History Main / PlotTumor

21st Apr '16 4:24:44 AM Malachi108
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** Similarly, it seems everything visits Tatooine, which was introduced as [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere the middle of nowhere]]. To be fair, while Tatooine is rather far out on the Outer Rim of the galaxy, it is also universally described at being directly near the intersection of four different trade routes, bringing many people there. Although that creates a bit of FridgeLogic; in RealLife, such intersections tend to become very prosperous.

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** Similarly, it seems everything visits Tatooine, which was introduced as [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere the middle of nowhere]]. To be fair, while Tatooine is rather far out on the Outer Rim of the galaxy, it is also universally described at being directly near the intersection of four different trade routes, bringing many people there. Although that creates a bit of FridgeLogic; in RealLife, such intersections tend to become very prosperous.And being controlled by organized crime justifies its allure for underworld players like smugglers and bounty hunters, while for regular folk it remains an unimportant dust ball.
9th Mar '16 5:01:11 PM DVB
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*** In-universe, the capabilities of the sonic screwdriver were jutified by the Doctor having modified it. Being several centuries old and with different personalities each regeneration cycle, it would make sense he would tinker and improve the sonic, especially with each new experience.
6th Jan '16 9:06:07 AM jbr
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** Transporters were created as a last-minute cost-cutting cop-out to prevent expensive effects shots of shuttles landing on planets, but soon became a rich source of plots, with whole episodes centered on [[TeleporterAccident the zanier aspects of their operation]], even though the [[http://www.xibalba.demon.co.uk/jbr/trek/7.html unintended applications]] make them outrageous and are best ignored to begin with. See MisappliedPhlebotinum.

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** Transporters were created as a last-minute cost-cutting cop-out to prevent expensive effects shots of shuttles landing on planets, but soon became a rich source of plots, with whole episodes centered on [[TeleporterAccident the zanier aspects of their operation]], even though the [[http://www.xibalba.demon.co.uk/jbr/trek/7.[[http://jbr.me.uk/trek/7.html unintended applications]] make them outrageous and are best ignored to begin with. See MisappliedPhlebotinum.
22nd Nov '15 6:50:14 PM Kadorhal
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** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...

to:

** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, ''The Burning Crusade'', the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing ''Wrath of the Lich King'' was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by the Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO no sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, ''Mists of Pandaria'', it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor ''Warlords of Draenor'' development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others other's throats again...again.


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* ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' ended up with two starting from the PS2 games. After ''VideoGame/AceCombat3Electrosphere'' the story began working its way back up from the modern day to the projected future seen in that game... which was soon almost completely derailed by the combined aftermaths of the Ulysses asteroid from ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat04ShatteredSkies 04]]'' and the [[GreatOffscreenWar Belkan War]] alluded to in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar 5]]'' - to the point that [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation the sixth game]] had the bad guys inspired by ''both'' (economically crippled by the impacts of asteroid fragments, then brought together by a faction using Belkan technology). And after that, when it finally seemed like those two events had inspired everything they could, the series almost entirely switched over to {{alternate continuit|y}}ies set in the real world rather than a proper prequel or sequel to ''Electrosphere''.
28th Oct '15 11:18:20 AM FF32
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** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ScrappyLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...

to:

** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ScrappyLevel [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...
14th Sep '15 8:48:34 PM kome360
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** Likewise, the Master Sword being the only sword able to kill Ganon is a relatively recent idea. In its first appearance in ''A Link to the Past'', the Master Sword was a powerful weapon to defeat evil, but in order to kill Ganon you had to stun him with the Master Sword, then actually harm him with a Silver Arrow. After ''Ocarina of Time'' the relationship has been reversed, and the Light Arrows are needed to stun Ganon so you can harm him with the Master Sword. Sometimes you don't even need the arrows at all. The Master Sword meanwhile has been given increased importance, and it's a Comic Keystone just as important to the world of Hyrule as the Triforce now. Although, in ''Ocarina of Time'', it was required only to seal him away; you're able to harm Ganon with the [[InfinityMinusOneSword Biggoron Sword]].

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** Likewise, the Master Sword being the only sword able to kill Ganon is a relatively recent idea. In its first appearance in ''A Link to the Past'', the Master Sword was a powerful weapon to defeat evil, but in order to kill Ganon you had to stun him with the Master Sword, then actually harm him with a Silver Arrow. After ''Ocarina of Time'' the relationship has been reversed, and the Light Arrows are needed to stun Ganon so you can harm him with the Master Sword. Sometimes you don't even need the arrows at all. The Master Sword meanwhile has been given increased importance, and it's a Comic Keystone just as important to the world of Hyrule as the Triforce now. Although, in ''Ocarina of Time'', it was required only to seal him away; you're able to harm Ganon with the [[InfinityMinusOneSword Biggoron Sword]]. Skyward Sword gives us the explanation that [[spoiler:Ganon is empowered by the curse of the demon overlord Demise, and the only thing that always works is the very weapon that killed Demise.]]
14th Sep '15 8:45:59 PM kome360
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** The Insult Swordfighting in [[VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland the first game]] was meant to be a parody of the [[YouFightLikeACow witty banter]] found in high adventure movies, but by the time ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' came around, there's apparently an Insult version of nearly ''every'' sport available floating around the Tri-Island Area.

to:

** The Insult Swordfighting in [[VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland the first game]] was meant to be a parody of the [[YouFightLikeACow witty banter]] found in high adventure movies, but by the time ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' came around, there's apparently an Insult version of nearly ''every'' sport available floating around the Tri-Island Area. May have something to do with [[spoiler:the legendary Ultimate Insult, an insult in primordial (read:monkey) tongue that burrows into the heart of a person's psyche and completely OBLITERATES it. It turned ''Lechuck'' into a cringing, primal ape! Basically the true secret of Monkey Island.]]
13th Sep '15 11:16:49 PM Ptorquemada
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* Many heroes with power sources that can be even remotely anthropomorphized, with the power source becoming used in more and more story elements instead of just being left in the background. For example, a lot of later [[Comicbook/{{Shazam}} Marvel Family]] stories are more about the Wizard and/or the gods who empower Captain Marvel and less about the Captain himself, Franchise/GreenLantern comics are frequently dominated by the Guardians and Lantern politics rather than heroics, and Comicbook/AnimalMan eventually started drowning in "the Red" (which eventually led to Animal Man ditching superheroics completely in favor of animal activism).

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* Many heroes with power sources that can be even remotely anthropomorphized, with the power source becoming used in more and more story elements instead of just being left in the background. For example, a lot of later [[Comicbook/{{Shazam}} Marvel Family]] stories are more about the Wizard[[note]]especially after The Big Red Cheese ''became'' The Wizard and passed the powers on to Freddy aka Captain Marvel Junior aka Shazam, which oddly enough was the ''original'' Wizard's name (Cap-as-Wizard uses the name Marvel)[[/note]] and/or the gods who empower Captain Marvel and less about the Captain himself, Franchise/GreenLantern comics are frequently dominated by the Guardians and Lantern politics rather than heroics, and Comicbook/AnimalMan eventually started drowning in "the Red" (which eventually led to Animal Man ditching superheroics completely in favor of animal activism).
9th May '15 2:27:06 AM morenohijazo
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** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ScrappyLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...

to:

** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ScrappyLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...again...
* ''Franchise/AloneInTheDark'': Burning the Evil Roots (of an Evil Tree, of course) in the 2008 game. Padding at its best. A nod to the original game, where the FinalBoss is an evil tree that must be burned.
28th Apr '15 3:54:08 PM Kadorhal
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*** It gets to the point that, in ''[[VideoGame/DarkForcesSaga Jedi Knight: Jedi Academy]]'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. On the other hand, when an experienced Jedi finds no aura on Byss, he realizes right away it's because the force has been drained already.]]
*** Lampshaded in ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'', where during the Hoth mission, the player states s/he has never heard of the planet. The Republic, apparently, is only there to salvage wreckage from a battle which occurred nearby... The Empire's agenda is tying up Republic forces on a meaningless iceball.
** Similarly, it seems everything visits Tatooine, which was introduced as [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere the middle of nowhere]]. To be fair, while Tatooine is rather far out on the Outer Rim of the galaxy, it is also universally described at being directly near the intersection of four different trade routes, bringing many people there.
*** Which creates a bit of a FridgeLogic; in RealLife, such intersections tend to become very prosperous.

to:

*** It gets to the point that, in ''[[VideoGame/DarkForcesSaga Jedi Knight: Jedi Academy]]'', ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being totally corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. On the other hand, when an experienced Jedi finds no aura on at Byss, he realizes right away it's because the force Force has been drained already.already; conversely, when Jaden doesn't sense an aura on Hoth, his first reaction is [[LampshadeHanging to assume Luke was wrong about it even having a strong aura in the first place]].]]
*** Lampshaded in ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'', where during the Hoth mission, the player states s/he has never heard of the planet. The Republic, apparently, is only there to salvage wreckage from a battle which occurred nearby... The and the Empire's agenda is tying up Republic forces on a meaningless iceball.
** Similarly, it seems everything visits Tatooine, which was introduced as [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere the middle of nowhere]]. To be fair, while Tatooine is rather far out on the Outer Rim of the galaxy, it is also universally described at being directly near the intersection of four different trade routes, bringing many people there.
*** Which
there. Although that creates a bit of a FridgeLogic; in RealLife, such intersections tend to become very prosperous.



* ''ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'' was originally about a flapper girl from the twenties of the same name. After the Great Depression hit, the focus of the comic [[GenreShift turned to domestic comedy]] involving her marriage to her inept comically-oversized sandwich-eating husband, Dagwood Bumstead. Dagwood himself originally came from wealthy roots - to mark the shift in focus, he was disowned by his family and his wealth for marrying below his social class and thus had to enter the blue-collar working world that he was unprepared for while Blondie shifted from gold-digging flapper to responsible and caring matriarch.

to:

* ''ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'' was originally about a flapper girl from the twenties of the same name. After the Great Depression hit, the focus of the comic [[GenreShift turned to domestic comedy]] involving her marriage to her inept comically-oversized sandwich-eating inept, comically-oversized-sandwich-eating husband, Dagwood Bumstead. Dagwood himself originally came from wealthy roots - to mark the shift in focus, he was disowned by his family and his wealth for marrying below his social class and thus had to enter the blue-collar working world that he was unprepared for while Blondie shifted from gold-digging flapper to responsible and caring matriarch.



* Pretty much every single ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' series since about 1992 where Takara (the Japanese toy company that shares the rights to the ''Transformers'' brand with their American partner Hasbro) had a major say in the direction of the toyline/story development has over-emphasized the role of Convoy (better known as Optimus Prime outside Japan) and his derivatives (Hasbro, on the other hand, despite also putting an "Optimus"/"Prime" character/toy in every series whenever possible, puts a little more emphasis on character diversity). This is particularly glaring in short-lived toy-only lines with no television show to back them up, which will often start with a new Convoy toy... then ''maybe'' a different character as the second toy if they're really lucky, or ''another'' Convoy-related toy of they're not so lucky... and then the line ends and gets replaced by a new line that starts with the next Convoy all over again. The most noteworthy example would be the "Robot Masters" line from 2004, which, during its 25-toy-run, had no less than ''seven'' toys with the word "Convoy" in their names (including redecos). One of these "Convoy" toys was even a retool of a ''Megatron'' toy and was intended to actually ''be'' a form of Megatron.

to:

* Pretty much every single ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' series since about 1992 where Takara (the Japanese toy company that shares the rights to the ''Transformers'' brand with their American partner Hasbro) had a major say in the direction of the toyline/story development has over-emphasized the role of Convoy (better known as Optimus Convoy/Optimus Prime outside Japan) and his derivatives (Hasbro, on the other hand, despite also putting an "Optimus"/"Prime" character/toy in every series whenever possible, puts a little more emphasis on character diversity). This is particularly glaring in short-lived toy-only lines with no television show to back them up, which will often start with a new Convoy toy... then ''maybe'' a different character as the second toy if they're really lucky, or ''another'' Convoy-related toy of they're not so lucky... and then the line ends and gets replaced by a new line that starts with the next Convoy all over again. The most noteworthy example would be the "Robot Masters" line from 2004, which, during its 25-toy-run, had no less than ''seven'' toys with the word "Convoy" in their names (including redecos). One of these "Convoy" toys was even a retool of a ''Megatron'' toy and was intended to actually ''be'' a form of Megatron.



** A more notable example in the Transformers mythos: The Autobot Matrix of Leadership. The term "matrix" originated with Optimus's "creation matrix" in the comics, in which it was simply used to create new [[MerchandiseDriven toys]]. It was then introduced into the movie with its current title, serving only as a MacGuffin to defeat Unicron (note that prior to Unicron mentioning it, Megatron had ''absolutely no use for it''); it quickly became the central [[GreenLanternRing do-anything power source]] and all-purpose MacGuffin for the cartoon. Several series have even had Megatron and other Decepticon leaders dip into MotiveDecay by having them all lust after the Matrix. In ''All Hail Megatron'', Megatron's acquisition of the Matrix was treated as "game over" for the Autobots, and [[TheStarscream Starscream]] was able to win over the ''Decepticon'' army just by possessing it.

to:

** A more notable example in the Transformers mythos: The Autobot Matrix of Leadership. The term "matrix" originated with Optimus's "creation matrix" in the comics, in which it was simply used to create new [[MerchandiseDriven toys]]. It was then introduced into the movie with its current title, serving only as a MacGuffin to defeat Unicron (note that prior to Unicron mentioning it, Megatron had ''absolutely no use for it''); it quickly became the central [[GreenLanternRing do-anything power source]] and all-purpose MacGuffin for the cartoon. Several series have even had Megatron and other Decepticon leaders dip into MotiveDecay by having them all lust after the Matrix. In ''All Hail Megatron'', Megatron's acquisition of the Matrix was treated as "game over" for the Autobots, and [[TheStarscream Starscream]] was able to win over the ''Decepticon'' entire Decepticon army just by possessing it.



* The Insult Swordfighting in ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' was meant to be a parody of the [[YouFightLikeACow witty banter]] found in high adventure movies, but by the time ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' came around, there's apparently an Insult version of nearly every sport available floating around the Tri-Island Area. ''Escape'' also included TheReveal that [[spoiler:Herman Toothrot is H. T. Marley with EasyAmnesia]].
* Sometimes the earlier games in ''Zelda'' series seem to be set in an almost separate universe than the more modern ones. Originally, the Triforce was a mysterious triangle that granted magical abilities, and there were only two of them, not three. Come ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'', however, and it's the CosmicKeystone of the entire ''Zelda'' universe with omnipotent wish-granting and reality-warping powers. The significance of the Triforce mark was also different. From ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' onward, the Triforce mark on one's hand signified which piece of the Triforce one had and would glow when its power was being used. The first appearance of this mark was in ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'', and it showed up on Link's hand before he even had the Triforce of Courage. It just marked him as the hero destined to claim it.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'':
**
The Insult Swordfighting in ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' [[VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland the first game]] was meant to be a parody of the [[YouFightLikeACow witty banter]] found in high adventure movies, but by the time ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' came around, there's apparently an Insult version of nearly every ''every'' sport available floating around the Tri-Island Area. Area.
**
''Escape'' also included TheReveal that [[spoiler:Herman Toothrot is H. T. Marley with EasyAmnesia]].
* Sometimes the earlier games in ''Zelda'' ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series seem to be set in an almost separate universe than the more modern ones. Originally, the Triforce was a mysterious triangle that granted magical abilities, and there were only two of them, not three. Come ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'', however, and it's the CosmicKeystone of the entire ''Zelda'' universe with omnipotent wish-granting and reality-warping powers. The significance of the Triforce mark was also different. From ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' onward, the Triforce mark on one's hand signified which piece of the Triforce one had and would glow when its power was being used. The first appearance of this mark was in ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'', and it showed up on Link's hand before he even had the Triforce of Courage. It just marked him as the hero destined to claim it.



** In the earlier games, UnusableEnemyEquipment was handwaved by the fact that the weapons were keyed to their users via {{Nanomachines}} and won't function for anyone else (which still doesn't explain why enemy guns couldn't be used in ''Videogame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', which is set in the 1960s and should predate that technology). In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'', the entire plot revolves around the weapon-identifying nanomachines (hence the subtitle) and the computer system that regulates them. Ironically enough, this is also the game that introduces the ability to take weapons from their keyed users and unlock them for your own use.

to:

** In the earlier games, UnusableEnemyEquipment was handwaved by the fact that the weapons were keyed to their users via {{Nanomachines}} and won't function for anyone else (which still doesn't explain why enemy guns couldn't be used in ''Videogame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', which is set in the 1960s and should predate that technology).technology[[note]]it's explained here that Naked Snake [[ReliablyUnreliableGuns doesn't trust the reliability of weapons taken from enemies]] when a fresh, unused weapon from the armory would be far more likely to serve him very well[[/note]]). In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'', the entire plot revolves around the weapon-identifying nanomachines (hence the subtitle) and the computer system that regulates them. Ironically enough, this is also the game that introduces the ability to take weapons from their keyed users and unlock them for your own use.
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