is that source code is not even required to produce an HD version of a [=PS2=] game. All you need is a retail copy, and a team of programmers savvy in the [=PS2=] language. It was how the HD versions of ''VideoGame/{{ICO}}'' and ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheColossus'' were made. Thankfully, Konami patched the [=PS3=] version, and ''[=SH2=]'' works pretty well now with minor issues. (They mostly fixed the fog effect, though it's still somewhat less impressive than the original.) Xbox 360 owners, however, were screwed as they didn't get that patch. All told, the InternetBackdraft from the whole debacle was so bad that many ''Silent Hill'' fans boycotted the collection out of spite.
** And all of that doesn't even get into the creative decisions, the biggest one being that both games came with redone voice acting that quickly proved controversial among fans of the series. In ''[=SH3=]'', for instance, the teenage protagonist Heather suffered a dramatic case of DawsonCasting, sounding like a forty-year-old woman imitating a teenage girl. (Comparisons between the originals and the remasters can be seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV_NC4JGntM here]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pu0JUqrZoYM here]].) Fortunately, with ''[=SH2=]'' the original voice track is still available as an option, but because Konami couldn't clear all the original voice actors for ''[=SH3=]'' in time for release (the VA for Heather turned out to be working in China and the VA for Douglas [[AuthorExistenceFailure died just before the original game was released]]), only the new voice track is available in that game.
* ''Starfighter 3000'', the Saturn and [=PlayStation=] ports of the 3DO game ''Starfighter'', has terrible draw distance and less graphical detail than the original, quite baffling considering how much weaker the 3DO is. The original version made heavy use of the 3DO's ARM RISC processors, but even there the port could have turned out much better than it did. The Saturn version is [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJYLjHgelPI especially bad]].
* Ports by High Voltage Studios:
** ''[[VideoGame/ZoneOfTheEnders Zone of the Enders HD Collection]]'' had its problems on both [=PlayStation=] 3 and Xbox 360, but the former got the raw end of the stick, even more so with ''The 2nd Runner''. It had very inconsistent frame-rate issues that were never present in the [=PlayStation=] 2 originals (at most it ran only about 30 FPS) and visual effects went missing, all of which is inexcusable running on superior hardware. As it turns out, Konami hired High Voltage Studios to handle the porting job rather than doing it in-house or hiring Bluepoint, the studio that handled the HD ports of the ''Metal Gear Solid'' games. And to put icing on the cake, due to the negative reception the ''Zone of the Enders HD Collection'' received, [[http://www.siliconera.com/2013/05/02/we-might-have-to-wait-a-little-longer-for-a-zone-of-the-enders-sequel/ Ender's Project has been put off indefinitely and the dev team dismantled as a result]]. Thankfully they worked on a patch with Hexa Drive, the same team behind the HD port of ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', for the [=PlayStation=] 3 roughly a year later that [[PolishedPort inverts this trope]], running in full 1080p with much smoother frame-rate. Unfortunately, like the ''Silent Hill HD Collection'', Xbox 360 owners were screwed over AGAIN as the patch was released only for [=PlayStation=] 3.
** The studio has been responsible for a number of other terrible ports since then: ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'', ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' and ''VideoGame/MortalKombatX'' were all optimisation disasters. Their [=PlayStation=] 4 and Xbox One ports of ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'' were missing several effects and possessed a janky frame rate. Their [=PlayStation=] 4 port of ''Injustice'', however, left the game completely intact with no noted issues.
* All three console versions of the game ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins'' suffer from some form of issues. Both the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 versions suffer from some nasty [[GameBreakingBug Game-Breaking Bugs]] that apparently Warner Bros. simply has no interest in patching, which involves the game randomly crashing when trying to enter certain areas, along with both versions having a somewhat inconsistent framerate. The 360 suffers from even more freezing issues, occasional black screens, and even save data corruption. The Wii U version seemed to not be hit as hard, as its main issues mainly just involve a somewhat choppy framerate like the other versions, and the gamepad features feel a bit bare bones compared to the Wii U port of ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' (likely the result of the Wii U version being handled by Human Head Studios, the people behind ''VideoGame/Prey2006'', instead of the game's primary developer, WB Montreal, who were the studio behind the Wii U port of ''Arkham City'' in the first place), but otherwise the Wii U game actually seems better by comparison due to higher quality graphics and much less game-breaking bugs.
* While not a "disaster" in the "this utterly shames the original product" sense, ''VideoGame/PrimalRage'' has a unique issue: It ''cannot'' be ported correctly. The original game has a very strange encryption scheme and it's never been decoded and all related parties who created it have never been willing to help out with breaking it. So all the ports are based on code that has been [=DRM'd=] by this encryption, resulting in various glitches, missing effects (such as blood color) and being unable to perform certain combos and fatalities properly.
* The "HD Remasters" of ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Prototype 2}}'' for the [=PlayStation=] 4 and Xbox One, which were uneventfully churned out by Activision, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGqkhkS4fqI actually run worse]] than their [=PlayStation=] 3 and Xbox 360 counterparts. Seeing how the games run worse on more powerful hardware is inexcusable and it shows that these are just lazy ports rather than actual remasters.
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'' is a trainwreck on every console. Occasional lag refusing to blow up cars one by one on Veteran Child's boss fight will inevitably cause him to create a chain reaction of exploding cars that will 99% of the time freeze the game, it will lock up more often on the crazier end-game missions, (really any over the top usage of the black hole gun or tons of explosions cause a hard lock) and to top it off if you're an achievement/trophy hunter/completionist all versions have the achievement/trophy ''Where is my Cape?'' glitched to a point that if that glitch happens you must start a new game and follow a specific set of requirements while recollecting all 1,255 Data Clusters just to be able to buy every single super power to qualify for it and even if you followed those requirements the game more often than not won't give it to you. Have fun replaying the game over and over just for 100% or a Platinum Trophy!
* ''VideoGame/SuperMonkeyBall: Deluxe'' on the [=PS2=] and Xbox may have levels and content from both the original games in one DVD, plus more, but both versions suffer from the controls not being anywhere as good from the UsefulNotes/GameCube versions. Worse yet for the [=PS2=] version having some framerate issues and, with the [=PS2=]'s hardware not being as powerful as the [=GameCube=], graphics that don't look as good as the original.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:PC Operating Systems]]
* ''[=BreakThru=]'', a jeep-based ShootEmUp by Creator/DataEast, had three computer ports published by US Gold. The UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} version had dishwater-ugly backgrounds, stupid sound effects, terrible hit detection and enemy vehicles that did things like drive over water. The UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum version had awkward keyboard controls, barely any sound, bad collision detection, and a lack of enemies, though the graphics weren't terrible for the system. The UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC version had programming similar to the Spectrum version, but the game window was inexplicably much smaller; it received the lowest score for any game reviewed in ''AMTIX!'' magazine.
* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonI'':
** The game was ported by UK-based Binary Design to home computer platforms in 1988, who were ordered by Mastertronic (the publisher that commissioned them) to finish these ports under a strict deadline, resulting in most of them turning out to be total rushjobs. A common problem all of these ports shared was the fact that the developers attempted to adapt the arcade game's three-button combat system to work on one-button joysticks that were standard for PC gaming back then. This meant that instead of having dedicated buttons for kicking, jumping and punching, players only had a single fire button for everything and performing anything other than a standing punch required rather counter-intuitive joystick/button combinations (e.g. Down-Away+Fire for a backward whirlwind kick, Down-Forward+Fire for a jump kicks). The uppercut and roundhouse kicks were also missing in these versions, since enemies lacked their stunned animations -- instead they simply fall down to the floor after a few hits. On top of all that, these versions had non-existent music and sound effects due to the floppy disk format they were released on.
** The Amiga and Atari ST versions, with both of them running on 16-bit hardware, could've theoretically reproduced the arcade version's visuals -- instead they feature laughably amateurish art assets in which all the male character (except the Abobos and Machine Gun Willy) are recolors of the same generic guy. The IBM PC version looked even worse, as it only supported the already dated CGA and EGA graphic cards. ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonII'' and ''3'' fared better visually on these platforms (especially ''3'', which resembled the arcade version pretty closely), but still suffered from the aforementioned controls and sound issues.
** The Commodore 64 version used a sprite stacking technique for its graphics that resulted in all the characters having an invisible waist. The manual for this version actually featured an apology and explanation from the developers for using this technique. When Ocean Software got the rights to re-release ''Double Dragon'' on the [=C64=], they chose to create their own conversion instead of re-releasing the Binary Design one, which was considerably better looking, but was one-player only and lacked the final boss battle against Machine Gun Willy.
** The Amstrad CPC actually had two versions of ''Double Dragon''. The version distributed in the UK was based on the ZX Spectrum version, while the version distributed in other European countries such as France and Spain used art assets similar to the Amiga version and is generally regarded to be the better of the two versions, although it's only compatible with CPC 6128 models.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Gradius}} Salamander]]'' for the UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum and UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC (the latter being a cheap conversion of the former, as was all too often the case). The majority of the screen was taken up with the HUD. The action was slow -- you don't get a speed up until halfway into the first level, and need it well before then. There are [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMcvCM5Rw_8 one or two bugs]] that make one of the {{boss battle}}s a LuckBasedMission. Only the first stage has an actual layout; the rest of them just have the odd enemy floating across the screen.
* ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'' received home computer ports of the original ''World Warrior'' for the western market in 1993.
** Aside from the fact that ''World Warrior'' was already considered vestigial by that time (the 16-bit consoles were already receiving ports of the previous year's ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' editions), the conversions were all being handled by U.S. Gold, a company with a spotty track record when it came to porting arcade games to home computers.
** [[http://www.scary-crayon.com/games/sf2pc/ The IBM PC port]] was a total trainwreck. Everybody moved like they were paralyzed, combos were impossible (the sprites were invincible while taking damage), if you won while in mid-air your character would stop and do his/her victory pose defying all rules of gravity, and there were only three songs -- Ken's theme (which became the title theme), the character select theme (which was the only theme to play during gameplay '''at all''') and Zangief's ending theme (which was now everyone's ending theme).
** The [=C64=] version had the large, detailed character sprites became tiny, unrecognizable messes of pixels and five-minute loads to move on to the next stage. On top of all that, instead of three-punch and three-kick buttons, it was played with a joystick which only had one button.
* ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' qualifies in every 8-bit computer version '''not''' on the C64 (the computer it was originally programmed for). Broken controls, choppy scrolling, and missing level features abound, and the graphics take strange liberties with the original material. Of course, this is probably more due to the computers' lack of hardware-accelerated sprites and scrolling (which the C64 had) than the programmers' incompetence, but one wonders why they attempted it at all. The exception is the Amstrad CPC version, which is well regarded and highly playable. Despite the scrolling and smaller game screen, the graphics are far better than the C64 graphics (but then the C64 has a horrendously drab palette to pick colors from). Still not sure why Turrican is green though when perfectly usable blues are available in the Amstrad palette and were used elsewhere in the games.
* Rare non-game example: Ports of the Clam antivirus program to UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows still do not have a real-time scanner. The original UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} versions started including a real-time scanner some years back, and the [[UsefulNotes/MacOS OS X]] version, while unable to get the original real-time scanner working, compensated with a completely rewritten real-time scanner called ''[=ClamXAV=] Sentry''. However, the Windows version lacked this basic amenity, because apparently the devs lack the manpower to make a port and no one else cared.
* While not a "disaster", per se, certain PC games around the early and mid-[=2000s=] (the ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheSandsOfTime'' trilogy and ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted'' 2005 spring to mind) have process threading issues on multi-core systems, which can cause jerky performance. This is because these games buffer information for preprocessing on the assumption of operating on a single-core system. In a multi-core environment, the process scheduler will grab queued threads and assign them to the cores for simultaneous processing. This in turn screws up things like order of execution and output scheduling, which the games aren't coded to handle, hence the jerkiness due to having to compensate for possible out of order data (and can occasionally cause crashes if the engine doesn't handle it right). The solution is to typically shut off all but one core for the game's executable to run its requests through (this can be done at runtime in the Task Manager or by using a hex patcher to modify the game executable directly).
* The Steam releases of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' are direct ports of the mobile versions, which have clunky interfaces that weren't meant for PC gaming. Entire chunks of the battle screen are taken up by needlessly huge menu options, and although the "run" and "fast-forward battle" icons had their functionality removed and assigned to keys/buttons, they inexplicably weren't removed from the interface. On top of that, ''Final Fantasy VI'' had bad lag, sound problems, and it couldn't even be played in offline mode. The issues were resolved quickly, but the clunky interface remained.
* ''VideoGame/JetSetRadio'''s Steam port only lets you configure keyboard controls, and it was a straight port of the [=X360=] port (a port of a port), thus using the 360 buttons as reference (e.g. "Hold down LT to center the camera"). You can, in fact, use a controller, but the controls will most likely be screwed up (for example, if using a [=PS3=] controller, the A button will be Triangle, or the Start button will be R2), and there is no option to configure them anywhere. If you want to have proper gamepad support, you will either have to download a controller program like [=MotionInJoy=] or you will have to download [[http://steamcommunity.com/app/205950/discussions/0/864946409163562007/ a fan-made patch]]. Emphasis on ''fan-made patch''. The Steam version of the game also infamously and inexplicably ''refuses to save'' on some copies. Re-downloading it... doesn't really help, and the main way of fixing it is to use a hex editor to modify the executable file. Even ''that'' doesn't always work.
* A tie-in for the film ''Film/BeverlyHillsCop'' was released on 4 platforms: UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}}, UsefulNotes/AtariST, UsefulNotes/Commodore64, and PC. The Amiga version has smashing music due to the Paula audio chip. The Atari ST and [=C64=] version was bearable thanks to the PSG sound system. The PC version, however, is this trope play straight. Using only EGA graphics and PC speaker sound, despite the [=AdLib=] and Game Blaster, and indeed the first generation Sound Blaster, being already released when the game came out and VGA was already picking up steam. And even then the PC music was often described as someone strangling an ice cream truck.
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21st Feb '17 3:58:11 PM billywws
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* ''VideoGame/SegaRally2'' suffered from framerates that were poor compared to the less powerful arcade machine, which ran the game at 60FPS. There was even a code to enable a 60FPS mode, but even then the game still suffered frequent framerate drops.



* The Dreamcast version of ''VideoGame/MortalKombat4'', ''Mortal Kombat Gold'', gets some extra characters but at the expense of being more buggy than any other version of the game.

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* The Dreamcast version of ''VideoGame/MortalKombat4'', ''Mortal Kombat Gold'', gets some extra characters but at the expense of being more buggy than any other version of the game. And despite being more powerful than the original Midway Zeus machine the arcade version ran on, the graphics were still inferior, with numerous visual effects missing. It appeared to be a port of the PC version, which was a port of the PlayStation version.
21st Feb '17 11:48:03 AM CodyPurple
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*The iOS and Android ports of VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys run fine, but the problem is that the map in the game is so big that it obstructs the view, making it very difficult to check the animatronics before you kick the bucket.
** The port for VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys4 is even worse! It suffers some framerate issues in certain smartphones and the controls feel pretty jerky, which makes beating the game a bitch.



** ''Sonic Jam'' was practically an InNameOnly version of the Saturn original. There was nothing from the original ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'', and only two levels each from the other three Genesis titles. On top of that, the graphics were barely adequate, the music sounded like a drunk guy playing a keyboard for the first time, and Sonic handled more like an actual hedgehog than his speedy self. Quite possibly the worst Sonic game ever made, beating out the much-maligned '''06'' and even the GBA ''Sonic 1'' (see above).

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** ''Sonic Jam'' was practically an InNameOnly version of the Saturn original. There was nothing nothing
from the original ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'', and only two levels each from the other three Genesis titles. On top of that, the graphics were barely adequate, the music sounded like a drunk guy playing a keyboard for the first time, and Sonic handled more like an actual hedgehog than his speedy self. Quite possibly the worst Sonic game ever made, beating out the much-maligned '''06'' and even the GBA ''Sonic 1'' (see above).
20th Feb '17 11:44:13 AM OlfinBedwere
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsBartVsTheWorld'' had Master System and Game Gear ports made by Flying Edge, the same developer who had previously produced Sega ports for ''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsBartVsTheSpaceMutants'' that were superior to the NES original in every way. This time around, however, the ports they created were ''worse'' than the NES version. While the graphics were somewhat better, the controls were even worse than the already skittish NES controls, the soundtrack was reduced to just two short and uninspired tunes, and all the storyline sequences were chopped out, along with the extra level you got for HundredPercentCompletion. It's almost like Flying Edge didn't feel the Sega ports were worth the effort and instead focused on the Amiga version, which actually ''is'' a PolishedPort.
13th Feb '17 6:34:16 AM Dere
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* ''VideoGame/SonicR'' also dropped the transparency effects on the final tracks, but made up for it by adding variable weather conditions. Certain versions didn't even come with the music!
13th Feb '17 6:33:32 AM Dere
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* While the PC port of ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld'' runs fine on sufficiently powerful hardware, it still commits one of the cardinal sins of porting to the PC, which is that the actual speed of the game is still tied to the framerate.[[note]]Using frames as a measure of time makes programming so much easier on consoles.[[/note]] This means that if the framerate ever dips below 60 FPS, the gameplay itself will slowdown, not just the rate at which the graphics render, making slowdown ''much'' more noticable. This is rather lacking in comparison to the PolishedPort its [[VideoGame/SonicGenerations predecessor]] received.
12th Feb '17 7:01:51 PM comicwriter
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* ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha 3 Upper'' got three new characters from ''Capcom Vs. SNK 2'' in exchange for butchered sounds and stages, as well as no endings. Apparently [[MisBlamed it wasn't the developer's fault]], however, since Capcom [[ExecutiveMeddling insisted on them using an 8 MB cart]] for whatever ridiculous reason, while 16 and 32 MB carts were available. They did try their best to at least fit all the play mechanics in those eight megabytes, as well as replacing World Tour with a set of options that more or less did the same thing and didn't require you to beat the mode with every single character that you wanted to be able to utilize them.

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* ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha 3 Upper'' got three new characters from ''Capcom Vs. ''VideoGame/{{Capcom Vs SNK 2'' 2|Mark Of The Millennium}}'' in exchange for butchered sounds and stages, as well as no endings. Apparently [[MisBlamed it wasn't the developer's fault]], however, since Capcom [[ExecutiveMeddling insisted on them using an 8 MB cart]] for whatever ridiculous reason, while 16 and 32 MB carts were available. They did try their best to at least fit all the play mechanics in those eight megabytes, as well as replacing World Tour with a set of options that more or less did the same thing and didn't require you to beat the mode with every single character that you wanted to be able to utilize them.
3rd Feb '17 3:45:16 PM MyFinalEdits
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* ''VideoGame/MegaManAndBass'' fares a lot better than most other examples on this list ([[BlindIdiotTranslation the hilariously bad translation of the Robot Database aside]]). The screen's understandably smaller, and the sound quality isn't as good (though the soundtrack has also been tweaked a bit, and there are some people who actually prefer the GBA soundtrack over the original Super Famicom one), but one thing that's never been defended is that Bass' dash command has been changed from its own dedicated button to double-tapping left or right, making it more awkward to use (which, in what is arguably the hardest game in the ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'' series is a big deal). They obviously did this because the GBA has less buttons, but couldn't they just make it the same input as Mega Man's slide instead?

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* ''VideoGame/MegaManAndBass'' fares a lot better than most other examples on this list ([[BlindIdiotTranslation the hilariously bad translation of the Robot Database aside]]). The screen's understandably smaller, and the sound quality isn't as good (though the soundtrack has also been tweaked a bit, and there are some people who actually prefer the GBA soundtrack over the original Super Famicom one), but one thing that's never been defended is that Bass' dash command has been changed from its own dedicated button to double-tapping left or right, making it more awkward to use (which, in what is arguably the hardest game in the ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'' series is a big deal).use. They obviously did this because the GBA has less buttons, but couldn't they just make it the same input as Mega Man's slide instead?



* It's ultimately generous of Blizzard release several of their old games for free on Windows, but the ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' release was a major mess up, period. The classic songs were removed and replaced with a generic grunge metal soundtrack, and to make things worse, it was actually the ''SNES'' version of the game patched to disable the songs and then run on a modified emulator that also provided the grunge soundtrack on it's own[[note]]loading the ROM into a proper emulator resulted in the game missing it's music, but sound effects are intact[[/note]]. This also meant that the game had one long soundtrack that doesn't change through the game and gets annoying quickly enough. One wonders that if they can't even convince the right holders of the songs to let them distribute their chiptune versions of the songs with their game(it's not even the real songs, just chiptune covers that they made themselves!), why even bother?
** Another thing to note, which is more egregious, is that the game is a demo version. While the free releases of ''Blackthorne'' and ''The Lost Vikings'' were the full games, for ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' the people at Blizzard decided to give out a severely cut-down version that, after just three races, unceremoniously dumps you back to the title screen, with no fanfare or anything.

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* It's ultimately generous of Blizzard release several of their old games for free on Windows, but the ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' release was a major mess up, period. The classic songs were removed and replaced with a generic grunge metal soundtrack, and to make things worse, it was actually the ''SNES'' version of the game patched to disable the songs and then run on a modified emulator that also provided the grunge soundtrack on it's own[[note]]loading the ROM into a proper emulator resulted in the game missing it's music, but sound effects are intact[[/note]]. This also meant that the game had one long soundtrack that doesn't change through the game and gets annoying quickly enough. One wonders that if they can't even convince the right holders of the songs to let them distribute their chiptune versions of the songs with their game(it's not even the real songs, just chiptune covers that they made themselves!), why even bother?
**
Another thing to note, which is more egregious, note is that the game is a demo version. While the free releases of ''Blackthorne'' and ''The Lost Vikings'' were the full games, for ''Rock 'n' Roll Racing'' the people at Blizzard decided to give out a severely cut-down version that, after just three races, unceremoniously dumps you back to the title screen, with no fanfare or anything.



* All three console versions of the game ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins'' suffer from some form of issues. Both the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 versions suffer from some nasty [[GameBreakingBug Game-Breaking Bugs]] that apparently Warner Bros. simply has no interest in patching, which involves the game randomly crashing when trying to enter certain areas, along with both versions having a somewhat inconsistent framerate. The 360 arguably got hit the worst though as it suffers from even more freezing issues, occasional black screens, and even save data corruption. The Wii U version seemed to not be hit as hard, as its main issues mainly just involve a somewhat choppy framerate like the other versions, and the gamepad features feel a bit bare bones compared to the Wii U port of ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' (likely the result of the Wii U version being handled by Human Head Studios, the people behind ''VideoGame/Prey2006'', instead of the game's primary developer, WB Montreal, who were the studio behind the Wii U port of ''Arkham City'' in the first place), but otherwise the Wii U game actually seems better by comparison due to higher quality graphics and much less game-breaking bugs.

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* All three console versions of the game ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins'' suffer from some form of issues. Both the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 versions suffer from some nasty [[GameBreakingBug Game-Breaking Bugs]] that apparently Warner Bros. simply has no interest in patching, which involves the game randomly crashing when trying to enter certain areas, along with both versions having a somewhat inconsistent framerate. The 360 arguably got hit the worst though as it suffers from even more freezing issues, occasional black screens, and even save data corruption. The Wii U version seemed to not be hit as hard, as its main issues mainly just involve a somewhat choppy framerate like the other versions, and the gamepad features feel a bit bare bones compared to the Wii U port of ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' (likely the result of the Wii U version being handled by Human Head Studios, the people behind ''VideoGame/Prey2006'', instead of the game's primary developer, WB Montreal, who were the studio behind the Wii U port of ''Arkham City'' in the first place), but otherwise the Wii U game actually seems better by comparison due to higher quality graphics and much less game-breaking bugs.
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