History Main / PinballScoring

20th Jun '17 10:22:05 AM Piterpicher
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** Pretty much every Sega racing game that had points was like this. Lots of others, too (''VideoGame/SpaceHarrier'', ''AfterBurner'', ''Wrestle War'', etc.)

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** Pretty much every Sega racing game that had points was like this. Lots of others, too (''VideoGame/SpaceHarrier'', ''AfterBurner'', ''VideoGame/AfterBurner'', ''Wrestle War'', etc.)
17th Jun '17 10:32:19 AM nombretomado
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* In RugbyUnion and RugbyLeague, a ridiculously large number of points in a match is often referred to as a "cricket score", a reference to the large number of runs usually scored by both sides in a game of cricket. This big a number of points isn't usually a good thing, as if achieved by only one team it means that the match was severely (often dangerously) one-sided, and if both teams get a very high score it means neither of them could defend.

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* In RugbyUnion UsefulNotes/RugbyUnion and RugbyLeague, a ridiculously large number of points in a match is often referred to as a "cricket score", a reference to the large number of runs usually scored by both sides in a game of cricket. This big a number of points isn't usually a good thing, as if achieved by only one team it means that the match was severely (often dangerously) one-sided, and if both teams get a very high score it means neither of them could defend.
16th May '17 6:28:04 PM nombretomado
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** The NES version of ''VideoGame/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTheArcadeGame'' is an odd example: the Japanese version of the game uses PinballScoring, while the American version uses the same "one point per enemy" scheme as the arcade version. The points scheme is different in other ways, too: in the Japanese version, some enemies give more than 100 points, and you get extra lives at different point values. Funnily enough, TMNT3 used PinballScoring in both regions, and [=TMNT4=] used it in neither (nor did the arcade game it was based on, although {{Ubisoft}}'s ''Re-Shelled'' [[VideoGameRemake remake]] does this in a limited capacity, with about 10-50 points for each enemy defeated).

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** The NES version of ''VideoGame/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTheArcadeGame'' is an odd example: the Japanese version of the game uses PinballScoring, while the American version uses the same "one point per enemy" scheme as the arcade version. The points scheme is different in other ways, too: in the Japanese version, some enemies give more than 100 points, and you get extra lives at different point values. Funnily enough, TMNT3 used PinballScoring in both regions, and [=TMNT4=] used it in neither (nor did the arcade game it was based on, although {{Ubisoft}}'s Creator/{{Ubisoft}}'s ''Re-Shelled'' [[VideoGameRemake remake]] does this in a limited capacity, with about 10-50 points for each enemy defeated).
18th Mar '17 6:12:30 PM nombretomado
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* In the {{Neopets}} flash sidegame ''The Return of the Return of Dr. Sloth'', high scores rise exponentially with play skill, though it is one of the lower scoring of games with this distinction. The current high score board has only one entry in the hundred billions.

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* In the {{Neopets}} {{Website/Neopets}} flash sidegame ''The Return of the Return of Dr. Sloth'', high scores rise exponentially with play skill, though it is one of the lower scoring of games with this distinction. The current high score board has only one entry in the hundred billions.
8th Feb '17 1:22:21 PM ElliottB1
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* ''EveryExtendExtraExtreme'' has 20 digit scores. Even the official leaderboards are called the "All-Time Trillionares' Club"

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* ''EveryExtendExtraExtreme'' ''VideoGame/EveryExtend Extra Extreme'' has 20 digit scores. Even the official leaderboards are called the "All-Time Trillionares' Club"
2nd Feb '17 5:06:23 PM ZombieAladdin
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Added DiffLines:

** That being said, even PhysicalPinballTables with digitally-managed scoring have Score Caps, as the programming requires it to avoid weird glitches and bugs. It's just that said caps are typically very, very high. They're way out of reach for all but the most dedicated players, and even then, only a select few games have ever had this limit reached (such as the aforementioned ''Johnny Mnemonic'' at 999,999,999,990). It does happen often enough that pinball jargon has a phrase for it, the aptly-named "over the top" scoring.
2nd Feb '17 4:43:10 PM ZombieAladdin
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** Sometimes a limited number of zeros are placed in the artwork, so while technically the score reads, say: 10 '''000''', the counter built in only needs to count up from one, assuming each point increment is 1 '''000'''. This was common on early score-reel games.

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** Sometimes a limited number of zeros are placed in the artwork, so while technically the score reads, say: 10 '''000''', the counter built in only needs to count up from one, assuming each point increment is 1 '''000'''. This was common on early score-reel games. Even when there's a convincing-looking reel for each digit, any digit that's always at 0 is actually a fake reel, as a strip of curved plastic with a "0" printed on it and nothing else.
2nd Feb '17 4:09:29 AM Morgenthaler
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* The Gummi Ship mode in ''KingdomHearts'' has large scoring. Rank S+9 can require 4,000,000 or more points. Taking enemy fire increases your score, by one. A nice touch is that instead of glowing white when the score goes up the ones digit glows red instead.
* In ''{{Gish}}'', if your score ends with "1", you've gotten a good ending since you'll get a good ending bonus of 1 point.

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* The Gummi Ship mode in ''KingdomHearts'' ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' has large scoring. Rank S+9 can require 4,000,000 or more points. Taking enemy fire increases your score, by one. A nice touch is that instead of glowing white when the score goes up the ones digit glows red instead.
* In ''{{Gish}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Gish}}'', if your score ends with "1", you've gotten a good ending since you'll get a good ending bonus of 1 point.
19th Dec '16 4:36:03 AM Hylarn
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** The spinoff games, ''Shoot the Bullet'' and ''Double Spoiler'', have the player take pictures of patterns. Base scores depend on the position of the boss and the number of bullets, but then bonus multipliers are added, ranging from how centered the boss is in the photograph, to having a large amount of bullets all be the same color, to having one of the bosses in her [[PettingZooPeople cat form]] at the time, to taking the picture exactly when you hear the boss going "clak!".
** The fangame ''Phantasmagoria Trues'' uses a scoring system that, courtesy of multipliers, one of which is squared before being applied, and various bonus values, offers up to ''19-digit scores''.
** Stage completion bonuses increase exponentially, to the point where it's possible to score more points in the final stage than the entire game up until that point ''combined''.

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** The spinoff games, ''Shoot the Bullet'' and ''Double Spoiler'', have the player take pictures of patterns. Base scores depend on the position of the boss and the number of bullets, but then bonus multipliers are added, ranging from how centered the boss is in the photograph, to having a large amount of bullets all be the same color, to having one of the bosses in her [[PettingZooPeople cat form]] at the time, to taking the picture exactly when you hear the boss going "clak!".
** The
* Touhou fangame ''Phantasmagoria Trues'' uses a Trues''' scoring system that, courtesy has, at it's base, linearly increasing point item values like mainline Touhou games. It also has a multiplier that increases throughout the game. And there's the more typical shmup stage multiplier that ranges from 1x to 999x. Atypically, ''this is squared''. All this, combined with the absurd amount of multipliers, one of which is squared before being applied, and various bonus values, offers up point items, leads to ''19-digit scores''.
** Stage completion bonuses increase exponentially, to the point where it's possible to score more points in the final stage than the entire game up until that point ''combined''.
highscores''.
8th Dec '16 3:52:09 PM Arcorann
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* TI-89 calculator game "Drifter" had a problem with this. It was essentially a game of moving the player object left and right to avoid the ever-shrinking walls of a tunnel. The problem came in with the scoring system for the Classic mode. "Drifting," or not hitting the left or right keys to change your horizontal velocity, would give your entire score multiplers. Drifting one screen would add 25% of your current score to itself, two 50% (of the NEW score after the first screen), and each screen drifted 3 and after (consecutively) would double your score. You can already see where this is going if you drift for ten screens straight or so, but add to that the fact that each "level," for which the tunnel shrinks one pixel or so every 5-15 screens, increases the amount of points added for each tick. Stage 1 gives you one point for each tick, stage 2 gives you two, etc. On a particularly good run, you can get up to stage 15-20. One level is about 100-200 ticks by the way, considering that the first level gives you about that many points if you do very little drifting. tl;dr, the game can crash your calculator due to some massive memory overflow. Certainly nowhere near Giga Wing's and MvC2's scores, but it probably could get that ridiculous with absolutely no inflation if the calculators were actually Windows XP computers. Fortunately, the mode that scored by only drifts, given arbitrary numbers of points instead of multipliers, did not have this problem. There were multipliers in the form of chaining multiple drifts together, but they only affected the points being earned, not total score, and chaining drifts is near-impossible in higher levels.

to:

* TI-89 calculator game "Drifter" had a problem with this. It was essentially a game of moving the player object left and right to avoid the ever-shrinking walls of a tunnel. The problem came in with the scoring system for the Classic mode. "Drifting," or not hitting the left or right keys to change your horizontal velocity, would give your entire score multiplers.multipliers. Drifting one screen would add 25% of your current score to itself, two 50% (of the NEW score after the first screen), and each screen drifted 3 and after (consecutively) would double your score. You can already see where this is going if you drift for ten screens straight or so, but add to that the fact that each "level," for which the tunnel shrinks one pixel or so every 5-15 screens, increases the amount of points added for each tick. Stage 1 gives you one point for each tick, stage 2 gives you two, etc. On a particularly good run, you can get up to stage 15-20. One level is about 100-200 ticks by the way, considering that the first level gives you about that many points if you do very little drifting. tl;dr, the game can crash your calculator due to some massive memory overflow. Certainly nowhere near Giga Wing's and MvC2's scores, but it probably could get that ridiculous with absolutely no inflation if the calculators were actually Windows XP computers. Fortunately, the mode that scored by only drifts, given arbitrary numbers of points instead of multipliers, did not have this problem. There were multipliers in the form of chaining multiple drifts together, but they only affected the points being earned, not total score, and chaining drifts is near-impossible in higher levels.
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