History Main / PoliceAreUseless

4th Jan '16 10:30:02 AM catmuto
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* ''Literature/TheBusinessOfDying'' has the London police force not be bad, since they are doing their jobs with the material and information given to them. But they do get lazy when they get Mark Wells, the dead prostitute's pimp, into custody and are a little too intent on convicting him of the crime.
13th Dec '15 1:56:56 AM MachRider1985
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* ''Fanfic/SOE2LoneHeirOfKrypton'': When the Section-2 agents (the security detail tasked with watching and protecting the pilots) are not busy with harassing, torturing or assassinating witnesses, they are highly incompetent. Asuka can very easily slip her bodyguards, even without her superpowers. And a terrorist group was capable of abducing Shinji despite of them.

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2nd Dec '15 10:34:35 PM Anddrix
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* The police in ''Literature/HushHush'' are laughably useless. While some of it can be attributed to many of the characters [[ItWasHereISwear making Nora hallucinate some of the stuff she reports]], but it doesn't explain some of the random conclusions they come to (the first book has a detective argue that Nora and Patch must be dating, because [[InsaneTrollLogic Patch gave Nora a ride home]]), various uncalled-for remarks (the second book has the detective flat-out tell Nora, "I think you're crazy", in response to her telling him she was drugged and chased), unprofessional behavior (in the third book, the police handle a girl going missing for months and showing up out of nowhere with no memory whatsoever of her abduction by releasing her without taking statements or examining her mental health/bringing up the possibility of therapy), and enforcing OnlyBadGuysCallTheirLawyers. Of course, given that we really only see one particular detective [[spoiler:who is actually an angel undercover]], it's possible that it's just him who's a terrible cop.
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* The police in ''Literature/HushHush'' are laughably useless. While some of it can be attributed to many of the characters [[ItWasHereISwear making Nora hallucinate some of the stuff she reports]], but it doesn't explain some of the random conclusions they come to (the first book has a detective argue that Nora and Patch must be dating, because [[InsaneTrollLogic Patch gave Nora a ride home]]), various uncalled-for remarks (the second book (''Crescendo'' has the detective flat-out tell Nora, "I think you're crazy", in response to her telling him she was drugged and chased), unprofessional behavior (in the third book, ''Silence'', the police handle a girl going missing for months and showing up out of nowhere with no memory whatsoever of her abduction by releasing her without taking statements or examining her mental health/bringing up the possibility of therapy), and enforcing OnlyBadGuysCallTheirLawyers. Of course, given that we really only see one particular detective [[spoiler:who is actually an angel undercover]], it's possible that it's just him who's a terrible cop.
29th Nov '15 6:28:49 PM merotoker
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*** And finally, in one moment when Team Rocket are fleeing the building, there is a massive crowd of police there waiting for them, but due to Team Rocket being previously sprayed by a Stunky, the smell emitting from them makes all the offices block their noses and ''they move into what looks like a guard of honor position'' allowing Team Rocket to run through and escape. [[FlatWhat What.]] It wasn't just this idiot Jenny. In a ''lot'' of Pokémon episodes, the Jennies can't or don't do anything to stop whatever crime is happening. And quite a few times, they do more harm than good. They've let Team Aqua escape once, and on many occasions, Team Rocket.
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*** And finally, in one moment when Team Rocket are fleeing the building, there is a massive crowd of police there waiting for them, but due to Team Rocket being previously sprayed by a Stunky, the smell emitting from them makes all the offices officers block their noses and ''they move into what looks like a guard of honor position'' allowing Team Rocket to run through and escape. [[FlatWhat What.]] It wasn't just this idiot Jenny. In a ''lot'' of Pokémon episodes, the Jennies can't or don't do anything to stop whatever crime is happening. And quite a few times, they do more harm than good. They've let Team Aqua escape once, and on many occasions, Team Rocket.

* The police in ''Anime/CodeGeass'' are an interesting case. While never shown to explicitly [[KickTheDog kick any dogs]], they are generally included in Lelouch's "all Britannian authorities are corrupt and must be obliterated" mindset. This is implied in Lelouch and Suzaku's debate in an early episode about whether the Black Knights are heroes for Justice, or whether they are vigilantes who should just join the police force and work from within the system if they want to enact change (Lelouch comments that they'd simply be absorbed and corrupted by the system). They're not shown to protect or serve the Numbers in the Ghettos, and it's implied that they may have been involved in the smuggling of Refrain. The episode in which they gain the most (and any positive) coverage is when [[spoiler: Lelouch geasses them into shooting Mao after Lelouch beats him using that tape trick.]]
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* The police in ''Anime/CodeGeass'' are an interesting case. While never shown to explicitly [[KickTheDog kick any dogs]], they are generally included in Lelouch's "all Britannian authorities are corrupt and must be obliterated" mindset. This is implied in Lelouch and Suzaku's debate in an early episode about whether the Black Knights are heroes for Justice, or whether they are vigilantes who should just join the police force and work from within the system if they want to enact change (Lelouch comments that they'd simply be absorbed and corrupted by the system). They're not shown to protect or serve the Numbers in the Ghettos, and it's implied that they may have been involved in the smuggling of Refrain. The episode in which they gain the most (and any positive) coverage is when [[spoiler: Lelouch geasses them into shooting Mao after Lelouch beats him using that tape trick.]]trick]].

* ''Manga/DeathNote'': The Police are discouraged to chase Kira, after he killed the false L, and he forces the FBI to surrender after he killed several FBI agents. Only a few police officers try to chase him, but they are not smart enough how to do it. They need the help and lead of people who do ''not'' work for the police, but by their own. That includes the anonymous master detective L, the college student Light (who ''is'' Kira), both for the Japanese Special Unit, [[spoiler:and the teenage L-wannabe Near for the SPK.]] [[spoiler:And many states surrender to Kira.]]
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* ''Manga/DeathNote'': The Police are discouraged to chase Kira, after he killed the false L, and he forces the FBI to surrender after he killed several FBI agents. Only a few police officers try to chase him, but they are not smart enough how to do it. They need the help and lead of people who do ''not'' work for the police, but by their own. That includes the anonymous master detective L, the college student Light (who ''is'' Kira), both for the Japanese Special Unit, [[spoiler:and the teenage L-wannabe Near for the SPK.]] [[spoiler:And many states surrender to Kira.]]Kira]].

** The Trope was played straight at first. The police were usually portrayed as antagonists, and usually as [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain Ineffectual Sympathetic Villains]] (or lowlifes who [[EvenEvilHasStandards sickened even the other villains]], like Takatsu). By the end of the first season and into the second, however, a few police did prove helpful (Ushio officially making a HeelFaceTurn) although it was rare when they could actually do anything heroic.
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** The Trope was played straight at first. The police were usually portrayed as antagonists, and usually as [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain Ineffectual {{Ineffectual Sympathetic Villains]] Villain}}s (or lowlifes who [[EvenEvilHasStandards sickened even the other villains]], like Takatsu). By the end of the first season and into the second, however, a few police did prove helpful (Ushio officially making a HeelFaceTurn) although it was rare when they could actually do anything heroic.

* Ultimately {{Subverted}} in ''Manga/CatsEye'': while the police ''seems'' useless at first, it's because [[OvershadowedByAwesome they're dealing with the titular thieves]], and we're later shown them (mostly the same cops who continue getting humiliated by Cat's Eye) proving themselves truly competent against other crooks, with the crowner being a criminal discovering the people at a coffee house egging him to confess his crimes were police officers, one of which being an old man who had earlier ''stolen the magazine of his gun and lured him there for arrest purpose''.
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* Ultimately {{Subverted}} {{subverted|Trope}} in ''Manga/CatsEye'': while the police ''seems'' useless at first, it's because [[OvershadowedByAwesome they're dealing with the titular thieves]], and we're later shown them (mostly the same cops who continue getting humiliated by Cat's Eye) proving themselves truly competent against other crooks, with the crowner being a criminal discovering the people at a coffee house egging him to confess his crimes were police officers, one of which being an old man who had earlier ''stolen the magazine of his gun and lured him there for arrest purpose''.

* In {{Superhero}} comics, police officers and security guards are rarely more than an annoyance for even the lowest-level {{supervillain}}. There are occasional subversions, however, when they save the hero's life or capture the criminal before the hero does.
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* In {{Superhero}} {{superhero}} comics, police officers and security guards are rarely more than an annoyance for even the lowest-level {{supervillain}}. There are occasional subversions, however, when they save the hero's life or capture the criminal before the hero does.

** Another subversion occurred as far back as the 1960s in an early ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'' comic, where Spider-Man tracked down the crime boss known as the Big Man and captured most of his gang for the police but the Big Man gets away. Thinking that the Big Man is his boss, J. Jonah Jameson, Peter Parker returns to the ''Daily Bugle'' in hopes of helping the police catch him. It turns out, though, that Peter was wrong, and the police managed to track down the ''real'' Big Man, who was in fact [[spoiler: reporter Frederick Foswell.]]
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** Another subversion occurred as far back as the 1960s in an early ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'' comic, where Spider-Man tracked down the crime boss known as the Big Man and captured most of his gang for the police but the Big Man gets away. Thinking that the Big Man is his boss, J. Jonah Jameson, Peter Parker returns to the ''Daily Bugle'' in hopes of helping the police catch him. It turns out, though, that Peter was wrong, and the police managed to track down the ''real'' Big Man, who was in fact [[spoiler: reporter Frederick Foswell.]]Foswell]].

** That said, it's brutally subverted at the end of the Teleporter arc - [[spoiler:the Teleporter's solution to the problem of an entire planet in peril is not to teleport each person off it individually. It's to teleport the entire planet to a different orbit. One which happens to be in a system which has laws against the exact activities that X-Tel was doing in order to get Godot to play nicely with them. And the Teleporter then teleports the space station that the X-Tel executive in question is on at the time to the same system.]]
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** That said, it's brutally subverted at the end of the Teleporter arc - [[spoiler:the Teleporter's solution to the problem of an entire planet in peril is not to teleport each person off it individually. It's to teleport the entire planet to a different orbit. One which happens to be in a system which has laws against the exact activities that X-Tel was doing in order to get Godot to play nicely with them. And the Teleporter then teleports the space station that the X-Tel executive in question is on at the time to the same system.]]system]].

* In Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/ProvostsDog'' novels, this seems to be the case for Night Watch and any of the Dogs portrayed unsympathetically. Taken up [[UpToEleven a notch]] with Sir Lionel of Trebond, which causes this trope in the Port Caynn Guard by extension--he's not only incompetent, [[spoiler:he's an incredible coward willing to put up with huge amounts of criminal activity to save his skin.]]
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* In Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/ProvostsDog'' novels, this seems to be the case for Night Watch and any of the Dogs portrayed unsympathetically. Taken up [[UpToEleven a notch]] with Sir Lionel of Trebond, which causes this trope in the Port Caynn Guard by extension--he's not only incompetent, [[spoiler:he's an incredible coward willing to put up with huge amounts of criminal activity to save his skin.]]skin]].

* The Aurors from ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' do very little good, unless they work with the [[LaResistance Order of the Phoenix]] : since the Ministry officially refuses to acknowledge [[BigBad Voldemort]]'s return, they end up [[NiceJobBreakingItHero helping the Death Eaters]] more than anything. ** They start [[AvertedTrope averting it]] in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince the sequel]], and actually try to stop Voldemort. But then again, most of the aurors who aren't part of the Order of the Phoenix still [[MilitariesAreUseless never do anything useful]] (for their side) anyway. *** Even the ones with the Order are still incompetent, except for Moody. Tonks loses every fight she's in. No Auror can handle Bellatrix Lestrange... who is beaten by a housewife. Another Auror loses a battle with Neville's grandmother. It would seem [=McGonagall=] was fibbing when she told Harry about the high standards just to qualify for training for the Aurors in an effort to trick him into focusing more on his studies.
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* The Aurors from ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' do very little good, unless they work with the [[LaResistance Order of the Phoenix]] : Phoenix]]: since the Ministry officially refuses to acknowledge [[BigBad Voldemort]]'s return, they end up [[NiceJobBreakingItHero helping the Death Eaters]] more than anything. ** anything. They start [[AvertedTrope averting it]] in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince the sequel]], and actually try to stop Voldemort. But then again, most of the aurors who aren't part of the Order of the Phoenix still [[MilitariesAreUseless never do anything useful]] (for their side) anyway. *** anyway. Even the ones with the Order are still incompetent, except for Moody. Tonks loses every fight she's in. No Auror can handle Bellatrix Lestrange... who is beaten by a housewife. Another Auror loses a battle with Neville's grandmother. It would seem [=McGonagall=] was fibbing when she told Harry about the high standards just to qualify for training for the Aurors in an effort to trick him into focusing more on his studies.

* Cops tend to be fairly useless in Creator/StephenKing's books. Even when they're persuaded to investigate the strange goings-on in a particular novel, they have a tendency to get bumped off before they can help the heroes. ** There's a BIG exception on ''Literature/NeedfulThings'', though; the main character, a small-town sheriff, manages to single-handedly fight off a demonic PuppetMaster. Most of his deputies manage to handle themselves half-decently considering the circumstances, too.
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* Cops tend to be fairly useless in Creator/StephenKing's books. Even when they're persuaded to investigate the strange goings-on in a particular novel, they have a tendency to get bumped off before they can help the heroes. ** heroes. There's a BIG exception on in ''Literature/NeedfulThings'', though; the main character, a small-town sheriff, manages to single-handedly fight off a demonic PuppetMaster. Most of his deputies manage to handle themselves half-decently considering the circumstances, too.

* A military variant happens in ''Literature/TheDestroyer'' #113, "The Empire Dreams". The neo-nazi villains successfully blitzes London ''three times'' because the same obstructive RAF officer keeps refusing to take the reports seriously. The first time he rejects the reports because they were made by a farmer and a meteorologist and who would fly WW2-era planes anyway? He later rejects a second report because it says the planes come from the direction of the English Channel, and the first planes ''obviously'' came from Ireland. In the third case they actually have a tight security net up, but fail to consider planes launched from ''within'' Britain, so he rejects those claims too, because "nothing can get through our security measures". He then accuses the near-hysterical official reporting the bombings of being drunk, while ''gunshots, explosions and screams can be heard in the background''. The villains later seize Paris by kidnapping roughly over a dozen important officials, including the French President, and torturing them until they sign a surrender. The entire coup is carried out one morning without any mention of interference from bodyguards or police, and the new regime has their jackbooted neo-nazi skinhead troops marching in the streets the same day, with no visible resistance at all.
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* A military variant happens in ''Literature/TheDestroyer'' #113, "The Empire Dreams". The neo-nazi villains successfully blitzes blitz London ''three times'' because the same obstructive RAF officer keeps refusing to take the reports seriously. The first time he rejects the reports because they were made by a farmer and a meteorologist and who would fly WW2-era UsefulNotes/{{W|orldWarII}}W2-era planes anyway? He later rejects a second report because it says the planes come from the direction of the English Channel, and the first planes ''obviously'' came from Ireland. In the third case they actually have a tight security net up, but fail to consider planes launched from ''within'' Britain, so he rejects those claims too, because "nothing can get through our security measures". He then accuses the near-hysterical official reporting the bombings of being drunk, while ''gunshots, explosions and screams can be heard in the background''. The villains later seize Paris by kidnapping roughly over a dozen important officials, including the French President, and torturing them until they sign a surrender. The entire coup is carried out one morning without any mention of interference from bodyguards or police, and the new regime has their jackbooted neo-nazi skinhead troops marching in the streets the same day, with no visible resistance at all.

** Also, Honor didn't deduce anything, she ''knew'' that Lt. Mears was under some sort of influence, because of her [[PsychicPowers empathic sense]]. Which she had to present as being that of her treecat, to keep TheMasquerade. The investigator simply didn't believe in the 'cats PsychicPowers, because at that time they were more of a hypothesis rather than an established fact, and were dismissed even by many respectable scientists.
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** Also, Honor didn't deduce anything, she ''knew'' that Lt. Mears was under some sort of influence, because of her [[PsychicPowers empathic sense]]. Which she had to present as being that of her treecat, to keep TheMasquerade.the {{masquerade}}. The investigator simply didn't believe in the 'cats PsychicPowers, because at that time they were more of a hypothesis rather than an established fact, and were dismissed even by many respectable scientists.

* In ''Literature/TheCloakSociety'', they do not appeal to the police for most of the trilogy -- indeed, the danger of coming to public attention, the warrants on some of them, and the villains' report that one of them has been kidnapped mean they avoid them entirely. Later, however, [[spoiler: they appeal to the police for help -- more on the reasoning that JurisdictionFriction means the police will want to support them than because the police ought to handle it.]]
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* In ''Literature/TheCloakSociety'', they do not appeal to the police for most of the trilogy -- indeed, the danger of coming to public attention, the warrants on some of them, and the villains' report that one of them has been kidnapped mean they avoid them entirely. Later, however, [[spoiler: they appeal to the police for help -- more on the reasoning that JurisdictionFriction means the police will want to support them than because the police ought to handle it.]]it]].

** In ''Literature/TheCuckoosCalling'' the police are convinced that Lula Landry commited suicide, and don't appreciate the hero's investigation that aims to prove otherwise.
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** In ''Literature/TheCuckoosCalling'' the police are convinced that Lula Landry commited committed suicide, and don't appreciate the hero's investigation that aims to prove otherwise.

* Averted and played straight in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', on the ground level, most Imperial Nobles have all sorts of law enforcement; from Enforcers, to Guard, to Police, all of which are usually not much better than a gang of ugly theif takers who simply enforce the will of the ruling Noble. The ubiquitous police force used by the Imperal Government proper, however, are the Arbites. These guys carry more guns and heavier armour than SWAT teams, tend to be fanatics who have borderline worship of the law, and have a habit of beating most unimportant suspects to death. Might have something to do with the fact that the Adeptus Arbites is a giant ShoutOut to ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd''.
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* Averted and played straight in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', on the ground level, most Imperial Nobles have all sorts of law enforcement; from Enforcers, to Guard, to Police, all of which are usually not much better than a gang of ugly theif thief takers who simply enforce the will of the ruling Noble. The ubiquitous police force used by the Imperal Government proper, however, are the Arbites. These guys carry more guns and heavier armour than SWAT teams, tend to be fanatics who have borderline worship of the law, and have a habit of beating most unimportant suspects to death. Might have something to do with the fact that the Adeptus Arbites is a giant ShoutOut to ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd''.

* This trope is played with in ''Theatre/GreatBritain''. The PlayedForLaughs Commissioner Kassam is hilariously incompetent, trying to cover up an AccidentalMurder, [[DiggingYourselfDeeper failing badly]], admitting that he doesn't have a clue and eventually committing career suicide by [[spoiler:racially abusing an officer that tasers him on his orders (to try and demonstrate that tasers are okay)]]; while all this goes along, he becomes an InUniverse meme. Some of the support staff are involved in the cover-up and not good at it either. More seriously, Assistant Commissioner Davidson's efforts [[WellIntentionedExtremists to solve a crime through a corrupt alliance with Free Press]] go ''horribly'' wrong.
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* This trope is played with in ''Theatre/GreatBritain''. The PlayedForLaughs Commissioner Kassam is hilariously incompetent, trying to cover up an AccidentalMurder, [[DiggingYourselfDeeper failing badly]], admitting that he doesn't have a clue and eventually committing career suicide by [[spoiler:racially abusing an officer that tasers him on his orders (to try and demonstrate that tasers are okay)]]; while all this goes along, he becomes an InUniverse meme. Some of the support staff are involved in the cover-up and not good at it either. More seriously, Assistant Commissioner Davidson's efforts [[WellIntentionedExtremists [[WellIntentionedExtremist to solve a crime through a corrupt alliance with Free Press]] go ''horribly'' wrong.

* In ''Webcomic/{{RasputinCatamite}}'', The local police seems lazy, adverse to paperwork, hideously bigoted and corrupt.
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* In ''Webcomic/{{RasputinCatamite}}'', ''Webcomic/RasputinCatamite'', The local police seems lazy, adverse to paperwork, hideously bigoted and corrupt.

* PlayedWith in ''Webcomic/KiwiBlitz'', as a kid Reed Bahia's mother explained that the police were always useless in the stories [[LampshadeHanging to make things more interesting for the hero]]. And now in the present day [[JustifiedTrope the police don't have a big enough budget to deal with all of the costumed villains running around]].
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* PlayedWith [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] in ''Webcomic/KiwiBlitz'', as a kid Reed Bahia's mother explained that the police were always useless in the stories [[LampshadeHanging to make things more interesting for the hero]]. And now in the present day [[JustifiedTrope the police don't have a big enough budget to deal with all of the costumed villains running around]].

* If they were living in reality and not a RuleOfFunny psycho-world, most of WebSite/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses would have been in jail or mental homes by now. Specific examples would be [[WebVideo/BumReviews Chester A. Bum]] and WebVideo/AskThatGuyWithTheGlasses, as they can get out of any trouble by using the insanity defense. ** The ''Literature/JamesAndTheGiantPeach'' review did open with the reveal that the Critic was serving time in the "Internet State Penitentiary"... for doing a really bad Let's Play. * One of ''Website/{{Cracked}}'''s [[http://www.cracked.com/photoplasty_586_31-life-lessons-you-can-only-learn-from-video-games/ 31 Life Lessons You Can Only Learn From Video Games]] is that police cars in a BeatEmUp are just for decoration. "Only trust your fists; police will never help you."
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* If they were living in reality and not a RuleOfFunny psycho-world, most of WebSite/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses would have been in jail or mental homes by now. Specific examples would be [[WebVideo/BumReviews Chester A. Bum]] and WebVideo/AskThatGuyWithTheGlasses, as they can get out of any trouble by using the insanity defense. ** defense. The ''Literature/JamesAndTheGiantPeach'' review did open with the reveal that the Critic was serving time in the "Internet State Penitentiary"... for doing a really bad Let's Play. * ''Website/{{Cracked}}'''s ** One of ''Website/{{Cracked}}'''s [[http://www.cracked.com/photoplasty_586_31-life-lessons-you-can-only-learn-from-video-games/ 31 Life Lessons You Can Only Learn From Video Games]] is that police cars in a BeatEmUp are just for decoration. "Only trust your fists; police will never help you."

* In ''Literature/{{Worm}}'', the [[CapeBusters Brockton Bay PRT]] barely bother fighting the truly malicious local supervillains or their gangs, and past a certain point the more friendly-ish supervillains are doing more to help their newly carved out territories and fight the major threats than they are. ** The mundane police are also useless the one time they appear, although that can be forgiven on account of their opponents being the [[TheDreaded Slaughterhouse Nine]]. * Arguably subverted in the WebAnimation/HomestarRunner cartoon literally called "The Strong Bad is in Jail Cartoon", which begins with Strong Bad and the Cheat being caught by the "police" (or more accurately, Homestar doing a poor imitation of a police siren) and arrested. He then escapes from a literal CardboardPrison and attempts to kidnap the Poopsmith, but once again the "police" (which includes Homestar, Bubs, and Coach Z) manage to easily recapture him.
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* In ''Literature/{{Worm}}'', the [[CapeBusters Brockton Bay PRT]] barely bother fighting the truly malicious local supervillains or their gangs, and past a certain point the more friendly-ish supervillains are doing more to help their newly carved out territories and fight the major threats than they are. ** are. The mundane police are also useless the one time they appear, although that can be forgiven on account of their opponents being the [[TheDreaded Slaughterhouse Nine]]. * Arguably subverted Subverted in the WebAnimation/HomestarRunner cartoon literally called "The Strong Bad is in Jail Cartoon", which begins with Strong Bad and the Cheat being caught by the "police" (or more accurately, Homestar doing a poor imitation of a police siren) and arrested. He then escapes from a literal CardboardPrison and attempts to kidnap the Poopsmith, but once again the "police" (which includes Homestar, Bubs, and Coach Z) manage to easily recapture him.

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25th Nov '15 11:27:47 AM MikeW
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** Averted in ''ComicBook/{{Starman}}''. The O'Dares, a family of policemen (and woman), regularly help Jack because his father saved their father. They start by capturing the Mist while Jack fights the Mist's son and keep up that track record throughout the series. Jack & his father consider them friends and celebrate Christmas with them.
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** Averted Played with when Otto Octavius became the Superior Spider-Man as in the early going, Otto would call the cops for backup before attacking a villain's lair. Stuck in Otto's mind, Peter Parker would must on how he never considered that. Of course, as the series goes on, Otto's arrogance makes him assume he knows better than the cops, which bites him big time in the climax. *Averted in ''ComicBook/{{Starman}}''. The O'Dares, a family of policemen (and woman), regularly help Jack because his father saved their father. They start by capturing the Mist while Jack fights the Mist's son and keep up that track record throughout the series. Jack & his father consider them friends and celebrate Christmas with them.
24th Nov '15 3:36:55 PM StFan
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** ''ComicStrip/DeKiekeboes'': Inspecteur Sapperdeboere, who usually is more interested in food than solving cases.
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** ''ComicStrip/DeKiekeboes'': ''ComicBook/DeKiekeboes'': Inspecteur Sapperdeboere, who usually is more interested in food than solving cases.
21st Nov '15 9:38:36 AM vikali
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* [[spoiler:[[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] in ''Literature/MurderAtColefaxManor''. While the chief inspector is reasonable, the player can decide to be one by deciding to arrest any of the cast without having any evidence or proof as to if they committed or were complicate in the murder.]]
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* [[spoiler:[[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] with]]]] in ''Literature/MurderAtColefaxManor''. While [[spoiler:While the chief inspector is reasonable, the player can decide to be one by deciding to arrest any of the cast without having any evidence or proof as to if they committed or were complicate in the murder.]]
21st Nov '15 9:37:52 AM vikali
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* [[spoiler:[[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] in ''Literature/MurderAtColefaxManor''. While the chief inspector is reasonable, the player can decide to be one by deciding to arrest any of the cast without having any evidence or proof as to if they committed or were complicate in the murder.]]
19th Oct '15 11:04:36 PM Josef5678
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-->-- '''[[UsefulNotes/RussianHumor Russian joke]]'''
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-->-- '''[[UsefulNotes/RussianHumor '''[[RussianHumor Russian joke]]'''
14th Oct '15 1:09:25 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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Some things police do in RealLife understandably ''seem'' lazy or useless to outside observers, too, when they actually aren't -- [[DonutMessWithACop like sitting in their car eating]][[note]]as anyone who has worked any security can tell you, this is a side effect of having a job where most of it is ''waiting for something to happen'' as opposed to jobs where earning money is dependent on action[[/note]] or a crowd of them arriving and standing around for a simple traffic stop -- you can't (like a quiet day at your job) send police home just because no one is breaking the law -- they still may be needed at a moment's notice! At lot of people get angry when CSI doesn't come and roadblocks aren't put up because someone broke into their car. [[note]]We've all heard about instances where police officers were killed that just started out as "a normal traffic stop" -- imagine how you would feel if you coworker was shot and you were sitting in your car two blocks away eating a donut.[[/note]]
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Some things police do in RealLife understandably ''seem'' lazy or useless to outside observers, too, when they actually aren't -- [[DonutMessWithACop like sitting in their car eating]][[note]]as anyone who has worked any security can tell you, this is a side effect of having a job where most of it is ''waiting for something to happen'' as opposed to jobs where earning money is dependent on action[[/note]] or a crowd of them arriving and standing around for a simple traffic stop -- you can't (like a quiet day at your job) send police home just because no one is breaking the law -- they still may be needed at a moment's notice! At & a lot of people get angry when CSI doesn't come and roadblocks aren't put up because someone broke into their car. [[note]]We've all heard about instances where police officers were killed that just started out as "a normal traffic stop" -- imagine how you would feel if you coworker was shot and you were sitting in your car two blocks away eating a donut.[[/note]]
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