History Main / PopCultureIsolation

16th Nov '17 5:38:13 AM CartoonPhysicist
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* ''Literature/RipleysBureauOfInvestigation'': Barely anyone, not even fans of [[Franchise/RipleysBelieveItOrNot Ripley's Believe It Or Not]], know about it.






* ''Literature/RipleysBureauOfInvestigation'': Barely anyone, not even fans of [[Franchise/RipleysBelieveItOrNot Ripley's Believe It Or Not]], know about it.

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* ''Literature/RipleysBureauOfInvestigation'': Barely anyone, not even fans of [[Franchise/RipleysBelieveItOrNot Ripley's Believe It Or Not]], know about it.
16th Nov '17 5:35:13 AM CartoonPhysicist
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/RipleysBureauOfInvestigation'': Barely anyone, not even fans of [[Franchise/RipleysBelieveItOrNot Ripley's Believe It Or Not]], know about it.
13th Sep '17 7:32:44 PM jormis29
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* Broadway actors often refer to themselves as "only famous for a couple of blocks". There are performers with astounding track records of roles and piles of awards who are absolute unknowns outside of New York City. Some have shaken this with success in film and television (such as Creator/KristinChenoweth, Creator/IdinaMenzel, Cheyenne Jackson, Creator/AaronTveit, Creator/LeaMichele, Creator/JonathanGroff, and Mark Rylance in recent years), but going through a list of names of Tony winners will leave the average person scratching their head. From TheNewTens winners alone: Norbert Leo Butz? Sutton Foster? Audra [=McDonald=], who won a record-setting ''sixth'' acting Tony in 2014? This is ''somewhat'' justified. A successful Broadway show can launch a tour or sister production in another city -- most often London; the cities are Transatlantic siblings since it's easy to transfer a show from one to the other as there's no need to translate it into another language -- but the original leads usually don't leave New York. Most theater productions are not recorded for posterity, aside from cast albums for musicals, limiting the audience for these actors to devoted Broadway fans and those who come to New York and see them. This also applies to London's West End stars; just substitute Oliviers for Tonys -- Maria Friedman? Michael Ball? Creator/DouglasHodge? All unknown to the masses, and [[ClassicallyTrainedExtra usually relegated to supporting/minor roles or guest spots in film and TV]] -- [[MoneyDearBoy albeit well-compensated ones]] -- if they work in those media at all.

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* Broadway actors often refer to themselves as "only famous for a couple of blocks". There are performers with astounding track records of roles and piles of awards who are absolute unknowns outside of New York City. Some have shaken this with success in film and television (such as Creator/KristinChenoweth, Creator/IdinaMenzel, Cheyenne Jackson, Creator/CheyenneJackson, Creator/AaronTveit, Creator/LeaMichele, Creator/JonathanGroff, and Mark Rylance Creator/MarkRylance in recent years), but going through a list of names of Tony winners will leave the average person scratching their head. From TheNewTens winners alone: Norbert Leo Butz? Sutton Foster? Audra [=McDonald=], who won a record-setting ''sixth'' acting Tony in 2014? This is ''somewhat'' justified. A successful Broadway show can launch a tour or sister production in another city -- most often London; the cities are Transatlantic siblings since it's easy to transfer a show from one to the other as there's no need to translate it into another language -- but the original leads usually don't leave New York. Most theater productions are not recorded for posterity, aside from cast albums for musicals, limiting the audience for these actors to devoted Broadway fans and those who come to New York and see them. This also applies to London's West End stars; just substitute Oliviers for Tonys -- Maria Friedman? Michael Ball? Creator/DouglasHodge? All unknown to the masses, and [[ClassicallyTrainedExtra usually relegated to supporting/minor roles or guest spots in film and TV]] -- [[MoneyDearBoy albeit well-compensated ones]] -- if they work in those media at all.
13th Sep '17 10:53:37 AM mimitchi33
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13th Sep '17 10:44:23 AM mimitchi33
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* [[PopCultureIsolation.Music Music]]

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* [[PopCultureIsolation.Music {{Music}} Music]]
13th Sep '17 10:44:04 AM mimitchi33
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[[index]]
* [[PopCultureIsolation.Music Music]]
[[/index]]



[[folder:Music]]
* OlderThanTelevision: RAndB of the [[TheThirties 1930s]] and [[TheForties 1940s]] was generally known only to black people due to segregation. This isolation was made clear by a name given to R&B back then -- "race music". The same happened to {{Jazz}}, {{Blues}}, and RockAndRoll.
* Western popular music itself has this, with respect to all other kinds of music. It used to be the case (up until the 1960s or so) that any non-fiction book about "music" was about Western classical music. Nowadays, "music" is generally taken to mean Western popular music, whether it's mainstream pop, rock, hip-hop, R&B, indie or dance music. If you ask someone whether they like music, and they say yes, the chances are that they mean they like Western popular music, and probably don't mean classical music (be it from the Western tradition, the Indian tradition or from somewhere else), any kind of traditional music, or jazz of any particular flavour. These latter musics in turn tend to have fans that are a little more eclectic, because the musics themselves are more of an acquired taste, but they too have plenty of fans that literally never listen to anything else.
* Most pop-culture music trends start out this way. PunkRock (the American version, at least) started out in lower Manhattan sometime in the mid-[[TheSeventies 1970s]] and slowly gained a following in other big cities across the country before finally breaking through to the mainstream. Similarly, HipHop began in the Bronx and only gradually spread throughout the rest of New York and then to Los Angeles before going nationwide.
* The British parallel concerns a cultural establishment - including big radio and TV names - who are based in London, consider the London scene is all and everything (and dismiss the rest of the country as "provincial"). Therefore they fail to notice what's going on outside London and only register it either when it moves South or it gets too big to ignore. Examples: "[[{{Soul}} Northern Soul]]", a specific sort of soul beat popular in Wigan and the North-West, so popular that people from all over came north to join in, but largely ignored by the establishment. Or the way northern groups were ignored - the myth grew that PunkRock was solely a London creation and bands from other parts of the country were simply imitating. (as the British provinces are of course populated by people incapable of creativity.)
** A modern example is the rise of Garage, Grime and Dubstep music. Whilst not unheard of elsewhere, it surprises many how popular they are in inner city London.
** Lots of bands in Sheffield were early adopters of synths and other electronic influenced music in the late-1970s but they stayed underground until The Human League, Heaven 17 and ABC suddenly hit the mainstream in the early 1980s. In general the Sheffield synth-pop scene often gets overlooked in histories of UK music.
* {{Grunge}} was very popular among young white youth. But young Blacks and Latinos for the most part were somewhat oblivious to it. The Lollapalooza tour helped bridged the gap a little. The reason hip-hoppers were oblivious to the grunge movement was because HipHop was going through what some would call a GoldenAge renaissance. NostalgiaFilter card aside, most fans believe ''1994'' alone crushes everything that came out in the past decade. Some argue that that era was a really, ''really'' good time period for HipHop and its fans. So basically, many Black/Latino youth were preoccupied by their own cultural rise.
* The Mexican-American singer {{Music/Selena}} might also count. [[DeadArtistsAreBetter How many of you knew of her]] ''[[DeadArtistsAreBetter before]]'' [[DeadArtistsAreBetter she died]]? Right after she died, and her murder was being covered nonstop in the press, ''People'' magazine put out an issue with Selena on the front -- but only in the Southwestern US. (The rest of America got a cover with the cast of ''Series/{{Friends}}''.) They were probably figuring the only people who were interested in reading about Selena (AKA Latinos) were all living in that area. Except that issue not only outsold the ''Friends'' one, but also went through several reprints. It ended up spawning only the third full commemorative issue in that magazine's history, and led to the creation of ''People en Español''. The people at the magazine grossly underestimated not only mainstream interest in Selena, but also the significant consumer power of the Latino community.
* Some say this trope created [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockism rockism]].
* During the documentary ''Pump Up the Volume'' (a docu-series about the rise of HouseMusic, {{Techno}} and the whole Detroit/Chicago/New York scene.) One guy was discussing the backlash against {{Disco}} around that time. He said there was a bonfire where people were standing in a line throwing in disco records (Now if you're GenreSavvy enough you know where this is leading), similar to Chicago's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disco_Demolition_Night Disco Demolition Night]]. He began to notice that most of what they were burning [[UnfortunateImplications isn't disco, but just black music in general]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jd8W7pbxTsQ He said he saw one guy with a]] Music/MarvinGaye record in his hand. This is also a double example as around this time House was only thriving in Chicago, and the New York underground.
** The same documentary noted that Chicago House music first really took hold in the UK in Northern discos (such as the Hacienda in Manchester), then via [=DJs=] on holiday islands like Ibiza, and finally becoming mainstream by reaching London.
** Many listeners dismissed disco as "too black" or "too gay," or both: making it the musical sub-genre equivalent of a TwoferTokenMinority.
** On a similar note, how many urban black people can tell you the difference between Music/{{Aerosmith}} and Music/AliceInChains? Keep in mind rock is almost non-existent on black radio, so the popularity of these bands probably flew over their heads (unless you include the general mainstream media which is biased toward rock anyway). Or how about the fact some blacks got into rock thanks to bands like Music/FaithNoMore, and Music/LivingColour during the late [[TheEighties 1980s]], and NuMetal during the late [[TheNineties 1990s]] and early [[TurnOfTheMillennium 2000s]] due to them incorporating HipHop, Funk and rhythm, or soulful vocals in Corey Glover's case? There's also the fact that some suburban whites can't tell you the difference between Music/BoneThugsNHarmony and Music/RunDMC To outsiders, rap music might as well all be the same. Similarly, many white people were introduced to HipHop through bands like Music/BeastieBoys, Music/RageAgainstTheMachine, Music/LimpBizkit, and Music/LinkinPark because they combined rock with rap.
*** There's always a segment of black people with a vested interest in rock music, at least stemming from the fact that rock came from black singers such as Music/ChuckBerry. But not as much as say HipHop and R&B.
* A funny sub example of this trope is that of singer Dionne Farris. Ask a white suburban person what song they know by her and they'll almost always say "''I Know''" (a Pop/Alt/rock song). Ask black urban music listeners and they'll say the song "''Hopeless''" (which is a down tempo soul song). The contrast is jarring, and funny.
* Another example is modern radio. Which is heavily segre...uh...divided up.
** This specific example might be at the heart of why Music/{{Anastacia}} has had almost no luck breaking into the U.S. market. A massive success all across Europe and Asia, she is still a relatively unknown in the U.S., despite the fact that she herself is from Chicago. It's believed that since American terrestrial radio is heavily format-driven and sharply divided, there isn't really a place for her eclectic sound to fit. Essentially too soulful for A/C stations, and not urban enough for urban radio stations, and not poppish enough for top 40, and not rockish enough for rock stations. No one can really seem to figure out what to do with her.
* A inverse hip-hop example is from the east coast rapper Jadakiss when he asks "Why my buzz in L.A. ain't like it is in New York?"
** Hip-Hop somewhat had this bad. If you're not a hardcore meticulous HipHop connoisseur who actively seeks out artists on your own, you probably missed out on a lot of regional acts, as radio from each region had different and diverse play lists. So whoever was popular in the Northeast might not be as popular in the Southwest. For better or for worse it's different now though, as most stations tend to follow a ''VERY'' strict playlist. And for the most part they're more or less the same around the country, likely because [[MusicIsPolitics most radio stations are corporate owned now instead of privately owned]].
** Music/QueenLatifah said if it wasn't for rappers like Music/{{NWA}} she wouldn't have known what life was like in south central LA.
* Go to a few rock concerts and you'll see a sprinkle of a few black kids, But not a lot. In the documentary ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afro-Punk_%28film%29 Afro Punk]]'', some of the black kids that were interviewed said that they didn't always feel accepted. Or when they did get acceptance, it felt like it was for [[ButNotTooBlack the wrong reasons]] to them.
* When Music/{{Eminem}}'s third album ''Music/TheEminemShow'' was released, two different singles were promoted at the same time on different genre stations. "White America" was mostly played on the rock stations, while "Cleaning out my Closet" was played on hip-hop stations. TLC's ''Unpretty'' had 2 different versions released for radio. One was a "Urban" mix, and the other was a mix for pop radio. The latter was the original version though.
* There's a lot of guitarists out there who are revered and recognized and put on a lot of top guitarists list. Guitarists like Music/SteveVai, Eddie Music/VanHalen, etc. But you'll be hard pressed to see people like [[Music/LivingColour Vernon Reid]], [[Music/DreamTheater John Petrucci]], and [[Music/TheIsleyBrothers Ernie Isley]] mentioned, or listed though. Exceptions being the politically correct choice of Music/JimiHendrix, and MAYBE Eddie Hazel...maybe.
* Clive Davis ''INTENTIONALLY'' invoked this when marketing Whitney Houston. Primarily by sending her exclusively to A/C radio stations instead of urban radio stations.
* This might have been the seed that help formed "''The Black Rock Coalition''"
* Music/NewEdition contrasted with Music/NewKidsOnTheBlock, This is believed to be why the latter was created in the first place. Maurice Starr was apparently very GenreSavvy.
* Music/ThreeSixMafia {{lampshade|Hanging}} this with the album title "''Most Known Unknowns''"
* This trope possibly explains the sub-culture division among 40 somethings when it comes to black music. In the beginning when hip-hop was in its infancy in the early eighties, only a hand full of 20-somethings were caught up in the culture of HipHop, while the majority of the other 20-somethings were still into the post-disco/R&B new wave funk scene. This explains the cultural schism of 40-something African Americans regarding the hip-hop culture, and why you have 40-something hip-hoppers and hip-hop artists, and 40-somethings who are outside the culture, despite being young adults around the genre's inception.
* It can still be true today with R&B. Everybody knows Music/{{Usher}}, Music/AliciaKeys, Music/{{Beyonce}}, and Music/{{Rihanna}} but very few people know Music/IndiaArie, Maxwell, Musiq Soulchild, Luke James, etc. outside the African-American community.
* Similar to the ''Music/NewEdition'' and ''New Kids on the Block'' example; There was ''Pat Boone'' who used CoveredUp as a way to market black music to whites. But all it did was veer into UnfortunateImplications territory..
* Robyn had a "urban mix" for "Do You Really Want Me" for urban radio stations. She also counts in another way in that some think she's a new artist, but she's been around since 1995.
* Music/ArcadeFire took home a Grammy for Best Album in 2011. They're not signed onto a major label, and apparently not known by a very large portion of the population, prompting various [[MemeticMutation "WTF WHO ARE THESE GUYS AND WHY'D THEY TAKE GAGA'S BEST ALBUM AWARD?" Tweets and Facebook posts]]. Chronicled in [[http://whoisarcadefire.tumblr.com/ this Tumblr blog]], with a heaping helping of FanDumb.
* This is also the reason why many R&B/Pop artists usually have to release two singles at a time: one for pop radio and the other for the urban market.
** Music/{{Beyonce}} basically had a DistinctDoubleAlbum (''I Am...Sasha Fierce'') for this - one side being the soft pop ballad and the other being urban jams. She released "[[TheUnfairSex If I Were A Boy]]" mainly for pop radio and "Single Ladies" for the urban market. The experiment [[GoneHorriblyRight Succeeded Too Well]] and the biggest hits from the album were only the urban songs.
** Music/ChrisBrown is balancing his ''F.A.M.E.'' album to have pop and urban singles and released the poppy "Yeah 3x" to pop radio to compliment "Deuces".
** Usher had the megahit ''OMG'' that topped the pop charts and didn't really make a dent in the urban market.
** And, in 2010, Creator/KellyRowland released ''three'' singles, each for different market - "Commander" for international (i.e. non-US) audiences, "Rose Colored Glasses" for American pop radio, and "Grown Woman" for the urban market.
** Music/NeYo's 2010 album ''Libra Scale'' sent "Beautiful Monster" to pop stations and "Champagne Life" and "One in a Million" to the urban format. ''R.E.D.'' sent "Let Me Love You (Until You Learn to Love Yourself)" and "Forever Now" to pop radio and "Lazy Love" and "Don't Make 'Em Like You" to urban audiences.
** Ce Ce Peniston might have been the prototype, with one foot in house music, and the other in R&B/New Jack Swing.
* For not only a whole generation but perhaps a largely white audience who grew up with Music/PhilCollins as the drummer (and later, also lead singer) of Music/{{Genesis}}, his transformation from white British art-rocker with hair down to his belly and a long white robe singing about squonks and eleventh Earls of Mar to [[TheEighties 1980s]], commercial, electronic blue-eyed soul/funk/soft rock singer in a suit and tie singing "Su-Su-Sudio" can be [[BrokenBase controversial]]. For a generation (and skin color) who know Phil's pop hits through black radio playing his MTV-era hits and who wouldn't necessarily pick up a copy of ''A Trick of the Tail'', you would have the likes of Music/IceT put in his place a white, smarmy, hipster rock journalist picking on the Phil Collins [=CDs=] in Ice's collection during an interview with Ice by responding, "Don't you mess with my Phil!" Similarly, the GenreShift that TheDoobieBrothers took by [[TheSeventies the late '70s]] from guitar-driven country-rock (with mild R&B influences) led by Tom Johnstone ("Listen To The Music"; "Black Water"; "Long Train Runnin'"; "China Grove") to the keyboard-heavy blue-eyed soul style led by Michael [=McDonald=] ("Takin' It To The Streets"; "What A Fool Believes"; "Minute By Minute"; "You Belong To Me") might possibly be more of a shock for white rock audiences than urban black audiences who would be less likely to pick a copy up of ''Toulouse Street'' or ''What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits''.
* Similar to the Dionne Farris example above, this trope can apply to {{Signature Song}}s as well. If a artist is popular in more than one demographic it's ''HIGHLY'' likely that each group has their own opinion of what that artist's signature song is.
* The death of R&B singer Music/{{Aaliyah}} completely gutted the HipHop and R&B community with huge outpourings of mourning and tributes. When it came around to the mainstream media to react, most of the entertainment news outlets (that primarily cover white celebs) didn't even have her death as the ''top story'', and they had to use Gladys Knight (Aaliyah's former aunt and close family friend) in order to make her more relevant to that audience.
** Same could be said for the aforementioned Selena.
** Creator/EllenDeGeneres touched upon this when '' Music/TupacShakur'' died. Noting that the mainstream media were more interested in her coming out of the closet.
** [[http://panachereport.com/channels/old_school_update/BlkCelebsDied.htm This is fairly common with black celebrities]]
* Like the Whitney Houston example above, the same could be said for Music/{{NSYNC}}. This trope combined with the ButNotTooBlack trope was how they were marketed by their handlers. They didn't start courting urban audiences till the ''Celebrity'' album.
* It is ''fiendishly'' difficult for [[JapanesePopMusic J Pop]] and [[KoreanPopMusic K Pop]] artists to cross over to American shores. Even Music/UtadaHikaru (who is ''American'') has had a difficult time despite switching up the production of her second U.S. album. And she's one of the most popular music artists in Japan and still has the worldwide record for most albums sold in a week. Both she and Music/{{BoA|Korea}} tried for U.S. success, but couldn't expand beyond the people who already were fans. The only KPop artist most Americans are familiar with is Music/{{Psy}}. Between both of the genres however, K Pop has a slight edge over them as the genre is very popular among Asians while J Pop at the moment is stuck in its own nation.
* Instead of making a straight dance song, a lot of singles from the early-90s on come with dance mixes to get play in clubs and on dance radio shows, adding in bigger beats and a beginning drum track for transitions. Depending on the release, these tracks might be included as a bonus track on an album, on the single, or only on a special "DJ Mix" single. This means if you don't hear it in a club, you probably won't hear this version at all. This was even done in ''country'' music, where songs already suitable for line dancing had the beat jacked up and an extended bridge.
* A main cause of CoveredUp, where an artist in one genre covers a song from another.
* CountryMusic. According to one survey, 38% of American adults are country music fans... but 25.4% of that group ''only'' listens to country music. While the stereotype of country music listeners being exclusively down-market blue collar types is no longer true, regional and demographic appeal does vary. Some urban markets have few to no country stations, with UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity not having one for years until 2013, when a commercial owner bought Family Radio's east coast flagship and converted it to the homogenous "Nash FM", a format which only plays the same few 'new country' songs. And with that, little to no knowledge of any country act who hasn't crossed over into pop (e.g. Music/TaylorSwift and Music/LadyAntebellum). On top of that, country is also one of the whitest genres by far — Music/CharleyPride and Music/DariusRucker (yes, the guy from Music/HootieAndTheBlowfish) are pretty much the only black country artists who have had any long term success.
** On the religious side of this, GospelMusic, often called Southern Gospel to distinguish it from the very different-looking and sounding Black Gospel, has this in spades. At one time it was the most popular form of Christian music outside of church hymns, but these days it is distinctly a niche market and one that is hemorrhaging fans at an alarming rate as it primarily appeals to people who were young when the genre became popular. But ask a Southern Gospel fan and you'd get the impression that it's still the only "real" Christian music out there, and the current groups (most of which perform mostly in churches to crowds of less than a hundred) are super-stars that everyone knows about. The groups themselves usually have side-jobs because performing in this genre doesn't pay well, and often break up due to not being able to so much as break even. If you're a Southern Gospel fan, you likely believe the Inspirations, Ernie Haase & Signature Sound, Gold City, the Kingsmen[[labelnote:†]](not to be confused with the 1960's garage band of "Louie, Louie" fame)[[/labelnote]], the Nelons, Karen Peck & New River, Greater Vision or the Booth Brothers are incredibly popular. If you're not, you likely have never even heard these names before, even if you're a regular church attendee.
* There are a few country artists known for exactly one song in the mainstream despite being very popular to its core audience: examples include Lonestar's "Amazed", Brad Paisley's "Accidental Racist", Toby Keith's "Red Solo Cup", Maddie & Tae's "Girl in a Country Song", Lady Antebellum's "Need You Now", Florida Georgia Line's "Cruise", The Band Perry's "If I Die Young", Cam's "Burning House", Thomas Rhett's "Die a Happy Man", Maren Morris's "My Church", Lee Ann Womack's "I Hope You Dance", Jerrod Niemann's "Lover, Lover" or Hunter Hayes' "Wanted". Rascal Flatts have two mainstream hits, "What Hurts The Most" and "Life is a Highway". It also doesn't help that among these, neither "Accidental Racist" nor "Life Is a Highway" was a single (although the latter did get some airplay).
* As far the UnitedKingdom is concerned, pop music in languages other than English ''does not exist''. The fact that most Brits are hopeless at foreign languages doesn't help.
** Very, very occasionally a song in French (The Singing Nun's "Dominique", Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin's "Je t'aime... moi non plus"), German (Kraftwerk's "Autobahn"), Italian (Drupi's "Vado Via"), Japanese (Kyu Sakamoto's "Sukiyaki"), Spanish (Los Lobos's cover of "La Bamba") or ecclesiastical Latin (Steeleye Span's cover of "Gaudete") will hit the British charts. These average about one a decade, discounting things like the Beatles' "Michelle" (the French bits are a bit pidgin). Usually the only way to get a true international hit is to be completely instrumental or only have limited English within a song (Eiffel 65's "Blue"). In the 2010s, Music/{{PSY}}'s "Gangnam Style" (and to a lesser extent, "Gentleman") was the only major foreign language hit in anglophone countries. Prior to that, the last foreign-language hit was probably O-Zone's Dragostea Din Tei (a.k.a. [[MemeticMutation the "Numa-Numa" song]], sung in Romanian) in 2004.
* This likely played a part in Music/MariahCarey's BrokenBase. When her music became more urban and less adult contemporary her fans whined about the inclusion of HipHop. Some even went as far as blaming the change on the insecurities she have regarding her cultural background and ethnicity.
* This is the case any time artists commit GenreAdultery. It's hard to sell a new genre to your fan base who is only used to the genre you are known for doing.
* Music/DaYoopers. Extremely popular in Michigan (particularly the Upper Peninsula, from which their name is derived) and Wisconsin, where countless stations will play "Second Week of Deer Camp" around hunting season in November, and "Rusty Chevrolet" around Christmas. Outside maybe one or two stations here or there, they're almost total unknowns. It probably doesn't help that many of their songs are local in nature, and that they've always been on limited distribution on their own label.
* Unless you were a member or were a band kid in school, you have probably never heard of the Blue Devils, Carolina Crown, the Cadets, Santa Clara Vanguard, Phantom Regiment, or the Cavaliers. In case you're wondering - they're drum corps.
** Even within the drum corps fanbase, there is a lack of familiarity with the all-age circuit (as opposed to the above junior corps, where the maximum age is 21), since it is primarily a Northeast regional phenomenon. However, a number of corps from outside the region (Minnesota Brass Inc., Atlanta CV, San Francisco Renegades) have made inroads into that circuit.
* This trope was very deliberately {{subverted|Trope}} with ''Hall and Oates'' in TheEighties. They noticed, certainly after disco died, how racially segregated white and black radio stations were becoming, and sought to create a blue-eyed soul/pop/new wave/rock/dance style that was partly informed by white and black influences and would appeal to both audiences, which they succeeded in doing for the first half of that decade.
* Amongst the general public, Music/NatKingCole is acknowledged as a great singer, for classics like [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDN5rG3wLa4 “Unforgettable”]]. Amongst musicians it’s understood his real contribution to music was revolutionising jazz piano playing. This is to the extent that his brilliant innovations provided a bridge towards a style of piano playing that fit bebop.
* Music/FranzFerdinand is, to many indie fans, one of the biggest indie rock bands of the '00s. Their SelfTitledAlbum is viewed as a defining album in alt-rock culture. To people outside their audience, they're mostly known for "Take Me Out" and little else. Sometimes they're even thought of as one-hit wonders for that song (despite the fact that it never actually reached the Top 40).
* Music/ModestMouse are a similar case, with "Float On" being the one famous song to general audiences despite being very acclaimed on the indie scene.
* Music/ArcticMonkeys are yet another similar case. They're hugely worshipped in the rock community and are a pretty big deal back in the U.K., but to average Americans, they're just the band who did "Do I Wanna Know?"
* Many underground/internet phenomenons, even after they break through to larger audiences. Music/LanaDelRey is a good example.
* Music/TheDecemberists, unless you live in the Pacific Northwest or are an indie fan.
* Anything Macklemore did before ''The Heist'' is fairly unknown unless you are from the Seattle area. Even fewer people know anything about Ryan Lewis, his producer, besides his name.
* Music/WeirdAlYankovic doesn't exist unless you're a geek, you lived during TheEighties, or both.
* Music/JudasPriest is one of the oldest and most influential heavy metal bands of all time. Most metal fans, regardless of their favorite subgenre, have a deep respect for the band and can name a lot of their songs. Despite this, Judas Priest isn't very well known in the mainstream. Their biggest hit, "You've Got Another Thing Coming", peaked at number 66 on the UK singles chart and number 4 on the US rock chart in the year 1982.
* Social media activity during ''Series/{{Eurovision|SongContest}}'' is split into two categories: Europeans (and, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff rather curiously, Australians]]) talking about it and Americans asking "What the hell is Eurovision and why is everyone talking about it?"
* In 2014, Music/{{U2}} released their new album on iTunes, and even "sent automatically" to many iPhone users. Reactions included a whole Website/{{Tumblr}} regarding "[[http://www.whoisu2.com/ Who Is U2]]" tweets. (most who don't know Bono and co. are either young fans of teen pop stars [mostly Music/OneDirection - see below] or Black people)
* Music fan communities. 90% of the time pop artists' fan followings come up in the news it's either Justin Bieber's fans or One Direction's (although as of 2014 it's usually only the latter). You almost never hear about [[Music/LadyGaga Little Monsters]], [[Music/KatyPerry KatyCats]], [[Music/MileyCyrus Smilers]], [[Music/BrunoMars Hooligans]], etc. unless you're an avid fan of pop music or part of a fandom. This is mostly because the former two fanbases are (or were, in Bieber's case) significantly larger than others. Male idol singers and boy bands (i.e., The Wanted, Big Time Rush, Austin Mahone) are disadvantaged in that the most popular acts typically have so tight a monopoly on the teenage girl demographic that it's almost impossible for any of their peers to break through. Older male acts and groups (i.e., Bruno Mars, Justin Timberlake, Maroon 5) typically don't cater to a rabid teen audience and are instead fueled by their universal appeal. Female acts (i.e., Katy Perry, Rihanna, Taylor Swift) have a similar mass-appeal factor, but boys don't idolize musicians the same way girls do, the female demographic they do appeal to is nowhere near as enthusiastic for female music idols as for their male counterparts, and the remainder of their fans are gay males, which makes up less than 3% of the population.
* Boy bands have been a huge worldwide phenomenon since the 1990s, but most such artists don't make it far outside their home country. While American boy bands have generally had the most success abroad, only two international groups were able to achieve superstardom over there -- Music/OneDirection and [[Music/FiveSecondsOfSummer 5 Seconds of Summer]]. And even then, the latter blur the line between a boy band and pop-punk act ''and'' only broke through by piggybacking off the former's popularity. Every other foreign boy band to have had a hit in America ultimately ended up a one-hit wonder.
* AvantGardeMusic: Few artists get some general fame outside their niche. And even then it's usually more for being interviewed or being subject of a news report or documentary, rather than the music itself.
* Music/GreenDay are one of the most popular rock bands of recent times. But the millennial generation are largely unfamiliar with any of their work predating ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' with the exception of their 1998 BlackSheepHit "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)."
* In the Southern United States, aside from major cities, it's possible to drive for hours without encountering anything but country stations on the radio
** Somewhat related, is the launch and sudden, inexplicable, inevitable failure of alternative rock stations in these areas. This is largely due to the tech-savviness of that demographic as they were early adapters to innovation such as Internet radio, while country and hip-hop demographics are less likely to have internet connections.
* Robin Thicke has been a household name to R&B audiences for many years but he is known to the general public almost exclusively for "Blurred Lines."
* Not very many Americans under 25 will be able to name a Music/DaftPunk song other than "Get Lucky," as it was their only hit there and most of their other international hits came more than a decade earlier.
* John Legend is either a well-respected R&B singer-songwriter or the "All of Me" guy, depending on whether or not you listen to R&B radio.
* Mark Ronson: In the UK, he's a very successful producer; in America his only claim to fame is being the official lead artist on "Uptown Funk," a song almost universally associated over there with Bruno Mars.
* Wiz Khalifa, despite being one of the biggest names in the rap world is primarily known to pop audiences for "See You Again," his hit song from the ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'' soundtrack. This, despite the fact that he also had a #1 hit with "Black & Yellow" and did a few memorable guest verses on other hit songs like Maroon 5's "Payphone."
* James Newton Howard is a respected name as a composer. Outside of that audience however, he is only known for being the actual lead artist of "The Hanging Tree" from ''Film/TheHungerGamesMockingjayPart1'' soundtrack -- assuming they know that it's not actually Creator/JenniferLawrence.
* Music/RitaOra is a megastar in the UK, but in the US she's only known for three things: 1. singing the chorus in Music/IggyAzalea's major hit "Black Widow", 2. appearing in ''Film/FiftyShadesOfGrey'', and 3. being a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to Music/{{Rihanna}}.
* It's virtually impossible for rappers from international markets to get any sort of following in the US. Only two British hip-hop artists have gotten hits there in the span of twenty years -- Stereo [=MCs=] with their Top 20 song "Connected" in 1993, and Music/TinieTempah with "Written in the Stars" in 2011. Both are one-hit wonders despite their popularity at home. The rest are completely unheard of, which includes the popular UK genre Grime. Mention that genre to Americans, and you'll like be met with puzzled looks. Only two international rappers have had continued success stateside -- Music/{{Drake}} and Music/IggyAzalea. However, they did so by imitating American hip-hop culture. The results couldn't have been any more different -- the former's Canadian nationality has become a footnote while the latter's popularity hit rock-bottom less than a year after she first became famous, precisely for pretending to be American.
* Walk the Moon is either one of the most promising indie rock bands on the market or those guys who made "Shut Up and Dance", depending on whether or not you're in the alternative scene.
* ElectronicMusic group Music/CleanBandit are superstars in the UK. In the US, they're known for "Rather Be", "Rockabye", and nothing else.
* Disclosure is a weird case. They're massively popular in the UK, but to general audiences are known primarily for "Latch" and are seen as a footnote for what is essentially a Music/SamSmith song. However, they are also known for another song stateside, "Magnets", which was their one alternative radio crossover, but only because it featured Music/{{Lorde}}. They're a odd example of a one hit wonder with two different songs on two different formats stateside -- neither of which is associated with them.
* Music/{{Hozier}}: Is he either a well-respected Northern Irish singer-songwriter, or the guy who sang "Take Me To Church"? It depends on what audience you're part of.
* Music/{{PSY}} is either one of the biggest music stars in Korean history or guy behind one of the biggest [[OneHitWonder one-hit wonders]] of the 2010s depending on whether or not you're a fan of Korean music.
* Avicii is absolutely massive in the EDM scene, but to general (American) audiences he's only recognized for two songs: "Levels" and "Wake Me Up!"
* Andy Grammer and Rachel Platten are both popular singer-songwriters on the adult pop radio scene, but outside of that format, good luck naming any songs by them other than "Honey I'm Good" and "Fight Song," respectively. That being said, many people do remember Grammer from two minor 2011/12 hits, "Keep Your Head Up" and "Fine By Me". and may be familiar with Platten's follow-up, "Stand By You", but mainstream audiences likely won't recognize anything else of theirs.
* In the {{progressive rock}} community, Steve Hackett is a well-known figure, both for his contributions to Music/{{Genesis}} and for his solo career, which contains a massive amount of records and is still going to this day. Outside of the community, if you were to ask someone about him, chances are they either won't know who you're talking about, or they'll only know him as a former guitarist of Genesis. In fact, since most (if not all) of the Genesis songs that still receive regular radio airplay are from after he left the band, and since Hackett himself doesn't release singles for his albums, a lot of people outside of the progressive rock community (especially the younger listeners) probably haven't heard his work.
* Outside of Oceania, you'd be hard-pressed to find someone who can name a New Zealand artist that isn't Music/{{Lorde}} (maybe Music/KeithUrban, who was born in New Zealand, will get a mention, but he's more associated with Australia).
* Major Lazer is a huge name in the world of EDM, enough to even get its own TV show. To the general public however, the only songs from them that most people can name are "Lean On" and "Cold Water".
* Most mainstream audiences knew who Music/{{Skrillex}} was and what he looked like before "Where Are U Now", but far fewer of them actually knew his music. Diplo even more so, as he was virtually unknown in the mainstream (despite being a behind-the-scenes producer of many hits) and people are generally far less aware he is a member of Major Lazer than for doing this song (as it as credited as "Skrillex & Diplo" rather than by their collaborative name "Jack U").
* What is Music/LynyrdSkynyrd's signature song? If you're a rabid fan of rock music (whether it's classic, mainstream, or active) or part of the VideoGame/GuitarHero[=/=]VideoGame/RockBand community, you're most likely going to say "[[IconicSongRequest Free Bird]]." To the greater public however, their most famous song by far is "Sweet Home Alabama."
* Music/{{Journey}} are, to certain audiences, rock legends, but to many people born after their heyday in the 1980s, they're known almost exclusively for their 1981 anthem "Don't Stop Believin'."
* Music/{{Boston}} are, to certain audiences, rock legends, but to many people born after their heyday in the 1970s, they're known almost exclusively for their 1976 anthem "More Than a Feeling."
* Music/{{Survivor}} [[RuleOfThree are, to certain audiences, rock legends, but to many people born after their heyday in the 1980s, they're known almost exclusively for their 1982 anthem "Eye of the Tiger."]]
* Music/{{Kansas}} [[OverlyLongGag are, to certain audiences, rock legends, but to many people born after their heyday in the 1970s, they're known almost exclusively for their 1976 anthem "Carry On Wayward Son."]]
* Depending on whether or not you listen to progressive rock, Music/{{Marillion}} is either one of the more underrated bands to come out of that genre, or they're the guys who made that '80s synthpop song "Kayleigh". They did have at least two other minor hits in the UK, but that song was the most popular.
* J Pop, as stated above, is stuck in its home country. [[{{Doujinshi}} Doujin Music]], gets hit with this trope ''much harder'' that even J Pop fans doesn't know much about them. For instance, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chata Chata]] is hailed as the queen of doujin music, but she is only known within doujin music enthusiasts.
* Most people born after Music/MCHammer's prime will have a hard time naming any songs of his other than his 1990 smash breakthrough hit "U Can't Touch This." ''Maybe'' "2 Legit 2 Quit", but that's as far as it goes.
* To rock fans, Music/TheWhiteStripes are demigods of alternative/indie rock; to mainstream audiences, they're little more than "the band who did "Seven Nation Army.""
* Music/LennyKravitz was hugely successful in the '90s and early 2000s, scoring smash hits like "It Ain't Over 'Till It's Over", "Are You Gonna Go My Way", "Fly Away", and "Again." To many younger audiences, he's chiefly known as Cinna, the dresser from ''Film/TheHungerGames'' series, leaving many people confused as to why an actor was playing a guitar during Music/KatyPerry's Super Bowl halftime show.
* The Music/EaglesOfDeathMetal are a cult rock band, but are only known in the mainstream for being the band playing at the Bataclan in Paris on November 13, 2015 when it was subject to a deadly terrorist attack by ISIS.
* A similar case can be made with glam-metal band Great White, who are primarily known for being the band playing during the Station nightclub fire in 2003.
* Music/{{Ylvis}} are one of the most popular comedy duos in their native Norway. Internationally, they're known almost solely for their 2013 viral hit "The Fox (What Does The Fox Say?)".
* ElectronicMusic and its many different subgenres have been mainstream in Europe for a longer time than in America, to the point where pure EDM songs can make pop hits. In the US, it's popular enough to have a vocal fanbase and the biggest names can draw in huge crowds, but the reception outside the fandom can be very polarizing. Additionally, names that are big in EDM won't ring a bell outside the audience. For example, most people have at least heard about Music/DavidGuetta, Music/CalvinHarris, Music/{{Skrillex}}, Music/DaftPunk and Music/{{Deadmau5}} ([[MainstreamObscurity even if they've never listened to their music]]), but mention names like Alesso, DJ Snake, Diplo, Clean Bandit, Steve Aoki, Disclosure, Music/{{Zedd}}, Avicii, or Music/{{Tiesto}} to people not into that music, and they're likely to be stumped.
* Music/DirEnGrey has a massive following with metalheads in Japan, and a very vocal but niche following in the west. They've been hailed as the TropeCodifier of AvantGardeMetal, and are one of the most respected bands of any metal genre. Most people outside their fanbase don't even know they exist.
* Music/FaithNoMore has one of rock music's most notable cult followings, and was a major influence on AlternativeMetal. To the general public, however, they're nothing more than a quintessential 90's OneHitWonder for their #9 hit "Epic".
* Music/{{Disturbed}} is, to rock radio listeners, one of the biggest rock bands of the new millennium. However, to outside audiences they're known almost solely for their 2000 song "Down with the Sickness" and their cover of Music/SimonAndGarfunkel's "The Sound of Silence", which went gold and fell just short of the Top 40.
* Music/PapaRoach is, to rock radio listeners, one of the biggest rock bands of the new millennium. However, to outside audiences they're known almost solely for their 2000 song "Last Resort" (although their only top 40 hit was 2005's "Scars").
* Music/{{Seether}} [[RuleOfThree is, to rock radio listeners, one of the biggest rock bands of the new millennium. However, to outside audiences they're known almost solely for their 2004 song "Broken"]].
* Music/{{Shinedown}} [[OverlyLongGag is, to rock radio listeners, one of the biggest rock bands of the new millennium. However, to outside audiences they're known almost solely for their 2009 song "Second Chance"]].
* There are several other rock bands who fit the above trend. However, some of them, usually acts who weren't ''quite'' as big as the above four, [[DeaderThanDisco had massive declines in popularity as time went on]] and their one "mainstream" hit is all rock listeners remember them by either. Examples include Trapt's "Headstrong", Hinder's "Lips of an Angel", Music/DrowningPool's "Bodies", Hoobastank's "The Reason", Crazy Town's "Butterfly", Alien Ant Farm's cover of "[[Music/MichaelJackson Smooth Criminal]]", Music/SavingAbel's "Addicted", 10 Years' "Wasteland", Crossfade's "Cold", Default's "Wasting My Time", Mudvayne's "Happy?", Saliva's "Click Click Boom", Music/{{Buckcherry}}'s "Crazy Bitch", Finger Eleven's "Paralyzer", and Music/PuddleOfMudd's "Blurry" (with "Not Falling", "Ladies and Gentlemen" and/or "Always", "Sorry" and/or "Lit Up", "One Thing", and "She Hates Me", respectively, ''possibly'' exempting the latter five from this status).
* This can also happen to alternative rock. Acts like Music/{{Gotye}} ("Somebody That I Used To Know"), Music/FosterThePeople ("Pumped Up Kicks"), Alex Clare ("Too Close"), Music/WalkTheMoon ("Shut Up and Dance"), Elle King ("Ex's and Oh's"), Music/{{Hozier}} ("Take Me to Church"), The Lumineers ("Ho Hey"), American Authors ("Best Day of My Life"), Capital Cities ("Safe and Sound"), and Bastille ("Pompeii"); and to a lesser extent, Of Monsters & Men ("Little Talks"), Awolnation ("Sail"), Kongos ("Come With Me Now"), Kaleo ("Way Down We Go"), Big Data ("Dangerous"), Bleachers ("I Wanna Get Better"), Music/{{Banks}} ("Beggin for Thread"), Nathaniel Rateliff & The Nightsweats ("S.O.B."), Cold War Kids ("First"), and Music/ArcticMonkeys ("Do I Wanna Know") are popular with indie audiences. Outside of that, they aren't known for much else. Only a handful of acts (namely Music/NeonTrees, Music/{{Fun}}, Music/ImagineDragons, Music/TwentyOnePilots, Music/TheBlackKeys, Music/{{Lorde}}, Music/LanaDelRey, and Music/MumfordAndSuns) have multiple well known songs to the greater public.
* Music/LCDSoundsystem is one of the most respected indie rock bands alongside the likes of Music/ArcadeFire and Music/FranzFerdinand, and pioneered the DancePunk movement of the '00s. Their breakup in 2011 caused massive outcry in the indie scene, and when they finally reunited nearly five years later, there was much rejoicing. That said, not a whole lot of people outside their audience even knew who they were. When they headlined Coachella 2016, some were confused as to why a band they never heard of before was headlining such a massive event (the other two headliners being Music/GunsNRoses and Music/CalvinHarris, two music acts with far more commercial success). It doesn't help that one of the acts billed under them was global household name Music/EllieGoulding.
* The Music/ZacBrownBand has had many country radio hits, but rock audiences have generally been exposed only to "Heavy Is The Head", their hard-rock collaboration with Music/ChrisCornell. While casual audiences are generally at least somewhat familiar with Brown's country hits, "Head" is almost completely unknown outside of the rock fanbase.
* Although she has a cult following, Elle King is known to mainstream audiences only for her smash hit "Ex's & Oh's", which became the biggest rock crossover hit of the 2010s by a female not named Lorde, and probably the closest hard rock has ever gotten to crossing over during the decade. In fact, most people are more likely to know that she is the daughter of a long-irrelevant actor (Rob Schneider) than name any song of hers other than "Ex's and Oh's".
* Music/TwentyOnePilots are one of the hottest names on the indie scene, but mainstream audiences likely aren't aware of anything they've done prior to 2015. Hardcore fans will remember that ''Vessel'' was a modest success and produced two #10 alternative hits, "Holding On to You" and "House of Gold", but casual audiences will assume that ''Blurryface'' was their debut album and their big breakout song was "Stressed Out" (or maybe "Tear in My Heart").
* Although she was fairly popular in the UK, Music/NataliaKills is known internationally only for her career-ending scandal on the New Zealand version of the ''Series/TheXFactor''. The same can be said about her husband Music/WillyMoon.
* Music/TinieTempah is a rap superstar in his native United Kingdom. Stateside, his success began and ended with "Written in the Stars". That said, his one hit was one more than most non-American hip-hop artists can ever hope for.
* Unless you count [[Music/{{Kiss}} Gene Simmons]], no Israeli musicians have ever made it big worldwide. While the country's Eurovision winners (Izhar Cohen, Gali Atari, and Dana International) and a few other occasional acts (like Ofra Haza and Asaf Avidan) and some French-Israeli names (like Yael Naim and Lilly Wood and the Prick) scored one global hit apiece, they never charted again outside of their homeland. Other names, like Rita Farouz, Sarit Hadad, Shlomo Artzi, Eyal Golan, Ethnix, and Teapacks, while huge in Israel and fairly well-known to the international Israeli, Jewish, and Hebrew-speaking community, are almost completely unheard of anywhere else.
* Few people who aren't fans of Music/{{Halsey}} can name any of her music aside from her verse on Music/TheChainsmokers' "Closer" (with the ''possible'' exception of "Now or Never").
* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banda_(music) Banda]] and the closely related [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norte%C3%B1o_(music) Norteño]] are everywhere in northwestern Mexico and areas of the United States with a high population of Mexican-Americans of northwestern descent, and fans will proudly blare the music out of their cars--even if you don't listen to it, you'll know about it. (Banda is a type of Mexican ensemble band, and Norteño is the polka-sounding music with accordions and trumpets, and often the ''grita'', a characteristic high-pitched laugh often found in traditional Mexican music.) If you don't live in northwestern Mexico or those areas of the United States, you might not have even heard of these genres before.
* Most people who aren't fans of Latin music will be hard-pressed to name any song by Luis Fonsi not named "Despacito".
* The years-long rivalry between Music/EscapeTheFate and Music/FallingInReverse was one of the most intense feuds in rock history, with both bands firing shots at each other on stage and in their music and concert attendees getting beaten up for wearing one band's shirt to the other's shows. Despite it being perhaps the most heated inter-band rivalry since the days of Metallica versus Megadeth, most people in the mainstream haven't heard of either band, let alone rock fans who aren't in the Warped Tour-centric scene of punk bands where the saga took place.
* On a website where haters of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' listed why they hated the show, a lot of people said that the episode title "Hey You, Don't Forget About Me In Your Memory" was one of the worst ones given to an episode of the show and made no sense. [[ItMakesSenseInContext It actually does make sense,]] since the episode was a spoof of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' and the title is a reference to Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)", which is the movie's theme song and is virtually unknown to those who don't listen to 80's music or a radio station that still plays those songs, fans of ''Series/HowItShouldHaveEnded'' [[note]] where in the ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'' episode Bing Bong sings a parody with altered lyrics[[/note]], fans of ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/TheGoldbergs'' [[note]] Both episodes had an episode where the song was played, but in the case of ''Victorious'', a cover was used, sung by Tori herself.[[/note]] and people who watched the ads on certain kids' shows in the 90's. [[note]]since an ad for an 80's CD with that song in it played a lot on some channels, mainly on syndicated airings of ''Series/{{Pokemon}}[[/note]]
[[/folder]]
13th Sep '17 6:10:55 AM mimitchi33
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* On a website where haters of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo!'' listed why they hated the show, a lot of people said that the episode title "Hey You, Don't Forget About Me In Your Memory" was one of the worst ones given to an episode of the show and made no sense. [[ItMakesSenseInContext It actually does make sense,]] since the episode was a spoof of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' and the title is a reference to Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)", which is the movie's theme song and is virtually unknown to those who don't listen to 80's music or a radio station that still plays those songs, fans of ''Series/HowItShouldHaveEnded'' [[note]] where in the ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'' episode Bing Bong sings a parody with altered lyrics[[/note]], fans of ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/TheGoldbergs'' [[note]] Both episodes had an episode where the song was played, but in the case of ''Victorious'', a cover was used, sung by Tori herself.[[/note]] and people who watched the ads on certain kids' shows in the 90's. [[note]]since an ad for an 80's CD with that song in it played a lot on some channels, mainly on syndicated airings of ''Series/{{Pokemon}}[[/note]]

to:

* On a website where haters of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo!'' ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' listed why they hated the show, a lot of people said that the episode title "Hey You, Don't Forget About Me In Your Memory" was one of the worst ones given to an episode of the show and made no sense. [[ItMakesSenseInContext It actually does make sense,]] since the episode was a spoof of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' and the title is a reference to Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)", which is the movie's theme song and is virtually unknown to those who don't listen to 80's music or a radio station that still plays those songs, fans of ''Series/HowItShouldHaveEnded'' [[note]] where in the ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'' episode Bing Bong sings a parody with altered lyrics[[/note]], fans of ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/TheGoldbergs'' [[note]] Both episodes had an episode where the song was played, but in the case of ''Victorious'', a cover was used, sung by Tori herself.[[/note]] and people who watched the ads on certain kids' shows in the 90's. [[note]]since an ad for an 80's CD with that song in it played a lot on some channels, mainly on syndicated airings of ''Series/{{Pokemon}}[[/note]]
13th Sep '17 6:09:12 AM mimitchi33
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* On a website where haters of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo!'' listed why they hated the show, a lot of people said that the episode title "Hey You, Don't Forget About Me In Your Memory" was one of the worst ones given to an episode of the show and made no sense. [[ItMakesSenseInContext It actually does make sense,]] since the episode was a spoof of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' and the title is a reference to Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)", which is the movie's theme song and is virtually unknown to those who don't listen to 80's music or a radio station that still plays those songs, fans of ''Series/HowItShouldHaveEnded'' [[note]] where in the ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'' episode Bing Bong sings a parody with altered lyrics[[/note]], fans of ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/TheGoldbergs'' [[note]] Both episodes had an episode where the song was played, but in the case of ''Victorious'', a cover was used, sung by Tori herself.[[/note]] and people who watched the ads on certain kids' shows in the 90's. [[note]]since an ad for an 80's CD with that song in it played a lot on some channels, mainly on syndicated airings of ''Series/{{Pokemon}}[[/note]]
12th Sep '17 4:57:51 AM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

* Politicians of sub-national units tend to only be known in said sub-national unit. For example, few Germans could list more than a handful state leaders of the 16 German states. The most likely to be known are the one of Bavaria (because he is usually also the head of the CSU, a major conservative party) and whoever last had an election or next has an election coming up. All that despite the fairly large influence state level politics has on the federal level in Germany. Some state leaders become notorious or well known for their federal ambitions or their persona but their successors are usually less known. Gerhard Schröder made the 1998 election in Lower Saxony (which he won) all about his 1998 run for chancellor (which was successful) but people would be hard pressed to say who succeeded him or who rules the state now. Klaus Wowereit was quite well known as mayor of Berlin for being openly gay and in the media a lot. His successor [[note]]Michael Müller[[/note]] is pretty unknown outside Berlin.
12th Sep '17 4:52:46 AM Jhonny
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* How many world leaders can people name? Aside from the ones in their own countries, not too many. The main globally known heads of state and government are U.S. President Donald Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Cuban President Raul Castro, British Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rouhani, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Chinese Premier Xi Jinping, North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, and Pope Francis[[note]]Dilma Rouseff, the former President of Brazil, was also very well-known around the world, but she was impeached in August 2016, and it'll take a while for her successor Michel Temet to gain recognition. King Salman of Saudi Arabia, while inheriting the throne of the well-known Abdullah in 2015, isn't quite as known yet[[/note]]. In fact, many of these people aren't even the actual heads of their state, as they lead the government of a parliamentary system, while the heads of state are ceremonial figureheads and mostly unknown outside their country. Some are more well known than others, though: while everyone knows who Queen Elizabeth is, not too many people will be able to recognize names like Joachim Gauck, Reuven Rivlin, Pranab Mukherjee, or Akihito unless they live in the country that person presides over.
* Hungarian-American businessman George Soros is notorious amongst right-wing Americans, who consider him the ultimate BigBad of the left. Amongst leftists, he's known as "that guy in all those right-wing conspiracy theories" and is virtually unheard of otherwise. The right-wing equivalent to Soros would be Charles and David Koch.

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* How many world leaders can people name? Aside from the ones in their own countries, not too many. The main globally known heads of state and government are U.S. President Donald Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Cuban President Raul Castro, British Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rouhani, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Chinese Premier Xi Jinping, North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, and Pope Francis[[note]]Dilma Rouseff, the former President of Brazil, was also very well-known around the world, but she was impeached in August 2016, and it'll take a while for her successor Michel Temet to gain recognition. King Salman of Saudi Arabia, while inheriting the throne of the well-known Abdullah in 2015, isn't quite as known yet[[/note]]. In fact, many of these people aren't even the actual heads of their state, as they lead the government of a parliamentary system, while the heads of state are ceremonial figureheads and mostly unknown outside their country. Some are more well known than others, though: while everyone knows who Queen Elizabeth is, not too many people will be able to recognize names like Joachim Gauck, Gauck[[note]]who has since been replaced by Frank Walter Steinmeyer, see what we're talking about?[[/note]], Reuven Rivlin, Pranab Mukherjee, or Akihito unless they live in the country that person presides over.
* Hungarian-American businessman George Soros is notorious amongst right-wing Americans, who consider him the ultimate BigBad of the left. Amongst leftists, he's known as "that guy in all those right-wing conspiracy theories" and is virtually unheard of otherwise. The right-wing equivalent to Soros would be Charles and David Koch.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PopCultureIsolation