History Main / PopularityPolynomial

13th Jul '17 5:47:08 PM avon
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* Submarine films were popular for decades following WWII. Each decade had at least one notable submarine film, TheFifties had ''Film/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'',''TheEnemyBelow'' and ''RunSilentRunDeep'', TheSixties had ''FantasticVoyage'', ''Submarine X1'', and ''Ice Station Zebra''. TheSeventies had few notable underwater films although JamesBond would get his turn in ''TheSpyWhoLovedMe''. Although ''DasBoot'' started off TheEighties, most of the submarine films of that decade were actually underwater science fiction romps such as ''TheAbyss''. TheNineties gave us ''TheHuntForRedOctober'' and ''CrimsonTide''. After this, submarine adventures seemed to vanish. The claustrophobic nature of underwater adventures makes such films a hard sell since there are few, if any, changes of scenery. Most conflict is through dialogue and character drama. Another reason may be chiefly due to the reality that submarine settings are traditionally all male. A significant number of these past submarine films had no female cast members in speaking roles or even onscreen. This makes submarine films difficult to market to a general audience in today's film market that mandates more inclusion and equal gender representation.
4th Jul '17 6:31:32 PM JulianLapostat
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* Believe it or not, the works of Creator/WilliamShakespeare (who, during his lifetime made enough money off of ''something'' to buy his family a coat of arms) underwent a period in which TheDiaryOfSamuelPepys wrote about several of them that they are SoBadItsHorrible or merely SoOkayItsAverage. Shakespeare-craziness didn't get started in earnest until much later and it didn't become a "thing" outside the Anglosphere until the Romanticists started celebrating Shakespeare as an example of "genius" where Shakespeare's "little Latin and lesse Greek" (a contemporary about him) didn't actually hurt the appreciation for him but made him even more of a "miraculous genius" granted natural talents by divine providence.

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* Believe it or not, the works of Creator/WilliamShakespeare (who, during his lifetime made enough money off of ''something'' to buy his family a coat of arms) underwent arms[[note]]His plays were successful and he was a very good businessman, who made what we can consider sound investments and he was also a moneylender which allowed him to leverage his capital[[/note]]) did not become the canonical greatest writer ever for some 170 years after his death.
** Some of this has to do with social changes (UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar, the Restoration) which led to
a period in which TheDiaryOfSamuelPepys wrote about several of them that they are SoBadItsHorrible or merely SoOkayItsAverage. In France, an Anglophile like Creator/{{Voltaire}} loved John Locke, Newton, Swift and Pope, but really thought Shakespeare was bad for [[SingleIssueWonk violating the classical unities]]. Shakespeare-craziness didn't get started really hit high gear in earnest until much later the late 1700s, first in England (under Creator/SamuelJohnson) and it didn't become a "thing" outside then in Germany (where the Anglosphere until Enlightenment and Romantic writers were revolting against the Romanticists French neoclassicism) started celebrating Shakespeare as an example of "genius" where Shakespeare's "little Latin and lesse Greek" (a contemporary about him) (as his good friend [[VitriolicBestBuds Ben Jonson wrote in a commemorative elegy]] on the First Folio) didn't actually hurt the appreciation for him but made him even more of a "miraculous genius" granted natural talents by divine providence.providence.
** Likewise, not all of Shakespeare's plays had the reputation they did today. In Shakespeare's lifetime, ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus'' was his biggest popular success which was largely deprecated by later critics (and is today considered a {{Cult}} favorite), while ''Theatre/KingLear'' was seen as so bleak that a {{Bowdlerization}} doctored the ending of the play. The likes of Samuel Johnson liked some plays but disliked others. ''Hamlet'' in particular became ''the'' canonical great Shakespeare play thanks to the Romanticists and it became a favorite in German and Russian romanticist circles. ''Theatre/TheTempest'' is today considered one of Shakespeare's greatest works but it did not always have that reputation. Plays that were considered minor like ''Theatre/AsYouLikeIt'' are today considered among his best comedies.
3rd Jul '17 3:09:07 PM Jhonny
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* Believe it or not, the works of Creator/WilliamShakespeare (who, during his lifetime made enough money off of ''something'' to buy his family a coat of arms) underwent a period in which TheDiaryOfSamualPepys wrote about several of them that they are SoBadItsHorrible or merely SoOkayItsAverage. Shakespeare-craziness didn't get started in earnest until much later and it didn't become a "thing" outside the Anglosphere until the Romanticists started celebrating Shakespeare as an example of "genius" where Shakespeare's "little Latin and lesse Greek" (a contemporary about him) didn't actually hurt the appreciation for him but made him even more of a "miraculous genius" granted natural talents by divine providence.

to:

* Believe it or not, the works of Creator/WilliamShakespeare (who, during his lifetime made enough money off of ''something'' to buy his family a coat of arms) underwent a period in which TheDiaryOfSamualPepys TheDiaryOfSamuelPepys wrote about several of them that they are SoBadItsHorrible or merely SoOkayItsAverage. Shakespeare-craziness didn't get started in earnest until much later and it didn't become a "thing" outside the Anglosphere until the Romanticists started celebrating Shakespeare as an example of "genius" where Shakespeare's "little Latin and lesse Greek" (a contemporary about him) didn't actually hurt the appreciation for him but made him even more of a "miraculous genius" granted natural talents by divine providence.
3rd Jul '17 3:08:16 PM Jhonny
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* Believe it or not, the works of Creator/WilliamShakespeare (who, during his lifetime made enough money off of ''something'' to buy his family a coat of arms) underwent a period in which TheDiaryOfSamualPepys wrote about several of them that they are SoBadItsHorrible or merely SoOkayItsAverage. Shakespeare-craziness didn't get started in earnest until much later and it didn't become a "thing" outside the Anglosphere until the Romanticists started celebrating Shakespeare as an example of "genius" where Shakespeare's "little Latin and lesse Greek" (a contemporary about him) didn't actually hurt the appreciation for him but made him even more of a "miraculous genius" granted natural talents by divine providence.
1st Jul '17 1:38:18 PM twilicorn
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* The televised live musical was inescapable in the '40s and '50s, but died out by 1960, with the last one being a remake of ''Theatre/PeterPan''. In 2013, NBC decided to put on the first televised live musical in 53 years, in the form of a remake of ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic'' starring Music/CarrieUnderwood. While it wasn't well received, ratings went through the roof and NBC decided that they would put out such a show annually. ''Peter Pan Live'', their next musical, was met with similar audience response, but 2015's ''Theatre/TheWiz Live'' became a critical darling just in time for another network to try out the live musical - Fox with ''Film/{{Grease}} Live'', set for January 2016. In addition, 2016 also brought an ABC-produced live remake of ''Film/DirtyDancing'' (presumably for as early as the fall sweeps) and NBC's fourth annual musical, ''Film/{{Hairspray}}'' (for December).

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* The televised live musical was inescapable in the '40s and '50s, but died out by 1960, with the last one being a remake of ''Theatre/PeterPan''. In 2013, NBC decided to put on the first televised live musical in 53 years, in the form of a remake of ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic'' starring Music/CarrieUnderwood. While it wasn't well received, ratings went through the roof and NBC decided that they would put out such a show annually. ''Peter Pan Live'', their next musical, was met with similar audience response, but 2015's ''Theatre/TheWiz Live'' became a critical darling just in time for another network to try out the live musical - Fox with ''Film/{{Grease}} Live'', set for Live'' in January 2016. In addition, 2016 also brought an ABC-produced and ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShowLetsDoTheTimeWarpAgain'' in October. In 2017, ABC announced that they too would give a stab at the formula with a live remake version of ''Film/DirtyDancing'' (presumably ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''[[note]]not to be confused with the non-Disney live action film[[/note]] under the ''[[Series/WaltDisneyPresents Wonderful World of Disney]]'' banner (to air in October of that year) - in the same month that Fox announced live versions of ''Theatre/{{Rent}}'' and ''Film/AChristmasStory'', and NBC announced ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' for as early as the fall sweeps) and NBC's fourth annual musical, ''Film/{{Hairspray}}'' (for December).Easter Sunday 2018.
17th Jun '17 9:57:35 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* In TheSixties, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series starring Creator/AdamWest left [[AudienceColoringAdaptation an indelible mark]] on the character and the superhero genre in general, winning audiences over with its sense of humor and its LighterAndSofter tone. During UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks in the '80s and '90s, however, many comic book fans came to regard it as a symbol of everything wrong with UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, having taken ComicBook/{{Batman}} away from his roots as a hard-bitten VigilanteMan and [[BadassDecay turned him into a cuddly live-action cartoon]]. The fact that, [[ScrewedByTheLawyers for the longest time]], the only media available from the show was [[Film/BatmanTheMovie the incredibly campy movie]] meant that there was little way to challenge that judgment, nor was the fact that the widely-reviled ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'' drew heavily from the show for its style. Backlash against the Dark Age, West's own reemergence in pop culture late in his life, and the show finally getting released on home video in 2014 led to a slow but steady reevaluation of the show's merits, with many praising it as a hilarious parody of the superhero genre that boasted a great cast.

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* In TheSixties, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series starring Creator/AdamWest left [[AudienceColoringAdaptation an indelible mark]] on the character and the superhero genre in general, winning audiences over with its sense of humor and its LighterAndSofter tone. During UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks in the '80s and '90s, however, many comic book fans came to regard it as a symbol of everything wrong with UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, having taken ComicBook/{{Batman}} away from his roots as a hard-bitten VigilanteMan and [[BadassDecay turned him into a cuddly live-action cartoon]]. The fact that, [[ScrewedByTheLawyers for the longest time]], the only media available from the show was [[Film/BatmanTheMovie the incredibly campy movie]] meant that there was little way to challenge that judgment, nor was the fact that the widely-reviled ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'' drew heavily from the show for its style. Backlash against the Dark Age, West's own reemergence in pop culture late in his life, and the show finally getting released on home video in 2014 led to a slow but steady reevaluation of the show's merits, with many praising it as a hilarious parody AffectionateParody of the superhero genre that boasted a great cast.
17th Jun '17 7:13:26 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* In TheSixties, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series starring Creator/AdamWest left [[AudienceColoringAdaptation an indelible mark]] on the character and the superhero genre in general, winning audiences over with its sense of humor and its LighterAndSofter tone. During UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks in the '80s and '90s, however, many comic book fans came to regard it as a symbol of everything wrong with UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, having taken ComicBook/{{Batman}} away from his roots as a hard-bitten VigilanteMan and [[BadassDecay turned him into a cuddly live-action cartoon]]. The fact that, [[ScrewedByTheLawyers for the longest time]], the only media available from the show was [[Film/BatmanTheMovie the incredibly campy movie]] meant that there was little way to challenge that judgment, nor was the fact that the widely-reviled ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'' drew heavily from the show for its style. Backlash against the Dark Age, West's own reemergence in pop culture late in his life, and the show finally getting released on home video in 2014 led to a slow but steady reevaluation of the show's merits, with many praising it as a hilarious parody of the superhero genre that boasted a great cast.
14th Jun '17 10:00:44 PM nombretomado
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* The long-form MiniSeries in the U.S. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, this was seen as the premier format for high-quality television, with shows like ''Series/{{Roots}}'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', ''Series/{{V}}'', and ''Rich Man Poor Man'' allowing the networks and their writers to stretch their wings and bring Hollywood-level production values and big-name stars to the small screen. The then-Big Three networks would devote large chunks of their annual budget and UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}} time to air miniseries that could take up a whole week (or even more) of programming to keep audiences glued to the TV. During TheNineties, however, the quality of miniseries fell into the gutter as networks exploited the format as a UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}}-week RatingsStunt first and a method of storytelling second. The length of most miniseries also decreased, shrinking to just two parts and 4-5 hours, as networks grew more cost-conscious. By the TurnOfTheMillennium, a glut of crappy miniseries had virtually discredited the format.\\

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* The long-form MiniSeries in the U.S. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, this was seen as the premier format for high-quality television, with shows like ''Series/{{Roots}}'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', ''Series/{{V}}'', ''{{Series/V 1983}}'', and ''Rich Man Poor Man'' allowing the networks and their writers to stretch their wings and bring Hollywood-level production values and big-name stars to the small screen. The then-Big Three networks would devote large chunks of their annual budget and UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}} time to air miniseries that could take up a whole week (or even more) of programming to keep audiences glued to the TV. During TheNineties, however, the quality of miniseries fell into the gutter as networks exploited the format as a UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}}-week RatingsStunt first and a method of storytelling second. The length of most miniseries also decreased, shrinking to just two parts and 4-5 hours, as networks grew more cost-conscious. By the TurnOfTheMillennium, a glut of crappy miniseries had virtually discredited the format.\\
11th Jun '17 1:35:42 PM nombretomado
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Soccer experienced a brief but explosive boom in the United States between the late '70s and the mid '80s with the North American Soccer League, thanks in part to the New York Cosmos, which brought in some of the soccer world's biggest heroes (such as Pele himself and Franz Beckenbauer) to play for them. While financial hardships following Peleís retirement would eventually lead to the NASLís folding in 1984, it reintroduced soccer to the North American sports scene on a large scale, and was a major contributing factor in soccer becoming one of the most popular sports among American youth. Along with FIFA giving the US hosting duties in the 1994 WorldCup, the improving success of the US Men's and Womenís National Teams, and the implementation and growing success of UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueSoccer, soccer has been on the way to regaining its long-sought Major League status. However, with the ever crowded American sporting landscape from leagues that thrived in soccer's absence, not to mention the persistent stereotypes of the sport which came about during its "death"[[note]]In the modern era, soccer is seen by many Americans as either a "kiddie" or "girly" sport played by adolescents boys and teenage girls with pushy "soccer mom" parents, or one that is dominated by (chiefly Latin American) immigrants.[[/note]], it will take time before soccer can become a "major league" sport in the same breath as the big 4 leagues.

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Soccer experienced a brief but explosive boom in the United States between the late '70s and the mid '80s with the North American Soccer League, thanks in part to the New York Cosmos, which brought in some of the soccer world's biggest heroes (such as Pele himself and Franz Beckenbauer) to play for them. While financial hardships following Peleís retirement would eventually lead to the NASLís folding in 1984, it reintroduced soccer to the North American sports scene on a large scale, and was a major contributing factor in soccer becoming one of the most popular sports among American youth. Along with FIFA giving the US hosting duties in the 1994 WorldCup, [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cup]], the improving success of the US Men's and Womenís National Teams, and the implementation and growing success of UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueSoccer, soccer has been on the way to regaining its long-sought Major League status. However, with the ever crowded American sporting landscape from leagues that thrived in soccer's absence, not to mention the persistent stereotypes of the sport which came about during its "death"[[note]]In the modern era, soccer is seen by many Americans as either a "kiddie" or "girly" sport played by adolescents boys and teenage girls with pushy "soccer mom" parents, or one that is dominated by (chiefly Latin American) immigrants.[[/note]], it will take time before soccer can become a "major league" sport in the same breath as the big 4 leagues.
11th Jun '17 10:43:33 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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** The [[Franchise/UniversalHorror classic Universal monster movies]] were certainly big hits in their own day, but they reached the height of their popularity in the [[TheFifties mid 1950s]], when Universal released a large number of them in a television package called ''Shock! Theater''. ''Shock!'' introduced the films to a new audience that could view them from the comfort of their homes, with the lovably campy assistance of various local [[HorrorHost Horror Hosts]], kicking off a "Monster Boom" craze that lasted well into the '70s. [[Film/HammerHorror Hammer Film Productions]] came along at almost the same time to produce lurid color remakes of the classic films, ensuring the monsters' legacies would live on and restoring glamour to the horror genre, which, by that point, had devolved into BMovie hell.
** In the first half of TheNineties, the horror genre (and the {{slasher|Movie}} genre in particular) was seen as stale, {{cliche|Storm}}, and behind the times, filled with bad writing, cheap scares, and [[UnfortunateImplications not-so-subtle misogyny]]. New horror movies were flopping at the box office left and right (even in the normally-reliable month of October), and the slasher icons of TheEighties viewed as walking punchlines. Then came ''Film/{{Scream|1996}}'', which {{deconstruct|ion}}ed, [[DeconstructiveParody parodied]], and {{lampshade|Hanging}}d all the genre's conventions, put them all back together, and single-handedly restored the genre to commercial viability. While the teen slasher boom it spawned turned out to be short-lived (due to a combination of SturgeonsLaw and a TooSoon reaction after the UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} massacre), horror cinema in general hasn't looked back.

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** The [[Franchise/UniversalHorror classic Universal monster movies]] were certainly big hits in their own day, the '30s and early '40s, but after the release of ''Film/TheWolfMan1941'', they reached fell into a DorkAge that would last the height rest of their popularity in TheForties and well into TheFifties, with only a few bright spots (''Film/CreatureFromTheBlackLagoon'', ''Film/ItCameFromOuterSpace'') as Creator/{{Universal}} struggled to adapt to the [[TheFifties mid 1950s]], when postwar boom of sci-fi horror. Then, in 1957, Universal released a large number of them its classic horror films in a television package called ''Shock! Theater''. ''Shock!'' introduced the films to a new audience that could view them from the comfort of their homes, with the lovably campy assistance of various local [[HorrorHost Horror Hosts]], {{Horror Host}}s, kicking off a "Monster Boom" craze that lasted well into TheSeventies and saw the '70s. monsters reach the height of their popularity and cultural presence. [[Film/HammerHorror Hammer Film Productions]] came along at almost the same time to produce lurid color remakes of the classic films, ensuring the monsters' legacies would live on and restoring glamour to the horror genre, which, which by that point, point had devolved into BMovie hell.
hell. To this day, even as new monsters, villains, and subgenres have risen to prominence, the Universal monsters are regarded as icons of the horror genre, with most takes on the basic monsters ([[ClassicalMovieVampire vampires]] and [[WolfMan werewolves]] especially) still referring back to films made in the '30s and '40s, even if only to [[OurMonstersAreDifferent show themselves to be different]] from the 'Hollywood' version.
** In the first half of TheNineties, the horror genre (and the {{slasher|Movie}} genre in particular) was seen as stale, {{cliche|Storm}}, and behind the times, filled with bad writing, cheap scares, and [[UnfortunateImplications not-so-subtle not-so-subtle]] [[MonsterMisogyny misogyny]]. New horror movies were flopping at the box office left and right (even in the normally-reliable month of October), and the slasher icons of TheEighties were viewed as walking punchlines. Then came ''Film/{{Scream|1996}}'', which {{deconstruct|ion}}ed, [[DeconstructiveParody parodied]], and {{lampshade|Hanging}}d all the genre's conventions, put them all back together, and single-handedly restored the genre to commercial viability. While the teen slasher boom it spawned turned out to be short-lived (due to a combination of SturgeonsLaw and a TooSoon reaction after the UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} massacre), horror cinema in general hasn't looked back.
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