History Main / PopularityPolynomial

22nd Jan '18 6:27:44 AM RAraya
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2001's ''Film/MoulinRouge'' was the first live-action musical in years to attract positive attention, but a comeback truly kicked off the following year with the Oscar-winning film of ''Film/{{Chicago}}'', and has continued into the present with the likes of ''Theatre/{{Dreamgirls}}'', ''Film/{{Hairspray}}'', ''Theatre/MammaMia'' and ''Theatre/LesMiserables''. Disney even managed to make a highly successful franchise out of ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'', to the point where the third film was upgraded to a theatrical release, its' success sparking franchises like ''Film/CampRock'' and ''Film/TeenBeachMovie''. ''Series/{{Glee}}'' helped to carry the musical revival torch into TheNewTens, alongside films like ''Film/PitchPerfect'', ''Joyful Noise'' and shows like ''Series/{{Smash}}'' (though neither of the latter two were particularly successful). However, 2016's ''La La Land'' stumped almost everyone, becoming a critical and financial hit.
* Putting original songs in movies has become this. Original songs in movies used to be the norm, with many being acclaimed as classics to this day, and the Best Original Song category was thriving with nominations. However, by the late 1990s a backlash spread against this (primarily because of Disney's abuse of this trope and ''Titanic''), and fewer and fewer films were using theme songs in favor of filling up the soundtrack with as many chart-topping songs as they could, with the added advantage they were less expensive. By the early 2000s, original songs had fallen off the radar. The persistence of the MovieBonusSong and AwardBaitSong tropes were the only things keeping them alive, and the effects showed at the Academy Awards Best Original Song category -- the 2011 winner [[Film/TheMuppets "Man or Muppet"]] beat out ''one'' other nominee (''Rio''), which was most likely there so that there wouldn't be just the single nominee. However, in TheNewTens, with the success of songs such as "Skyfall" from ''Skyfall'', "Everything is Awesome" from ''The Lego Movie'' and "Let It Go" from ''Frozen'' along with their performances on stage, original songs have seen a significant revival.

to:

2001's ''Film/MoulinRouge'' was the first live-action musical in years to attract positive attention, but a comeback truly kicked off the following year with the Oscar-winning film of ''Film/{{Chicago}}'', and has continued into the present with the likes of ''Theatre/{{Dreamgirls}}'', ''Film/{{Hairspray}}'', ''Theatre/MammaMia'' and ''Theatre/LesMiserables''. Disney even managed to make a highly successful franchise out of ''Film/HighSchoolMusical'', to the point where the third film was upgraded to a theatrical release, its' success sparking franchises like ''Film/CampRock'' and ''Film/TeenBeachMovie''. ''Series/{{Glee}}'' helped to carry the musical revival torch into TheNewTens, alongside films like ''Film/PitchPerfect'', ''Joyful Noise'' and shows like ''Series/{{Smash}}'' (though neither of the latter two were particularly successful). However, 2016's ''La La Land'' ''Film/LaLaLand'' stumped almost everyone, becoming a critical and financial hit.
hit much like ''Film/BeautyAndTheBeast2017'' and ''Film/TheGreatestShowman''.
* Putting original songs in movies has become this. Original songs in movies used to be the norm, with many being acclaimed as classics to this day, and the Best Original Song category was thriving with nominations. However, by the late 1990s a backlash spread against this (primarily because of Disney's abuse of this trope and ''Titanic''), and fewer and fewer films were using theme songs in favor of filling up the soundtrack with as many chart-topping songs as they could, with the added advantage they were less expensive. By the early 2000s, original songs had fallen off the radar. The persistence of the MovieBonusSong and AwardBaitSong tropes were the only things keeping them alive, and the effects showed at the Academy Awards Best Original Song category -- the 2011 winner [[Film/TheMuppets "Man or Muppet"]] beat out ''one'' other nominee (''Rio''), which was most likely there so that there wouldn't be just the single nominee. However, in TheNewTens, with the success of songs such as "Skyfall" from ''Skyfall'', ''Film/{{Skyfall}}'', "Happy" from ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe 2'', "Everything is Awesome" from ''The Lego Movie'' ''WesternAnimation/TheLegoMovie'' and "Let It Go" from ''Frozen'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Frozen}}'' along with their performances on stage, original songs have seen a significant revival.



* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' became a sleeper hit with its sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box-office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens, leading to a "golden age of the raunchy comedy" that peaked around 2007-2009. However the genre fell apart around 2010 as some of its more popular tropes began to attract negative attention, [[ValuesDissonance including some of]] [[UnfortunateImplications the language used]]. The most successful "adult" comedy of the early 10s became 2012's Film/{{Ted}}, and even its 2015 sequel tanked. However, by the latter part of the decade, films like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms'' have successfully pushed the envelope by resorting on less juvenile humor.

to:

* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' became a sleeper hit with its sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box-office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens, leading to a "golden age of the raunchy comedy" that peaked around 2007-2009. However the genre fell apart around 2010 as some of its more popular common tropes began to attract negative attention, [[ValuesDissonance including some of]] [[UnfortunateImplications the language used]]. The most successful "adult" comedy of the early 10s became 2012's Film/{{Ted}}, ''Film/{{Ted}}'', and even its 2015 sequel tanked. However, by the latter part of the decade, films like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms'' have successfully pushed the envelope by resorting on less juvenile humor.
22nd Jan '18 6:10:33 AM RAraya
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* The Literature/SherlockHolmes stories have been famous among the public ever since Creator/ArthurConanDoyle first published them in ''The Strand''. While there was not really a time when ''nobody'' admitted to liking them, there were times when few people could take them seriously and parodies (affectionate or not) dominated the discussion of Holmes as a character. The latest wave of Sherlock Holmes "consciousness" is at least in part attributable to ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and ''Series/{{Elementary}}'', both of which "update" Sherlock Holmes by setting it in the present day instead of the stuffy, foggy Victorian setting that has been parodied to death.

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* The Literature/SherlockHolmes stories have been famous among the public ever since Creator/ArthurConanDoyle first published them in ''The Strand''. While there was not really a time when ''nobody'' admitted to liking them, there were times when few people could take them seriously and parodies (affectionate or not) dominated the discussion of Holmes as a character. The latest wave of Sherlock Holmes "consciousness" is at least in part attributable to ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and ''Series/{{Elementary}}'', both of which "update" Sherlock Holmes by setting it in the present day instead of the stuffy, [[AFoggyDayInLondonTown foggy Victorian setting setting]] that has been parodied to death.
21st Jan '18 6:27:15 PM HighCrate
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** Actually, the idea of taking Holmes and Watson to contemporary times [[OlderThanTheyThink actually emerged]] in the 1940s, when the characters were set in a WWII-era setting for the Basil Rathbone films, [[AudienceColoringAdaptation which for decades became the reference point for the franchise]].
21st Jan '18 4:38:37 PM RAraya
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** Actually, the idea of taking Holmes and Watson to contemporary times [[OlderThanTheyThink actually emerged]] in the 1940s, when the characters were set in a WWII-era setting for the Basil Rathbone films, [[AudienceColoringInterpretation which for decades became the reference point for the franchise]].

to:

** Actually, the idea of taking Holmes and Watson to contemporary times [[OlderThanTheyThink actually emerged]] in the 1940s, when the characters were set in a WWII-era setting for the Basil Rathbone films, [[AudienceColoringInterpretation [[AudienceColoringAdaptation which for decades became the reference point for the franchise]].
21st Jan '18 4:37:07 PM RAraya
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* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' became a sleeper hit with its sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box-office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens, leading to a "golden age of the raunchy comedy" that peaked around 2007-2009. However the genre fell apart around 2010 as some of its more popular tropes began to attract negative attention, [[ValuesDissonance including some of]] [[UnforttunateImplications the language used]]. The most successful "adult" comedy of the early 10s became 2012's Film/{{Ted}}, and even its 2015 sequel tanked. However, by the latter part of the decade, films like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms'' have successfully pushed the envelope by resorting on less juvenile humor.

to:

* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' became a sleeper hit with its sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box-office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens, leading to a "golden age of the raunchy comedy" that peaked around 2007-2009. However the genre fell apart around 2010 as some of its more popular tropes began to attract negative attention, [[ValuesDissonance including some of]] [[UnforttunateImplications [[UnfortunateImplications the language used]]. The most successful "adult" comedy of the early 10s became 2012's Film/{{Ted}}, and even its 2015 sequel tanked. However, by the latter part of the decade, films like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms'' have successfully pushed the envelope by resorting on less juvenile humor.
21st Jan '18 4:35:55 PM RAraya
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However, in TheSixties, ''Mary Poppins'' and ''The Sound of Music'', as well the British musical films of the Beatles era, led Hollywood to reconsider musicals, but these attempts were [[GenreKiller killed]] by a parade of flops over 1967-69 (''Camelot'', ''Film/DoctorDolittle'', ''Film/PaintYourWagon'', ''Finian's Rainbow'', ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'', and finally ''Theatre/HelloDolly'') that took musicals out of fashion, with more somber takes such as ''Film/{{Cabaret}}'' and rock operas like ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' being the only exceptions. While the genre briefly resurfaced late in TheSeventies via a few successful efforts with quite some help from the Music/BeeGees, most notably ''Film/SaturdayNightFever'' and ''Film/{{Grease}}'', it gave up the ghost early in TheEighties after the disco backlash set on, with ''Film/{{Xanadu}}'' and ''Can't Stop the Music'' [[GenreKiller killing off the genre for two decades]], the Disney animated films of the 1990s being the closest to a musical during those lean years.\\

to:

However, in TheSixties, ''Mary Poppins'' and ''The Sound of Music'', as well the British musical films of the Beatles era, led Hollywood to reconsider musicals, but these attempts were [[GenreKiller killed]] by a parade of flops over 1967-69 (''Camelot'', ''Film/DoctorDolittle'', ''Film/PaintYourWagon'', ''Finian's Rainbow'', ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'', and finally ''Theatre/HelloDolly'') that took musicals out of fashion, with more somber takes such as ''Film/{{Cabaret}}'' and rock operas like ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' being the only exceptions. While the genre briefly resurfaced late in TheSeventies via a few successful efforts with quite some help from the Music/BeeGees, from Music/TheBeeGees, most notably ''Film/SaturdayNightFever'' and ''Film/{{Grease}}'', it gave up the ghost early in TheEighties after the disco backlash set on, with ''Film/{{Xanadu}}'' and ''Can't Stop the Music'' [[GenreKiller killing off the genre for two decades]], the Disney animated films of the 1990s being the closest to a musical during those lean years.\\



* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}''' sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor made it a sleeper hit and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens, leading to a "golden age of the raunchy comedy" that peaked around 2007-2009. However the genre fell apart around 2010 as some of its more popular tropes began to attract negative attention, [[ValuesDissonance including some of]] [[UnforttunateImplications the language used]]. The most successful "adult" comedy of the early 10s became 2012's Film/{{Ted}}, and even its 2015 sequel tanked. However, by the latter part of the decade, films like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms'' have successfully pushed the envelope by resorting on less juvenile humor.

to:

* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}''' ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' became a sleeper hit with its sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor made it a sleeper hit and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box office box-office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens, leading to a "golden age of the raunchy comedy" that peaked around 2007-2009. However the genre fell apart around 2010 as some of its more popular tropes began to attract negative attention, [[ValuesDissonance including some of]] [[UnforttunateImplications the language used]]. The most successful "adult" comedy of the early 10s became 2012's Film/{{Ted}}, and even its 2015 sequel tanked. However, by the latter part of the decade, films like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms'' have successfully pushed the envelope by resorting on less juvenile humor.
21st Jan '18 4:08:08 PM RAraya
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Something funny happened in the 2010s, however: for the first time in decades, Archie became genuinely hip. It started in 2010 when the company relaunched their adventure series ''Life with Archie'' as a more mature take on the characters, with storylines dealing with marriage, financial problems, homosexuality, and gun violence. This was followed in 2013 by ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'', a horror story featuring the characters battling a ZombieApocalypse; its success and critical acclaim saw its writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, promoted to chief creative officer the following year[[note]]Ironically -- and as if to drive home just how much the company had changed -- Aguirre-Sacasa had previously been [[ScrewedByTheLawyers hit with a cease-and-desist letter]] by the company in 2003 for writing a gay-themed ''Archie'' stage play.[[/note]], along with a [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 modernized reboot]] of their flagship series by Creator/MarkWaid and a GothicHorror [[ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina rendition]] of ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch. By 2017, Archie Comics' comeback culminated with the TV show ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' on Creator/TheCW.

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Something funny happened in the 2010s, however: for the first time in decades, Archie became genuinely hip. It started in 2010 when the company relaunched their adventure series ''Life with Archie'' as a more mature take on the characters, with storylines dealing with marriage, financial problems, homosexuality, and gun violence. This was followed in 2013 by ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'', a horror story featuring the characters battling a ZombieApocalypse; its success and critical acclaim saw its writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, promoted to chief creative officer the following year[[note]]Ironically -- and as if to drive home just how much the company had changed -- Aguirre-Sacasa had previously been [[ScrewedByTheLawyers hit with a cease-and-desist letter]] by the company in 2003 for writing a gay-themed ''Archie'' stage play.[[/note]], along with a [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 modernized reboot]] of their flagship series by Creator/MarkWaid and a GothicHorror [[ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina rendition]] of ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch. By 2017, Archie Comics' comeback culminated with the TV show ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' on Creator/TheCW.Creator/TheCW, its unusual setting (a thriller in a mid-century-style small town with a grunge-ish/1990s alt-rock soundtrack) becoming quite successful.



* Disney has gone through ups and downs. During UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, Disney's films were successes. However, after the death of Creator/WaltDisney, the confused company released a string of weak, underperforming films in TheSeventies. By TheEighties, Disney was better known as a theme park operator than a filmmaker. However, in 1989, ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', an animated film deliberately reminiscent of the Golden Age films of the 1940-50s, became an unexpected critical and commercial success and kicked off the [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation Disney Renaissance]] that lasted throughout the entire [[TheNineties Nineties]]. By the TurnOfTheMillennium though, audiences, tiring of the increasingly [[AwardBaitSong clichéd]] [[TalkingAnimal formula]] [[RebelliousPrincess prevalent]] in these films, drifted towards the then-new AllCGICartoon popularized by Creator/{{Pixar}} and Creator/DreamWorksAnimation. Disney responded by shutting down their traditional animation studio and releasing a string of their own CGI animated films, few of which made much of an impact; even the traditionally-animated throwback ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog'' and the well-received ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' were only moderately successful. It wasn't until the double-whammy of 2012's ''Disney/WreckItRalph'' followed by 2013's ultra-successful ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' that Disney truly got back on top again.

to:

* Disney has gone through ups and downs. During UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, Disney's films were successes. successes and set the industry standard. However, after the death of Creator/WaltDisney, the confused company released a string of weak, underperforming under-performing films in TheSeventies. By TheEighties, Disney was better known as a theme park operator than a filmmaker. However, in 1989, ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', an animated film deliberately reminiscent of the Golden Age films of the 1940-50s, became an unexpected critical and commercial success and kicked off the [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation Disney Renaissance]] that lasted throughout the entire [[TheNineties Nineties]]. By the TurnOfTheMillennium though, audiences, tiring of the increasingly [[AwardBaitSong clichéd]] [[TalkingAnimal formula]] [[RebelliousPrincess prevalent]] in these films, drifted towards the then-new AllCGICartoon popularized by Creator/{{Pixar}} and Creator/DreamWorksAnimation. Disney responded by shutting down their traditional animation studio and releasing a string of their own CGI animated films, few of which made much of an impact; even the traditionally-animated throwback ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog'' and the well-received ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' were only moderately successful. It wasn't until the double-whammy of 2012's ''Disney/WreckItRalph'' followed by 2013's ultra-successful ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' that Disney truly got back on top again.



* Musicals have been getting in and out of this since its beginnings: the UsefulNotes/RiseOfTheTalkies brought a glut of musical films in 1929-30, only for TheGreatDepression to shift tastes to the point many films had to be modified to eliminate the songs and promoted as such. But halfway through the decade Busby Berkeley's new approach to choreography and the popularity of the Astaire-Rogers team led to a wave of musicals that intensified during the war years, with MGM becoming associated with the genre, which then faltered through the 1950s with the rise of television, being relegated to the B-movie domain by the time rock-and-roll came along.\\

to:

* Musicals have been getting in and out of this since its beginnings: the UsefulNotes/RiseOfTheTalkies brought a glut of musical films in 1929-30, only for TheGreatDepression to shift tastes to the point many films had to be modified to eliminate the songs and promoted as such.''not'' being musicals. But halfway through the decade Busby Berkeley's new approach to choreography and the popularity of the Astaire-Rogers team led to a wave of musicals that intensified during the war years, with MGM becoming associated with the genre, which then faltered through the 1950s with the rise of television, being relegated to the B-movie domain by the time rock-and-roll came along.\\



However, in TheSixties, ''Mary Poppins'' and ''The Sound of Music'', as well the British musical films of the Beatles era, led Hollywood to reconsider musicals, but these attempts were [[GenreKiller killed]] by a parade of flops over 1967-69 (''Camelot'', ''Film/DoctorDolittle'', ''Film/PaintYourWagon'', ''Finian's Rainbow'', ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'', and finally ''Theatre/HelloDolly'') that took musicals out of fashion, with ''Film/{{Cabaret}}'' and ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' being the only exceptions. While the genre briefly resurfaced late in TheSeventies via a few successful efforts, most notably ''Film/SaturdayNightFever'' and ''Film/{{Grease}}'', it gave up the ghost early in TheEighties after the disco backlash set on, with ''Film/{{Xanadu}}'' and ''Cant Stop the Music'' [[GenreKiller killing off the genre for two decades]].\\

to:

However, in TheSixties, ''Mary Poppins'' and ''The Sound of Music'', as well the British musical films of the Beatles era, led Hollywood to reconsider musicals, but these attempts were [[GenreKiller killed]] by a parade of flops over 1967-69 (''Camelot'', ''Film/DoctorDolittle'', ''Film/PaintYourWagon'', ''Finian's Rainbow'', ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'', and finally ''Theatre/HelloDolly'') that took musicals out of fashion, with more somber takes such as ''Film/{{Cabaret}}'' and rock operas like ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' being the only exceptions. While the genre briefly resurfaced late in TheSeventies via a few successful efforts, efforts with quite some help from the Music/BeeGees, most notably ''Film/SaturdayNightFever'' and ''Film/{{Grease}}'', it gave up the ghost early in TheEighties after the disco backlash set on, with ''Film/{{Xanadu}}'' and ''Cant ''Can't Stop the Music'' [[GenreKiller killing off the genre for two decades]].decades]], the Disney animated films of the 1990s being the closest to a musical during those lean years.\\



* Putting original songs in movies has become this. Original songs in movies used to be the norm, with many being acclaimed as classics to this day, and the Best Original Song category was thriving with nominations. However, by the late 1990s a backlash spread against this (primarily because of Disney's abuse of this trope), and fewer and fewer films were using theme songs in favor of filling up the soundtrack with as many hot artists as they could, with the added advantage they were less expensive. By the early 2000s, original songs had fallen off the radar. The persistence of the MovieBonusSong and AwardBaitSong tropes were the only things keeping them alive, and the effects showed at the Academy Awards Best Original Song category -- the 2011 winner [[Film/TheMuppets "Man or Muppet"]] beat out ''one'' other nominee (''Rio''), which was most likely there so that there wouldn't be just the single nominee. However, in TheNewTens, with the success of songs such as "Skyfall" from ''Skyfall'', "Everything is Awesome" from ''The Lego Movie'' and "Let It Go" from ''Frozen'' along with their performances on stage, original songs have seen a significant revival.

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* Putting original songs in movies has become this. Original songs in movies used to be the norm, with many being acclaimed as classics to this day, and the Best Original Song category was thriving with nominations. However, by the late 1990s a backlash spread against this (primarily because of Disney's abuse of this trope), trope and ''Titanic''), and fewer and fewer films were using theme songs in favor of filling up the soundtrack with as many hot artists chart-topping songs as they could, with the added advantage they were less expensive. By the early 2000s, original songs had fallen off the radar. The persistence of the MovieBonusSong and AwardBaitSong tropes were the only things keeping them alive, and the effects showed at the Academy Awards Best Original Song category -- the 2011 winner [[Film/TheMuppets "Man or Muppet"]] beat out ''one'' other nominee (''Rio''), which was most likely there so that there wouldn't be just the single nominee. However, in TheNewTens, with the success of songs such as "Skyfall" from ''Skyfall'', "Everything is Awesome" from ''The Lego Movie'' and "Let It Go" from ''Frozen'' along with their performances on stage, original songs have seen a significant revival.



** In the first half of TheNineties, the horror genre (and the {{slasher|Movie}} genre in particular) was seen as stale, {{cliche|Storm}}, and behind the times, filled with bad writing, cheap scares, and [[UnfortunateImplications not-so-subtle]] [[MonsterMisogyny misogyny]]. New horror movies were flopping at the box office left and right (even in the normally-reliable month of October), and the slasher icons of TheEighties were viewed as walking punchlines. Then came ''Film/{{Scream|1996}}'', which {{deconstruct|ion}}ed, [[DeconstructiveParody parodied]], and {{lampshade|Hanging}}d all the genre's conventions, put them all back together, and single-handedly restored the genre to commercial viability. While the teen slasher boom it spawned turned out to be short-lived (due to a combination of SturgeonsLaw and a TooSoon reaction after the UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} massacre), horror cinema in general hasn't looked back.

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** In the first half of TheNineties, the horror genre (and the {{slasher|Movie}} genre in particular) was seen as stale, {{cliche|Storm}}, and behind the times, filled with bad writing, cheap scares, and [[UnfortunateImplications not-so-subtle]] [[MonsterMisogyny misogyny]]. New horror movies were flopping at the box office left and right (even in the normally-reliable month of October), and the slasher icons of TheEighties were viewed as walking punchlines. Then came ''Film/{{Scream|1996}}'', which {{deconstruct|ion}}ed, [[DeconstructiveParody parodied]], and {{lampshade|Hanging}}d all the genre's conventions, put them all back together, and single-handedly restored the genre to commercial viability. While the teen slasher boom it spawned turned out to be short-lived (due to a combination of SturgeonsLaw and a TooSoon reaction after the UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} massacre), horror cinema in general hasn't looked back.back, even taking advantage of the general hysteria of the late 2010s to have success outside the Halloween season once again.



* Big-budget, theatrical superhero movies have risen and fallen several times. The 1940s and '50s saw ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'', ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'', and ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet'' movie serials ride the original comic book boom onto the big screen, but that trend crashed roughly alongside the Comics Code Authority bringing about the end of the Golden Age of superhero comics, and superhero movies were relegated to low-budget made-for-TV fare for twenty years (with the odd exception like 1966's Adam West TV spinoff ''Film/BatmanTheMovie''). The success of Richard Donner's ''Film/{{Superman}}'' in 1978 revived interest, as did 1989's ''Film/{{Batman}}'', but each was followed by only one well-received sequel, two poorly-received ones, and a decade each of [[FollowTheLeader B-grade imitators]] like ''Film/{{Supergirl}}'', ''Film/HowardTheDuck'', and ''Film/TheMeteorMan'' which were generally poorly received by critics and audiences. In 1998, ''Film/{{Blade}}'' was released and ended up being a SleeperHit. Then in the early [[TheAughts 2000s]], the genre began a slow-building but powerful and long-lasting resurgence with the ''[[Film/XMenFilmSeries X-Men]]'' and ''[[Film/SpiderManTrilogy Spider-Man]]'' film franchises. In TheNewTens, the release calendar has been dominated by big budget superhero adaptations such as Christopher Nolan's ''The [[Film/BatmanBegins Dark]] [[Film/TheDarkKnight Knight]] [[Film/TheDarkKnightRises Trilogy]]'', [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse Marvel's sprawling Cinematic Universe]] and the nascent DC Film Universe, and there appears to be no end in sight.

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* Big-budget, theatrical superhero movies have risen and fallen several times. The 1940s and '50s saw ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'', ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'', and ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet'' movie serials ride the original comic book boom onto the big screen, but that trend crashed roughly alongside the Comics Code Authority bringing about the end of the Golden Age of superhero comics, and superhero movies were relegated to low-budget made-for-TV fare for twenty years (with the odd exception like 1966's Adam West TV spinoff spin-off ''Film/BatmanTheMovie''). The success of Richard Donner's ''Film/{{Superman}}'' in 1978 revived interest, as did 1989's ''Film/{{Batman}}'', but each was followed by only one well-received sequel, two poorly-received ones, and a decade each of [[FollowTheLeader B-grade imitators]] like ''Film/{{Supergirl}}'', ''Film/HowardTheDuck'', and ''Film/TheMeteorMan'' which were generally poorly received by critics and audiences. In 1998, ''Film/{{Blade}}'' was released and ended up being a SleeperHit. Then in the early [[TheAughts 2000s]], the genre began a slow-building but powerful and long-lasting resurgence with the ''[[Film/XMenFilmSeries X-Men]]'' and ''[[Film/SpiderManTrilogy Spider-Man]]'' film franchises. In TheNewTens, franchises, the release calendar has been dominated by big budget latter [[UnbuiltTrope setting up the format]] for further superhero adaptations such as films. By the late 2000s/early 2010s, Christopher Nolan's ''The [[Film/BatmanBegins Dark]] [[Film/TheDarkKnight Knight]] [[Film/TheDarkKnightRises Trilogy]]'', Trilogy]]'' became critically acclaimed, while ''Iron Man'' kick-started [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse Marvel's sprawling Cinematic Universe]] and Universe]]. By the nascent mid-2010s the DC Film Universe, and there appears Universe emerged, while other studios have begun to be no end in sight.build their own inter-connected universes.



* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor made it a sleeper hit and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens. And while the "second golden age of raunchy comedies" died down during the mid-2010s in favor of more family fare, some movies have successfully pushed the envelope like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms''.

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* Hard-R comedies first took off in the late 1970s, with films like ''Film/AnimalHouse'' and ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'' pushing major boundaries in terms of what constituted "good taste"[[note]]Although, technically, 1972's ''Film/PinkFlamingos'' still holds the record for "raunchiest movie ever made", and unlike most European comedies of the era, these had a plot and could be shown at a regular movie house.[[/note]] and becoming hit films in the process. Unfortunately, a saturation of films in the early '80s, many of which relied solely on VulgarHumor rather than witty writing, dissolved the genre just before ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' and ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' led family-friendly humor to dominate comedy. During that time, the decidedly tamer comedy of "teen films" like ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' in the late '80s and some of the works of actors like [[Creator/PaulReubens Paul "Pee-Wee" Reubens]], Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/RobinWilliams, and Creator/AdamSandler became the norm for more mature audiences. However, ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' ''Film/{{Clerks}}''' sardonic Gen X-fueled approach to adult humor made it a sleeper hit and the hard-R comedy came back in 1998 when ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary'' became a surprise critical and commercial hit. The genre thrived for the next three or four years with such box office bonanzas as ''Film/AmericanPie'' and ''Film/ScaryMovie''. While the new wave's over-emphasis on high school- and college-centered comedy (what with the audience for such movies moving on to adulthood) and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' brand of humor influencing family films like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' threatened to dissolve the genre yet again, the films of Creator/JuddApatow, starting with the 2005 hit ''Film/TheFortyYearOldVirgin'', proved that such films could be just as popular with adults as with teenagers, even pre-teens. And while the "second golden pre-teens, leading to a "golden age of the raunchy comedies" died down during comedy" that peaked around 2007-2009. However the mid-2010s in favor genre fell apart around 2010 as some of its more family fare, popular tropes began to attract negative attention, [[ValuesDissonance including some movies have successfully pushed of]] [[UnforttunateImplications the envelope language used]]. The most successful "adult" comedy of the early 10s became 2012's Film/{{Ted}}, and even its 2015 sequel tanked. However, by the latter part of the decade, films like ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', ''Film/MikeAndDaveNeedWeddingDates'' and ''Film/BadMoms''.''Film/BadMoms'' have successfully pushed the envelope by resorting on less juvenile humor.



* After his [[Film/GodzillaFinalWars last film]] in 2004, ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' received very little public or internet attention. But once footage and trailers for [[Film/{{Godzilla2014}} the 2014 reboot]] started being released in December of 2013, Godzilla started trending very often on social network sites, leading to revived interest in the franchise specifically (hence why many of the films were brought back into circulation after [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes years with no home video releases]]) and the {{Kaiju}} genre in general (hence the sustained interest in ''Film/PacificRim'' and the ContinuityReboot for ''Franchise/{{Gamera}}'').

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* After his [[Film/GodzillaFinalWars last film]] was heavily panned in 2004, ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' received very little public or internet attention. But once footage and trailers for [[Film/{{Godzilla2014}} the 2014 reboot]] started being released in December of 2013, Godzilla started trending very often on social network sites, leading to revived interest in the franchise specifically (hence why many of the films were brought back into circulation after [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes years with no home video releases]]) and the {{Kaiju}} genre in general (hence the sustained interest in ''Film/PacificRim'' and the ContinuityReboot for ''Franchise/{{Gamera}}'').



* Submarine films were popular for decades following WWII. Each decade had at least one notable submarine film, TheFifties had ''Film/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'',''Film/TheEnemyBelow'' and ''Film/RunSilentRunDeep'', TheSixties had ''Film/FantasticVoyage'', ''Submarine X1'', and ''Ice Station Zebra''. TheSeventies had few notable underwater films although Film/JamesBond would get his turn in ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe''. Although ''Film/DasBoot'' started off TheEighties, most of the submarine films of that decade were actually underwater science fiction romps such as ''Film/TheAbyss''. TheNineties gave us ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober'' and ''Film/CrimsonTide''. After this, submarine adventures seemed to vanish. The claustrophobic nature of underwater adventures makes such films a hard sell since there are few, if any, changes of scenery. Most conflict is through dialogue and character drama. Another reason may be chiefly due to the reality that submarine settings are traditionally all male. A significant number of these past submarine films had no female cast members in speaking roles or even onscreen. This makes submarine films difficult to market to a general audience in today's film market that mandates more inclusion and equal gender representation.

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* Even ''Franchise/StarWars'' has had its moments of unpopularity. Beginning in the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s, the franchise was regarded as nothing special, and few people took the films seriously. But after the release of ''The Phantom Menace'', the saga became a pop-culture icon, especially the original trilogy as fans were polarized by the prequels.
* Submarine films were popular for decades following WWII. Each decade had at least one notable submarine film, TheFifties had ''Film/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'',''Film/TheEnemyBelow'' and ''Film/RunSilentRunDeep'', while more extravagant stories dominated the genre in TheSixties had like ''Film/FantasticVoyage'', ''Submarine X1'', and ''Ice Station Zebra''. TheSeventies had few notable underwater films although Film/JamesBond would get his turn in ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe''. Although ''Film/DasBoot'' started off TheEighties, most of the submarine films of that decade were actually underwater science fiction romps such as ''Film/TheAbyss''. TheNineties gave us ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober'' and ''Film/CrimsonTide''. After this, submarine adventures seemed to vanish. The ''Film/CrimsonTide'', although the same decade would see a shift in action/adventure films into flashier combat sequences that became incompatible with the claustrophobic nature of underwater adventures makes such films a hard sell since there are few, if any, changes of scenery. Most conflict is through dialogue and character drama. Another reason may be chiefly due to the reality that submarine settings are traditionally all male. A significant number of these past submarine films had no female cast members in speaking roles or even onscreen. This makes submarine films difficult to market to a general audience in today's film market that mandates more inclusion and equal gender representation.films.



* The Literature/SherlockHolmes books have been cycling in and out of popularity and the public consciousness ever since Creator/ArthurConanDoyle first came up with them. While there was not really a time when ''nobody'' admitted to liking them, there were times when few people could take them seriously and parodies (affectionate or not) dominated the discussion of Holmes as a character. The latest wave of Sherlock Holmes craziness is at least in part attributable to ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and ''Series/{{Elementary}}'', both of which "update" Sherlock Holmes by setting it in the present day instead of some stuffy Victorian London many people cannot take seriously any more. Interestingly, setting Sherlock in the (then) present is actually OlderThanTheyThink and has been done before.
* SpaceOpera, once the dominant sub-genre of Science Fiction, has declined considerably since TheEighties. The reason for this is twofold. Firstly, the end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar also ended the Space Race between the Soviet Union and the United States, leading to a period of stagnation. Secondly, around the same time an unexpected explosion in computers and bio-technology occurred. These two factors caused futurists and SciFi writers to stop looking at Space for inspiration, and look instead to genetic engineering, cloning, cybernetics, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence, hence the dominance of CyberPunk and its derivatives. It's only in recent years, with the over exposure of cyberpunk, nostalgic [[{{Reconstruction}} reconstructionist]] works of SpaceOpera (like for example, ''Franchise/MassEffect''), and renewed interest in space coming from the discovery of Extra-solar planets that the Genre has begun to recover. Cyberpunk and its derivatives remain on top however.

to:

* The Literature/SherlockHolmes books stories have been cycling in and out of popularity and famous among the public consciousness ever since Creator/ArthurConanDoyle first came up with them.published them in ''The Strand''. While there was not really a time when ''nobody'' admitted to liking them, there were times when few people could take them seriously and parodies (affectionate or not) dominated the discussion of Holmes as a character. The latest wave of Sherlock Holmes craziness "consciousness" is at least in part attributable to ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and ''Series/{{Elementary}}'', both of which "update" Sherlock Holmes by setting it in the present day instead of some stuffy the stuffy, foggy Victorian London many people cannot take seriously any more. Interestingly, setting Sherlock in that has been parodied to death.
** Actually,
the (then) present is idea of taking Holmes and Watson to contemporary times [[OlderThanTheyThink actually OlderThanTheyThink and has been done before.
emerged]] in the 1940s, when the characters were set in a WWII-era setting for the Basil Rathbone films, [[AudienceColoringInterpretation which for decades became the reference point for the franchise]].
* SpaceOpera, once the dominant sub-genre of Science Fiction, has declined considerably since TheEighties. The reason for this is twofold. Firstly, the end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar also ended the Space Race between the Soviet Union and the United States, States (the Challenger disaster did not help matters for the U.S.), leading to a period of stagnation. Secondly, around the same time an unexpected explosion in computers and bio-technology occurred. These two factors caused futurists and SciFi writers to stop looking at Space space for inspiration, and look instead to genetic engineering, cloning, cybernetics, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence, hence the dominance of CyberPunk and its derivatives. It's only in recent years, with the over exposure of cyberpunk, nostalgic [[{{Reconstruction}} reconstructionist]] works of SpaceOpera (like for example, ''Franchise/MassEffect''), and renewed interest in space coming from the discovery of Extra-solar planets that the Genre has begun to recover. Cyberpunk and its derivatives remain on top however.



* For 25 years or so after it first aired, ''Series/BattlestarGalactica1978'' was regarded as being a pretty solid show considering the time period when it was produced. Then during the [=2000s=] following the launch of the reimagined series, people tended to dismiss it as being just silly, campy fluff that wasted the potential of its concept. In the years since the finale of the reimagined series however, people have started to warm up to the original again, for at least being fun to watch and not having a storyline which collapsed in on itself (it helps that it's much easier to ignore ''Galactica 1980'' than it is to ignore the latter few reimagined seasons).

to:

* For 25 years or so after it first aired, ''Series/BattlestarGalactica1978'' was regarded as being a pretty solid show considering the time period when it was produced. produced, being even more popular than ''Franchise/StarWars'' during TheNineties. Then during the [=2000s=] 2000s, following the launch of the reimagined series, people tended to dismiss it as being just silly, campy fluff that wasted the potential of its concept. In the years since the finale of the reimagined series however, people have started to warm up to the original again, for at least being fun to watch and not having a storyline which collapsed in on itself (it helps that it's much easier to ignore ''Galactica 1980'' than it is to ignore the latter few seasons of the reimagined seasons).series).



* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' was a huge phenomenon in the early '90s, but it began to slowly dwindle until about 2002, when it was bought by Disney, when it got worse. It had a short burst of success then, but Disney was apathetic towards the franchise at even the best of times, and it essentially culminated in its cancellation in 2009 after ''Series/PowerRangersRPM''. However, soon after, the franchise was bought back by Saban, [[ChannelHop hopped]] over to Nickelodeon, and it seems to be back on an upswing.

to:

* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' was a huge phenomenon in the early '90s, but it began to slowly dwindle until about 2002, when it was bought by Disney, when it got worse.things getting worse afterwards. It had a short burst of success then, but Disney was apathetic towards the franchise at even the best of times, and it essentially culminated in its cancellation in 2009 after ''Series/PowerRangersRPM''. However, soon after, the franchise was bought back by Saban, [[ChannelHop hopped]] over to Nickelodeon, and it seems to be back on an upswing.



* The long-form MiniSeries in the U.S. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, this was seen as the premier format for high-quality television, with shows like ''Series/{{Roots}}'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', ''{{Series/V 1983}}'', and ''Rich Man Poor Man'' allowing the networks and their writers to stretch their wings and bring Hollywood-level production values and big-name stars to the small screen. The then-Big Three networks would devote large chunks of their annual budget and UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}} time to air miniseries that could take up a whole week (or even more) of programming to keep audiences glued to the TV. During TheNineties, however, the quality of miniseries fell into the gutter as networks exploited the format as a UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}}-week RatingsStunt first and a method of storytelling second. The length of most miniseries also decreased, shrinking to just two parts and 4-5 hours, as networks grew more cost-conscious. By the TurnOfTheMillennium, a glut of crappy miniseries had virtually discredited the format.\\

to:

* The long-form MiniSeries in the U.S. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, this was seen as the premier format for high-quality television, with shows like ''Series/{{Roots}}'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', ''{{Series/V 1983}}'', and ''Rich Man Man, Poor Man'' allowing the networks and their writers to stretch their wings and bring Hollywood-level production values and big-name stars to the small screen. The then-Big Three networks would devote large chunks of their annual budget and UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}} time to air miniseries that could take up a whole week (or even more) of programming to keep audiences glued to the TV. During TheNineties, however, the quality of miniseries fell into the gutter as networks exploited the format as a UsefulNotes/{{sweeps}}-week RatingsStunt first and a method of storytelling second. The length of most miniseries also decreased, shrinking to just two parts and 4-5 hours, as networks grew more cost-conscious. By the TurnOfTheMillennium, a glut of crappy miniseries had virtually discredited the format.\\



* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has varied in both popularity and quality, constantly going from being a CultClassic to being a mainstream phenomenon. ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' was moderately popular during its original 1966-69 run, but was cancelled after a low budget third season. The series was later revived as a 22 [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries episode animated series]]. While the first [[Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture film]] received mixed reviews, it was enough to get another sequel, ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', which was wildly considered the best film of the franchise and helped create a film series, albeit [[StarTrekMovieCurse one of varying quality]]. Later, another series, ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' was released, and became an iconic show, lasting 176 episodes and seven seasons. The popularity ended up spawning two shows: ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' and ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. While both were popular, they never achieved the status of ''The Next Generation''. The franchise hit a low point in the early 2000s, with the box office failure and poor reception of ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' and the low ratings, lukewarm reception, and cancellation of ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''. However, ''Film/StarTrek'', a reboot of the franchise was a success both critically and commercially, and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'' continued the streak, even though it resulted in a BrokenBase. A new TV series is scheduled for 2017.
* The televised live musical was inescapable in the '40s and '50s, but died out by 1960, with the last one being a remake of ''Theatre/PeterPan''. In 2013, NBC decided to put on the first televised live musical in 53 years, in the form of a remake of ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic'' starring Music/CarrieUnderwood. While it wasn't well received, ratings went through the roof and NBC decided that they would put out such a show annually. ''Peter Pan Live'', their next musical, was met with similar audience response, but 2015's ''Theatre/TheWiz Live'' became a critical darling just in time for another network to try out the live musical - Fox with ''Film/{{Grease}} Live'' in January 2016 and ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShowLetsDoTheTimeWarpAgain'' in October. In 2017, ABC announced that they too would give a stab at the formula with a live version of ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''[[note]]not to be confused with the non-Disney live action film[[/note]] under the ''[[Series/WaltDisneyPresents Wonderful World of Disney]]'' banner (to air in October of that year) - in the same month that Fox announced live versions of ''Theatre/{{Rent}}'' and ''Film/AChristmasStory'', and NBC announced ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' for Easter Sunday 2018.

to:

* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has varied in both popularity and quality, constantly going from being a CultClassic to being a mainstream phenomenon. ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' was moderately popular during its original 1966-69 run, but was cancelled after a low budget low-budget third season. season scheduled on Fridays. The series was later revived as a 22 [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries episode 22-episode animated series]]. While the first [[Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture film]] received mixed reviews, it was did well enough to get another sequel, ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', which was wildly widely considered the best film of the franchise and helped create a film series, albeit [[StarTrekMovieCurse one of varying quality]]. Later, another series, ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' was released, and became an iconic show, lasting 176 episodes and seven seasons. The popularity ended up spawning two shows: ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' and ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. While both were popular, they never achieved the status of ''The Next Generation''. The franchise hit a low point in the early 2000s, with the box office failure and poor reception of ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' and the low ratings, lukewarm reception, and cancellation of ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''. However, ''Film/StarTrek'', a reboot of the franchise was a success both critically and commercially, and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'' continued the streak, even though it resulted in a BrokenBase. A new TV series is scheduled for premiered on Netflix in 2017.
* The televised live musical was inescapable in during the '40s and '50s, but died out by 1960, with the last one being a remake of ''Theatre/PeterPan''. In 2013, NBC decided to put on the first televised live musical in 53 years, in the form of a remake of ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic'' starring Music/CarrieUnderwood. While it wasn't well received, ratings went through the roof and NBC decided that they would put out such a show annually. ''Peter Pan Live'', their next musical, was met with similar audience response, but 2015's ''Theatre/TheWiz Live'' became a critical darling just in time for another network to try out the live musical - Fox with ''Film/{{Grease}} Live'' in January 2016 and ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShowLetsDoTheTimeWarpAgain'' in October. In 2017, ABC announced that they too would give a stab at the formula with a live version of ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''[[note]]not to be confused with the non-Disney live action film[[/note]] under the ''[[Series/WaltDisneyPresents Wonderful World of Disney]]'' banner (to air in October of that year) - in the same month that Fox announced live versions of ''Theatre/{{Rent}}'' and ''Film/AChristmasStory'', and NBC announced ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' for Easter Sunday 2018.



* ''Theatre/{{Cats}}'' was ''the'' musical during the 80s but overtime the jokes about its niche premise and unusual costumes became more common and common. Eventually the only time it was referenced would be when it was to be poked fun at. In the 2010s however, with musicals becoming more popular the play received new fans and ultimately ended up getting a revival.

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* ''Theatre/{{Cats}}'' was ''the'' musical during the 80s but overtime the jokes about its niche premise and unusual costumes became more common and common. Eventually the only time it was referenced would be when it was to be poked fun at. In the 2010s however, with musicals becoming more popular in general the play received new fans and ultimately ended up getting a revival.



* WesternAnimation as a whole went through this from the late 1960s to the late 1980s at least in so-called critical circles. While animation was already becoming less and less popular through the 1950s and much of the 1960s, the death of Creator/WaltDisney ushered upon a period of change. With a lot of the former mainstream on individual down turns, most of the success came from LimitedAnimation on tv, which while popular in society, the critical side denounced it as UsefulNotes/{{the dark age|OfAnimation}}. A typical device used in favor of this is that it transformed animation from DoingItForTheArt into [[AnimationAgeGhetto a gimmick used to entertain children]], Critics would later change tune when films such as ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'' [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation were released]]. Arguments as to how true this was will often result in one side arguing the other sees things through a NostalgiaFilter, but the other's counter point will be WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids This also applies to the TurnOfTheMillennium, where popularity suffered greatly with the likes of ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyTest'' plaguing several cartoon channels, resulting in NetworkDecay. Then, ''Phineas and Ferb'' came out, after more than a decade of DevelopmentHell and became a massive hit ratings wise (From 2009 through 2012, often sided with/beat ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob|SquarePants}}'' in the ratings) with children and adults, allowing shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'', ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'', and ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' for a new considered Renaissance of cartoons in the 2010s. [[OpinionMyopia And just a closing reminder there are reasons]] [[CriticalDissonance why we single out critical circles]] [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and put this on the YMMV tab]].

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* WesternAnimation as a whole went through this from the late 1960s to the late 1980s at least in so-called critical circles. While animation was already becoming less and less popular through the 1950s and much of the 1960s, the death of Creator/WaltDisney ushered upon a period of change. With a lot of the former mainstream on individual down turns, downturns, most of the success came from LimitedAnimation shows on tv, Saturday mornings, which while popular in society, among the public, the critical side denounced it as UsefulNotes/{{the dark age|OfAnimation}}. A typical device used in favor of this is that it transformed animation from DoingItForTheArt [[DoingItForTheArt an art form]] into [[AnimationAgeGhetto a gimmick used to entertain children]], Critics would later change their tune when films such as ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'' and ''WesternAnimation/TheLittleMermaid'' [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation were released]]. Arguments as to how true this was will often result in one side arguing the other sees things through a NostalgiaFilter, but the other's counter point counter-point will be WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids. This also applies to the TurnOfTheMillennium, where popularity suffered greatly with the likes of ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyTest'' plaguing several cartoon channels, resulting in NetworkDecay. Creator/CartoonNetwork [[NetworkDecay making live-action shows]]. Then, ''Phineas and Ferb'' ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' came out, after more than a decade of DevelopmentHell and became a massive hit ratings wise ratings-wise (From 2009 through 2012, often sided with/beat ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob|SquarePants}}'' in the ratings) with children and adults, allowing shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'', ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'', and ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' for a new considered Renaissance "second Renaissance" of cartoons in the 2010s. [[OpinionMyopia And just a closing reminder there are reasons]] [[CriticalDissonance why we single out critical circles]] [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and put this on the YMMV tab]].



* ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes''. The characters became popular during the war years, but fizzled out by TheSixties due to the departures of most of its creative team.[[note]]The studio closed between 1964 and 1967 (the void filled by [=DePatie=]-Freleng), before closing for good in 1969. The final cartoon of the original series was a rare Cool Cat (no, not [[Film/CoolCatSavesTheKids that one]]) cartoon called ''Injun Trouble''.[[/note]] By then however, the original ''Looney Tunes'' shorts had ben repackaged for FirstRunSyndication (cartoons made before 1948) as well as (in the case of the post-1948 material) Saturday morning cartoons (and later prime-time specials), renewing their popularity among young people. But this too died out with the "toy shows" of the 1980s. Along came ''Film/SpaceJam'', which combined classic ''Looney Tunes'' humor with a story accessible to 1990s youth thanks to the involvement of Michael Jordan. The buzz was so large that WB[[note]]Which by then regained the pre-1948 shorts[[/note]] released some of the original shorts in [[http://looney.goldenagecartoons.com/DVDvideo/VHS/videostarsofsj.html VHS compilations]] to get kids to better familiarize with the classic characters, and today the film is remembered on the Internet as a FountainOfMemes. Between the Creator/CartoonNetwork's "June Bugs" marathons, ''Film/LooneyTunesBackInAction'' and multiple original TV shows, the ''Looney Tunes''[='=] popularity has been on-off since then.

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* ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes''. The characters became were created during the 1930s, becoing immensely popular during the war years, but fizzled out by TheSixties due to the departures departure of most of its creative team.[[note]]The studio closed between 1964 and 1967 (the void filled by [=DePatie=]-Freleng), before closing for good in 1969. The final cartoon of the original series was a rare Cool Cat (no, not [[Film/CoolCatSavesTheKids that one]]) cartoon called ''Injun Trouble''.[[/note]] By then however, the original ''Looney Tunes'' shorts had ben repackaged for FirstRunSyndication (cartoons made before 1948) as well as (in the case of the post-1948 material) Saturday morning cartoons (and later prime-time specials), renewing their popularity among young people. But this too died out with the "toy shows" of the 1980s. Along came ''Film/SpaceJam'', which combined classic ''Looney Tunes'' humor with a story accessible to 1990s youth thanks to the involvement of Michael Jordan. The buzz was so large that WB[[note]]Which by then regained the pre-1948 shorts[[/note]] released some of the original shorts in [[http://looney.goldenagecartoons.com/DVDvideo/VHS/videostarsofsj.html VHS compilations]] to get kids to better familiarize with the classic characters, and today the film is remembered on the Internet as a FountainOfMemes. Between the Creator/CartoonNetwork's "June Bugs" marathons, ''Film/LooneyTunesBackInAction'' and multiple original TV shows, the ''Looney Tunes''[='=] popularity has been on-off since then.
21st Jan '18 2:37:58 PM RAraya
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** The 1919 Black Sox scandal, in which several players on the UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox were caught having thrown the World Series in order to collect on gambling bets, shattered baseball's public image and almost destroyed the sport. Fortunately, Creator/BabeRuth began his career around the same time, and his prowess made baseball even more popular than before. It was also around this time when the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead-ball_era "dead-ball era"]] of low-scoring, defense-focused, inside-the-park baseball (in 1908, the average number of runs scored in a game, by ''both'' teams, was only 3.4) gave way to the high-hitting, home run-focused game that the sport has been famous for ever since. However, some sports writers point out that the "boring" Baseball of way back when was immensely popular at the ticket office and fascinated the media, and the supposedly exciting focus on offense fails to draw the crowds of the times when baseball truly was America's pastime bar none.

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** The 1919 Black Sox scandal, in which several players on the UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox were caught having thrown the World Series in order to collect on gambling bets, shattered baseball's public image and almost destroyed the sport. Fortunately, Creator/BabeRuth began his career around the same time, and his prowess made baseball even more popular than before. It was also around this time when the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead-ball_era "dead-ball era"]] of low-scoring, defense-focused, inside-the-park baseball (in 1908, the average number of runs scored in a game, by ''both'' teams, was only 3.4) gave way to the high-hitting, home run-focused game that the sport has been famous for ever since. However, some sports writers point out that the "boring" Baseball of way back when was immensely popular at the ticket office era had the necessary degree of drama that made it the nation's biggest sport, and fascinated the media, and that the supposedly exciting focus on offense fails to draw batting cannot really compete with the crowds nerve-wracking tension of the times when baseball truly was America's pastime bar none.NFL or the [[TestosteronePoisoning extreme manliness]] newer leagues such as the NBA take pride on.



* The NBA experiences this. While it gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late night broadcasts on tape delay. Magic Johnson and Larry Bird would help popularized the league in the '80s. As TheNineties unfolded, UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) or the Argentine Manu Ginobili have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something which the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.

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* The NBA experiences this. While it gained notoriety in TheSeventies with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the only place you could see basketball on TV was on scattered late night broadcasts on tape delay. Magic Johnson and Larry Bird would help popularized the league in the '80s. As TheNineties unfolded, UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan took the sport to worldwide popularity, but his eventual retirement left a huge void in its popularity at the TurnOfTheMillennium. While it is currently nowhere near its '90s peak, [=LeBron=] James has given the league enough buzz to rival football and baseball in national attention. The internet and exemplary talent from abroad like Dirk Nowitzki (who is easily the best known non-soccer team sport athlete in his native Germany) or the Argentine Manu Ginobili have also helped the NBA garner a significant international fanbase, something helped by the fact basketball is far simpler than gridiron football and baseball, which have struggled to gain popularity outside the NFL, despite its dominance of American professional sports in the 2010s, is still struggling to find.influence sphere until recent years.



Soccer experienced a brief but explosive boom in the United States between the late '70s and the mid '80s with the North American Soccer League, thanks in part to the New York Cosmos, which brought in some of the soccer world's biggest heroes (such as Pele himself and Franz Beckenbauer) to play for them. While financial hardships following Peleís retirement would eventually lead to the NASLís folding in 1984, it reintroduced soccer to the North American sports scene on a large scale, and was a major contributing factor in soccer becoming one of the most popular sports among American youth. Along with FIFA giving the US hosting duties in the 1994 [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cup]], the improving success of the US Men's and Womenís National Teams, and the implementation and growing success of UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueSoccer, soccer has eventually gained its long-sought Major League status. However, the stereotypes of the sport being for kids, pushy "soccer moms" and immigrants persisted until the early 2010s, when its popularity exploded thanks to British cultural influence, surging Hispanic population, and the national team's improving performance, reaching the best-of-16 rounds in the 2010 and 2014 World Cups, which had different degrees of fan enthusiasm (only 50 American fans traveled in 2010, while in 2014 U.S. fans amounted for more tickets than any country other than Brazil). In 2015, NBC began broadcasting Premier League games, becoming the only league other than the NFL to get network coverage outside of play-offs. As a result, many polls have placed soccer as America's second most-popular sport, something unfathomable one or two decades ago, with many commentators speculating that the MLS might eventually become "the national pastime" by the 2020s.

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Soccer experienced a brief but explosive boom in the United States between the late '70s and the mid '80s with the North American Soccer League, thanks in part to the New York Cosmos, which brought in some of the soccer world's biggest heroes (such as Pele himself and Franz Beckenbauer) to play for them. While financial hardships following Peleís retirement would eventually lead to the NASLís folding in 1984, it reintroduced soccer to the North American sports scene on a large scale, and was a major contributing factor in soccer becoming one of the most popular sports among American youth. Along with FIFA giving the US hosting duties in the 1994 [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cup]], the improving success of the US Men's and Womenís National Teams, and the implementation and growing success of UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueSoccer, soccer has eventually gained its long-sought Major League status. However, the stereotypes of the sport being for kids, kids who got bored rather quickly, pushy "soccer moms" and brown-skinned immigrants persisted until the early 2010s, when its popularity exploded thanks to a craze over British cultural influence, culture, surging Hispanic population, and the national team's improving performance, reaching the best-of-16 rounds in the 2010 and 2014 World Cups, which had different degrees of fan enthusiasm (only 50 American fans traveled in 2010, while in 2014 U.S. fans amounted for more tickets than any country other than the hosting Brazil). In 2015, NBC began broadcasting Premier League games, becoming the only league other than the NFL to get network coverage outside of play-offs. As a result, many polls have placed soccer as America's second most-popular sport, sport (even if the US team failed to qualify for Russia 2018), something unfathomable one or two decades ago, with many commentators speculating that the MLS might eventually become "the national pastime" by the 2020s.
18th Jan '18 1:55:51 PM HighCrate
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This is when something which portrays itself as "cutting edge" becomes mainstream, but soon becomes [[ItsPopularNowItSucks overexposed]], [[DiscoDan behind the times]], [[DiscreditedMeme old hat]], or [[DeaderThanDisco just plain uncool]]. However, given enough time, it suddenly begins to make a comeback, usually accompanied by words like "vintage," "nostalgic," and "classic." It's gone through the ups and downs of the popularity polynomial.

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This is when something which portrays itself as "cutting edge" becomes mainstream, but soon becomes [[ItsPopularNowItSucks overexposed]], [[DiscoDan behind the times]], [[DiscreditedMeme old hat]], or [[DeaderThanDisco just plain uncool]].uncool. However, given enough time, it suddenly begins to make a comeback, usually accompanied by words like "vintage," "nostalgic," and "classic." It's gone through the ups and downs of the popularity polynomial.



See also ColbertBump (a resurgence triggered by a specific factor), DeadArtistsAreBetter (when a person's death [[NeverSpeakIllOfTheDead rehabilitates his or her reputation]]), CyclicTrope (when this happens to tropes) and DiscreditedMeme. Compare with TwoDecadesBehind, CareerResurrection, NostalgiaFilter, GenreRelaunch and VindicatedByHistory. Contrast with DeaderThanDisco.

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See also ColbertBump (a resurgence triggered by a specific factor), DeadArtistsAreBetter (when a person's death [[NeverSpeakIllOfTheDead rehabilitates his or her reputation]]), CyclicTrope (when this happens to tropes) and DiscreditedMeme. Compare with TwoDecadesBehind, CareerResurrection, NostalgiaFilter, GenreRelaunch and VindicatedByHistory. Contrast with DeaderThanDisco.DeaderThanDisco, for something that ''never'' comes back.



However, in TheSixties, ''Mary Poppins'' and ''The Sound of Music'', as well the British musical films of the Beatles era, led Hollywood to reconsider musicals, but these attempts were [[GenreKiller killed]] by a parade of flops over 1967-69 (''Camelot'', ''Film/DoctorDolittle'', ''Film/PaintYourWagon'', ''Finian's Rainbow'', ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'', and finally ''Theatre/HelloDolly'') that rendered musicals DeaderThanDisco, with ''Film/{{Cabaret}}'' and ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' being the only exceptions. While the genre briefly resurfaced late in TheSeventies via a few successful efforts, most notably ''Film/SaturdayNightFever'' and ''Film/{{Grease}}'', it gave up the ghost early in TheEighties after the disco backlash set on, with ''Film/{{Xanadu}}'' and ''Cant Stop the Music'' [[GenreKiller killing off the genre for two decades]].\\

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However, in TheSixties, ''Mary Poppins'' and ''The Sound of Music'', as well the British musical films of the Beatles era, led Hollywood to reconsider musicals, but these attempts were [[GenreKiller killed]] by a parade of flops over 1967-69 (''Camelot'', ''Film/DoctorDolittle'', ''Film/PaintYourWagon'', ''Finian's Rainbow'', ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'', and finally ''Theatre/HelloDolly'') that rendered took musicals DeaderThanDisco, out of fashion, with ''Film/{{Cabaret}}'' and ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' being the only exceptions. While the genre briefly resurfaced late in TheSeventies via a few successful efforts, most notably ''Film/SaturdayNightFever'' and ''Film/{{Grease}}'', it gave up the ghost early in TheEighties after the disco backlash set on, with ''Film/{{Xanadu}}'' and ''Cant Stop the Music'' [[GenreKiller killing off the genre for two decades]].\\



* Sci-Fi shooters like ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Doom}}'' have experienced this cycle. During the '90s and early 2000s, ''Doom'', ''Halo'' and their clones were insanely popular among action aficionados for their fast-paced, action-packed gameplay and sci-fi aethetics. However, while neither have been forgotten per se, they declined in popularity from 2005 onwards due to competition from modern military shooters. So much so that ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty4ModernWarfare'' dethroned ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' as the most played game on Xbox Live. It didn't help that an increasing ScifiGhetto attitude led to a backlash towards sci-fi shooters However, military shooters themselves [[DeaderThanDisco became less popular]] starting since 2010 due to a mix of market oversaturation, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks lack of innovation]], [[UnfortunateImplications questionable depictions of foreigners and military intervention]] and the stereotype that only whiny, racist little kids and dudebros play them. Subsequently, interest in sci-fi shooter was rekindled as they offered diverse array of gameplay styles and weapon diversity in fantastical settings without any real baggage that plagued modern military shooters. Ironically, many new shooters like ''VideoGame/TitanFall'', ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'', and even ''Halo'''s rival ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' [[FollowTheLeader have begun copying]] ''Doom'' and ''Halo''. A good example of this can be seen in Yahtzee's review of ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'' re-release on his show ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation''. Although he considers the game to be tacky and dated, he admits that ''Doom 3'' and other sci-fi shooters are more enjoyable than most "spunkgargleweewees".

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* Sci-Fi shooters like ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Doom}}'' have experienced this cycle. During the '90s and early 2000s, ''Doom'', ''Halo'' and their clones were insanely popular among action aficionados for their fast-paced, action-packed gameplay and sci-fi aethetics. However, while neither have been forgotten per se, they declined in popularity from 2005 onwards due to competition from modern military shooters. So much so that ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty4ModernWarfare'' dethroned ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' as the most played game on Xbox Live. It didn't help that an increasing ScifiGhetto attitude led to a backlash towards sci-fi shooters However, military shooters themselves [[DeaderThanDisco became less popular]] popular starting since 2010 due to a mix of market oversaturation, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks lack of innovation]], [[UnfortunateImplications questionable depictions of foreigners and military intervention]] and the stereotype that only whiny, racist little kids and dudebros play them. Subsequently, interest in sci-fi shooter was rekindled as they offered diverse array of gameplay styles and weapon diversity in fantastical settings without any real baggage that plagued modern military shooters. Ironically, many new shooters like ''VideoGame/TitanFall'', ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'', and even ''Halo'''s rival ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' [[FollowTheLeader have begun copying]] ''Doom'' and ''Halo''. A good example of this can be seen in Yahtzee's review of ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'' re-release on his show ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation''. Although he considers the game to be tacky and dated, he admits that ''Doom 3'' and other sci-fi shooters are more enjoyable than most "spunkgargleweewees".
16th Jan '18 5:13:33 PM nighttrainfm
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* The Literature/SherlockHolmes books have been cycling in and out of popularity and the public consciousness ever since Creator/ArthurConanDoyle first came up with them. While there was not really a time when ''nobody'' admitted to liking them, there were times when few people could take them seriously and parodies (affectionate or not) dominated the discussion of Holmes as a character. The latest wave of Sherlock Holmes craziness is at least in part attributable to ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and ''Series/{{Elementary}}'', both of which "update" Sherlock Holmes by setting it in the present day instead of some stuffy Victorian London many people cannot take seriously any more. Interestingly setting Sherlock in the (then) present is actually OlderThanTheyThink and has been done before.

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* The Literature/SherlockHolmes books have been cycling in and out of popularity and the public consciousness ever since Creator/ArthurConanDoyle first came up with them. While there was not really a time when ''nobody'' admitted to liking them, there were times when few people could take them seriously and parodies (affectionate or not) dominated the discussion of Holmes as a character. The latest wave of Sherlock Holmes craziness is at least in part attributable to ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and ''Series/{{Elementary}}'', both of which "update" Sherlock Holmes by setting it in the present day instead of some stuffy Victorian London many people cannot take seriously any more. Interestingly Interestingly, setting Sherlock in the (then) present is actually OlderThanTheyThink and has been done before.
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