History Main / PopularityPolynomial

7th Apr '17 3:56:44 PM nombretomado
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** Although easy to forget now that it's a massive media juggernaut seemingly beloved by all, the show was considered a joke in the years between the mid '80s and 2005. It had been a very popular show at its height in the '70s, but during its '80s DorkAge and after its cancellation in 1989 it was, at best, a CultClassic, and at worst, something for people to sneer at and assert that, no, ''they'' never watched if they wanted to maintain a shred of credibility. Then Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/ChristopherEccleston came along, and suddenly everything changed. The show not only became a huge success in Britain and returned to omnipresence in pop culture, but for the first time it managed to cross ThePond and establish a substantial international fanbase, with ''Doctor Who'' merchandise sold in mainstream American music/video stores.

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** Although easy to forget now that it's a massive media juggernaut seemingly beloved by all, the show was considered a joke in the years between the mid '80s and 2005. It had been a very popular show at its height in the '70s, but during its '80s DorkAge and after its cancellation in 1989 it was, at best, a CultClassic, and at worst, something for people to sneer at and assert that, no, ''they'' never watched if they wanted to maintain a shred of credibility. Then Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/ChristopherEccleston came along, and suddenly everything changed. The show not only became a huge success in Britain and returned to omnipresence in pop culture, but for the first time it managed to cross ThePond UsefulNotes/ThePond and establish a substantial international fanbase, with ''Doctor Who'' merchandise sold in mainstream American music/video stores.
3rd Apr '17 11:16:47 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ComicBook/LukeCage, as discussed in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRtW10X0Vr4 this video]] by Creator/BobChipman. Created in TheSeventies to both diversify the Creator/MarvelComics lineup and cash in on the {{blaxploitation}} boom, from TheEighties into the '00s he was seen by many comics fans, white and black alike, as a [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece dated relic]] and a symbol of everything wrong with Marvel's [[WereStillRelevantDammit clueless attempts at social commentary]] during that time. Attempts to revive the character mostly went nowhere outside of guest appearances in ''ComicBook/{{Alias}}'', where he was largely shorn of his '70s trappings. His return to popularity and respectability came alongside the broader reappraisal of the blaxploitation genre in the '00s and '10s, with [[Series/LukeCage a popular Netflix TV series]] being the turning point after years of increasingly popular appearances in the comics. Now, he's one of Marvel's headliners, updated for the 21st century but still rooted in his '70s inspirations.
16th Mar '17 9:13:13 PM WaxingName
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After ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' introduced a new well-received style of play, with ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' and ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' refining it and removing any poorly received alternate gameplay styles, Sonic's popularity increased even more to the point of appearing to market commercials (he hasn't done this since the '90s), and even appearing in ''[[Disney/WreckItRalph a movie]]''. Then after ''that'', the series' popularity dipped once again, with ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld'' getting a mixed reception for its jarringly different gameplay and collection of other highly experimental play styles after the well-received boost games, and then even more so with the ill-fated ''VideoGame/SonicBoom: Rise of Lyric''. Even though the latter was part of a spin-off [[WesternAnimation/SonicBoom sub-franchise]], the industry as a whole started to trash Sonic as being a relic of the 16-bit era that [[JumpingTheShark jumped the shark]] once again. The upcoming 25th anniversary for Sonic is seen by its fans as a make-or-break point for the franchise, and only time will tell if the series can permanently regain its status as a venerated video game icon or slide into SnarkBait.

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After ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' introduced a new well-received style of play, with ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' and ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' refining it and removing any poorly received alternate gameplay styles, Sonic's popularity increased even more to the point of appearing to market commercials (he hasn't done this since the '90s), and even appearing in ''[[Disney/WreckItRalph a movie]]''. Then after ''that'', the series' popularity dipped once again, with ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld'' getting a mixed reception for its jarringly different gameplay and collection of other highly experimental play styles after the well-received boost games, and then even more so with the ill-fated ''VideoGame/SonicBoom: Rise of Lyric''. Even though the latter was part of a spin-off [[WesternAnimation/SonicBoom sub-franchise]], the industry as a whole started to trash Sonic as being a relic of the 16-bit era that [[JumpingTheShark jumped the shark]] once again. The upcoming 25th anniversary for Sonic duo of ''VideoGame/SonicMania'' and ''VideoGame/SonicForces'' is seen by its fans as a make-or-break point for the franchise, and only time will tell if the series can permanently regain its status as a venerated video game icon or slide into SnarkBait.
5th Mar '17 5:36:23 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* At the dawn of the TurnOfTheMillennium, Creator/ArchieComics seemed poised to finish its long slide from MainstreamObscurity into plain obsolescence. Its squeaky-clean characters and its [[RetroUniverse perpetual 1950s setting]] had grown increasingly out of touch with younger readers, and its efforts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit keep up with the times]] had done little more than [[SnarkBait render it a laughingstock]] and the butt of jokes about being TwoDecadesBehind. Something funny happened in the 2010s, however: for the first time in decades, Archie became genuinely hip. It started in 2010 when the company relaunched their adventure series ''Life with Archie'' as a more mature take on the characters, with storylines dealing with marriage, financial problems, homosexuality, and gun violence. This was followed in 2013 by ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'', a horror story featuring the characters battling a ZombieApocalypse; its success and critical acclaim saw its writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, promoted to chief creative officer the following year[[note]]Ironically -- and as if to drive home just how much the company had changed -- Aguirre-Sacasa had previously been [[ScrewedByTheLawyers hit with a cease-and-desist letter]] by the company in 2003 for writing a gay-themed Archie stage play.[[/note]], along with a [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 modernized reboot]] of their flagship series by Creator/MarkWaid and a GothicHorror [[ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina rendition]] of ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch. By 2017, Archie Comics' comeback culminated with the TV show ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' on Creator/TheCW.

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* At In the dawn of the TurnOfTheMillennium, '90s and '00s, Creator/ArchieComics seemed poised to finish its long slide from MainstreamObscurity into plain obsolescence. Its squeaky-clean characters and its [[RetroUniverse perpetual 1950s setting]] had grown increasingly out of touch with younger readers, and its efforts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit keep up with the times]] had done little more than [[SnarkBait render it a laughingstock]] and the butt of jokes about being TwoDecadesBehind. TwoDecadesBehind, and it seemed as though most of its fandom was of the ironic sort, with stories like ''ComicBook/ArchieMeetsThePunisher'' outright playing the company's image for laughs. ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' was a hit on television and kept the characters in the public eye, but it was largely divorced from the comics.\\\
Something funny happened in the 2010s, however: for the first time in decades, Archie became genuinely hip. It started in 2010 when the company relaunched their adventure series ''Life with Archie'' as a more mature take on the characters, with storylines dealing with marriage, financial problems, homosexuality, and gun violence. This was followed in 2013 by ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'', a horror story featuring the characters battling a ZombieApocalypse; its success and critical acclaim saw its writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, promoted to chief creative officer the following year[[note]]Ironically -- and as if to drive home just how much the company had changed -- Aguirre-Sacasa had previously been [[ScrewedByTheLawyers hit with a cease-and-desist letter]] by the company in 2003 for writing a gay-themed Archie stage play.[[/note]], along with a [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 modernized reboot]] of their flagship series by Creator/MarkWaid and a GothicHorror [[ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina rendition]] of ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch. By 2017, Archie Comics' comeback culminated with the TV show ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' on Creator/TheCW.
25th Feb '17 3:45:58 PM jormis29
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%% The creator of AwkwardZombie allows whole comic pages to be used provided the link at the bottom is left: http://www.awkwardzombie.com/index.php?page=4

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%% The creator of AwkwardZombie Webcomic/AwkwardZombie allows whole comic pages to be used provided the link at the bottom is left: http://www.awkwardzombie.com/index.php?page=4



* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor made it a sleeper hit and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''Film/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens. And while the "second golden age of raunchy comedies" died down during the mid-2010s in favor of more family fare, some movies have successfully pushed the envelope like ''Sausage Party'', ''Mike & Dave'' and ''Bad Moms''.

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* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor made it a sleeper hit and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''Film/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens. And while the "second golden age of raunchy comedies" died down during the mid-2010s in favor of more family fare, some movies have successfully pushed the envelope like ''Sausage Party'', ''Mike & Dave'' ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Bad Moms''.''Film/BadMoms''.
20th Feb '17 6:54:41 AM PF
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* The ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' series has gone on a wild roller coaster of this. When it came out, it immediately became on of the definitive games of [[UsefulNotes/The16BitEraOfConsoleVideoGames The 16-bit Era]] and put the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis into a fierce [[UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars competition]] with Nintendo. During the time of the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn, his popularity dipped because the series was strangely on main series hiatus, only existing through spinoffs such as ''VideoGame/SonicR'' and an enhanced remake of ''VideoGame/Sonic3DFlickiesIsland''. Come the UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast, Sonic regained the spotlight with the leap to 3D, with ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' and ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' was wildly popular and highly acclaimed, but subsequent games would take their flaws, such as [[PolygonCeiling dodgy camera and controls]] and GameplayRoulette, and cause the series to slowly slide into a bad reputation for its flawed 3D games and an annoying fanbase. This was exacerbated by the over-the-top DarkerAndEdgier ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'', the infamous ObviousBeta ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' and the shameful PortingDisaster of [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog1 the original game]], causing the series to fall into SnarkBait.\\

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* The ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' series has gone on a wild roller coaster of this. When it came out, it immediately became on one of the definitive games of [[UsefulNotes/The16BitEraOfConsoleVideoGames The 16-bit Era]] and put the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis into a fierce [[UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars competition]] with Nintendo. During the time of the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn, his popularity dipped because the series was strangely on main series hiatus, only existing through spinoffs such as ''VideoGame/SonicR'' and an enhanced remake of ''VideoGame/Sonic3DFlickiesIsland''. Come the UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast, Sonic regained the spotlight with the leap to 3D, with ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' and ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' was wildly popular and highly acclaimed, but subsequent games would take their flaws, such as [[PolygonCeiling dodgy camera and controls]] and GameplayRoulette, and cause the series to slowly slide into a bad reputation for its flawed 3D games and an annoying fanbase. This was exacerbated by the over-the-top DarkerAndEdgier ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'', the infamous ObviousBeta ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' and the shameful PortingDisaster of [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog1 the original game]], causing the series to fall into SnarkBait.\\
19th Feb '17 11:56:19 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* At the dawn of the TurnOfTheMillennium, Creator/ArchieComics seemed poised to finish its long slide from MainstreamObscurity into plain obsolescence, its squeaky-clean characters and its [[RetroUniverse perpetual 1950s setting]] having grown increasingly out of touch with younger readers, and its efforts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit keep up with the times]] doing little more than [[SnarkBait render it a laughingstock]]. Something funny happened in the 2010s, however: for the first time since TheFifties, Archie became genuinely hip. It started in 2010 when the company relaunched their adventure series ''Life with Archie'' as a more mature take on the characters, with storylines dealing with marriage, financial problems, homosexuality, and gun violence. This was followed in 2013 by ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'', a horror story featuring the characters battling a ZombieApocalypse; its success and critical acclaim saw its writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, promoted to chief creative officer the following year[[note]]Ironically -- and as if to drive home just how much the company had changed -- Aguirre-Sacasa had previously been [[ScrewedByTheLawyers hit with a cease-and-desist letter]] by the company in 2003 for writing a gay-themed Archie stage play.[[/note]], along with a [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 modernized reboot]] of their flagship series by Creator/MarkWaid and a GothicHorror [[ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina rendition]] of ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch. By 2017, Archie Comics' comeback culminated with the TV show ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' on Creator/TheCW.

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* At the dawn of the TurnOfTheMillennium, Creator/ArchieComics seemed poised to finish its long slide from MainstreamObscurity into plain obsolescence, its obsolescence. Its squeaky-clean characters and its [[RetroUniverse perpetual 1950s setting]] having had grown increasingly out of touch with younger readers, and its efforts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit keep up with the times]] doing had done little more than [[SnarkBait render it a laughingstock]]. laughingstock]] and the butt of jokes about being TwoDecadesBehind. Something funny happened in the 2010s, however: for the first time since TheFifties, in decades, Archie became genuinely hip. It started in 2010 when the company relaunched their adventure series ''Life with Archie'' as a more mature take on the characters, with storylines dealing with marriage, financial problems, homosexuality, and gun violence. This was followed in 2013 by ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'', a horror story featuring the characters battling a ZombieApocalypse; its success and critical acclaim saw its writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, promoted to chief creative officer the following year[[note]]Ironically -- and as if to drive home just how much the company had changed -- Aguirre-Sacasa had previously been [[ScrewedByTheLawyers hit with a cease-and-desist letter]] by the company in 2003 for writing a gay-themed Archie stage play.[[/note]], along with a [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 modernized reboot]] of their flagship series by Creator/MarkWaid and a GothicHorror [[ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina rendition]] of ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch. By 2017, Archie Comics' comeback culminated with the TV show ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' on Creator/TheCW.
19th Feb '17 11:55:04 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* {{Superhero}} comics have been on this path for years. They were one of the few comic book genres that survived UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode, although they had to censor themselves, and were the more successful comics throughout the {{UsefulNotes/The Silver Age|Of Comic Books}} and {{UsefulNotes/The Bronze Age|Of Comic Books}}. During the later parts of the '80s, ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' was a successful deconstruction of the superhero genre, while ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' and ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' were grittier takes on ''Franchise/{{Batman}}''. Seeing this, many comics went DarkerAndEdgier, leading to the UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. Unfortunately, most of the dark material, while popular at first, got old. UsefulNotes/TheGreatComicsCrashOf1996, caused by a number of factors (such as the failure of ' ''ComicBook/DeathMate'', and the overuse of collectors editions/crisis crossovers), made many companies such as Creator/ValiantComics die, and even Creator/{{Marvel}} filed for bankruptcy. By 2001, comic book sales were only 67 million, their lower point in years. Marvel and DC focused on their movies, while Creator/DarkHorseComics and Creator/ImageComics focused on licensed and genre material. However, with the popularity of Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse and similar films, as well as lots of successful TV adaptations and new diverse titles like ''[[ComicBook/MsMarvel2014 Ms. Marvel]]'' and ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2011}}'', superhero comic books have had a significant rebound.

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* {{Superhero}} comics have been on this path for years. They were one of the few comic book genres that survived UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode, although they had to censor themselves, and were the more successful comics throughout the {{UsefulNotes/The Silver Age|Of Comic Books}} and {{UsefulNotes/The Bronze Age|Of Comic Books}}. During the later parts of the '80s, ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' was a successful deconstruction of the superhero genre, while ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' and ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' were grittier takes on ''Franchise/{{Batman}}''. Seeing this, many comics went DarkerAndEdgier, leading to the UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. Unfortunately, most of the dark material, while popular at first, got old. UsefulNotes/TheGreatComicsCrashOf1996, caused by a number of factors (such as the bursting of the speculator bubble, the failure of ' ''ComicBook/DeathMate'', and the overuse of collectors editions/crisis crossovers), made many companies such as Creator/ValiantComics die, and even Creator/{{Marvel}} filed for bankruptcy. By 2001, comic book sales were only 67 million, their lower point in years. Marvel and DC focused on their movies, while Creator/DarkHorseComics and Creator/ImageComics focused on licensed and genre material. However, with the popularity of Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse and similar films, as well as lots of successful TV adaptations and new new, diverse titles like ''[[ComicBook/MsMarvel2014 Ms. Marvel]]'' and ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2011}}'', superhero comic books have had a significant rebound.
* At the dawn of the TurnOfTheMillennium, Creator/ArchieComics seemed poised to finish its long slide from MainstreamObscurity into plain obsolescence, its squeaky-clean characters and its [[RetroUniverse perpetual 1950s setting]] having grown increasingly out of touch with younger readers, and its efforts to [[WereStillRelevantDammit keep up with the times]] doing little more than [[SnarkBait render it a laughingstock]]. Something funny happened in the 2010s, however: for the first time since TheFifties, Archie became genuinely hip. It started in 2010 when the company relaunched their adventure series ''Life with Archie'' as a more mature take on the characters, with storylines dealing with marriage, financial problems, homosexuality, and gun violence. This was followed in 2013 by ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'', a horror story featuring the characters battling a ZombieApocalypse; its success and critical acclaim saw its writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, promoted to chief creative officer the following year[[note]]Ironically -- and as if to drive home just how much the company had changed -- Aguirre-Sacasa had previously been [[ScrewedByTheLawyers hit with a cease-and-desist letter]] by the company in 2003 for writing a gay-themed Archie stage play.[[/note]], along with a [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 modernized reboot]] of their flagship series by Creator/MarkWaid and a GothicHorror [[ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina rendition]] of ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch. By 2017, Archie Comics' comeback culminated with the TV show ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' on Creator/TheCW.
16th Feb '17 1:54:22 PM AgentS7
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** Nintendo seems to have hit another low with their UsefulNotes/{{Wii U}}, which has fallen to last place behind the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}} and UsefulNotes/XboxOne despite a one year head start. This is largely due to their attempt to [[WinBackTheCrowd win back]] core gamers while [[MisaimedMarketing still trying to appeal to casuals simultaneously]], not to mention with the apparent lack of innovation (the primary controller resembles a tablet), and the shift in consumer electronics development (for easy porting) results in the [=PS4=] and Xbox One using standardized PC hardware. Whilst it does have an audience with hardcore gamers and Nintendo fans, the casual fans have moved on to other products like smartphones and casual games in PC or the more mainstream consoles. The Wii U was, however, partially rescued [[KillerApp by the success of games]] like ''Videogame/HyruleWarriors'', the fourth game in the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series, and the SleeperHit ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}''.

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** Nintendo seems to have hit another low with their UsefulNotes/{{Wii U}}, which has fallen to last place behind the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}} and UsefulNotes/XboxOne despite a one year head start. This is largely due to their attempt to [[WinBackTheCrowd win back]] core gamers while [[MisaimedMarketing still trying to appeal to casuals simultaneously]], not to mention with the apparent lack of innovation (the primary controller resembles a tablet), and the shift in consumer electronics development (for easy porting) results in the [=PS4=] and Xbox One using standardized PC hardware. Whilst it does have an audience with hardcore gamers and Nintendo fans, the casual fans have moved on to other products like smartphones and casual games in PC or the more mainstream consoles. The Wii U was, however, partially rescued By the time [[KillerApp by the success of successful games]] like ''Videogame/HyruleWarriors'', the fourth game in the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series, and the SleeperHit ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}''. ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' came out, it was already too late for the console.



** The SurvivalHorror genre originated as a nifty response to the technological limitations of fifth-generation consoles, and produced a mountain of {{killer app}}s for the young UsefulNotes/PlayStation console, most notably ''VideoGame/{{Resident Evil|1}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Silent Hill|1}}'', which were among the premier game franchises in the second half of the '90s. In the TurnOfTheMillennium, however, the genre was squeezed out by rising budgets and the homogenization of the AAA game industry; both ''Resident Evil'' and ''Silent Hill'' went through {{Dork Age}}s brought on by attempts to compete with shooters, and other series likewise withered and died. However, starting in the late '00s, the genre made a comeback in the indie realm, with games like ''VideoGame/AmnesiaTheDarkDescent'', ''VideoGame/DayZ'', ''VideoGame/{{Slender}}'', and the ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' games being well-received and spawning a wave of new horror efforts. With ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUs'' being a smash hit critically and commercially, with many even considering it the best game of the entire [[UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames Seventh Generation]], the genre is on its way back to being a success with mainstream developers as well. This was further reinforced with the announcement of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil7Biohazard''.

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** The SurvivalHorror genre originated as a nifty response to the technological limitations of fifth-generation consoles, and produced a mountain of {{killer app}}s for the young UsefulNotes/PlayStation console, most notably ''VideoGame/{{Resident Evil|1}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Silent Hill|1}}'', which were among the premier game franchises in the second half of the '90s. In the TurnOfTheMillennium, however, the genre was squeezed out by rising budgets and the homogenization of the AAA game industry; both ''Resident Evil'' and ''Silent Hill'' went through {{Dork Age}}s brought on by attempts to compete with shooters, and other series likewise withered and died. However, starting in the late '00s, the genre made a comeback in the indie realm, with games like ''VideoGame/AmnesiaTheDarkDescent'', ''VideoGame/DayZ'', ''VideoGame/{{Slender}}'', and the ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' games being well-received and spawning a wave of new horror efforts. With ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUs'' being a smash hit critically and commercially, with many even considering it the best game of the entire [[UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames Seventh Generation]], the genre is on its way back to being a success with mainstream developers as well. This was further reinforced with the announcement runaway success of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil7Biohazard''.
15th Feb '17 10:21:00 AM erforce
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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has varied in both popularity and quality, constantly going from being a CultClassic to being a mainstream phenomenon. ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' was moderately popular during its original 1966-69 run, but was cancelled after a low budget third season. The series was later revived as a 22 [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries episode animated series]]. While the first [[Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture film]] received mixed reviews, it was enough to get another sequel, ''Film/StarTrekTheWrathOfKhan'', which was wildly considered the best film of the franchise and helped create a film series, albeit [[StarTrekMovieCurse one of varying quality]]. Later, another series, ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' was released, and became an iconic show, lasting 176 episodes and seven seasons. The popularity ended up spawning two shows: ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' and ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. While both were popular, they never achieved the status of ''The Next Generation''. The franchise hit a low point in the early 2000s, with the box office failure and poor reception of ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' and the low ratings, lukewarm reception, and cancellation of ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''. However, ''Film/StarTrek'', a reboot of the franchise was a success both critically and commercially, and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'' continued the streak, even though it resulted in a BrokenBase. A new TV series is scheduled for 2017.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has varied in both popularity and quality, constantly going from being a CultClassic to being a mainstream phenomenon. ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' was moderately popular during its original 1966-69 run, but was cancelled after a low budget third season. The series was later revived as a 22 [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries episode animated series]]. While the first [[Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture film]] received mixed reviews, it was enough to get another sequel, ''Film/StarTrekTheWrathOfKhan'', ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', which was wildly considered the best film of the franchise and helped create a film series, albeit [[StarTrekMovieCurse one of varying quality]]. Later, another series, ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' was released, and became an iconic show, lasting 176 episodes and seven seasons. The popularity ended up spawning two shows: ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' and ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. While both were popular, they never achieved the status of ''The Next Generation''. The franchise hit a low point in the early 2000s, with the box office failure and poor reception of ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' and the low ratings, lukewarm reception, and cancellation of ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''. However, ''Film/StarTrek'', a reboot of the franchise was a success both critically and commercially, and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'' continued the streak, even though it resulted in a BrokenBase. A new TV series is scheduled for 2017.
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