History Main / PlotTumor

27th Jul '16 11:56:05 PM Kadorhal
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* [[KiManipulation Ki Attacks]] and powering up in ''Anime/DragonBallZ''. At the beginning of the original Dragonball, there were no Ki Attacks, and the first of them, the [[KamehameHadoken Kamehameha Wave]], didn't appear until the middle of the first arc. Even then, it was sort of the trump card, came at a high cost, and wasn't played terribly often. As the series progressed, though, the [=Kamehameha=] became a more standard attack, and ki attacks became more and more prominent. Then, ''DBZ'' came along, and it became the main premise behind practically everything the fighters did. They could fly, teleport, power up, etc., all based on Ki manipulation. Ki Attacks eventually led to BeamSpam, and the ability to power up that was introduced early in DBZ became the method by which nearly every BigBad but the last one was defeated, by digging just a little deeper and becoming just a bit more powerful.
** Flight is also this, when introduced it was a technique that only a few characters had, later almost every single character who fights had this ability.
** It's also interesting to note that ''Franchise/{{Dragonball}}'' started as a homage to ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', then it got a little martial-arts focused and drifted so far, you almost forgot the original ''purpose'' of the story was to find the Dragon Balls. By two-thirds of the series gone past, the balls were so easy to recollect again by the good guys, and the bad guys were no longer focused on getting wishes from them and settled for the destruction of the world and the rest of the cosmos.
*** By the first arc of DBZ, the Dragon Balls are even assembled off camera.

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* [[KiManipulation Ki Attacks]] attacks]] and powering up in ''Anime/DragonBallZ''. At the beginning of the original Dragonball, ''Manga/DragonBall'', there were no Ki ki Attacks, and the first of them, the [[KamehameHadoken Kamehameha Wave]], didn't appear until the middle of the first arc. Even then, it was sort of the trump card, came at a high cost, and wasn't played terribly often. As the series progressed, though, the [=Kamehameha=] Kamehameha became a more standard attack, and ki attacks became more and more prominent. Then, ''DBZ'' came along, and it became the main premise behind practically everything the fighters did. They could fly, teleport, power up, etc., all based on Ki manipulation. Ki Attacks attacks eventually led to BeamSpam, and the ability to power up that was introduced early in DBZ became the method by which nearly every BigBad but the last one was defeated, by digging just a little deeper and becoming just a bit more powerful.
** Flight is also this, when introduced it was a technique that only a few characters had, later almost every single character who fights had this ability.
ability, and only one (Videl) is shown actually having to be taught how to.
** It's also interesting to note that ''Franchise/{{Dragonball}}'' started as a homage to ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', then it got a little martial-arts focused and drifted so far, you almost forgot the original ''purpose'' of the story was to find the Dragon Balls. By two-thirds of the series gone past, the balls were so easy to recollect again by the good guys, and the bad guys were no longer focused on getting wishes from them and settled for the destruction of the world and the rest of the cosmos.
***
cosmos. By the first arc of DBZ, the Dragon Balls are even assembled off camera.mostly off-camera.
27th Jul '16 11:07:46 PM Kadorhal
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*** It gets to the point that, in ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being totally corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. This even seems to get a LampshadeHanging, where Jaden's first reaction to not sensing any sort of aura on Hoth is to assume Luke was wrong about it having one in the first place, while he and his more experienced Master realize right away there's no aura at the remains of Byss because it has been drained already.]]

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*** It gets to the point that, in ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being totally corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. This even seems to get a LampshadeHanging, where Jaden's first reaction to not sensing any sort of aura on Hoth is to assume Luke was wrong about it having one in the first place, while he and his more experienced Master realize when Jaden accompanies Kyle to Byss so they can finish Rosh's mission, Kyle realizes right away there's no aura at the remains of Byss there because it has been drained already.]]
27th Jul '16 11:19:37 AM Kadorhal
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** It can be argued that [[EnergyWeapon lightsaber]] combat qualifies, as it was never paid that much attention in the original trilogy compared to the prequels (and in the ExpandedUniverse, there are seven ''forms'' of lightsaber combat, each explored in detail).
** Boba Fett -- starting with a [[EnsembleDarkhorse non-notable background character]] with almost no dialogue, whom the audience liked for his "cool" armor, and ending up with the Mandalorians, an entire society of [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proud warrior race guys]] like him, who have played a major role in at least two galaxy-spanning conflicts to date and basically became the ''Star Wars'' answer to the Klingons (not to mention the original source of the stormtroopers!).
** The ''Star Wars'' video games, having a relatively limited amount of iconic canonical material to draw on, have become almost comical in the way various memorable elements of the movies show up over and over again in different, unrelated games. For instance, there are now, in the non-canonical parts of the EU at least, at least five different sets of Death Star plans that have been stolen five different and mutually exclusive ways by five different heroes or sets of heroes. And even with what ''is'' still canonical there's still at least two versions of how each half of the plans were stolen, both featuring entirely different people doing the work.

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** It can be argued that [[EnergyWeapon lightsaber]] combat qualifies, as it was never paid that much attention in the original trilogy (only one actual duel per film) compared to the prequels (and - and in the ExpandedUniverse, there are seven ''forms'' of lightsaber combat, each explored in detail).
detail, plus another three in some video games.
** Boba Fett -- starting with a [[EnsembleDarkhorse non-notable background character]] with almost no dialogue, whom the audience liked for his "cool" armor, and ending up with the Mandalorians, an entire society of [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proud warrior race guys]] {{Proud Warrior Race|Guy}} like him, who have played a major role in at least two galaxy-spanning conflicts to date and basically became the ''Star Wars'' answer to the Klingons (not to mention the original source of the stormtroopers!).
** The ''Star Wars'' video games, having a relatively limited amount of iconic canonical material to draw on, have become almost comical in the way various memorable elements of the movies show up over and over again in different, unrelated games. For instance, there are now, in the non-canonical parts of the EU at least, "Legends" continuity, there have been at least five ''seven'' different sets of Death Star plans that have been stolen five seven different and mutually exclusive ways by five seven different heroes or sets of heroes. And even with what ''is'' still canonical there's Even when most of those were declared non-canon before the ''Legends'' declaration, there was still at least two versions of how each half of the plans were stolen, both featuring entirely different people doing the work.



** Force Lightning is used six times in the six movies - three times by Palpatine (''Return of the Jedi'', twice in ''Revenge of the Sith'') and three times by Dooku/Darth Tyrannus (all in ''Attack Of The Clones''). Both major league Sith Lords. In the games, anyone who has a smidge of Dark Side can throw lightning around with impunity [[http://jediknight3.filefront.com/potd/40774 and on a vastly greater scale, too]].

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** Force Lightning is used six times in the six movies - three times by Palpatine (''Return of the Jedi'', (''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', twice in ''Revenge of the Sith'') ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'') and three times by Dooku/Darth Tyrannus (all in ''Attack Of The Clones'').''Film/AttackOfTheClones''). Both major league Sith Lords. In the games, anyone who has a smidge of Dark Side can throw lightning around with impunity impunity, [[http://jediknight3.filefront.com/potd/40774 and on a vastly greater scale, too]].



*** It gets to the point that, in ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being totally corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. On the other hand, when an experienced Jedi finds no aura at Byss, he realizes right away it's because the Force has been drained already; conversely, when Jaden doesn't sense an aura on Hoth, his first reaction is [[LampshadeHanging to assume Luke was wrong about it even having a strong aura in the first place]].]]

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*** It gets to the point that, in ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being totally corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. On the other hand, when an experienced Jedi finds no aura at Byss, he realizes right away it's because the Force has been drained already; conversely, when Jaden doesn't sense an aura on Hoth, his This even seems to get a LampshadeHanging, where Jaden's first reaction to not sensing any sort of aura on Hoth is [[LampshadeHanging to assume Luke was wrong about it even having a strong aura one in the first place]].place, while he and his more experienced Master realize right away there's no aura at the remains of Byss because it has been drained already.]]



** A more notable example in the Transformers mythos: The Autobot Matrix of Leadership. The term "matrix" originated with Optimus's "creation matrix" in the comics, in which it was simply used to create new [[MerchandiseDriven toys]]. It was then introduced into the movie with its current title, serving only as a MacGuffin to defeat Unicron (note that prior to Unicron mentioning it, Megatron had ''absolutely no use for it''); it quickly became the central [[GreenLanternRing do-anything power source]] and all-purpose MacGuffin for the cartoon. Several series have even had Megatron and other Decepticon leaders dip into MotiveDecay by having them all lust after the Matrix. In ''All Hail Megatron'', Megatron's acquisition of the Matrix was treated as "game over" for the Autobots, and [[TheStarscream Starscream]] was able to win over the entire Decepticon army just by possessing it.

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** A more notable example in the Transformers mythos: The Autobot Matrix of Leadership. The term "matrix" originated with Optimus's "creation matrix" in the comics, in which it was simply used to create new [[MerchandiseDriven toys]]. It was then introduced into the movie with its current title, serving only as a MacGuffin to defeat Unicron (note that prior to Unicron mentioning it, Megatron had ''absolutely no use for it''); it quickly became the central [[GreenLanternRing do-anything power source]] and all-purpose MacGuffin [=MacGuffin=] for the cartoon. Several series have even had Megatron and other Decepticon leaders dip into MotiveDecay by having them all lust after the Matrix. In ''All Hail Megatron'', Megatron's acquisition of the Matrix was treated as "game over" for the Autobots, and [[TheStarscream Starscream]] was able to win over the entire Decepticon army just by possessing it.



* ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2'', starting with the Ember Trial, seems to force one quest on the player after another, leading to the question "Whatever happened to going to the Jerro Estate?", it takes most of part II for the answer to that question

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* ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2'', starting with the Ember Trial, seems to force one quest on the player after another, leading to the question "Whatever happened to going to the Jerro Estate?", it takes most of part II for the answer to that questionquestion.



** The Insult Swordfighting in [[VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland the first game]] was meant to be a parody of the [[YouFightLikeACow witty banter]] found in high adventure movies, but by the time ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' came around, there's apparently an Insult version of nearly ''every'' sport available floating around the Tri-Island Area. May have something to do with [[spoiler:the legendary Ultimate Insult, an insult in primordial (read:monkey) tongue that burrows into the heart of a person's psyche and completely OBLITERATES it. It turned ''Lechuck'' into a cringing, primal ape! Basically the true secret of Monkey Island.]]

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** The Insult Swordfighting in [[VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland the first game]] was meant to be a parody of the [[YouFightLikeACow witty banter]] found in high adventure movies, but by the time ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' came around, there's apparently an Insult version of nearly ''every'' sport available floating around the Tri-Island Area. May have something to do with [[spoiler:the legendary Ultimate Insult, an insult in primordial (read:monkey) (read: monkey) tongue that burrows into the heart of a person's psyche and completely OBLITERATES obliterates it. It turned ''Lechuck'' into a cringing, primal ape! Basically the true secret of Monkey Island.]]



** Likewise, the Master Sword being the only sword able to kill Ganon is a relatively recent idea. In its first appearance in ''A Link to the Past'', the Master Sword was a powerful weapon to defeat evil, but in order to kill Ganon you had to stun him with the Master Sword, then actually harm him with a Silver Arrow. After ''Ocarina of Time'' the relationship has been reversed, and the Light Arrows are needed to stun Ganon so you can harm him with the Master Sword. Sometimes you don't even need the arrows at all. The Master Sword meanwhile has been given increased importance, and it's a Comic Keystone just as important to the world of Hyrule as the Triforce now. Although, in ''Ocarina of Time'', it was required only to seal him away; you're able to harm Ganon with the [[InfinityMinusOneSword Biggoron Sword]]. Skyward Sword gives us the explanation that [[spoiler:Ganon is empowered by the curse of the demon overlord Demise, and the only thing that always works is the very weapon that killed Demise.]]

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** Likewise, the Master Sword being the only sword able to kill Ganon is a relatively recent idea. In its first appearance in ''A Link to the Past'', the Master Sword was a powerful weapon to defeat evil, but in order to kill Ganon you had to stun him with the Master Sword, then actually harm him with a Silver Arrow. After ''Ocarina of Time'' the relationship has been reversed, and the Light Arrows are needed to stun Ganon so you can harm him with the Master Sword. Sometimes you don't even need the arrows at all. The Master Sword meanwhile has been given increased importance, and it's a Comic Keystone CosmicKeystone just as important to the world of Hyrule as the Triforce now. Although, in ''Ocarina of Time'', it was required only to seal him away; you're able to harm Ganon with the [[InfinityMinusOneSword Biggoron Sword]]. Skyward Sword gives us the explanation that [[spoiler:Ganon is empowered by the curse of the demon overlord Demise, and the only thing that always works is the very weapon that killed Demise.]]



** The games were once about bipedal nuclear tanks but ever since ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' introduced the Patriots, everything, even retroactively, has something to do with them.

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** The games were once about bipedal nuclear tanks but ever since ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' introduced the Patriots, everything, [[{{Retcon}} even retroactively, retroactively]], has something to do with them.



** By a certain scale, nanomachines started to be responsible for basically maintaining the entire modern world order and was probably intended to be used eventually on every civilian in the world along with government officials. The Patriots were even revealed to basically just be the AI System regulating said nanomachines, with the original human ones being reduced to psychotic messes, rebel leaders, persistent vegetables, or just plain dead.

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** By a certain scale, nanomachines started to be responsible for basically maintaining the entire modern world order and was probably intended to be used eventually on every civilian in the world along with government officials. The Patriots were even revealed to basically just be the AI System regulating said nanomachines, with the original human ones being reduced to psychotic messes, messes (Ocelot), rebel leaders, leaders (EVA/Big Mama), persistent vegetables, vegetables (Zero), or just plain dead.dead (Para-Medic/Dr. Clark and Sigint/Donald Anderson).



* ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' ended up with two starting from the [=PS2=] games. After ''VideoGame/AceCombat3Electrosphere'' the story began working its way back up from the modern day to the projected future seen in that game... which was soon almost completely derailed by the combined aftermaths of the Ulysses asteroid from ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat04ShatteredSkies 04]]'' and the [[GreatOffscreenWar Belkan War]] alluded to in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar 5]]'' - to the point that [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation the sixth game]] had the bad guys inspired by ''both'' (economically crippled by the impacts of asteroid fragments, then brought together by a faction using Belkan technology). And after that, when it finally seemed like those two events had inspired everything they could, the series almost entirely switched over to {{alternate continuit|y}}ies set in the real world rather than a proper prequel or sequel to ''Electrosphere''.

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* ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' ended up with two starting from the [=PS2=] games. After ''VideoGame/AceCombat3Electrosphere'' the story began working its way back up from the modern day to the projected future seen in that game... which was soon almost completely derailed by the combined aftermaths of the Ulysses asteroid from ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat04ShatteredSkies 04]]'' and the [[GreatOffscreenWar Belkan War]] alluded to in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar 5]]'' - to the point that [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation the sixth game]] had the bad guys inspired by ''both'' (economically crippled by the impacts of asteroid fragments, then brought together by a faction using Belkan technology). And after that, when it finally seemed like those two events had inspired everything they could, could and the devs had no choice but to make an actual sequel or prequel to ''Electrosphere'', the series almost entirely switched over to {{alternate continuit|y}}ies set in the real world rather than a proper prequel or sequel to ''Electrosphere''.[[VideoGameRemake remakes]] for the next decade.



** The Dimension of Pain was originally just a concept that fueled roughly a week's worth of strips. Then Pete Abrams decided to make it a RunningGag, having the Dimension of Pain demons show up each Halloween to claim Torg's soul. Each Halloween arc got longer than the last, and eventually the demons caught on so much that they were made the stars of their own [[BSideComics B Side Comic Strip]] "Meanwhile in the Dimension of Pain." Then eventually even ''that'' wasn't enough, and the Dimension of Pain demons became the main antagonists of the massive "That Which Redeems" arc.
*** Although Pete Abrams has stated he knew the demons would be invading the Dimension of Lame when he left them a potential means to do so, right in the first story.

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** The Dimension of Pain was originally just a concept that fueled roughly a week's worth of strips. Then Pete Abrams decided to make it a RunningGag, having the Dimension of Pain demons show up each Halloween to claim Torg's soul. Each Halloween arc got longer than the last, and eventually the demons caught on so much that they were made the stars of their own [[BSideComics B Side Comic Strip]] "Meanwhile in the Dimension of Pain." Then eventually even ''that'' wasn't enough, and the Dimension of Pain demons became the main antagonists of the massive "That Which Redeems" arc.
*** Although
arc. Pete Abrams has has, however, stated he knew the demons would be invading the Dimension of Lame when he left them a potential means to do so, right in the first story.



* The "Patriarchy" in ''Webcomic/{{Sinfest}}'' during fall of 2011 quickly grew to overtake the strip, turning the focus to the actions of Xanthe (AKA "Trike Girl") and the ramifications of said actions on the world. Webcomic/{{Sinfest}} runs into this trope a lot, due to the author [[WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants writing by the seat of his pants]]. "Patriarchy" is notable for taking over so much in such a short time period, but there are plenty of other examples:

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* The "Patriarchy" in ''Webcomic/{{Sinfest}}'' during fall of 2011 quickly grew to overtake the strip, turning the focus to the actions of Xanthe (AKA "Trike Girl") and the ramifications of said actions on the world. Webcomic/{{Sinfest}} ''Sinfest'' runs into this trope a lot, due to the author [[WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants writing by the seat of his pants]]. "Patriarchy" is notable for taking over so much in such a short time period, but there are plenty of other examples:
7th Jun '16 4:49:05 AM Hylarn
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* Quess' subplot in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack'' which ultimately hurts the film as a whole. Quess' story contributes little to a movie that was supposed to be about resolving the Amuro vs Char conflict, and takes away screentime from other, more interesting characters.

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* Quess' subplot Newtypes in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack'' which ultimately hurts ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam''. About two thirds of the film as way through it somewhat abruptly moves from a whole. Quess' sci-fi war story contributes little to a movie that was supposed sci-fi war story about ''psychics''. Most major characters turn out to be about resolving newtypes, they turn out to figure into the Amuro vs Char conflict, and takes away screentime from other, more interesting characters.backstory, some fairly important characters have motivations involving them...
4th Jun '16 7:58:47 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' ended up with two starting from the PS2 games. After ''VideoGame/AceCombat3Electrosphere'' the story began working its way back up from the modern day to the projected future seen in that game... which was soon almost completely derailed by the combined aftermaths of the Ulysses asteroid from ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat04ShatteredSkies 04]]'' and the [[GreatOffscreenWar Belkan War]] alluded to in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar 5]]'' - to the point that [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation the sixth game]] had the bad guys inspired by ''both'' (economically crippled by the impacts of asteroid fragments, then brought together by a faction using Belkan technology). And after that, when it finally seemed like those two events had inspired everything they could, the series almost entirely switched over to {{alternate continuit|y}}ies set in the real world rather than a proper prequel or sequel to ''Electrosphere''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' ended up with two starting from the PS2 [=PS2=] games. After ''VideoGame/AceCombat3Electrosphere'' the story began working its way back up from the modern day to the projected future seen in that game... which was soon almost completely derailed by the combined aftermaths of the Ulysses asteroid from ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat04ShatteredSkies 04]]'' and the [[GreatOffscreenWar Belkan War]] alluded to in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar 5]]'' - to the point that [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation the sixth game]] had the bad guys inspired by ''both'' (economically crippled by the impacts of asteroid fragments, then brought together by a faction using Belkan technology). And after that, when it finally seemed like those two events had inspired everything they could, the series almost entirely switched over to {{alternate continuit|y}}ies set in the real world rather than a proper prequel or sequel to ''Electrosphere''.
21st Apr '16 4:24:44 AM Malachi108
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** Similarly, it seems everything visits Tatooine, which was introduced as [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere the middle of nowhere]]. To be fair, while Tatooine is rather far out on the Outer Rim of the galaxy, it is also universally described at being directly near the intersection of four different trade routes, bringing many people there. Although that creates a bit of FridgeLogic; in RealLife, such intersections tend to become very prosperous.

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** Similarly, it seems everything visits Tatooine, which was introduced as [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere the middle of nowhere]]. To be fair, while Tatooine is rather far out on the Outer Rim of the galaxy, it is also universally described at being directly near the intersection of four different trade routes, bringing many people there. Although that creates a bit of FridgeLogic; in RealLife, such intersections tend to become very prosperous.And being controlled by organized crime justifies its allure for underworld players like smugglers and bounty hunters, while for regular folk it remains an unimportant dust ball.
9th Mar '16 5:01:11 PM DVB
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Added DiffLines:

*** In-universe, the capabilities of the sonic screwdriver were jutified by the Doctor having modified it. Being several centuries old and with different personalities each regeneration cycle, it would make sense he would tinker and improve the sonic, especially with each new experience.
6th Jan '16 9:06:07 AM jbr
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** Transporters were created as a last-minute cost-cutting cop-out to prevent expensive effects shots of shuttles landing on planets, but soon became a rich source of plots, with whole episodes centered on [[TeleporterAccident the zanier aspects of their operation]], even though the [[http://www.xibalba.demon.co.uk/jbr/trek/7.html unintended applications]] make them outrageous and are best ignored to begin with. See MisappliedPhlebotinum.

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** Transporters were created as a last-minute cost-cutting cop-out to prevent expensive effects shots of shuttles landing on planets, but soon became a rich source of plots, with whole episodes centered on [[TeleporterAccident the zanier aspects of their operation]], even though the [[http://www.xibalba.demon.co.uk/jbr/trek/7.[[http://jbr.me.uk/trek/7.html unintended applications]] make them outrageous and are best ignored to begin with. See MisappliedPhlebotinum.
22nd Nov '15 6:50:14 PM Kadorhal
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** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...

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** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, ''The Burning Crusade'', the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing ''Wrath of the Lich King'' was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by the Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO no sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, ''Mists of Pandaria'', it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor ''Warlords of Draenor'' development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others other's throats again...again.


Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' ended up with two starting from the PS2 games. After ''VideoGame/AceCombat3Electrosphere'' the story began working its way back up from the modern day to the projected future seen in that game... which was soon almost completely derailed by the combined aftermaths of the Ulysses asteroid from ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat04ShatteredSkies 04]]'' and the [[GreatOffscreenWar Belkan War]] alluded to in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar 5]]'' - to the point that [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation the sixth game]] had the bad guys inspired by ''both'' (economically crippled by the impacts of asteroid fragments, then brought together by a faction using Belkan technology). And after that, when it finally seemed like those two events had inspired everything they could, the series almost entirely switched over to {{alternate continuit|y}}ies set in the real world rather than a proper prequel or sequel to ''Electrosphere''.
28th Oct '15 11:18:20 AM FF32
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** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ScrappyLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...

to:

** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is also this. During classic and TheBurningCrusade, the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then WrathOfTheLichKing was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely NO sense for the factions to be warring at the time). By MistsOfPandaria, it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early WarlordsOfDraenor development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ScrappyLevel [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], and the Horde and the Alliance are at each others throats again...
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PlotTumor