History Main / PortingDisaster

21st May '17 1:35:13 PM Lirodon
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* Konami made a PS1 port of ''[[VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution Dancing Stage]] Fusion'', which was released for [=PlayStation 2=] in 2004 and as an arcade title as a trial run for [=DDR SuperNOVA=]. Konami had, in all other markets, shifted ''Dance Dance Revolution'' console releases exclusively to PS2 in 2002 with ''DDRMAX''. However, it is unknown why they even bothered; it only had 12 songs ''at all'' (''Dancing Stage Party Edition'' had 51, and PS2 ''Fusion'' had 54), and it used a re-skin of the aging and already abandoned ''DDR 4th Mix'' engine with a modified UI and ''DDR Extreme'' graphics pasted into the gameplay screen. Given how little it offers, why did Konami even bother?

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* Konami made a PS1 port of ''[[VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution Dancing Stage]] Fusion'', which was released for [=PlayStation 2=] in 2004 and as an arcade title as a trial run for [=DDR SuperNOVA=]. Konami had, in all other markets, shifted ''Dance Dance Revolution'' console releases exclusively to PS2 in 2002 with ''DDRMAX''. However, it is unknown why they even bothered; it only had 12 songs ''at all'' (''Dancing Stage Party Edition'' had 51, and PS2 ''Fusion'' had 54), and it used a re-skin of the aging and already abandoned ''DDR 4th Mix'' engine with a modified UI and ''DDR Extreme'' graphics pasted into the gameplay screen. Given how little it offers, why did Konami even bother?Witness the curiosity of [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVObglxFVu8 playing "Kakumei"]], with freeze arrows expunged because they didn't exist yet.
21st May '17 1:32:35 PM Lirodon
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* Konami made PS1 ports of ''[[VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution Dancing Stage]] Fusion'', which was released for [=PlayStation 2=] in 2004 and as an arcade title as a trial run for [=DDR SuperNOVA=]. Konami had, in all other markets, shifted ''Dance Dance Revolution'' console releases exclusively to PS2 in 2002 with ''DDRMAX''. However, it is unknown why they even bothered; it only had 12 songs ''at all'' (''Dancing Stage Party Edition'' had 51, and PS2 ''Fusion'' had 54), and it used a re-skin of the aging and already abandoned ''DDR 4th Mix'' engine with a modified UI and ''DDR Extreme'' graphics pasted into the gameplay screen. Given how little it offers, why did Konami even bother?

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* Konami made a PS1 ports port of ''[[VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution Dancing Stage]] Fusion'', which was released for [=PlayStation 2=] in 2004 and as an arcade title as a trial run for [=DDR SuperNOVA=]. Konami had, in all other markets, shifted ''Dance Dance Revolution'' console releases exclusively to PS2 in 2002 with ''DDRMAX''. However, it is unknown why they even bothered; it only had 12 songs ''at all'' (''Dancing Stage Party Edition'' had 51, and PS2 ''Fusion'' had 54), and it used a re-skin of the aging and already abandoned ''DDR 4th Mix'' engine with a modified UI and ''DDR Extreme'' graphics pasted into the gameplay screen. Given how little it offers, why did Konami even bother?
21st May '17 1:32:21 PM Lirodon
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* Konami made PS1 ports of ''[[VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution Dancing Stage]] Fusion'', which was released for [=PlayStation 2=] in 2004 and as an arcade title as a trial run for [=DDR SuperNOVA=]. Konami had, in all other markets, shifted ''Dance Dance Revolution'' console releases exclusively to PS2 in 2002 with ''DDRMAX''. However, it is unknown why they even bothered; it only had 12 songs ''at all'' (''Dancing Stage Party Edition'' had 51, and PS2 ''Fusion'' had 54), and it used a re-skin of the aging and already abandoned ''DDR 4th Mix'' engine with a modified UI and ''DDR Extreme'' graphics pasted into the gameplay screen. Given how little it offers, why did Konami even bother?
14th May '17 3:22:43 PM N8han11
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** Not everyone was happy with the reversal of her play style, however. Some preferred her new moves much more than her old ones. Also, other stuff the PSP version left out from the Saturn version were some new tracks. One of which being [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aceWIRyTcW8 her boss theme]], which was replaced with Richter's for some reason.
10th May '17 4:24:04 AM AndreyKva
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* The first two ''Splinter Cell'' games [[TechnologyMarchesOn eventually]] became this. They were directly ported from the original Xbox versions, and as such were optimised for a number of Nvidia and ATI cards that supported a form of shadow mapping called "shadow buffers", first supported on the [=GeForce 3=] and the [=NV2A=] GPU used on the console. While it did work on most hardware at the time, later graphics cards, driver versions and [=DirectX=] [=APIs=] broke functionality for the said buffers, causing spotlights and other projected shadows to no longer work. As shadows are a key gameplay element, playing the original ''Splinter Cell'' and ''Pandora Tomorrow'' would be nigh impossible on modern hardware. ''Splinter Cell 1'' did have a fallback mode for ATI video cards and other systems that are incapable of rendering shadow buffers, but ''Pandora Tomorrow'' lacks it, which may have accounted for why the latter is unavailable on Steam. [[http://www.jiri-dvorak.cz/scellpt/ There is a fan-made fix for that game, though]].

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* The first two ''Splinter Cell'' games [[TechnologyMarchesOn eventually]] became this. They were directly ported from the original Xbox versions, version, and as such were optimised for a number of contemporary Nvidia and ATI cards that supported a form of shadow mapping called "shadow buffers", first supported on the [=GeForce 3=] and the [=NV2A=] GPU used on the console. While it did work on most hardware at the time, later graphics cards, driver versions and [=DirectX=] [=APIs=] broke functionality for the said buffers, causing spotlights and other projected shadows to no longer work. As lighting and shadows are a key gameplay element, elements of the gameplay, playing the original ''Splinter Cell'' and ''Pandora Tomorrow'' would be nigh impossible on modern hardware. a an ugly and unpleasant ordeal with a lot of trial and error. Fortunately, ''Splinter Cell 1'' did does have a fallback mode for ATI video cards and other systems that are incapable of rendering shadow buffers, but ''Pandora Tomorrow'' lacks it, which may have accounted account for why the latter it is completely unavailable on Steam.through digital distribution. [[http://www.jiri-dvorak.cz/scellpt/ There However, there is now a fan-made fan made fix for that game, though]].both of those games]].
9th May '17 10:03:07 PM Kalaong
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Also related is "consolitis"; a game is designed for ''both'' PC and consoles, and suffers in the eyes of PC gamers who are used to the greater capabilities of high-end PCs. This is especially evident in franchises that began as PC games, but later installments expanded their markets; as a result, the sequel will be noticeably less refined gameplay than its predecessor.
9th May '17 6:03:28 AM AndreyKva
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* ''VideoGame/SaintsRow2'' was so bad that Volition fired the outside company who made the port and essentially washed their hands of it, declaring it hopeless. The on-foot sequences basically worked, but driving was essentially impossible thanks to an internal game clock that did not know how to adapt for CPU speeds other than 3.2 [=GHz=], which is the clockspeed of the Xbox 360 the game was originally developed for. Thankfully the game has a fantastic community that has not only brought the game back to its intended speed and fixed thousands of other bugs, and added plenty of neat content to boot. [[http://idolninja.com/ You can check it out here]]. With the fan patch, it still isn't perfect, but it's far more playable.
** The one thing that can't be fixed is the sound; the company in charge of the PC port didn't have the budget to license the sound middleware, so they ''used the trial version'' which downgrades sound to cassette quality and mono sound. Even worse, since the sound files and the interpreter for the middleware are separate files, a patch to fix it would be 10 MB tops, and wouldn't even require re-licensing the music or voice work, since it's not those files being fixed! Luckily, there's a fan-made patch that fixes the radio back to its intended high quality sound from the Xbox 360 and Playstation 3 versions.
** The Steam release of the PC version also displays a bizarre issue where, unless both the client and the game are installed to the C: drive, the game will run, but only show the opening titles and not progress past the loading screen that comes immediately afterwards, which would ordinarily lead to the main menu. Oddly enough, years later the Steam release of ''VideogGame/SaintsRowIV'', a ''vastly'' superior port, would suffer from the same issue.

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* ''VideoGame/SaintsRow2'' was so bad that Volition essentially fired the outside company who made the port and essentially washed their hands of it, declaring it hopeless. The on-foot sequences basically worked, but driving was essentially impossible thanks to an internal game clock that did not know how to adapt for CPU speeds other than 3.2 [=GHz=], which is was the clockspeed of the Xbox 360 360, the platform the game was originally developed for. Thankfully Thankfully, the game has a fantastic community that has not only brought the game back to its intended speed and fixed thousands of other bugs, and but also added plenty of neat content to boot. [[http://idolninja.com/ You can check it out the Gentlemen of the Row supermod here]]. With the fan patch, it still isn't perfect, but it's far more playable.
** The one thing that can't be fixed is the sound; the company in charge all of the PC port didn't have the budget to license the sound middleware, so they ''used the trial version'' which downgrades sound to cassette quality and mono sound. Even worse, since the sound files are compressed to cassete tape quality and the interpreter for the middleware are separate files, a patch to fix it would be 10 MB tops, and wouldn't even require re-licensing the music or voice work, since it's not those files being fixed! mono. Luckily, there's a [[https://www.saintsrowmods.com/forum/threads/high-quality-radio-mod.9515/ huge fan-made patch patch]] that fixes the radio back to its intended high quality sound from the Xbox 360 and Playstation 3 console versions.
** The Steam release of the PC version also displays a bizarre issue where, unless both the client and the game are installed to the C: drive, the game will run, but only show the opening titles and not progress past the loading screen that comes immediately afterwards, which would ordinarily lead to the main menu. Oddly enough, years later the Steam release of ''VideogGame/SaintsRowIV'', a ''vastly'' superior port, would suffer from the exact same issue.



* ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Conviction'' is sadly brought down by Ubisoft's new CopyProtection system. If either you or Ubisoft's Internet connection is anything less than perfect for more than a single second, you are automatically kicked out of the game, and must return to the previous checkpoint upon recovery. As always with copy protection, the pirates had it cracked within - well, okay, it took a month, but the method should patch through to crack every future Ubisoft game using the same tech within a day or two. It also had an issue that affected players who installed the game on anything other than the C: drive. Launching the game from that location would result in just a black screen, while the sound played as normal. Apparently Ubisoft didn't foresee this kind of situation.
* ''Splinter Cell: Double Agent'' had a PC version that, while technically not a port, was clearly based on the Xbox 360 version. Considering that the game is based on the Unreal engine, that Ubisoft had released plenty of PC games before (including every other ''Splinter Cell'' game before then, no less, with no issues inherent to the games themselves), ''and'' that it's a pretty high-profile game, you'd think it would go fairly smoothly. Wrong. There are so many problems with this port that a list is necessary.
** The menus are a confusing mess, and you can't use the mouse on the in-game "laptop" menus; you need to stupidly press the keys mapped to "use" and "crouch". This wasn't a problem in earlier ''Splinter Cell'' PC games.

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* ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Conviction'' is sadly was another port brought down by Ubisoft's new CopyProtection system. If either you or Ubisoft's Internet connection is anything less than perfect for more than a single second, you are automatically kicked out of the game, and must return to the previous checkpoint upon recovery. As always with copy protection, the pirates had it cracked within - well, okay, it took a month, but the method should patch through to crack every future Ubisoft game using the same tech within a day or two. It also had an issue that affected players who installed the game on anything other than the C: drive. Launching the game from that location would result in just a black screen, while the sound played as normal. Apparently Ubisoft didn't foresee this kind of situation.
* ''Splinter Cell: Double Agent'' had a PC version that, while technically not a port, was clearly based on the Xbox 360 version. Considering that the game is was based on the Unreal engine, that Ubisoft had released plenty of PC games before (including every other ''Splinter Cell'' game before then, no less, with no issues inherent to the games themselves), themselves on systems back then), ''and'' that it's it was a pretty high-profile game, you'd think it would go would've gone fairly smoothly. Wrong. There are so many problems with this port that a list is necessary.
** The menus are a confusing mess, and you can't use the mouse on the in-game "laptop" menus; menus (even though you could in the previous games); you need to stupidly press the keys mapped to "use" and "crouch". This wasn't a problem in earlier ''Splinter Cell'' PC games.
9th May '17 5:48:38 AM AndreyKva
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* ''VideoGame/RedFaction: Guerrilla'' would run far too fast on Windows 7 computers (which rather quickly replaced Vista as the go-to modern Microsoft OS), forcing the player to use a third party hacking program to slow down the game's refresh rate. Furthermore, the game carries an infamous bug where Games for Windows Live informs the player that a patch is available and is mandatory for online gameplay (even if the game itself is already up to date). Every time without fail, should the player accept the patch download, the game's framerate is reduced to a crawl (in the '''main menu''', mind you) and eventually freezes. Even Volition's release of a manual patch to fix this didn't work for many, making online multiplayer completely unplayable. This was eventually fixed with a late 2014 UpdatedRerelease as the "Steam Edition", removing the [=GFWL=] requirement in favor of Steamworks, along with various other fixes and upgrades.

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* ''VideoGame/RedFaction: Guerrilla'' would run ran far too fast on Windows 7 computers (which rather quickly replaced Vista as the go-to modern Microsoft OS), forcing the player which forced players to use a third party hacking program to slow down the game's refresh rate. Furthermore, the game carries carried an infamous bug where Games for Windows Live informs informed the player that a patch is was available and is was mandatory for online gameplay (even if the game itself is was already up to date). Every time without fail, should the player accept have accepted the patch download, the game's framerate is was reduced to a crawl (in the '''main menu''', mind you) and eventually freezes.froze. Even Volition's release of a manual patch to fix this didn't work for many, making online multiplayer completely unplayable. This was eventually fixed In 2013, with a the shutdown of Creator/THQ, the ''Red Faction'' franchise was bought by Nordic Games, and in late 2014 UpdatedRerelease as 2014, Nordic released the "Steam Edition", removing which removed the [=GFWL=] requirement in favor of Steamworks, along with introducing various other fixes and upgrades.
9th May '17 5:40:09 AM AndreyKva
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** The elevator from the fourth map regularly causes players to fall through the floor randomly (can mostly happen if a player goes idle) even today despite several attempts by Valve to fix it. Considering that everything in the first game got fixed very quickly or was not even present, that looks rather pathetic.

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** The elevator from the fourth map regularly causes players to fall through the floor randomly (can mostly happen if a player goes idle) even today despite several attempts by Valve to fix it. Considering that everything most issues in the first game got fixed very quickly or was were not even present, that looks rather pathetic.



** There's also other audio issues related to The Passing -. when it comes to a line from Louis saying "That was for Bill!" after killing a Tank in The passing, the game seems to be unable to differentiate between that campaign, where Louis is an NPC and Bill is dead, and the other campaigns ported from the first game, where Louis and Bill are both playable and likely to be alive.

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** There's also other audio issues related to The Passing -. when Passing. When it comes to a line from Louis Louis, saying "That was for Bill!" after killing a Tank in The passing, Tank, the game seems to be unable to differentiate between that campaign, where Louis is an NPC and Bill is dead, and the other campaigns ported from the first game, where Louis and Bill are both playable and likely to be alive.



* ''VideoGame/MafiaIII'' ended up being a disaster on the PC, with irate players complaining about the game being locked to 30 fps. On top of that, lower-end systems which are able to run games that are just as graphically intensive as Mafia III are unable to maintain a stable framerate even with the settings turned down to a minimum - forget about playing it on a G3258 or a similar dual-core chip, the game simply goes down to a crawl in city areas, yet in the bayou areas the game seems to run more or less fine. A post-release patch did remove the framerate cap and fixed a number of issues, but there are still some glitches and performance problems that are waiting to be fixed.

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* ''VideoGame/MafiaIII'' ended up being a disaster on the PC, with irate players complaining about the game being locked to 30 fps. On top of that, lower-end systems which are able to run games that are just as graphically intensive as Mafia III are unable to maintain a stable framerate even with the settings turned down to a minimum - forget about playing it on a G3258 or a similar dual-core chip, the game simply goes down to a crawl in city areas, yet in the bayou areas the game seems to run more or less fine. A post-release patch did remove Very soon after release, the framerate cap and fixed was removed in a patch (which lead to many players wondering why it was even there in the first place). Other patches also resolved a number of issues, but there are still some glitches and performance problems that are waiting to be fixed.



** The PC port was from the Xbox 360 version. While there were actually gameplay improvements, rumor has it that the game was tested on one graphics card and one sound driver. The released game was exceptionally buggy, with sound effects and background music dropping out and it regularly crashing between the transitions of unskippable cutscenes (which were made unskippable because skipping them crashed the game!). It took over a year and a combination of game and driver patches before the game was stable. It also had rather high system requirements for an Xbox 360 port, although [[TechMarchesOn most PCs you can buy or build today]] will run it fine.
** The PC version of the game's first DLC, ''Bring Down the Sky'', was released for free, but for some reason still required a CD-Key. To get the key, one would merely have to register on the Mass Effect website, on a page dedicated to giving out [=BDtS=] CD-Keys... a website that stopped existing once the second game was announced. For a long time, players new to the series had to e-mail EA tech support to get a CD-Key for the DLC. Fortunately, they eventually fixed it with a [[https://help.ea.com/article/mass-effect-bring-down-the-sky-dlc-redemption new downloadable file]] for the DLC that doesn't require a key.

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** The PC port game was from originally released exclusively on the Xbox 360 version. 360, but was ported to the PC about half a year later (and also to the PS3 about ''four more years'' after that). While there were actually actual gameplay improvements, such as ten hotkeys for abilities (instead of the 360's three), and generally better controls, rumor has it that the game was tested on one graphics card and one sound driver. The released game was exceptionally buggy, with sound effects and background music dropping out and it the game regularly crashing between the transitions of unskippable cutscenes (which were made unskippable because skipping them crashed the game!). It took over a year and a combination of game and driver patches before the game was stable. It also had rather high system requirements for an Xbox 360 port, although [[TechMarchesOn most PCs you can buy or build today]] will run it fine.
** The PC version of the game's first DLC, ''Bring Down the Sky'', was released for free, but for some reason still required a CD-Key. To get the key, one would merely have to register on the Mass Effect website, on a page dedicated to giving out [=BDtS=] CD-Keys... a website that stopped existing once by the second game time ''Mass Effect 2'' was announced. For a long time, players new to the series had to e-mail EA tech support to get a CD-Key for the DLC. Fortunately, they eventually fixed it with a [[https://help.ea.com/article/mass-effect-bring-down-the-sky-dlc-redemption new downloadable file]] for the DLC that doesn't require a key.
9th May '17 5:24:57 AM AndreyKva
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* ''VideoGame/FromDust'' shipped with the same maligned DRM scheme as other contemporary Ubisoft PC games even after the developers had previously announced that it wouldn't, deleting and rephrasing their original announcement on the game's own forum. Coupled with minimal visual options (no choice for anti-aliasing or any way to disable the 30 FPS limit on the display) and some baffling performance issues and {{Game Breaking Bug}}s (one level is very nearly {{unwinnable|ByMistake}} because the tides change much faster than on the console version), the PC release was a public relations disaster for Ubisoft, with Steam giving out refunds to disgruntled players for the first time since ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV''.

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* ''VideoGame/FromDust'' shipped with the same maligned DRM scheme as other contemporary Ubisoft PC games even games, ''even'' after the developers had previously announced that it wouldn't, deleting and rephrasing their original announcement on the game's own forum. Coupled with minimal visual options (no choice for anti-aliasing or any way to disable the 30 FPS limit on the display) and some baffling performance issues and {{Game Breaking Bug}}s (one level is very nearly {{unwinnable|ByMistake}} because the tides change much faster than on the console version), the PC release was a public relations disaster for Ubisoft, with Steam giving out refunds to disgruntled players for the first time since ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV''.



** The PC port had one horrible, horrible flaw. Occasionally, your saved games would disappear, never to be seen again. Epic also forgot to renew the certificate on the game's copy protection, leading everyone's copy to declare that the game was pirated and refuse to boot on January 28, 2009. This was fixed just over a week later, on February 6. During that time, ''[[{{Irony}} only pirated installations of the game could still play]]!''
** Because every installation of game is run over the Internet, people eventually ran out of installation codes, making them unable to install game even when they bought it from store (the game will just spew something about the code "exceeding number of uses, please try another one"). Solution? [[spoiler:Find any webpage with ''Halo 2'' codes and try them all, one at a time]] -- and checking each code may take several minutes. Good luck, you'll need it.

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** The PC port had one horrible, horrible flaw. Occasionally, your players' saved games would disappear, never to be seen again. The developers, Epic Games, also forgot to renew the certificate on the game's copy protection, leading everyone's copy to declare that the game was pirated and refuse to boot on January 28, 2009. This was fixed just over a week later, on February 6. During that time, ''[[{{Irony}} only pirated installations of the game could still play]]!''
** Because every installation of game is run over the Internet, people eventually ran out of installation codes, making them unable to install game even when they bought it from store (the game will just spew something about the code "exceeding number of uses, please try another one"). Solution? [[spoiler:Find any webpage with ''Halo 2'' codes and try them all, one at a time]] -- and checking each code may take several minutes. Good luck, you'll need it.
play]]!''



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'', for a good while, had a particularly infamous PC port, not only thanks to noticable performance issues and a clumsy mouse and keyboard interface, but particularly because Rockstar decided to package the game with an extra piece of software known as the Rockstar Social Club, a utility created to handle the game's multiplayer connectivity, which in its original iteration would run on top of the game (along with [=SecuROM=] ''and'' the infamous Games for Windows Live) and nag you to log into it not only whenever you wanted to play, but on startup as well. The controls can't be changed (a feature that has been standard even in the DOS era). It was so bad that UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} gave out ''refunds''[[note]]To clarify, Steam '''never''' gave out refunds before that point. Before they set up a new system in June 2015 where anything could be refunded if it's been owned for less than two weeks and played for less than two hours, they only did so five times including here - twice for other games that were the epitome of this trope like ''From Dust'' and ''Ghost Recon: Future Soldier'', and twice for games that were advertised entirely on BlatantLies like ''The War Z'' and the "remake" of ''VideoGame/ColinMcRaeRally'' (which turned out to be a port of the ''[=iOS=] game'').[[/note]] to angry gamers. Since the game's launch in December 2008, many of the game's performance issues have now been ironed out, and Rockstar Social Club has been integrated into the game software itself... almost a year and a half after launch.
** Version 1.0.4.0 ran at an acceptable framerate and is generally recommended by most gamers on low-end systems (at the cost of not being able to sign in to multiplayer). This wasn't the case with 1.0.6.0 and 1.0.7.0 -- despite Rockstar's claims about the shadow mapping system being "less memory-intensive", it actually accounts for the decreased framerate after updating to the said patches.

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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'', for a good while, had ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' is a particularly infamous PC port, port. At release, it not only thanks to had noticable performance issues and a clumsy mouse and keyboard interface, but particularly because Rockstar also decided to package the game with an extra piece of software known as the Rockstar Social Club, a utility created to handle the game's multiplayer connectivity, which in its original iteration would run on top of the game (along with [=SecuROM=] ''and'' the infamous Games for Windows Live) and nag you to log into it not only whenever you wanted to play, but on startup as well. The controls can't couldn't be changed (a feature that has been standard even in the DOS era). It was so bad that UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} gave out ''refunds''[[note]]To clarify, Steam '''never''' gave out refunds before that point. Before they set up a new system in June 2015 where anything could be refunded if it's been owned for less than two weeks and played for less than two hours, they only did so five times including here - twice for other games that were the epitome of this trope like ''From Dust'' and ''Ghost Recon: Future Soldier'', and twice for games that were advertised entirely on BlatantLies like ''The War Z'' and the "remake" of ''VideoGame/ColinMcRaeRally'' (which turned out to be a port of the ''[=iOS=] game'').[[/note]] to angry gamers. Since the game's launch in December 2008, many of the game's performance issues have now been ironed out, and Rockstar Social Club has been integrated into the game software itself... almost a year and a half after launch.
** Version 1.0.4.0 ran at an acceptable framerate and is generally recommended by most gamers on low-end systems (at the cost of not being able to sign in to multiplayer).multiplayer, which went down in 2014 with Games for Windows Live anyway). This wasn't the case with 1.0.6.0 and 1.0.7.0 -- despite Rockstar's claims about the shadow mapping system being "less memory-intensive", it actually accounts has ''worse'' performance than the previous versions. A lot of mods for the decreased framerate game are also incompatible with anything after updating to the said patches.1.0.4.0.
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