History Main / PlotArmor

23rd Mar '17 8:15:33 PM merotoker
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* Done as straight as an arrow for both the four major protagonists and Xellos of ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'', and the one time that they were thought to have died was a DisneyDeath. Also, any character that winds up allying with them for an extended period of time also survives, [[spoiler:with the only exception being Ozel in ''Evolution-R'']]. This is averted in the novels when [[spoiler:Millina and Luke, Zelgadis and Amelia's replacements, wind up dead (Millina is poisoned and Luke, as a host of [[{{Satan}} Shabranigdo]], is killed in battle), but they were more [[SatelliteCharacter distant]] in helping Lina and Gourry than Zelgadis and Amelia were.]]

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* Done as straight as an arrow for both the four major protagonists and Xellos of ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'', and the one time that they were thought to have died was a DisneyDeath. Also, any character that winds up allying with them for an extended period of time also survives, [[spoiler:with the only exception being Ozel in ''Evolution-R'']]. This is averted in the novels when [[spoiler:Millina and Luke, Zelgadis and Amelia's replacements, wind up dead (Millina is poisoned and Luke, as a host of [[{{Satan}} Shabranigdo]], is killed in battle), but they were more [[SatelliteCharacter distant]] in helping Lina and Gourry than Zelgadis and Amelia were.]]were]].



* Lampshaded in ''Manga/MedakaBox''; the reason the ArcVillain won't start her plans yet is because Medaka is the main character, and thus guaranteed to defeat her if she is challenged. At which point she recruits Medaka's childhood friend Zenkichi to do it for her, and grants him an ability of his own choosing called "Devil Style" [[spoiler:which nullifies Zenkichi's own plot armor. First, though, she has to shift the genre of the work to make him the main character in the first place.]]

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* Lampshaded in ''Manga/MedakaBox''; the reason the ArcVillain won't start her plans yet is because Medaka is the main character, and thus guaranteed to defeat her if she is challenged. At which point she recruits Medaka's childhood friend Zenkichi to do it for her, and grants him an ability of his own choosing called "Devil Style" [[spoiler:which nullifies Zenkichi's own plot armor. First, though, she has to shift the genre of the work to make him the main character in the first place.]]place]].



* In ''Manga/HollowFields'', underachieving students are punished by a weekly elimination system, where the worst student is sent to the Windmill and forced to undergo a FateWorseThanDeath. Lucy Snow, the protagonist, is guaranteed to never endure this fate, even in the beginning where she still hasn't grasped the crafts of Hollow Fields. [[spoiler:Even when she is sent to the Windmill, for reasons other than poor academic performance, she still escapes with [[IndyPloy quick thinking]] and [[ThePowerOfFriendship help from her friends]]]].
* This trope is deconstructed in ''Anime/YukiYunaIsAHero''. In the first half, the heroes always survive the fights against the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Vertexes]] without a scratch on them, even after falling from heights that should have killed them. If the Vertex actually attacks one of them directly, their faery guardian will just block the attack harmlessly, so they still win without without too much difficulty even when the Vertexes start to avert ConservationOfNinjutsu. In the second half, however, once it's revealed that [[spoiler:they aren't recovering from the "temporary" injuries caused by the use of [[SuperMode Mankai]]]], Togo [[spoiler:attempts suicide]] ten times, and her faeries stop her without fail, even from things like [[spoiler:carbon monoxide poisoning]]. It turns out that [[spoiler:the girls are destined to fight the Vertexes over and over without end, and therefore cannot be killed. Since the use of their powers progressively and inevitably takes their bodily functions away until they're ultimately tetraplegic]], that is ''not'' a good thing.

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* In ''Manga/HollowFields'', underachieving students are punished by a weekly elimination system, where the worst student is sent to the Windmill and forced to undergo a FateWorseThanDeath. Lucy Snow, the protagonist, is guaranteed to never endure this fate, even in the beginning where she still hasn't grasped the crafts of Hollow Fields. [[spoiler:Even when she is sent to the Windmill, for reasons other than poor academic performance, she still escapes with [[IndyPloy quick thinking]] and [[ThePowerOfFriendship help from her friends]]]].
friends]].]]
* This trope is deconstructed in ''Anime/YukiYunaIsAHero''. In the first half, the heroes always survive the fights against the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Vertexes]] without a scratch on them, even after falling from heights that should have killed them. If the Vertex actually attacks one of them directly, their faery guardian will just block the attack harmlessly, so they still win without without too much difficulty even when the Vertexes start to avert ConservationOfNinjutsu. In the second half, however, once it's revealed that [[spoiler:they aren't recovering from the "temporary" injuries caused by the use of [[SuperMode Mankai]]]], Togo [[spoiler:attempts suicide]] ten times, and her faeries stop her without fail, even from things like [[spoiler:carbon monoxide poisoning]]. It turns out that [[spoiler:the girls are destined to fight the Vertexes over and over without end, and therefore cannot be killed. Since the use of their powers progressively and inevitably takes their bodily functions away until they're ultimately tetraplegic]], that is ''not'' a good thing.



* ComicBook/SquirrelGirl, from the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, has beaten every archvillain she has faced, including Doctor Doom, Mandarin, Comicbook/{{MODOK}}, and ''Comicbook/{{Thanos}}''. This is impressive considering her superpower is the ability to communicate with squirrels.

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* ComicBook/SquirrelGirl, from the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, has beaten every archvillain she has faced, including Doctor Doom, ComicBook/DoctorDoom, Mandarin, Comicbook/{{MODOK}}, and ''Comicbook/{{Thanos}}''. This is impressive considering her superpower is the ability to communicate with squirrels.



* An explicit plot point of ''Comicbook/ContestOfChampions''. The Collector and the Maestro don't want to bring down the collective wrath of the entire MarvelUniverse, so most of the combatants they kidnap for the tournament are obscure heroes who won't be missed. When they do kidnap a well-known hero like Comicbook/IronMan or [[Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy Gamora]], they only keep them around briefly before wiping their memories and sending them back home.
* Creator/DCComics hero ComicBook/TheQuestion had legendary plot armor during the Dennis O'Neil run. In one fight a mook has a gun to the back of Question's head and pulls the trigger. When nothing happens, the mook looks at the gun quizzically and simply says "Misfire?" before Question pummels him. The Question once DID get shot in the head and dumped in the river. The bullet went around the skull, as it was a weak gun. As for the rest, he was rescued by Lady Shiva, who knows all about healing (and killing).

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* An explicit plot point of ''Comicbook/ContestOfChampions''. The Collector and the Maestro don't want to bring down the collective wrath of the entire MarvelUniverse, Franchise/MarvelUniverse, so most of the combatants they kidnap for the tournament are obscure heroes who won't be missed. When they do kidnap a well-known hero like Comicbook/IronMan or [[Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy Gamora]], they only keep them around briefly before wiping their memories and sending them back home.
* Creator/DCComics hero ComicBook/TheQuestion had legendary plot armor during the Dennis O'Neil run. In one fight a mook has a gun to the back of Question's head and pulls the trigger. When nothing happens, the mook looks at the gun quizzically and simply says "Misfire?" before Question pummels him. The Question once DID get shot in the head and dumped in the river. The bullet went around the skull, as it was a weak gun. As for the rest, he was rescued by Lady Shiva, ComicBook/LadyShiva, who knows all about healing (and killing).



* More or less the only reason why ''anyone'' survived ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk''.
** Justified in-universe. Comicbook/AmadeusCho "did the math" and figured out that the only explanation for no one dying is that Banner/The Hulk must have been consciously preventing the numerous beatings from killing anyone.

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* More or less the only reason why ''anyone'' survived ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk''.
**
''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk''. Justified in-universe. Comicbook/AmadeusCho "did the math" and figured out that [[NoEndorHolocaust the only explanation for no one dying is that Banner/The Hulk must have been consciously preventing the numerous beatings from killing anyone.]]



* This is basically Comicbook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool's entire thing. She is a girl from the real world who got plopped down in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, and she recognizes it as such. She has no superpowers, but she is GenreSavvy. So her plan is basically to put on a costume and act like a Superhero (well, AntiHero) that is the star of a story, so that she will gain plot armor. That she knows she can't be killed because she is the star of her own book essentially becomes her superpower.
** This ends up getting {{Deconstructed|Trope}} in her encounter with SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}} along with PopularityPower. Gwen boasts that she'll be able to kill Wade because this is her book and her Plot Armor will save her. When Wade figures out what's going on, he delivers a devastating TheReasonYouSuckSpeech to Gwen by pointing out that she's a D-Lister who casual readers might confuse for one of the many Gwen Stacy duplicates that spawned from ComicBook/SpiderGwen's popularity while he's an A-Lister with hundreds of issues, merchandise and the highest-grossing R-Rated movie of all time - there was no way she will win.

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* This is basically Comicbook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool's entire thing. She is a girl from the real world who got plopped down in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, and she recognizes it as such. She has no superpowers, but she is GenreSavvy. So her plan is basically to put on a costume and act like a Superhero (well, AntiHero) that is the star of a story, so that she will gain plot armor. That she knows she can't be killed because she is the star of her own book essentially becomes her superpower.
**
superpower. This ends up getting {{Deconstructed|Trope}} {{deconstructed|Trope}} in her encounter with SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}} along with PopularityPower. Gwen boasts that she'll be able to kill Wade because this is her book and her Plot Armor will save her. When Wade figures out what's going on, he delivers a devastating TheReasonYouSuckSpeech to Gwen by pointing out that she's a D-Lister who casual readers might confuse for one of the many Gwen Stacy duplicates that spawned from ComicBook/SpiderGwen's popularity while he's an A-Lister with hundreds of issues, merchandise and the highest-grossing R-Rated movie of all time - there was no way she will win.



* ''FanFic/UninvitedGuests'': [[spoiler: Used, lampshaded, and weaponized by Aizen.]]

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* ''FanFic/UninvitedGuests'': [[spoiler: Used, lampshaded, and weaponized by Aizen.]]Aizen]].



* Lelouch in ''Fanfic/SoulChess'' has an excuse, but apart from that, [[spoiler: WordOfGod states that even Ichigo and his friends will lose theirs after graduation. Some of the other characters from Bleach have lost theirs already. Like Head Captain Yamamoto. Plus Aizen and Yhwach]]

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* Lelouch in ''Fanfic/SoulChess'' has an excuse, but apart from that, [[spoiler: WordOfGod states that even Ichigo and his friends will lose theirs after graduation. Some of the other characters from Bleach have lost theirs already. Like Head Captain Yamamoto. Plus Aizen and Yhwach]]Yhwach]].



** Stormtroopers are supposedly elite soldiers, and Obi-Wan notes that their marksmanship is unusually precise, yet they hit precisely no important characters despite ample opportunities, and when they do, it's typically [[OnlyAFleshWound a minor injury at best]]. Compare that to how they [[CurbStompBattle steamroll over no-name Rebels with ruthless efficiency]]. In the first movie it's ultimately revealed that they were doing it deliberately to keep the heroes from figuring out they were actually being let go so they could be tracked, although no excuse is offered for the way it continues in the later movies.
*** ''Empire'' also has an explanation as to why the Stormtroopers ''still'' can't hit the heroes: In Luke's case they are under order to lure him to Vader, and the escaping rebels are similarly to be brought to him alive.

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** Stormtroopers are supposedly elite soldiers, and Obi-Wan notes that their marksmanship is unusually precise, yet they hit precisely no important characters despite ample opportunities, and when they do, it's typically [[OnlyAFleshWound a minor injury at best]]. Compare that to how they [[CurbStompBattle steamroll over no-name Rebels with ruthless efficiency]]. In the first movie it's ultimately revealed that they were doing it deliberately to keep the heroes from figuring out they were actually being let go so they could be tracked, although no excuse is offered for the way it continues in the later movies.
***
tracked. ''Empire'' also has an explanation as to why the Stormtroopers ''still'' can't hit the heroes: In Luke's case they are under order to lure him to Vader, and the escaping rebels are similarly to be brought to him alive.



** In the first movie [[spoiler:Brenda is stabbed to death in a theater for being rude and Cindy is run down by a car at the very end.]]
** In the second movie, [[spoiler:Brenda says that she only had a "near death experience", and it turns out Cindy is alive because she was never officially declared dead.]]

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** In the first movie movie, [[spoiler:Brenda is stabbed to death in a theater for being rude and Cindy is run down by a car at the very end.]]
end]].
** In the second movie, [[spoiler:Brenda says that she only had a "near death experience", and it turns out Cindy is alive because she was never officially declared dead.]]dead]].



* Lampshaded in TheMovie of ''Film/GeorgeOfTheJungle'', the narrator mentions during a recap that "George was really shot but can't die because, let's face it, he's the hero."

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* Lampshaded in TheMovie of ''Film/GeorgeOfTheJungle'', ''Film/GeorgeOfTheJungle''; the narrator mentions during a recap that "George was really shot but can't die because, let's face it, he's the hero."



* In Film/LordOfTheRings the main characters have all experienced at least one near death experience and managed to survive or in case of Gandalf [[BackFromTheDead he not only came back]], [[CameBackStrong he came back stronger]] (Except Boromir). Aragorn especially has shown this, surviving after falling from a cliff and getting up with no injuries after a explosion occured right beneath his feet, when everybody else near to him died.

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* In Film/LordOfTheRings ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' the main characters have all experienced at least one near death experience and managed to survive or in case of Gandalf [[BackFromTheDead he not only came back]], [[CameBackStrong he came back stronger]] (Except Boromir). Aragorn especially has shown this, surviving after falling from a cliff and getting up with no injuries after a explosion occured occurred right beneath his feet, when everybody else near to him died.



* This is made literal in the ''Literature/{{Xanth}}'' novels. In the very first Xanth novel, [[spoiler:Bink's magic talent is essentially plot armor, as he cannot be harmed by magic.]] Unlike many examples, the book is kept interesting because [[spoiler:it is a great deal of the point of the plot, and it is not known that this is his talent until quite late in the book, when he exploits it.]] In the second book, [[spoiler:he is specifically chosen for the task of finding the source of magic due to his immunity to harm from it. Despite this, his talent is somewhat picky about what is defined by "harm", and he is still worried that he could be killed by mundane means, as well as by the source of all magic itself, a nearly omnipotent demon. In the end, however, it is implied that his talent is in fact so powerful that even the demon could not overcome it, and that all his seeming misfortune was what saved him in the end]]. In later books, which become more and more comedy-based, anybody who was one of the stars of a given book has in-universe "major character" status, guaranteeing their safety for at least that one story.

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* This is made literal in the ''Literature/{{Xanth}}'' novels. In the very first Xanth novel, [[spoiler:Bink's magic talent is essentially plot armor, as he cannot be harmed by magic.]] magic]]. Unlike many examples, the book is kept interesting because [[spoiler:it is a great deal of the point of the plot, and it is not known that this is his talent until quite late in the book, when he exploits it.]] it]]. In the second book, [[spoiler:he is specifically chosen for the task of finding the source of magic due to his immunity to harm from it. Despite this, his talent is somewhat picky about what is defined by "harm", and he is still worried that he could be killed by mundane means, as well as by the source of all magic itself, a nearly omnipotent demon. In the end, however, it is implied that his talent is in fact so powerful that even the demon could not overcome it, and that all his seeming misfortune was what saved him in the end]]. In later books, which become more and more comedy-based, anybody who was one of the stars of a given book has in-universe "major character" status, guaranteeing their safety for at least that one story.



* The later novels in ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' series feature some {{lampshade|Hanging}}d Plot Armor: Arthur Dent knows he can't die until he visits Stavromula Beta. (Arthur learns this from meeting somebody who wants to kill him because of a long list of things Arthur did, including something that happened there. When he discovers that Arthur hasn't even heard of Stavromula Beta yet, he realises that this means Arthur can't be killed yet without causing a serious time paradox -- but he's so angry he tries to kill Arthur anyway.) [[spoiler: This leads to a shocking [[ProphecyTwist twist]] at the end of ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'', when Arthur unwittingly fulfills the conditions of the accidental prophecy, and is swiftly KilledOffForReal.]] [[spoiler: [[Literature/AndAnotherThing Probably.]]]] To much collective dismay, Authors are not granted the benefits of Plot Armor, and AuthorExistenceFailure has caused a serious disruption in the successful use of Plot Armor.
* Subverted in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', as the perceived main heroes [[spoiler:(Ned Stark, Robb Stark)]] and several characters who were darlings of the readers [[spoiler: (Ygritte)]] pay for their stupid mistakes with death. George R. R. Martin wants to make a point here: his series is a realistic, AnyoneCanDie series, and nobody, especially not those who embrace the formulaic role of the LawfulStupid [[TheHero hero]], escapes the consequences of screwing up. Not even the POV characters are protected [[spoiler:(at least one, probably two of them are dead by the fifth book).]] On the other side, some characters who start as secondary characters and little by little gain importance may (or may not) have a form of plot armor against death:

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* The later novels in ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' series feature some {{lampshade|Hanging}}d Plot Armor: Arthur Dent knows he can't die until he visits Stavromula Beta. (Arthur learns this from meeting somebody who wants to kill him because of a long list of things Arthur did, including something that happened there. When he discovers that Arthur hasn't even heard of Stavromula Beta yet, he realises that this means Arthur can't be killed yet without causing a serious time paradox -- but he's so angry he tries to kill Arthur anyway.) [[spoiler: This leads to a shocking [[ProphecyTwist twist]] at the end of ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'', when Arthur unwittingly fulfills the conditions of the accidental prophecy, and is swiftly KilledOffForReal.]] [[spoiler: [[Literature/AndAnotherThing Probably.]]]] To much collective dismay, Authors are not granted the benefits of Plot Armor, and AuthorExistenceFailure has caused a serious disruption in the successful use of Plot Armor.
* Subverted in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', as the perceived main heroes [[spoiler:(Ned Stark, Robb Stark)]] and several characters who were darlings of the readers [[spoiler: (Ygritte)]] pay for their stupid mistakes with death. George R. R. Martin wants to make a point here: his series is a realistic, AnyoneCanDie series, and nobody, especially not those who embrace the formulaic role of the LawfulStupid [[TheHero hero]], escapes the consequences of screwing up. Not even the POV characters are protected [[spoiler:(at least one, probably two of them are dead by the fifth book).]] book)]]. On the other side, some characters who start as secondary characters and little by little gain importance may (or may not) have a form of plot armor against death:



** Literature/CiaphasCain is the narrator of his books, which are presented as his memoirs from his time in retirement, so it's kind of a given he'll see the end of each story. Other characters protected by the "memoirs" rationale: Jurgen, Cain's aide-de-camp who stays with Cain his entire documented career; Amberly Vail, Cain's Inquisitorial connection and off-again-on-again lover, who's editing the memoirs; and Jenit Sulla, who we're told very early on will someday become a general (and whose terrible, terrible memoirs often fill in gaps in Cain's narrative). Since this is a much more comedic view of the 40K universe, this isn't a problem; even in the grim darkness of the far future, not knowing if a character will survive to the end would damage their humor value. It's also notable in that the characters themselves ''notice''. Cain in particular is so convinced that all of his successes are due to pure luck that he totally overlooks his own BadassNormal status, and so despite a century of ludicrously one-sided victories thinks of himself as a phoney.

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** Literature/CiaphasCain is the narrator of his books, which are presented as his memoirs from his time in retirement, so it's kind of a given he'll see the end of each story. Other characters protected by the "memoirs" rationale: Jurgen, Cain's aide-de-camp who stays with Cain his entire documented career; Amberly Vail, Cain's Inquisitorial connection and off-again-on-again lover, who's editing the memoirs; and Jenit Sulla, who we're told very early on will someday become a general (and whose terrible, terrible memoirs often fill in gaps in Cain's narrative). Since this is a much more comedic view of the 40K universe, this isn't a problem; even in the grim darkness of the far future, not knowing if a character will survive to the end would damage their humor value. It's also notable in that the characters themselves ''notice''. Cain in particular is so convinced that all of his successes are due to pure luck that he totally overlooks his own BadassNormal status, and so despite a century of ludicrously one-sided victories thinks of himself as a phoney.phony.



** And {{Invoked}} for Captain Demoux of ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy''. He's named after a friend of the author, and the author had to promise that friend that the character named after him would survive to the end and get a LoveInterest. This is confirmed by WordOfGod to be the only thing that kept him alive when he got hit by a nasty curse.

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** And {{Invoked}} {{invoked|Trope}} for Captain Demoux of ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy''. He's named after a friend of the author, and the author had to promise that friend that the character named after him would survive to the end and get a LoveInterest.{{Love Interest|s}}. This is confirmed by WordOfGod to be the only thing that kept him alive when he got hit by a nasty curse.



* Used as a major plot point in ''Literature/{{Redshirts}}'', and the Plot Armor of the ''Intrepid's'' head officers is exploited by the main characters in order to [[spoiler: travel to the real world and get the television show they're characters on cancelled before their characters are killed off.]]
** Later on [[spoiler: Andrew Dahl uses his own Plot Armor to deduce that he is the real main character of the book.]]
* ''Literature/ThePiratesCoveredInFur'' shows the main heroes going through grim situations that would (and ''did'') kill off any regular, minor characters. Yet they manage to get through it all with only a couple scratches or bullet wounds. [[spoiler:The last third of the story subverts this ''hard'', and the main characters start dying fast]].

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* Used as a major plot point in ''Literature/{{Redshirts}}'', and the Plot Armor of the ''Intrepid's'' head officers is exploited by the main characters in order to [[spoiler: travel to the real world and get the television show they're characters on cancelled before their characters are killed off.]]
**
off]]. Later on [[spoiler: Andrew Dahl uses his own Plot Armor to deduce that he is the real main character of the book.]]
book]].
* ''Literature/ThePiratesCoveredInFur'' shows the main heroes going through grim situations that would (and ''did'') kill off any regular, minor characters. Yet they manage to get through it all with only a couple scratches or bullet wounds. [[spoiler:The last third of the story subverts this ''hard'', and the main characters start dying fast]].fast.]]



** Harry Potter himself seems to have this, due to being the main character. Each school year, he gets into mortal peril at least once and each time and barely manages to survive it due to the circumstances being slightly more in his favor. When people start praising his victories against the dark forces, Harry lampshades this by saying he only succeeded due to having an improbable amount of luck.
** Arthur Weasly suddenly gained Plot Armor when Rowling was writing ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix''. Her initial plan was for him to actually die after Nagini attacked him, but she realized that killing him would remove the Weaslys as Harry's safe haven and turn Ron from a lighthearted comic relief character to "Half a Harry" ie, a much darker and serious character, which Rowling did not want.
** Hagrid has Plot armour throughout the whole series, because as stated by WordOfGod, Rowling knew that Hagrid would carry Harry at the end of the 7th book from the very beginning. This Plot Armor allows him to safely deal with creatures deemed mortally dangerous by the Ministry for Magic.
* Artyom of ''Metro 2033'' goes into a lengthy internal monologue about this trope near the end of the book, noting that [[spoiler:Mikhail Porfirievich, Daniel, and Tretyak all died]] [[LampshadedTrope over the course of his adventure, and yet he managed to survive for no apparent reason]].
* The ''Literature/{{Divergent}}'' series [[spoiler: subverts this trope. Tris, who has been the first-person narrator through the entire series, dies in the third book, ''Allegiant''. This is somewhat telegraphed by the fact that she and Four start trading off narration duties at the start of that book when she had been the only narrator before.]]

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** Harry Potter himself seems to have this, due to being the main character. Each school year, he gets into mortal peril at least once and each time and barely manages to survive it due to the circumstances being slightly more in his favor. When people start praising his victories against the dark forces, Harry lampshades this by saying he only succeeded due to having an improbable amount of luck.
** Arthur Weasly Weasley suddenly gained Plot Armor when Rowling was writing ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix''. Her initial plan was for him to actually die after Nagini attacked him, but she realized that killing him would remove the Weaslys Weasleys as Harry's safe haven and turn Ron from a lighthearted comic relief character to "Half a Harry" ie, i.e., a much darker and serious character, which Rowling did not want.
** Hagrid has Plot armour Armor throughout the whole series, because as stated by WordOfGod, Rowling knew that Hagrid would carry Harry at the end of the 7th book from the very beginning. This Plot Armor allows him to safely deal with creatures deemed mortally dangerous by the Ministry for Magic.
* Artyom of ''Metro 2033'' goes into a lengthy internal monologue about this trope near the end of the book, noting that [[spoiler:Mikhail Porfirievich, Daniel, and Tretyak all died]] [[LampshadedTrope [[LampshadeHanging over the course of his adventure, and yet he managed to survive for no apparent reason]].
* The ''Literature/{{Divergent}}'' series [[spoiler: subverts this trope. Tris, who has been the first-person narrator through the entire series, dies in the third book, ''Allegiant''. This is somewhat telegraphed by the fact that she and Four start trading off narration duties at the start of that book when she had been the only narrator before.]]before]].



* ''Series/{{The100}}'': In the S1 finale [[spoiler: when it's decided the entire Ark would be sent down to the ground, but it was likely only one section of the station would survive.]]

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* ''Series/{{The100}}'': ''Series/{{The 100}}'': In the S1 finale [[spoiler: when it's decided the entire Ark would be sent down to the ground, but it was likely only one section of the station would survive.]]survive]].



** At the end of the first half of a two-parter season finale, [[spoiler:Kate Beckett's apartment exploded just as she stepped out of her shower. We all knew her Plot Armor would protect her, but we still had to wait a week to find out how. Turns out she survived by hiding in the bathtub.]]

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** At the end of the first half of a two-parter season finale, [[spoiler:Kate Beckett's apartment exploded just as she stepped out of her shower. We all knew her Plot Armor would protect her, but we still had to wait a week to find out how. Turns out she survived by hiding in the bathtub.]]bathtub]].



* ''Series/{{GameofThrones}}'':
** Famously avoids this trope by regularly killing off main characters in an almost offhand way, until Season 6 at least when [[spoiler: suddenly Arya becomes impossible to kill, even when pro-assassin the waif stabs her in the gut, and don't even get us started on Jon Snow.]] Interestingly the cases where characters display plot armor are usually justified in the show. [[spoiler: The waif fails to kill Arya because she usually kills with poison due to her physical frailty and Arya she tries to stab. Jon, by contrast, actually ''is'' killed, and resurrected by the woman who had earlier displayed similarly impossible magical abilities. It's also hinted at that he may actually be protected by the Lord of Light]]. Overall, the AnyoneCanDie nature of the show is rather exaggerated, and characters are rarely killed without either coming to the end of a character arc or their death being important to the plot. [[spoiler: A leak of GRRM's early drafts reveals that he originally intended to focus on five central characters: Jon, Dany, Arya, Bran, and Tyrion. Knowing this, it's very clear that all of the above will most likely survive until the final stretch of the series. Also, since all of the above are involved in story arcs that are indispensable to the show's main conflicts and/or have taken up a large share of screen time, it becomes incredibly obvious that they will survive at least until their arcs come to completion (i.e. If Dany were to die before returning to Westeros, it would render her entire story irrelevant to the main plot, resulting in a near guarantee that she'll survive any danger until she makes it across the Narrow Sea)]]
** Special mention to [[spoiler: the Stark side during the battle for Winterfell. Knowing that there are only 13 episodes left before the finale, and that focus will need to shift away from fighting Ramsay and over to the White Walker threat soon in order to finish within the allotted time, it isn't very hard for the viewer to guess which side is going to win this battle. Jon Snow's survival isn't quite as guaranteed, and Melisandre even references the possibility that he was only need for this small part of the Lord of Light's greater plan, but ends up surviving against a barrage of arrows and nearly being crushed by a mountain of corpses regardless due to a combination of skill, stupidity from his foes, his allies helping him, and a ridiculous amount of sheer luck.]]

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* ''Series/{{GameofThrones}}'':
''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** Famously avoids this trope by regularly killing off main characters in an almost offhand way, until Season 6 at least when [[spoiler: suddenly Arya becomes impossible to kill, even when pro-assassin the waif stabs her in the gut, and don't even get us started on Jon Snow.]] Snow]]. Interestingly the cases where characters display plot armor are usually justified in the show. [[spoiler: The waif fails to kill Arya because she usually kills with poison due to her physical frailty and Arya she tries to stab. Jon, by contrast, actually ''is'' killed, and resurrected by the woman who had earlier displayed similarly impossible magical abilities. It's also hinted at that he may actually be protected by the Lord of Light]]. Overall, the AnyoneCanDie nature of the show is rather exaggerated, and characters are rarely killed without either coming to the end of a character arc or their death being important to the plot. [[spoiler: A leak of GRRM's early drafts reveals that he originally intended to focus on five central characters: Jon, Dany, Arya, Bran, and Tyrion. Knowing this, it's very clear that all of the above will most likely survive until the final stretch of the series. Also, since all of the above are involved in story arcs that are indispensable to the show's main conflicts and/or have taken up a large share of screen time, it becomes incredibly obvious that they will survive at least until their arcs come to completion (i.e. If Dany were to die before returning to Westeros, it would render her entire story irrelevant to the main plot, resulting in a near guarantee that she'll survive any danger until she makes it across the Narrow Sea)]]
Sea)]].
** Special mention to [[spoiler: the Stark side during the battle for Winterfell. Knowing that there are only 13 episodes left before the finale, and that focus will need to shift away from fighting Ramsay and over to the White Walker threat soon in order to finish within the allotted time, it isn't very hard for the viewer to guess which side is going to win this battle. Jon Snow's survival isn't quite as guaranteed, and Melisandre even references the possibility that he was only need for this small part of the Lord of Light's greater plan, but ends up surviving against a barrage of arrows and nearly being crushed by a mountain of corpses regardless due to a combination of skill, stupidity from his foes, his allies helping him, and a ridiculous amount of sheer luck.]]luck]].



* ''Series/RedDwarf'': The Dwarfers both have and attempt to exploit this in the episode Cassandra, when the titular precognitive computer predicts that everyone in the main cast but Rimmer will survive the destruction of the shipwreck that they're on they form human plot armour for him by standing around him as they get to their escape ship. he manages to fall down a hole on the way but [[spoiler:it turns out that the computer was lying all along]]

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* ''Series/RedDwarf'': The Dwarfers both have and attempt to exploit this in the episode Cassandra, when the titular precognitive computer predicts that everyone in the main cast but Rimmer will survive the destruction of the shipwreck that they're on they form human plot armour for him by standing around him as they get to their escape ship. he manages to fall down a hole on the way but [[spoiler:it turns out that the computer was lying all along]]along]].



* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': Gwen is another prime example. Despite the show touting an AnyoneCanDie world, circumstances always seem to ensure Gwen's survival, even in highly implausible situations. This is mostly necessary to preserve her pairing with Jack as the lead characters on the show, since Jack is explicitly immortal and can thus be expected to survive pretty much anything that gets thrown at him. Being a mere mortal, Gwen instead survives by writer fiat. In one particularly notable instance of BondVillainStupidity, [[spoiler: a group of government assassins sent to kill the Torchwood team is delayed in tracking down Gwen because ''they never bothered to research her home address!'']]

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* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': Gwen is another prime example. Despite the show touting an AnyoneCanDie world, circumstances always seem to ensure Gwen's survival, even in highly implausible situations. This is mostly necessary to preserve her pairing with Jack as the lead characters on the show, since Jack is explicitly immortal and can thus be expected to survive pretty much anything that gets thrown at him. Being a mere mortal, Gwen instead survives by writer fiat. In one particularly notable instance of BondVillainStupidity, [[spoiler: a group of government assassins sent to kill the Torchwood team is delayed in tracking down Gwen because ''they never bothered to research her home address!'']]address'']]!



* Throughout its long history, wrestling has had a fetish of propping up old stars instead of actually pushing new ones.
** As the past has shown, {{Wrestling/WWE}} (in particular ''[[{{Wrestling/WWERAW}} RAW]]'') won't push anybody higher than they absolutely have to. Look at [[Wrestling/HulkHogan Hogan]]. Stayed on top until he left. Everyone else was on the fringe until Hogan, [[Wrestlng/RandySavage Savage]], [[Wrestling/UltimateWarrior Warrior]] and co. were all gone. Once the "main event" guys started defecting to {{Wrestling/WCW}}, then guys like Wrestling/SteveAustin found room at the top. After Austin, [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson Rock]] and others left, [[Wrestling/JohnCena Cena]], [[Wrestling/RandyOrton Orton]] and {{Wrestling/Batista}} found their way up the card. Now, despite having the most talented and charismatic roster of all time possibly, nobody in WWE gets any kind of push-up except the veterans [[DentedIron who can barely walk anymore]], or people with family connections, like Wrestling/RomanReigns (cousin of Rocky) or {{Wrestling/Charlotte}} (daughter of Wrestling/RicFlair).

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* Throughout its long history, wrestling has had a fetish of propping up old stars instead of actually pushing new ones. \n** As the past has shown, {{Wrestling/WWE}} (in particular ''[[{{Wrestling/WWERAW}} RAW]]'') won't push anybody higher than they absolutely have to. Look at [[Wrestling/HulkHogan Hogan]]. Stayed on top until he left. Everyone else was on the fringe until Hogan, [[Wrestlng/RandySavage [[Wrestling/RandySavage Savage]], [[Wrestling/UltimateWarrior Warrior]] and co. were all gone. Once the "main event" guys started defecting to {{Wrestling/WCW}}, then guys like Wrestling/SteveAustin found room at the top. After Austin, [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson Rock]] and others left, [[Wrestling/JohnCena Cena]], [[Wrestling/RandyOrton Orton]] and {{Wrestling/Batista}} found their way up the card. Now, despite having the most talented and charismatic roster of all time possibly, nobody in WWE gets any kind of push-up except the veterans [[DentedIron who can barely walk anymore]], or people with family connections, like Wrestling/RomanReigns (cousin of Rocky) or {{Wrestling/Charlotte}} (daughter of Wrestling/RicFlair).



* Many a fan groaned at in ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' at the conclusion of the Fate route, where [[spoiler: Shirou´s HealingFactor is revealed literally minutes before the FinalBattle to be a Noble Phantasm capable of blocking [[InfinityPlusOneSword Ea]], Gilgamesh´s WaveMotionSword capable of destroying the entire world in a single blast. It was then used to block that and a swarm of curses from the Grail, completely killing any conflict once Shirou and Saber finally used it.]]

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* Many a fan groaned at in ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' at the conclusion of the Fate route, where [[spoiler: Shirou´s HealingFactor is revealed literally minutes before the FinalBattle to be a Noble Phantasm capable of blocking [[InfinityPlusOneSword Ea]], Gilgamesh´s WaveMotionSword capable of destroying the entire world in a single blast. It was then used to block that and a swarm of curses from the Grail, completely killing any conflict once Shirou and Saber finally used it.]]it]].



* Deirdre and Julia from ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral'' have a unique case of this. If either of them reaches 0 HP, they'll be captured by the enemy, and rescued at the end of the chapter. This is because [[spoiler: the BigBad ''needs'' them alive, since they carry the bloodline of the GodOfEvil he's trying to revive.]]

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* Deirdre and Julia from ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral'' have a unique case of this. If either of them reaches 0 HP, they'll be captured by the enemy, and rescued at the end of the chapter. This is because [[spoiler: the BigBad ''needs'' them alive, since they carry the bloodline of the GodOfEvil he's trying to revive.]]revive]].



* Lampshaded by Balthier, the self-proclaimed "Leading Man" in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII''. While performing a heroic sacrifice during the game's climax, he assures his companion Fran that the main character "never dies". She seems to doubt his Plot Armor however, as she admits that he's "more of a supporting role". [[spoiler: He lives!]].
* ''VideoGame/HeavyRain'': [[spoiler:Ethan can get into a car accident, cut up his body crawling through broken glass, electrocute himself, cut off his own finger, get shot at with a shotgun ''at point-blank range'' (it clips him, though) and fall off a building ''in that order'', '''and he still can't die until the endgame.''' Shelby can get beat down, get shot in the shoulder, get beat down again, [[OverusedGag get beat down once more]], nearly drown in his car and get shot at by {{Mooks}} ''in that order'', '''and he still can't die until the endgame'''. Justified in Shelby's case, as he's the main villain.]]

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* Lampshaded by Balthier, the self-proclaimed "Leading Man" in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII''. While performing a heroic sacrifice during the game's climax, he assures his companion Fran that the main character "never dies". She seems to doubt his Plot Armor however, as she admits that he's "more of a supporting role". [[spoiler: He lives!]].
lives!]]
* ''VideoGame/HeavyRain'': [[spoiler:Ethan can get into a car accident, cut up his body crawling through broken glass, electrocute himself, cut off his own finger, get shot at with a shotgun ''at point-blank range'' (it clips him, though) and fall off a building ''in that order'', '''and he still can't die until the endgame.''' Shelby can get beat down, get shot in the shoulder, get beat down again, [[OverusedGag get beat down once more]], nearly drown in his car and get shot at by {{Mooks}} ''in that order'', '''and he still can't die until the endgame'''. Justified in Shelby's case, as he's the main villain.]]villain]].



** The trope applies to all party members in the series. While the playable character's defeat is a game over, party members simply fall unconscious, only to get up after a moment with some HP. The only exceptions are the above, where the party member cannot be defeated, and [[spoiler:the fight with Captain Barbossa in the second game. If Jack is defeated, the game is over.]]

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** The trope applies to all party members in the series. While the playable character's defeat is a game over, party members simply fall unconscious, only to get up after a moment with some HP. The only exceptions are the above, where the party member cannot be defeated, and [[spoiler:the fight with Captain Barbossa in the second game. If Jack is defeated, the game is over.]]over]].



* Squad 7 in ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles''. For the most part it's unobtrusive, since it's a war game and it's entirely possible to lose during the individual stages, but it's impossible to lose any of your lieutenants permanently (without getting a Game Over, anyway). There's also the fact that [[spoiler: Selvaria, upon being captured, requests that Squad 7 be let go to escort her men away from the battle field before she flash-fries the rest of the army in her SuicideAttack. Squad 7 is the only reason she was captured in the first place and represents the ''only'' serious threat to the Empire; if she didn't have to let them walk because of the plot, the Empire would've won.]]

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* Squad 7 in ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles''. For the most part it's unobtrusive, since it's a war game and it's entirely possible to lose during the individual stages, but it's impossible to lose any of your lieutenants permanently (without getting a Game Over, anyway). There's also the fact that [[spoiler: Selvaria, upon being captured, requests that Squad 7 be let go to escort her men away from the battle field before she flash-fries the rest of the army in her SuicideAttack. Squad 7 is the only reason she was captured in the first place and represents the ''only'' serious threat to the Empire; if she didn't have to let them walk because of the plot, the Empire would've won.]]won]].



** A general rule is this: If a character is a human SBURB player, Karkat, or one of Karkat's friends, they're safe and any death will turn out to be a fake. Anyone else dying is fair game, including [[spoiler:any carapacian including AR and the agents and some of the more minor trolls. Vriska ''did'' stay dead for an extremely large portion of the comic but was eventually revived by means of her death being ret-conned away.]]
** Ascending to the God Tiers gives characters near-impenetrable in-story Plot Armor. They can only be killed in a manner that is either heroic or just, preventing meaningless deaths. Interestingly, the heroicness or justness of the deaths are decided by a clock, it is not clear if a single clock or one per character, but the important thing is that the clock simply exists within the universe of the story, meaning characters could conceivably go and mess with it to kill or save a particular God Tier. This is one interpretation of what happens to Vriska, as a TakeThat to the fans [[BrokenBase arguing back and forth on her villianousness or lack thereof]]. [[spoiler:[[FaceHeelTurn Aranea]] shows that her luck-based powers work on the clock, which aided in killing off some God Tiered characters, but the events of which were ret-conned later. Even the characters she killed ended up surviving to the end thanks to an alternate timeline]].
* ''Webcomic/TheCyantianChronicles'' is a collection of comic series , the first one "Campus Safari" taking place ten years after the current series, "Darius". Any characters that appear in "Safari" (i.e. Syrys, Darius, Sheanna, Ravon, Cilke, Chatin, Silver, Tira, Darrik, Rama and a significant number of others) are certain to survive at least until the latest chronological strips, but it looks like you shouldn't get too attached to anyone else.

to:

** A general rule is this: If a character is a human SBURB player, Karkat, or one of Karkat's friends, they're safe and any death will turn out to be a fake. Anyone else dying is fair game, including [[spoiler:any carapacian including AR and the agents and some of the more minor trolls. Vriska ''did'' stay dead for an extremely large portion of the comic but was eventually revived by means of her death being ret-conned away.]]
away]].
** Ascending to the God Tiers gives characters near-impenetrable in-story Plot Armor. They can only be killed in a manner that is either heroic or just, preventing meaningless deaths. Interestingly, the heroicness or justness of the deaths are decided by a clock, it is not clear if a single clock or one per character, but the important thing is that the clock simply exists within the universe of the story, meaning characters could conceivably go and mess with it to kill or save a particular God Tier. This is one interpretation of what happens to Vriska, as a TakeThat to the fans [[BrokenBase arguing back and forth on her villianousness or lack thereof]]. [[spoiler:[[FaceHeelTurn Aranea]] shows that her luck-based powers work on the clock, which aided in killing off some God Tiered characters, but the events of which were ret-conned later. Even the characters she killed ended up surviving to the end thanks to an alternate timeline]].
timeline.]]
* ''Webcomic/TheCyantianChronicles'' is a collection of comic series , series, the first one "Campus Safari" taking place ten years after the current series, "Darius". Any characters that appear in "Safari" (i.e. Syrys, Darius, Sheanna, Ravon, Cilke, Chatin, Silver, Tira, Darrik, Rama and a significant number of others) are certain to survive at least until the latest chronological strips, but it looks like you shouldn't get too attached to anyone else.



* The Velvet Knights and the recently rescued princesses in ''Webcomic/CommanderKitty'' had to be wearing a pretty sturdy set to survive [[spoiler: [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/02/24/two-down/ being at the mercy of a psychotic A.I. with control over a transporter]]. [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/03/03/the-calls-are-coming-from-inside-the-mouse/ First, there's the issue that said A.I. teleports them back to their own ship, instead of, say, into open space]]. [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/03/17/they-found-another-one/ Then, after their ship gets sucker punched by a torpedo]], [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/04/14/aftermath/ they somehow had time to don space suits before the bridge decompressed]], [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/06/01/questions-answered/ and the princesses were fortunate enough to end up in a still-pressurized part of the ship]].]]

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* The Velvet Knights and the recently rescued princesses in ''Webcomic/CommanderKitty'' had to be wearing a pretty sturdy set to survive [[spoiler: [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/02/24/two-down/ being at the mercy of a psychotic A.I. with control over a transporter]]. [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/03/03/the-calls-are-coming-from-inside-the-mouse/ First, there's the issue that said A.I. teleports them back to their own ship, instead of, say, into open space]]. [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/03/17/they-found-another-one/ Then, after their ship gets sucker punched by a torpedo]], [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/04/14/aftermath/ they somehow had time to don space suits before the bridge decompressed]], [[http://www.commanderkitty.com/2013/06/01/questions-answered/ and the princesses were fortunate enough to end up in a still-pressurized part of the ship]].]]ship]]]].



* Averted in several shorts of WebAnimation/HowItShouldHaveEnded, as its episodes tend to show why several characters from different movies survive is because of plot and shows what happens in reality. It goes to show in the 2012 episode showing that [[spoiler: the reason why the main characters ever survived the massive disaster is because of the plot and shows that they would be just like anyone else in the movie in reality if the movie ever happened in real life.]]

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* Averted in several shorts of WebAnimation/HowItShouldHaveEnded, as its episodes tend to show why several characters from different movies survive is because of plot and shows what happens in reality. It goes to show in the 2012 episode showing that [[spoiler: the reason why the main characters ever survived the massive disaster is because of the plot and shows that they would be just like anyone else in the movie in reality if the movie ever happened in real life.]]life]].
22nd Mar '17 9:47:26 AM NumberFortyFour
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* ''WesternAnimation/TotalDrama'': Heather in season 1. Despite her manipulative tactics earning the ire of just about every other player, she repeatedly manages to avoid elimination either by earning literal invincibility or through a ContrivedCoincidence to make another player's elimination seem more immediately necessary. The most egregious example would be Jeff's elimination. Despite having wanted Heather gone for weeks and finally having the perfect opportunity to boot her (no invincibility, no immediate issues with other players), they decide to vote off Jeff instead for "being too nice," justifying this sudden shift in attitude with some InsaneTrollLogic.
20th Mar '17 7:47:03 AM BelligerentQuelea
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** The Battle City Finals take this UpToEleven, where most characters win/lose due to plot armor, since it's obvious who will meet who in the finals. Yami Yugi is about to lose to Yami Bakura until on his very last turn he gets an Egyptian God Card. Rishid is about to win against Jonouchi, but Malik orders him to summon the copy of The Winged Dragon of Ra, resulting that Ra gets enraged and strikes both players with lightning, and Jonouchi recovers from ThePowerOfFriendship. Mai would have beaten Yami Malik had she just attacked, but tries to summon Ra and can't read its text, and Yami Malik uses Ra instead. Kaiba suddenly has a vision that tells him that he should use his Blue-Eyes White Dragon instead of Obelisk the Tormentor, sacrificing his Egyptian God Card, which makes Ishizu's Trap Card useless. And then in the semi-finals, Jonouchi would have defeated Yami Malik(and saved Mai as he vowed he would), but nearly dies because of the torture he had to endure in the duel. And Yami Yugi is able to save himself from losing by suddenly being able to use the effect of Kaiba's The Flute of Summoning Dragon.

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** The Battle City Finals take this UpToEleven, where most characters win/lose due to plot armor, since it's obvious who will meet who in the finals. Yami Yugi is about to lose to Yami Bakura until on his very last turn he gets an Egyptian God Card. Rishid is about to win against Jonouchi, but Malik orders him to summon the copy of The Winged Dragon of Ra, resulting that Ra gets enraged and strikes both players with lightning, and Jonouchi recovers from ThePowerOfFriendship. Mai would have beaten Yami Malik had she just attacked, but tries to summon Ra and can't read its text, and Yami Malik uses Ra instead. Kaiba suddenly has a vision that tells him that he should use his Blue-Eyes White Dragon instead of Obelisk the Tormentor, sacrificing his Egyptian God Card, which makes Ishizu's Trap Card useless. And then in the semi-finals, Jonouchi would have defeated Yami Malik(and Malik (and saved Mai as he vowed he would), but nearly dies because of the torture he had to endure in the duel. And Yami Yugi is able to save himself from losing by suddenly being able to use the effect of Kaiba's The Flute of Summoning Dragon.
20th Mar '17 7:10:35 AM BelligerentQuelea
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** The Battle City Finals take this UpToEleven, where most characters win/lose due to plot armor, since it's obvious who will meet who in the finals. Yami Yugi is about to lose to Yami Bakura until on his very last turn he gets an Egyptian God Card. Rishid is about to win against Jonouchi, but Malik orders him to summon the copy of The Winged Dragon of Ra, resulting that Ra gets enraged and strikes both players with lightning, and Jonouchi recovers from ThePowerOfFriendship. Mai would have beaten Yami Malik had she just attacked, but tries to summon Ra and can't read its text, and Yami Malik uses Ra instead. Kaiba suddenly has a vision that tells him that he should use his Blue-Eyes White Dragon instead of Obelisk the Tormentor, sacrificing his Egyptian God Card, which makes Ishizu's Trap Card useless. And then in the semi-finals, Jonouchi would have defeated Yami Malik, but dies because of the torture he had to endure in the duel. And Yami Yugi is able to save himself from losing by suddenly being able to use the effect of Kaiba's The Flute of Summoning Dragon.

to:

** The Battle City Finals take this UpToEleven, where most characters win/lose due to plot armor, since it's obvious who will meet who in the finals. Yami Yugi is about to lose to Yami Bakura until on his very last turn he gets an Egyptian God Card. Rishid is about to win against Jonouchi, but Malik orders him to summon the copy of The Winged Dragon of Ra, resulting that Ra gets enraged and strikes both players with lightning, and Jonouchi recovers from ThePowerOfFriendship. Mai would have beaten Yami Malik had she just attacked, but tries to summon Ra and can't read its text, and Yami Malik uses Ra instead. Kaiba suddenly has a vision that tells him that he should use his Blue-Eyes White Dragon instead of Obelisk the Tormentor, sacrificing his Egyptian God Card, which makes Ishizu's Trap Card useless. And then in the semi-finals, Jonouchi would have defeated Yami Malik, Malik(and saved Mai as he vowed he would), but nearly dies because of the torture he had to endure in the duel. And Yami Yugi is able to save himself from losing by suddenly being able to use the effect of Kaiba's The Flute of Summoning Dragon.
19th Mar '17 8:25:00 PM BlueDogXL
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* LoweredMonsterDifficulty: The villain's Plot Armor degrades over time, and/or the hero(es)'(s) becomes more prominent against them)

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* LoweredMonsterDifficulty: The villain's Plot Armor degrades over time, and/or the hero(es)'(s) hero's or group of heroes' Plot Armor becomes more prominent against them)
13th Mar '17 11:02:29 AM BeerBaron
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' averts it with [=NPCs=]. You can kill anyone in the game if you so choose and are strong enough to do so. For most plot-important characters, you will get pop-up text stating that you've doomed the world and recommending that you load a saved game after you've killed them, but that is all. (And some plot-important NPCs do not give this message.)

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' averts it with [=NPCs=]. You can kill anyone in the game if you so choose and are strong enough to do so. For most plot-important characters, you will get pop-up text stating that you've doomed the world and recommending that you load a saved game after you've killed them, but that is all. (And some plot-important NPCs [=NPCs=] do not give this message.)
13th Mar '17 11:01:55 AM BeerBaron
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** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' averts it with [=NPCs=]. You can kill anyone in the game if you so choose and are strong enough to do so. For most plot-important characters, you will get pop-up text stating that you've doomed the world and recommending that you load a saved game after you've killed them, but that is all. (And some plot-important NPCs do not give this message.)

to:

** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' averts it with [=NPCs=]. You can kill anyone in the game if you so choose and are strong enough to do so. For most plot-important characters, you will get pop-up text stating that you've doomed the world and recommending that you load a saved game after you've killed them, but that is all. (And some plot-important NPCs do not give this message.)
13th Mar '17 11:01:33 AM BeerBaron
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** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', perhaps to avoid completely breaking quests as one could do in its predecessor ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', had certain characters marked Essential - they cannot die, only fall unconscious, after which they would get up like nothing ever happened. However, this can still end up {{Unwinnable}} if they're trapped somewhere where they continuously take damage, like a lava pit.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' has characters that are essential for quests which crawl around for a bit when drained of health, then get back up. However, there are so many quests in the game that approximately 70% of a city's population is essential, which really gets in the way if the player were to go on a rampage.
** As for ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', plot-critical [=NPC=]s were capable of dying just as everyone else was, and since the game had no "dynamic targeting reticule" that turned into a crown whenever it was pointing to someone particularly important, the player had to make sure he or she understood who was important. Hopefully no one [[WideOpenSandbox came across a character]] he or she was not meant to at the time, before knowing if or why this character was important. However, if a character important to the main plot was killed (it actually uses the same Essential flag as in ''Oblivion'', they just changed the effect of it and added scripting to add or remove it in-game for the later game), the game was decent enough to inform you that the "thread of prophecy has been severed" and suggest that you might want to re-load. The tricky thing is that which characters give the warning and which don't are a bit hit-and-miss (some plot-important characters ''don't'' give the warning, and some random plot-unimportant hostiles in tombs ''do'').

to:

** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' averts it with [=NPCs=]. You can kill anyone in the game if you so choose and are strong enough to do so. For most plot-important characters, you will get pop-up text stating that you've doomed the world and recommending that you load a saved game after you've killed them, but that is all. (And some plot-important NPCs do not give this message.)
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]] '',
perhaps to avoid completely breaking quests as one could do in its predecessor ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', predecessor, ''Morrowind'', had certain characters marked Essential - they cannot die, only fall unconscious, after which they would get up like nothing ever happened. However, this can still end up {{Unwinnable}} if they're trapped somewhere where they continuously take damage, like a lava pit.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' has characters that are essential for quests which crawl around for a bit when drained of health, then get back up. However, there are so many quests in the game that approximately 70% of a city's population is essential, which really gets in the way if the player were to go on a rampage.
** As for ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', plot-critical [=NPC=]s were capable of dying just as everyone else was, and since the game had no "dynamic targeting reticule" that turned into a crown whenever it was pointing to someone particularly important, the player had to make sure he or she understood who was important. Hopefully no one [[WideOpenSandbox came across a character]] he or she was not meant to at the time, before knowing if or why this character was important. However, if a character important to the main plot was killed (it actually uses the same Essential flag as in ''Oblivion'', they just changed the effect of it and added scripting to add or remove it in-game for the later game), the game was decent enough to inform you that the "thread of prophecy has been severed" and suggest that you might want to re-load. The tricky thing is that which characters give the warning and which don't are a bit hit-and-miss (some plot-important characters ''don't'' give the warning, and some random plot-unimportant hostiles in tombs ''do'').
rampage.
9th Mar '17 4:42:05 PM Blazer
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** This ends up getting {{Deconstructed|Trope}} in her encounter with SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}} along with PopularityPower. Gwen boasts that she'll be able to kill Wade because this is her book and her Plot Armor will save her. When Wade figures out what's going on, he delivers a devastating TheReasonYouSuckSpeech to Gwen by pointing out that she's a D-Lister who casual readers might confuse for one of the many Gwen Stacy duplicates that spawned from ComicBook/SpiderGwen's popularity while he's an A-Lister with hundreds of issues, merchandise and the highest-grossing R-Rated movie of all time - there was no way she will win.
7th Mar '17 9:14:06 PM mlsmithca
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* This trope is played completely straight and completely serious, as it is literally the superpower of Eli in ''Film/TheBookOfEli'', due to him being protected by [[spoiler:God Himself]]. And while it may sound silly, it really, [[CurbStompBattle really]] [[SoCoolItsAwesome works]].

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* This trope is played completely straight and completely serious, as it is literally the superpower of Eli in ''Film/TheBookOfEli'', due to him being protected by [[spoiler:God Himself]]. And while it may sound silly, it really, [[CurbStompBattle really]] [[SoCoolItsAwesome really works]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PlotArmor