History Main / PopularityPolynomial

28th Sep '17 6:53:31 AM PF
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* The NBA experiences this around every two decades. While it gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late night broadcasts on tape delay. Magic Johnson and Larry Bird would help popularized the league in the '80s. As TheNinties unfolded, UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.

to:

* The NBA experiences this around every two decades.this. While it gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late night broadcasts on tape delay. Magic Johnson and Larry Bird would help popularized the league in the '80s. As TheNinties unfolded, UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.
28th Sep '17 6:50:31 AM PF
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* The NBA experiences this around every two decades. While it gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late-night broadcasts on tape delay. UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity as TheNineties unfolded, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.

to:

* The NBA experiences this around every two decades. While it gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late-night late night broadcasts on tape delay. Magic Johnson and Larry Bird would help popularized the league in the '80s. As TheNinties unfolded, UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity as TheNineties unfolded, popularity, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.



Then the NFL Europe shut down because Roger Goodell (who had just become commissioner) wanted to save money and instead focus on the NFL International Series. To add insult to injury, Hamburg went bankrupt and Braunschweig entered a serious DorkAge due to money and fan interest running out. The pay TV company dropped the NFL due to its high cost and Football entered a serious slump. Cue back to back European championships for the German national team (2010 and 2014, the 2018 edition will be held in Germany) and promising ratings for the NFL in free TV coverage (Playoffs only). Suddenly one very smart person over at [=Pro7/Sat1=] Media Group decides to carry the regular season (two games every Sunday, plus all London and Thanksgiving games) and ratings suddenly explode, teams don't know where to go with all the young people who suddenly want to try the sport and NFL related hashtags are trending topic on German Twitter. And if you try counting the amount of people running around with NFL basecaps on any given day, you'd soon get tired of all the Raiders and Patriots gear.

to:

Then the NFL Europe shut down because Roger Goodell (who Goodell, who had just become commissioner) commissioner, wanted to save money and instead focus on the NFL International Series. To add insult to injury, Hamburg went bankrupt and Braunschweig entered a serious DorkAge due to money and fan interest running out. The pay TV company dropped the NFL due to its high cost and Football football entered a serious slump. Cue back to back European championships for the German national team (2010 and 2014, the 2018 edition will be held in Germany) and promising ratings for the NFL in free TV coverage (Playoffs only). Suddenly one very smart person over at [=Pro7/Sat1=] Media Group decides to carry the regular season (two games every Sunday, plus all London and Thanksgiving games) and ratings suddenly explode, teams don't know where to go with all the young people who suddenly want to try the sport and NFL related hashtags are trending topic on German Twitter. And if you try counting the amount of people running around with NFL basecaps on any given day, you'd soon get tired of all the Raiders and Patriots gear.
25th Sep '17 3:26:37 PM PF
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** For much of TheEighties, the {{cyberpunk}} literary genre and movement was the new wave in both ScienceFiction and science fact, acting as a fertile seed on a ground tormented by efforts to adapt to a changing world where the computer was king and [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan was the new force on the block]]. However, books like ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' failed to anticipate how a) the internet, cell phones, personal computers and handheld IT devices would become a mundane reality in the life of the average white-collar Joe Sixpack, and b) that the Japanese economic powerhouse [[Analysis/JapanTakesOverTheWorld would trip over itself in the early '90s]]. Once "the future" became the present, cyberpunk went from being high-tech to being filled with {{zeerust}}, painting a portrait of the future that had [[TechnologyMarchesOn stopped being relevant after about 1993]] -- the main reason why PostCyberpunk came to replace it. Not to mention that the virtual reality craze of the late '80s and early '90s simply shelved itself (for now) after failing to provide a holodeck-like experience.

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** * For much of TheEighties, the {{cyberpunk}} literary genre and movement was the new wave in both ScienceFiction and science fact, acting as a fertile seed on a ground tormented by efforts to adapt to a changing world where the computer was king and [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan was the new force on the block]]. However, books like ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' failed to anticipate how a) the internet, cell phones, personal computers and handheld IT devices would become a mundane reality in the life of the average white-collar Joe Sixpack, and b) that the Japanese economic powerhouse [[Analysis/JapanTakesOverTheWorld would trip over itself in the early '90s]]. Once "the future" became the present, cyberpunk went from being high-tech to being filled with {{zeerust}}, painting a portrait of the future that had [[TechnologyMarchesOn stopped being relevant after about 1993]] -- the main reason why PostCyberpunk came to replace it. Not to mention that the virtual reality craze of the late '80s and early '90s simply shelved itself (for now) after failing to provide a holodeck-like experience.
25th Sep '17 3:26:04 PM PF
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* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' was a huge phenomenon in the early '90s, but it began to slowly dwindle until about 2002, when it was bought by Disney, when it got worse. It had a short burst of success then, but Disney was apathetic to the show at even the best of times, and it essentially culminated in its cancellation in 2009 after ''Series/PowerRangersRPM''. However, soon after, the show was bought back by Saban, [[ChannelHop hopped]] over to Nickelodeon, and the franchise seems to be back on an upswing.

to:

* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' was a huge phenomenon in the early '90s, but it began to slowly dwindle until about 2002, when it was bought by Disney, when it got worse. It had a short burst of success then, but Disney was apathetic to towards the show franchise at even the best of times, and it essentially culminated in its cancellation in 2009 after ''Series/PowerRangersRPM''. However, soon after, the show franchise was bought back by Saban, [[ChannelHop hopped]] over to Nickelodeon, and the franchise it seems to be back on an upswing.
25th Sep '17 3:24:09 PM PF
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The genre returned in a big way in the late '90s/early 2000s with ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' and ''Series/TheWeakestLink'', as well as shows like ''Series/{{Greed}}'' and the {{revival}} of ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares''. This boom also caused a deluge of [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire their assorted clones]]. In the early 2000s, ''Millionaire'' and ''Link'' pulled in tens of millions of viewers and were watercooler discussion fodder, and their hosts (Regis Philbin and [[TheMeanBrit Anne Robinson]], respectively) were household names. On top of that, their flashiness and huge prize budgets mostly spelled the end of low-budget cable game shows. Then their networks [[AdoredByTheNetwork began marketing them to death]] (Creator/{{ABC}} aired ''Millionaire'' almost every night of the week), and reality shows like ''Series/{{Survivor}}'', ''Series/AmericanIdol'' and ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' started taking off and providing what were then innovative alternatives to the traditional quiz show model. Almost overnight, the shows were only surviving in syndication -- and even that wasn't enough to keep ''Link'' alive. To this day, their catch phrases ("Is that your final answer?" for ''Millionaire''; "You are the weakest link. Goodbye!" for ''Link'') are considered annoying as all hell. Game shows generally started to die off again, with one of the only success stories in the mid-2000s being ''Series/{{Lingo}}'' (2002-2007) on GSN. ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' sparked another brief revival in 2008, but its incredibly flimsy premise, ever-increasing gimmickry, and WolverinePublicity helped do it in. Meanwhile, through all the cycles the genre has gone through, the aforementioned syndie versions of ''Wheel'' and ''Jeopardy!'', and ''Price'' over on CBS, have remained consistently strong.
** In the UK, the genre seemingly died out at the end of the Millionaire Years (thanks to that show and others like The Weakest Link becoming a bit of a joke), but has recovered in later years with shows like ''Pointless'', ''Series/TheChase'' and ''Eggheads'' getting good ratings and being nominated for TV awards.
* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' is quickly becoming a good example of this. It was a huge phenomenon in the early 90s, but it began to slowly dwindle until about 2002, when it was bought by Disney, when it got worse. It had a short burst of success then, but Disney was apathetic to the show at even the best of times, and it essentially culminated in its cancellation in 2009 after ''Series/PowerRangersRPM''. However, soon after, the show was bought back by Saban, [[ChannelHop hopped]] over to Nickelodeon, and the franchise seems to be back on an upswing.
* In-universe example from ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': Marshall and Ted take a long drive with just one song to listen to, "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)". In alternating hours, they either hate it or love it (though unlike in a standard example, the moments of high "popularity" don't follow the thing's absence, but rather that it has managed to sink in).
* The long-form MiniSeries in the U.S. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, this was seen as the premier format for high-quality television, with shows like ''Series/{{Roots}}'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', ''{{Series/V 1983}}'', and ''Rich Man Poor Man'' allowing the networks and their writers to stretch their wings and bring Hollywood-level production values and big-name stars to the small screen. The then-Big Three networks would devote large chunks of their annual budget and UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}} time to air miniseries that could take up a whole week (or even more) of programming to keep audiences glued to the TV. During TheNineties, however, the quality of miniseries fell into the gutter as networks exploited the format as a UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}}-week RatingsStunt first and a method of storytelling second. The length of most miniseries also decreased, shrinking to just two parts and 4-5 hours, as networks grew more cost-conscious. By the TurnOfTheMillennium, a glut of crappy miniseries had virtually discredited the format.\\

to:

The genre returned in a big way in the late '90s/early 2000s with ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' and ''Series/TheWeakestLink'', as well as shows like ''Series/{{Greed}}'' and the {{revival}} of ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares''. This boom also caused a deluge of [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire their assorted clones]]. In the early 2000s, ''Millionaire'' and ''Link'' pulled in tens of millions of viewers and were watercooler discussion fodder, and their hosts (Regis Philbin and [[TheMeanBrit Anne Robinson]], respectively) were household names. On top of that, their flashiness and huge prize budgets mostly spelled the end of low-budget cable game shows. Then their networks [[AdoredByTheNetwork began marketing them to death]] (Creator/{{ABC}} aired ''Millionaire'' almost every night of the week), and reality shows like ''Series/{{Survivor}}'', ''Series/AmericanIdol'' and ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' started taking off and providing what were then innovative alternatives to the traditional quiz show model. Almost overnight, the shows were only surviving in syndication -- and even that wasn't enough to keep ''Link'' alive. To this day, their catch phrases ("Is that your final answer?" for ''Millionaire''; "You are the weakest link. Goodbye!" for ''Link'') are considered annoying as all hell. Game shows generally started to die off again, with one of the only success stories in the mid-2000s being ''Series/{{Lingo}}'' (2002-2007) on GSN. ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' sparked another brief revival in 2008, but its incredibly flimsy premise, ever-increasing gimmickry, and WolverinePublicity helped do it in. Meanwhile, through all the cycles the genre has gone through, the aforementioned syndie versions of ''Wheel'' and ''Jeopardy!'', and ''Price'' over on CBS, have remained consistently strong.
** In the UK, the genre seemingly died out at the end of the Millionaire Years (thanks to that show and others like The Weakest Link becoming a bit of a joke), but has recovered in later years with shows like ''Pointless'', ''Series/TheChase'' and ''Eggheads'' getting good ratings and being nominated for TV awards.
* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' is quickly becoming a good example of this. It was a huge phenomenon in the early 90s, but it began to slowly dwindle until about 2002, when it was bought by Disney, when it got worse. It had a short burst of success then, but Disney was apathetic to the show at even the best of times, and it essentially culminated in its cancellation in 2009 after ''Series/PowerRangersRPM''. However, soon after, the show was bought back by Saban, [[ChannelHop hopped]] over to Nickelodeon, and the franchise seems to be back on an upswing.
* In-universe example from ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': Marshall and Ted take a long drive with just one song to listen to, "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)". In alternating hours, they either hate it or love it (though unlike in a standard example, the moments of high "popularity" don't follow the thing's absence, but rather that it has managed to sink in).
* The long-form MiniSeries in the U.S. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, this was seen as the premier format for high-quality television, with shows like ''Series/{{Roots}}'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', ''{{Series/V 1983}}'', and ''Rich Man Poor Man'' allowing the networks and their writers to stretch their wings and bring Hollywood-level production values and big-name stars to the small screen. The then-Big Three networks would devote large chunks of their annual budget and UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}} time to air miniseries that could take up a whole week (or even more) of programming to keep audiences glued to the TV. During TheNineties, however, the quality of miniseries fell into the gutter as networks exploited the format as a UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}}-week RatingsStunt first and a method of storytelling second. The length of most miniseries also decreased, shrinking to just two parts and 4-5 hours, as networks grew more cost-conscious. By the TurnOfTheMillennium, a glut of crappy miniseries had virtually discredited the format.
strong.\\



In the UK, the genre seemingly died out at the end of the Millionaire Years (thanks to that show and others like ''The Weakest Link'' becoming a bit of a joke), but has recovered in later years with shows like ''Pointless'', ''Series/TheChase'', and ''Eggheads'' getting good ratings and being nominated for TV awards.
* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' was a huge phenomenon in the early '90s, but it began to slowly dwindle until about 2002, when it was bought by Disney, when it got worse. It had a short burst of success then, but Disney was apathetic to the show at even the best of times, and it essentially culminated in its cancellation in 2009 after ''Series/PowerRangersRPM''. However, soon after, the show was bought back by Saban, [[ChannelHop hopped]] over to Nickelodeon, and the franchise seems to be back on an upswing.
* In-universe example from ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': Marshall and Ted take a long drive with just one song to listen to, "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)". In alternating hours, they either hate it or love it (though unlike in a standard example, the moments of high "popularity" don't follow the thing's absence, but rather that it has managed to sink in).
* The long-form MiniSeries in the U.S. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, this was seen as the premier format for high-quality television, with shows like ''Series/{{Roots}}'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', ''{{Series/V 1983}}'', and ''Rich Man Poor Man'' allowing the networks and their writers to stretch their wings and bring Hollywood-level production values and big-name stars to the small screen. The then-Big Three networks would devote large chunks of their annual budget and UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}} time to air miniseries that could take up a whole week (or even more) of programming to keep audiences glued to the TV. During TheNineties, however, the quality of miniseries fell into the gutter as networks exploited the format as a UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}}-week RatingsStunt first and a method of storytelling second. The length of most miniseries also decreased, shrinking to just two parts and 4-5 hours, as networks grew more cost-conscious. By the TurnOfTheMillennium, a glut of crappy miniseries had virtually discredited the format.\\
\\



** As [[http://www.rottentomatoes.com/news/1933242/the_rise_and_fall_of_the_miniseries/ this article]] on Website/RottenTomatoes explains, many of the trends of modern television -- {{All Star Cast}}s in television productions, complete stories told in a finite number of episodes, even binge-watching -- began with the miniseries of the '70s and '80s. As such, the much-ballyhooed "GoldenAge of Television" of the 2010s can simply be viewed as the miniseries' return to prominence and takeover of the TV landscape, even if it's no longer referred to as such anymore.
25th Sep '17 3:19:41 PM PF
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* The NBA experiences this around every two decades. It gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, but the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late-night broadcasts. UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity as TheNineties unfolded, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.

to:

* The NBA experiences this around every two decades. It While it gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, but the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late-night broadcasts.broadcasts on tape delay. UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity as TheNineties unfolded, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.
25th Sep '17 2:44:51 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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** The [[Franchise/UniversalHorror classic Universal monster movies]] were certainly big hits in the '30s and early '40s, but after the release of ''Film/TheWolfMan1941'', they fell into a DorkAge that would last the rest of TheForties and well into TheFifties, with only a few bright spots (''Film/CreatureFromTheBlackLagoon'', ''Film/ItCameFromOuterSpace'') as Creator/{{Universal}} struggled to adapt to the postwar boom of sci-fi horror. Then, in 1957, Universal released a large number of its classic horror films in a television package called ''Shock! Theater''. ''Shock!'' introduced the films to a new audience that could view them from the comfort of their homes, with the lovably campy assistance of various local {{Horror Host}}s, kicking off a "Monster Boom" craze that lasted well into TheSeventies and saw the monsters reach the height of their popularity and cultural presence. [[Film/HammerHorror Hammer Film Productions]] came along at almost the same time to produce lurid color remakes of the classic films, ensuring the monsters' legacies would live on and restoring glamour to the horror genre, which by that point had devolved into BMovie hell. To this day, even as new monsters, villains, and subgenres have risen to prominence, the Universal monsters are regarded as icons of the horror genre, with most takes on the basic monsters ([[ClassicalMovieVampire vampires]] and [[WolfMan werewolves]] especially) still referring back to films made in the '30s and '40s, even if only to [[OurMonstersAreDifferent show themselves to be different]] from the 'Hollywood' version.

to:

** The [[Franchise/UniversalHorror classic Universal monster movies]] were certainly big hits in the '30s 1930s and early '40s, but after the release of ''Film/TheWolfMan1941'', they fell into a DorkAge that would last the rest of TheForties and well into TheFifties, with only a few bright spots (''Film/CreatureFromTheBlackLagoon'', ''Film/ItCameFromOuterSpace'') as Creator/{{Universal}} struggled to adapt to the postwar boom of sci-fi horror. Then, in 1957, Universal released a large number of its classic horror films in a television package called ''Shock! Theater''. ''Shock!'' introduced the films to a new audience that could view them from the comfort of their homes, with the lovably campy assistance of various local {{Horror Host}}s, kicking off a "Monster Boom" craze that lasted well into TheSeventies and saw the monsters reach the height of their popularity and cultural presence. [[Film/HammerHorror Hammer Film Productions]] came along at almost the same time to produce lurid color remakes of the classic films, ensuring the monsters' legacies would live on and restoring glamour to the horror genre, which by that point had devolved into BMovie hell. To this day, even as new monsters, villains, and subgenres have risen to prominence, the Universal monsters are regarded as icons of the horror genre, with most takes on the basic monsters ([[ClassicalMovieVampire vampires]] and [[WolfMan werewolves]] especially) still referring back to films made in the '30s and '40s, during UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfHollywood, even if only to [[OurMonstersAreDifferent show themselves to be different]] from the 'Hollywood' version.



** The effects of ''Scream'' revitalizing the horror genre are visible in how the reputation of ''Film/{{Halloween 1978}}'' has evolved over the years. While it's always had, at the very least, a cult fandom, in the late '80s and early '90s its status as the TropeCodifier for the SlasherMovie was more of a liability than anything, and many critics blamed it for drowning the horror genre in a wave of gore-soaked hack-n-slashes (despite the fact that ''Halloween'' itself was [[GoryDiscretionShot comparatively bloodless]]). With the reappraisal of slashers in general starting in the late '90s, its reputation has recovered, and most critics once more recognize it as a classic.

to:

** The effects of ''Scream'' revitalizing the horror genre are visible in how the reputation of ''Film/{{Halloween 1978}}'' has evolved over the years. While it's always had, at the very least, a cult fandom, in the late '80s and early '90s its status as the TropeCodifier for the SlasherMovie was an albatross around its neck more of a liability than anything, and many critics [[FranchiseOriginalSin blamed it for drowning the horror genre genre]] in a wave of [[{{Gorn}} gore-soaked hack-n-slashes hack-'n-slashes]] (despite the fact that ''Halloween'' itself was [[GoryDiscretionShot comparatively bloodless]]). With the reappraisal of slashers in general starting in the late '90s, its reputation has recovered, and most critics once more recognize it as a classic.
20th Sep '17 8:36:40 AM CosmicFerret
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* Submarine films were popular for decades following WWII. Each decade had at least one notable submarine film, TheFifties had ''Film/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'',''Film/TheEnemyBelow'' and ''Film/RunSilentRunDeep'', TheSixties had ''Film/FantasticVoyage'', ''Submarine X1'', and ''Ice Station Zebra''. TheSeventies had few notable underwater films although JamesBond would get his turn in ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe''. Although ''Film/DasBoot'' started off TheEighties, most of the submarine films of that decade were actually underwater science fiction romps such as ''Film/TheAbyss''. TheNineties gave us ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober'' and ''Film/CrimsonTide''. After this, submarine adventures seemed to vanish. The claustrophobic nature of underwater adventures makes such films a hard sell since there are few, if any, changes of scenery. Most conflict is through dialogue and character drama. Another reason may be chiefly due to the reality that submarine settings are traditionally all male. A significant number of these past submarine films had no female cast members in speaking roles or even onscreen. This makes submarine films difficult to market to a general audience in today's film market that mandates more inclusion and equal gender representation.

to:

* Submarine films were popular for decades following WWII. Each decade had at least one notable submarine film, TheFifties had ''Film/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'',''Film/TheEnemyBelow'' and ''Film/RunSilentRunDeep'', TheSixties had ''Film/FantasticVoyage'', ''Submarine X1'', and ''Ice Station Zebra''. TheSeventies had few notable underwater films although JamesBond Film/JamesBond would get his turn in ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe''. Although ''Film/DasBoot'' started off TheEighties, most of the submarine films of that decade were actually underwater science fiction romps such as ''Film/TheAbyss''. TheNineties gave us ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober'' and ''Film/CrimsonTide''. After this, submarine adventures seemed to vanish. The claustrophobic nature of underwater adventures makes such films a hard sell since there are few, if any, changes of scenery. Most conflict is through dialogue and character drama. Another reason may be chiefly due to the reality that submarine settings are traditionally all male. A significant number of these past submarine films had no female cast members in speaking roles or even onscreen. This makes submarine films difficult to market to a general audience in today's film market that mandates more inclusion and equal gender representation.
14th Sep '17 5:36:03 AM PF
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Of course, [[CreatorProvincialism New York sportswriters]] are still likely to remember TheFifties as [[NostalgiaFilter baseball's "golden age"]], simply because it was the era in which the Yankees got the World Series rings they were ''entitled'' to, dammit! And if the Yankees didn't win, then the Dodgers or the Giants probably did.

to:

Of course, [[CreatorProvincialism New York sportswriters]] are still likely to remember TheFifties as [[NostalgiaFilter baseball's "golden age"]], simply because it was the era in which the Yankees got the World Series rings they were ''entitled'' to, dammit! And if the Yankees didn't win, then the Dodgers or the Giants probably did.



* The NBA experiences this around every two decades. It gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, but in TheEighties, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late-night broadcasts. UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity as TheNineties unfolded, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.

to:

* The NBA experiences this around every two decades. It gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, but in TheEighties, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late-night broadcasts. UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity as TheNineties unfolded, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.



* The Indie Game scene altogether is the end result of this. Many Indie Developers are themselves gamers who first got introduced into the medium during the 8 and 16-bit era of gaming. As a result, [[SpiritualLicensee they model their own games]] on the ones they grew up with.

to:

* The Indie Game indie scene altogether is the end result of this. Many Indie Developers indie developers are themselves gamers who first got introduced into the medium during the 8 and 16-bit era of gaming. As a result, [[SpiritualLicensee they model their own games]] on the ones they grew up with.



* Sci-Fi shooters like ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Doom}}'' have experienced this cycle. During the '90s and early 2000s, ''Doom'', ''Halo'' and their clones were insanely popular among action aficionados for their fast-paced, action-packed gameplay and sci-fi aethetics. However, while neither have been forgotten per se, they declined in popularity from 2005 onwards due to competition from modern military shooters. So much so that ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty4ModernWarfare'' dethroned ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' as the most played game on Xbox Live. It didn't help that an increasing ScifiGhetto attitude led to a backlash towards sci-fi shooters. However, military shooters themselves [[DeaderThanDisco became less popular]] starting since 2010 due to a mix of market oversaturation, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks lack of innovation]], [[UnfortunateImplications questionable depictions of foreigners and military intervention]] and the stereotype that only whiny, racist little kids and dudebros play them. Subsequently, interest in sci-fi shooter was rekindled as they offered diverse array of gameplay styles and weapon diversity in fantastical settings without any real baggage that plagued modern military shooters. Ironically, many new shooters like ''VideoGame/TitanFall'', ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'', and even ''Halo'''s rival ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' [[FollowTheLeader have begun copying]] ''Doom'' and ''Halo''. A good example of this can be seen in Yahtzee's review of ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'' re-release on his show ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation''. Although he considers the game to be tacky and dated, he admits that ''Doom 3'' and other sci-fi shooters are more enjoyable than most "spunkgargleweewees".
** Then came 2016 with games like ''VideoGame/Doom2016'', ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'', and ''Videogame/CallOfDutyInfiniteWarfare'' on the spotlight, and practically the only non-Sci-Fi shooter that is an AAA title for the last two years is Battlefield 1, for different reasons.

to:

* Sci-Fi shooters like ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Doom}}'' have experienced this cycle. During the '90s and early 2000s, ''Doom'', ''Halo'' and their clones were insanely popular among action aficionados for their fast-paced, action-packed gameplay and sci-fi aethetics. However, while neither have been forgotten per se, they declined in popularity from 2005 onwards due to competition from modern military shooters. So much so that ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty4ModernWarfare'' dethroned ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' as the most played game on Xbox Live. It didn't help that an increasing ScifiGhetto attitude led to a backlash towards sci-fi shooters. shooters However, military shooters themselves [[DeaderThanDisco became less popular]] starting since 2010 due to a mix of market oversaturation, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks lack of innovation]], [[UnfortunateImplications questionable depictions of foreigners and military intervention]] and the stereotype that only whiny, racist little kids and dudebros play them. Subsequently, interest in sci-fi shooter was rekindled as they offered diverse array of gameplay styles and weapon diversity in fantastical settings without any real baggage that plagued modern military shooters. Ironically, many new shooters like ''VideoGame/TitanFall'', ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'', and even ''Halo'''s rival ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' [[FollowTheLeader have begun copying]] ''Doom'' and ''Halo''. A good example of this can be seen in Yahtzee's review of ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'' re-release on his show ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation''. Although he considers the game to be tacky and dated, he admits that ''Doom 3'' and other sci-fi shooters are more enjoyable than most "spunkgargleweewees".
** Then came 2016 with games like ''VideoGame/Doom2016'', ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'', and ''Videogame/CallOfDutyInfiniteWarfare'' on the spotlight, and practically the only non-Sci-Fi shooter that is an AAA title for the last two years is Battlefield 1, for different reasons.
"spunkgargleweewees".
13th Sep '17 8:44:42 PM HighCrate
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* Even the NFL has had some rough patches along the way. A ''Sports Illustrated'' cover in the early 1990s mentioning how to revive "a boring league". An article like this would hardly be associated with pigskin nowadays.
** The public becoming aware of the dangers associated with playing football, especially concussion-caused brain damage, has slowed football down, though whether it will go down in popularity or recover is anyone's guess.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PopularityPolynomial