History Main / PortalNetwork

20th Oct '17 3:31:21 PM Anura
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* The Mass Relay network from ''Franchise/MassEffect''. Each Relay is possibly linked to dozens of others, all in different systems. It's widely believed that it was built by the {{Pr|ecursors}}otheans 50,000 years ago, along with everything else related to the titular technology. [[spoiler: It turns out that they were ''actually'' built by a group of [[CosmicHorror super-advanced artificial intelligences called the Reapers]] that use them to direct societal and technological evolution along certain lines, making it easier to wipe out all advanced life in the galaxy every 50,000 years.]]

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* The Mass Relay network Relays from ''Franchise/MassEffect''. Each Relay is possibly linked ''Franchise/MassEffect'' come in two varieties: Primary Relays that send a ship thousands of light years but only to dozens of others, all it's twin Relay, and Secondary Relays that are limited in different systems.range to "merely" a few hundred light years but can link to any other secondary relay in that range. It's widely believed that it was built by the {{Pr|ecursors}}otheans 50,000 years ago, along with everything else related to the titular technology. [[spoiler: It turns out that they were ''actually'' built by a group of [[CosmicHorror super-advanced artificial intelligences called the Reapers]] that use them to direct societal and technological evolution along certain lines, making it easier to wipe out all advanced life in the galaxy every 50,000 years.]]
1st Oct '17 6:40:26 PM esr
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* The trope-defining portal network in SF was in the 1975 novel ''The Mote In God's Eye'' By Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. There were scattered earlier instances in earlier SF, but these authors were the first to fully exploit the dramatic possibilities of jump points and tramlines. In so doing they made these a model for a lot of later space opera, and stimulated interest in the other SF variant of the trope with artificial stargates. Before this novel, point-to-point warp drives were more common in SF than portal networks; after, this reversed.
18th Aug '17 5:38:37 AM ChronoLegion
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** Temporary paths can also be established as a side effect of the [[{{BFG}} Kostura cannon]] impact.

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** Temporary paths can also be established as a side effect of the [[{{BFG}} Kostura cannon]] impact. It's implied that this is a way to invade planets that have been crippled, while bypassing any defenses in-between (i.e. shoot the cannon, then send a fleet directly to the planet).
18th Aug '17 5:36:08 AM ChronoLegion
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** The third game did away with the Stargates and went with HyperspaceLanes and a few rare [[SwirlyEnergyThingy Wormholes]] instead

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** The third game did away with the Stargates and went with HyperspaceLanes and a few rare [[SwirlyEnergyThingy Wormholes]] instead instead.
** The fourth game kept the HyperspaceLanes and the [[OurWormsholesAreDifferent wormholes]], but also allowed players to built hypergates at warp nodes, which allowed ships to travel directly between any two star systems with gates. Travel isn't instantaneous, though. The developers were originally going to add advanced gates that allowed instantaneous travel, but that never happened.
18th Aug '17 5:33:02 AM ChronoLegion
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* Averted in ''VideoGame/GalacticCivilizations'' where all the aliens used a (very limited) Portal Network that basically just connected a few homeworlds together, until humanity developed Hyperdrive, which they then (rather idiotically) gave to every alien race they contact. The Jumpgates are then completely abandoned as obsolete relics since Hyperdrive is better in pretty much every possible way.

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* Averted in ''VideoGame/GalacticCivilizations'' where all the aliens used a (very limited) Portal Network that basically just connected a few homeworlds together, until humanity developed Hyperdrive, which they then (rather idiotically) gave to every alien race they contact. The Jumpgates are then completely abandoned as obsolete relics since Hyperdrive is better in pretty much every possible way.way (the last time the Drengin tried to invade another planet, they had to drag a hypergate for tens of thousands of years using sublight; when the other race rebelled, all they had to do was shut down their own gate to keep the Drengin out).
18th Aug '17 5:22:51 AM ChronoLegion
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* In ''Literature/TheExpanse'', the [[spoiler:gate/wormhole network has been built by a powerful alien civilization billions of years ago. All Rings lead to a hub area of sorts. There's a station in the middle of the zone, which sets a speed limit of sorts on any physical object passing through. Any ship that attempts to move faster than a few hundred meters per second is drastically slowed down (causing injuries or even deaths aboard them due to the sudden deceleration) and pulled towards the station. The Solar System gets its own Ring, when the alien protomolecule builds one, allowing humans to explore the galaxy.]]
24th Jul '17 5:25:11 PM magic713
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** The gates also have different appearances and styles in different series. The only change from the movie to the SG-1 is that the chevrons now light up red. In ''Atlantis,'' the newer Pegasus Galaxy gates have actual depictions of constellations rather than symbols that represent them, and instead of the inner ring spinning, the lights travel in a circle, each constellation lighting up in turn like Christmas lights. In ''Universe,'' the ''older'' gates have the ''whole thing'' spin. The biggest difference is that in SG1 and SGA, the gates are NighInvulnerable, able to survive almost anything (to the point of one being able to last a few minutes after being ''thrown into a star.'') SGU gates are about as tough as the stone they appear to be made of - tough, but conventional means of destroying stuff ''can'' break them and that's ''bad'' if you don't have another way off the planet.

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** The gates also have different appearances and styles in different series. The only change from the movie to the SG-1 is that the chevrons now light up red. In ''Atlantis,'' the newer Pegasus Galaxy gates have actual depictions of constellations rather than symbols that represent them, and instead of the inner ring spinning, the lights travel in a circle, each constellation lighting up in turn like Christmas lights. Some are even set in orbit of a planet, rather than set on the planet itself, and are activated remotely through ships with dialing systems set in them. In ''Universe,'' the ''older'' gates have the ''whole thing'' spin. The biggest difference is that in SG1 and SGA, the gates are NighInvulnerable, able to survive almost anything (to the point of one being able to last a few minutes after being ''thrown into a star.'') SGU gates are about as tough as the stone they appear to be made of - tough, but conventional means of destroying stuff ''can'' break them and that's ''bad'' if you don't have another way off the planet.
20th Jun '17 4:45:50 PM WithFlowers
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' used to have two, but is now down to one. Back in the lost glory days of the First Age, the Exalted got around by means of permanently fixed portals called "Gates of Auspicious Passage". These used massive amounts of [[{{Mana}} Essence]], but could take a person from one side of the world to another in seconds. Unfortunately, they weren't [[RagnarokProofing Ragnarok-proofed]]; the end of the First Age brought down the network, and nowadays there's few if any left. The Yu-Shan gates, which don't need the portal network, are still active. Those take anyone who steps through them into the [[MegaCity continent-sized Heavenly City]]. If you can use them, the Yu-Shan gates are generally a faster means of long-distance travel than anything else available - the Yu-Shan sides are scattered around the edge of the city, but the Creation sides are scattered across the entire world.
4th Jun '17 9:53:24 PM PhantomRider
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* The Franchise/StargateVerse, including ''Series/StargateSG1'', ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', and ''Series/StargateUniverse''. The original ''Film/{{Stargate}}'' movie has a single two-way link (other gates are not shown, but not ruled out either). The expansions give us a full-blown network.
** The gates have a calibration system reminiscent of a rotary telephone. In the film the first six symbols are said to be constellations that act as coordinates in 3-dimensional space while the seventh chevron is the point of origin. The system in the sequels appears to be high-level automation: dial in the destination you want, the gate does the rest, Bob's your larval symbiote.

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* The Franchise/StargateVerse, including ''Series/StargateSG1'', ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', and ''Series/StargateUniverse''. The original ''Film/{{Stargate}}'' movie possibly has a single two-way link (other gates are not shown, but not ruled out either). The expansions give us a full-blown network.
** The gates have a calibration system reminiscent of a rotary telephone. In the film the first six symbols are said to be constellations that act as coordinates in 3-dimensional space while the seventh chevron is the point of origin. The system in the sequels appears to be high-level automation: dial in the destination you want, the gate does the rest, Bob's your larval symbiote. We later find that gates exist in ''multiple galaxies;'' in an eight-symbol address, the seventh is the point of origin and the eighth is the "area code," if we continue the phone metaphor.
**The gates also have different appearances and styles in different series. The only change from the movie to the SG-1 is that the chevrons now light up red. In ''Atlantis,'' the newer Pegasus Galaxy gates have actual depictions of constellations rather than symbols that represent them, and instead of the inner ring spinning, the lights travel in a circle, each constellation lighting up in turn like Christmas lights. In ''Universe,'' the ''older'' gates have the ''whole thing'' spin. The biggest difference is that in SG1 and SGA, the gates are NighInvulnerable, able to survive almost anything (to the point of one being able to last a few minutes after being ''thrown into a star.'') SGU gates are about as tough as the stone they appear to be made of - tough, but conventional means of destroying stuff ''can'' break them and that's ''bad'' if you don't have another way off the planet.
31st May '17 2:57:06 PM Discar
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* ''Literature/KingsOfTheWyld'': The ancient Dominion had a small one, with only three "Thresholds:" One in the ruins near Castia, one in Kaladar where the War Fair is held, and one in Antica, which sunk into the sea. [[spoiler:They open the Castia portal to send the dragon Akatung to Antica, then take it to Kaladar and bring the entire War Fair to fight the Heartwyld Horde]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PortalNetwork