History Main / PoirotSpeak

29th May '17 12:17:14 PM Goldfritha
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* In Karina Fabian's ''Discovery'', one character notes that the captain tends to slip back to his Jamaican roots when angry. Consequently, although he shows no other signs, we can tell that he's furious when giving certain orders.
25th Apr '17 5:54:19 AM StFan
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Both this invoked form and the straight form can easily be TruthInTelevision--as anyone who has learned a second language will tell you, it is difficult to break the habit of applying syntax and [[BlindIdiotTranslation awkwardly translating idioms]] from one's native tongue to other languages, particularly when learned later in life. Slipping into native tongue is also rather common for those who are not completely fluent with a foreign language, particularly when stressed. Any of these can be doubly true for someone who has a strong accent in their original language to begin with, especially if they take pride in it.

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Both this invoked form and the straight form can easily be TruthInTelevision--as TruthInTelevision -- as anyone who has learned a second language will tell you, it is difficult to break the habit of applying syntax and [[BlindIdiotTranslation awkwardly translating idioms]] from one's native tongue to other languages, particularly when learned later in life. Slipping into native tongue is also rather common for those who are not completely fluent with a foreign language, particularly when stressed. Any of these can be doubly true for someone who has a strong accent in their original language to begin with, especially if they take pride in it.



[[folder:Comedy]]
* Peter Serafinowicz (got it in one) lampooned this by having [[Literature/HerculePoirot Poirot]] say that he doesn't actually know French, he just uses enough French words to convince people he does.
* Many of the French phrases in Creator/DaveBarry's writing are American idioms or brand names clumsily forced into French grammatical structures, such as "La Ware de la Tupper" or "Que l'enfer, c'est seulement Canada" ("What the hell, it's only Canada"). Some are just AsLongAsItSoundsForeign sentences relying on InherentlyFunnyWords.
* Creator/AnnaRussell's routine "Schreechenrauf," introduced as a pastiche of [[Creator/RichardWagner Wagnerian]] arias for dramatic soprano, is actually a parody of the ''Ring'' cycle, with mangled Anglo-German phrases like "wir fallen in lieber" set to Creator/RichardWagner's music. The aria reaches a climax when it puts down one of the characters from ''[[Theatre/TheRingOfTheNibelung Götterdämmerung]]'' (Gutrune, daughter of Gibich) as "Gutrune, die ''Götterdämmerung'' Gibich!"
** She does the same thing with what can only be described as dog-Italian, in "Canto Dolcemente Pipo", from the opera ''La Cantatrice Squelante''.
* Comedian Creator/EddieIzzard's bit on Martin Luther spirals into an exploration of this trope: "Then Martin Luther said 'hang on a minute!' Only in German, so, 'ein minuten bitte... ich habe einen kleinen problemm ... avec dieser, uhh, religione.' ...He was from everywhere."
** Izzard also does a bit on attempting to communicate in France with schoolboy French, most of which involves dragging a cat, a table, and a monkey everywhere so that his vocabulary stays applicable. This is sort of complicated/averted because Izzard can actually speak pretty good French good enough to do whole shows in the language.
** Averted in one act, where in the middle of the act he starts repeating his entire routine up to that point in French, without making any attempt to make sure the audience has any idea what he's saying. Partway through, he says "You people have no idea what I'm saying, you're only laughing because I'm speaking French."
** "If you don't speak French, by the way, all that was fucking funny, alright?"
* Czech humorous singer Ivan Mladek once did a routine where he spoke German, slipping back into Czech. He told of a television show, approximately "Look Out For The Curve", and translated it as "Achtung! Die Kurve!" (Which, to Czechs, sounds like "Look out! A whore!" as ''kurva'' means prostitute...)
[[/folder]]



** It does not help that writers and letterers frequently misspell the German words they use - sometimes creating unintentional humour, e. g. with Nightcrawler addressing a lady as "Leibchen" (bodice or vest) - or translating English expressions into German word for word, resulting in phrases that either don't exist or have a significantly different meaning than the intended one.

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** It does not help that writers and letterers frequently misspell the German words they use - ++ sometimes creating unintentional humour, e. g. with Nightcrawler addressing a lady as "Leibchen" (bodice or vest) - -- or translating English expressions into German word for word, resulting in phrases that either don't exist or have a significantly different meaning than the intended one.



[[folder:Fan Work]]

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[[folder:Fan Work]]Works]]



* ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'' has the Kaiba Corps Nazis, Kaiba's two lackeys who speak like this. When Kaiba asks them to tone it down they hastily agree "Yes mein führer."
* ''WebVideo/MyLittlePonyTheMentallyAdvancedSeries'' has Pinkie. No one really knows what that accent is 'supposed' to be, but her speech is liberally peppered with "Yes"es and inverted syntax. "He thinks he is in the out field where he is safe from getting strikes, but Pinkie has fooled him! [[VerbalTic Yes.]]"



[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* A classic film example is Inspector Clouseau from the ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' movies, expertly played by Peter Sellers. Subversion: Clouseau's horrendous (and fake) French accent was so thick the French characters in the movies had moments where they could not understand him.
** Several of the jokes are actually based on people '''expecting''' him to speak like this: for example, he says English ''room'' like the French ''rhume'' (cold (the virus))...

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* A classic film example is Inspector Clouseau from the ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' movies, expertly played by Peter Sellers. Subversion: Clouseau's horrendous (and fake) French accent was so thick the French characters in the movies had moments where they could not understand him.
**
him. Several of the jokes are actually based on people '''expecting''' him to speak like this: for example, he says English ''room'' like the French ''rhume'' (cold (the virus))...[the virus])...



* In ''Film/InglouriousBasterds'', recognizable words in the French and German dialogue are occasionally reproduced untranslated in the subtitles, producing a PoirotSpeak-like effect even though the characters are speaking entirely in their own languages.
** It actually comes off more like GratuitousGerman, since it's mostly just words like "wunderbar," "mein Führer," "ja," or "nein."

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* In ''Film/InglouriousBasterds'', recognizable words in the French and German dialogue are occasionally reproduced untranslated in the subtitles, producing a PoirotSpeak-like effect even though the characters are speaking entirely in their own languages.
**
languages. It actually comes off more like GratuitousGerman, since it's mostly just words like "wunderbar," "mein Führer," "ja," or "nein."



-->'''Mr. Leuchtag:''' Liebchen - sweetness, what watch?
-->'''Mrs. Leuchtag:''' Ten watch.
-->'''Mr. Leuchtag:''' Such much?

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-->'''Mr. Leuchtag:''' Liebchen - sweetness, what watch?
-->'''Mrs.
watch?\\
'''Mrs.
Leuchtag:''' Ten watch.
-->'''Mr.
watch.\\
'''Mr.
Leuchtag:''' Such much?



* In ''JohannesCabalTheNecromancer'' Cabal is Herman-born but lived most of his life in England-he's stated to have a very mild accent which isn't written phonetically, so the only time this shows up is when he's particularly stressed and swears in German or uses very common phrases like 'du lieber gott'. However, Cabal is also a necromancer so when he really swears he dips into dead, inhuman languages that are that much more vitriolic.
* Named for Detective Literature/HerculePoirot, who spoke this way as part of his FunnyForeigner facade. Hercule speaks fine English at the end as he explains step-by-step how he solved the case. Other characters and the detective himself have commented on it.
** Poirot's speech is something of a subversion, as he uses his accent to disarm suspects, making them think he's only a FunnyForeigner when it's really "[[ObfuscatingStupidity just an act]]".

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* In ''JohannesCabalTheNecromancer'' ''Literature/JohannesCabalTheNecromancer'', Cabal is Herman-born German-born but lived most of his life in England-he's stated to have a very mild accent which isn't written phonetically, so the only time this shows up is when he's particularly stressed and swears in German or uses very common phrases like 'du "du lieber gott'.gott". However, Cabal is also a necromancer so when he really swears he dips into dead, inhuman languages that are that much more vitriolic.
* Named for Detective Literature/HerculePoirot, who spoke this way as part of his FunnyForeigner facade. Hercule speaks fine English at the end as he explains step-by-step how he solved the case. Other characters and the detective himself have commented on it.
**
it. Poirot's speech is something of a subversion, as he uses his accent to disarm suspects, making them think he's only a FunnyForeigner when it's really "[[ObfuscatingStupidity just an act]]".



-->"Did I tellez vous about le chemise je trouvez at le Bendel's? C'est ''tres froid''. Mais je ne affordez pas it at all so je chargez a Mama. Now she'll be pissoired a la maximum. Have to frapper les libres now--examination terminal de la français is demain..."
* There is also a series of books full of the mistakes Dutch people have made whilst trying to speak English, but while still using Dutch words/grammar. This stems from the fact that English and Dutch are related, and share many of the same words. Sometimes words ''sound'' familiar, but mean something slightly different, but hilarious, or something different entirely.
** It also comments on the fact that a lot of Dutch people literally translate Dutch proverbs into English.
*** Which is not restricted to Dutch speakers. Most people who are comparatively fluent in a foreign language, but are not native speakers (or native speaker equivalents, if e.g. they learned the second language at a very young age), tend to have trouble with idioms, proverbs and the like. Even if their command of the foreign language in question is quite good, proverbs are frequently translated word-for-word.

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-->"Did I tellez vous about le chemise je trouvez at le Bendel's? C'est ''tres froid''. Mais je ne affordez pas it at all so je chargez a Mama. Now she'll be pissoired a la maximum. Have to frapper les libres now--examination now -- examination terminal de la français is demain..."
* There is also a series of books full of the mistakes Dutch people have made whilst trying to speak English, but while still using Dutch words/grammar. This stems from the fact that English and Dutch are related, and share many of the same words. Sometimes words ''sound'' familiar, but mean something slightly different, but hilarious, or something different entirely.
**
entirely. It also comments on the fact that a lot of Dutch people literally translate Dutch proverbs into English.
***
English. Which is not restricted to Dutch speakers. Most people who are comparatively fluent in a foreign language, but are not native speakers (or native speaker equivalents, if e.g. they learned the second language at a very young age), tend to have trouble with idioms, proverbs and the like. Even if their command of the foreign language in question is quite good, proverbs are frequently translated word-for-word.



** Creator/HarryTurtledove uses the same tactic to make sure you don't forget that people with French names in obviously French-speaking places speak French, or whatever other lingual group the story focuses on. In the ''Literature/WorldWar'' series, very little of The Race's language is ever translated into English in the text, but they have distinctive speech patterns which are often indicated (such as the 'interrogative cough'), which people will often use even when speaking human languages which have their own auditory cues to indicate that a question is being asked.

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** * Creator/HarryTurtledove uses the same tactic to make sure you don't forget that people with French names in obviously French-speaking places speak French, or whatever other lingual group the story focuses on. In the ''Literature/WorldWar'' series, very little of The Race's language is ever translated into English in the text, but they have distinctive speech patterns which are often indicated (such as the 'interrogative cough'), "interrogative cough"), which people will often use even when speaking human languages which have their own auditory cues to indicate that a question is being asked.



* Hork-Bajir in ''{{Literature/Animorphs}}'' tend to switch between English/whatever the translation is in and their own language, plus the common-language Galard.

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* Hork-Bajir in ''{{Literature/Animorphs}}'' ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' tend to switch between English/whatever the translation is in and their own language, plus the common-language Galard.



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]

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[[folder:Professional [[folder:Pro Wrestling]]



** Every single Hispanic wrestler in Wrestling/{{WWE}} does this.

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** * Every single Hispanic wrestler in Wrestling/{{WWE}} does this.



[[folder:Stand-up Comedy]]
* Peter Serafinowicz (got it in one) lampooned this by having [[Literature/HerculePoirot Poirot]] say that he doesn't actually know French, he just uses enough French words to convince people he does.
* Many of the French phrases in Creator/DaveBarry's writing are American idioms or brand names clumsily forced into French grammatical structures, such as "La Ware de la Tupper" or "Que l'enfer, c'est seulement Canada" ("What the hell, it's only Canada"). Some are just AsLongAsItSoundsForeign sentences relying on InherentlyFunnyWords.
* Creator/AnnaRussell's routine "Schreechenrauf," introduced as a pastiche of [[Creator/RichardWagner Wagnerian]] arias for dramatic soprano, is actually a parody of the ''Ring'' cycle, with mangled Anglo-German phrases like "wir fallen in lieber" set to Creator/RichardWagner's music. The aria reaches a climax when it puts down one of the characters from ''[[Theatre/TheRingOfTheNibelung Götterdämmerung]]'' (Gutrune, daughter of Gibich) as "Gutrune, die ''Götterdämmerung'' Gibich!"
** She does the same thing with what can only be described as dog-Italian, in "Canto Dolcemente Pipo", from the opera ''La Cantatrice Squelante''.
* Comedian Creator/EddieIzzard's bit on Martin Luther spirals into an exploration of this trope: "Then Martin Luther said 'hang on a minute!' Only in German, so, 'ein minuten bitte... ich habe einen kleinen problemm ... avec dieser, uhh, religione.' ...He was from everywhere."
** Izzard also does a bit on attempting to communicate in France with schoolboy French, most of which involves dragging a cat, a table, and a monkey everywhere so that his vocabulary stays applicable. This is sort of complicated/averted because Izzard can actually speak pretty good French good enough to do whole shows in the language.
** Averted in one act, where in the middle of the act he starts repeating his entire routine up to that point in French, without making any attempt to make sure the audience has any idea what he's saying. Partway through, he says "You people have no idea what I'm saying, you're only laughing because I'm speaking French."
** "If you don't speak French, by the way, all that was fucking funny, alright?"
* Czech humorous singer Ivan Mladek once did a routine where he spoke German, slipping back into Czech. He told of a television show, approximately "Look Out For The Curve", and translated it as "Achtung! Die Kurve!" (Which, to Czechs, sounds like "Look out! A whore!" as ''kurva'' means prostitute...)
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theatre]]

to:

[[folder:Stand-up Comedy]]
* Peter Serafinowicz (got it in one) lampooned this by having [[Literature/HerculePoirot Poirot]] say that he doesn't actually know French, he just uses enough French words to convince people he does.
* Many of the French phrases in Creator/DaveBarry's writing are American idioms or brand names clumsily forced into French grammatical structures, such as "La Ware de la Tupper" or "Que l'enfer, c'est seulement Canada" ("What the hell, it's only Canada"). Some are just AsLongAsItSoundsForeign sentences relying on InherentlyFunnyWords.
* Creator/AnnaRussell's routine "Schreechenrauf," introduced as a pastiche of [[Creator/RichardWagner Wagnerian]] arias for dramatic soprano, is actually a parody of the ''Ring'' cycle, with mangled Anglo-German phrases like "wir fallen in lieber" set to Creator/RichardWagner's music. The aria reaches a climax when it puts down one of the characters from ''[[Theatre/TheRingOfTheNibelung Götterdämmerung]]'' (Gutrune, daughter of Gibich) as "Gutrune, die ''Götterdämmerung'' Gibich!"
** She does the same thing with what can only be described as dog-Italian, in "Canto Dolcemente Pipo", from the opera ''La Cantatrice Squelante''.
* Comedian Creator/EddieIzzard's bit on Martin Luther spirals into an exploration of this trope: "Then Martin Luther said 'hang on a minute!' Only in German, so, 'ein minuten bitte... ich habe einen kleinen problemm ... avec dieser, uhh, religione.' ...He was from everywhere."
** Izzard also does a bit on attempting to communicate in France with schoolboy French, most of which involves dragging a cat, a table, and a monkey everywhere so that his vocabulary stays applicable. This is sort of complicated/averted because Izzard can actually speak pretty good French good enough to do whole shows in the language.
** Averted in one act, where in the middle of the act he starts repeating his entire routine up to that point in French, without making any attempt to make sure the audience has any idea what he's saying. Partway through, he says "You people have no idea what I'm saying, you're only laughing because I'm speaking French."
** "If you don't speak French, by the way, all that was fucking funny, alright?"
* Czech humorous singer Ivan Mladek once did a routine where he spoke German, slipping back into Czech. He told of a television show, approximately "Look Out For The Curve", and translated it as "Achtung! Die Kurve!" (Which, to Czechs, sounds like "Look out! A whore!" as ''kurva'' means prostitute...)
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theatre]]
[[folder:Theater]]



[[folder:Webcomics]]

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[[folder:Webcomics]][[folder:Web Comics]]



* ElfBlood's Carlita Delacroix is the most {{Egregious}} offender of this. Interestingly, although she had a Cuban mother and a French father, she only ever talks with a French accent.
** Hell, it might even be completely put on seeing as she went to school with the others and they don't have any kind of accent whatsoever.

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* ElfBlood's ''Webcomic/ElfBlood'':
**
Carlita Delacroix is the most {{Egregious}} offender of this. Interestingly, although she had a Cuban mother and a French father, she only ever talks with a French accent.
**
accent. Hell, it might even be completely put on seeing as she went to school with the others and they don't have any kind of accent whatsoever.



-->'''Orville von Schtein''': "You did not speak until you were sechs... oder sieben? Ja, I believe you had just become seven."

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-->'''Orville von Schtein''': "You Schtein:''' You did not speak until you were sechs... oder sieben? Ja, I believe you had just become seven."



* ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'' has the Kaiba Corps Nazis, Kaiba's two lackeys who speak like this. When Kaiba asks them to tone it down they hastily agree "Yes mein führer."
* ''MyLittlePonyTheMentallyAdvancedSeries'' has Pinkie. No one really knows what that accent is 'supposed' to be, but her speech is liberally peppered with "Yes"es and inverted syntax. "He thinks he is in the out field where he is safe from getting strikes, but Pinkie has fooled him! [[VerbalTic Yes.]]"
14th Mar '17 11:37:58 AM FF32
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* In ''Webcomic/Polandball'', all non-anglophone countryballs will speak broken English with some words from their native languages thrown in.

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* In ''Webcomic/Polandball'', ''Webcomic/{{Polandball}}'', all non-anglophone countryballs will speak broken English with some words from their native languages thrown in.
25th Feb '17 3:47:21 PM nombretomado
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* Comedian EddieIzzard's bit on Martin Luther spirals into an exploration of this trope: "Then Martin Luther said 'hang on a minute!' Only in German, so, 'ein minuten bitte... ich habe einen kleinen problemm ... avec dieser, uhh, religione.' ...He was from everywhere."

to:

* Comedian EddieIzzard's Creator/EddieIzzard's bit on Martin Luther spirals into an exploration of this trope: "Then Martin Luther said 'hang on a minute!' Only in German, so, 'ein minuten bitte... ich habe einen kleinen problemm ... avec dieser, uhh, religione.' ...He was from everywhere."
20th Jan '17 4:25:49 PM Lithhx
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Added DiffLines:

** Plus there is a degree of TruthInTelevision in the use of English loan-words; Southwest Wales in particular is an area where you'll often hear people speaking "Wenglish", and it's not uncommon for people to use sentences such as "Dwi'n teimlo knackered heddiw" or "Bydd fy nheulu yn dod next week".
24th Nov '16 3:55:08 PM jeez
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Fanfiction/ChrysalisVisitsTheHague'', many human characters, but the Swiss Estermann in particular, like to lapse back into their native language when things get excited or stressful. This is probably done to remind the reader that they are ''actually'' averting TranslationConvention.
12th Nov '16 12:51:22 AM Chabal2
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* ''Literature/TheRadix'': Erich Metzger speaks English well, but loves to drop a "Ja". Nicolette Bettenncourt also delivers spades of lines in French, form "Qui" to "Putain!".

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* ''Literature/TheRadix'': Erich Metzger speaks English well, but loves to drop a "Ja". Nicolette Bettenncourt also delivers spades of lines in French, form from "Qui" to "Putain!"."Putain!".
* Literature/SherlockHolmes uses this to identify the nationality of his client in an early story, not by GratuitousGerman but the sentence construction.
3rd Nov '16 5:15:32 AM amaXdear
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** It probably works this way for most religions: walk into a Jewish kindergarten class, sit back, and don't have a clue. But on the bright side, the Shabbos Ima and Shabbos Abba will most likely share some nosh with you, because Morah taught them about ''v'ahavta l'reyacha kamocha'', and they want to practice the ''mitzvah.''

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** It probably works this way for most religions: walk into a Jewish kindergarten class, sit back, and don't have a clue. But on the bright side, the Shabbos Ima and Shabbos Abba will most likely share some nosh with you, because Morah taught them about ''v'ahavta l'reyacha kamocha'', and they want to practice the ''mitzvah.'''' Depending on the area and the demographic, it's also common to hear English spoken with aspects of Yiddish grammar.
28th Sep '16 12:55:29 AM Morgenthaler
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* The [[ThoseWackyNazis nazis]] in ''IrregularWebcomic''.

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* The [[ThoseWackyNazis nazis]] in ''IrregularWebcomic''.''Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic''.
25th Sep '16 3:21:28 PM StevieC
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Added DiffLines:

* It's often said that if someone is especially fluent in a foreign language, then the most reliable way to identify their native language is to listen closely when they start counting things, because although one would assume that numbers are the same everywhere, the words '''for''' individual numbers often follow language-specific patterns that make counting objects out something that even the most fluent speaker of a foreign language will probably fall back to their native language to ensure they're accurate.
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