History Main / PeoplesRepublicofTyranny

16th May '17 4:28:48 PM SullenFrog
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* The People’s Alliance for Common Treatment ([[FunWithAcronyms or simply PACT]]) from ''VisualNovel/{{Sunrider}}''. Its leader Veniczar Arcadius is a [[FullCircleRevolution former anti-Imperial revolutionary turned megalomaniacal]] [[GalacticConqueror galaxy-conquering]] [[FullCircleRevolution dictator]] with a cult of personality, and PACT itself is heavily implied to be a communist state with several parallels to Soviet Russia.
12th Apr '17 10:54:05 AM thatother1dude
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* The Galactic Federation in ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' apparently has elected leaders, but seems to [[MasterRace reserve all political power for a single species of]] InsectoidAliens, is relentlessly expansionist, and turns its conquered planets into {{Police State}}s with heavily GovernmentDrugEnforcement. [[VichyEarth They conquer Earth in the second season finale]], [[spoiler:and then Rick destroys them entirely in the third season premier by devaluing their currency]].

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* The Galactic Federation in ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' apparently has elected leaders, but seems to [[MasterRace reserve all political power for a single species of]] InsectoidAliens, is relentlessly expansionist, and turns its conquered planets into {{Police State}}s with heavily heavy GovernmentDrugEnforcement. [[VichyEarth They conquer Earth in the second season finale]], [[spoiler:and then Rick destroys them entirely in the third season premier by devaluing their currency]].
8th Apr '17 8:46:54 AM thatother1dude
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' has the Socialist Democratic Federated Republic of Carbombya, led by Supreme Military Commander, President-for-Life, and King of Kings Abdul Fakkadi. The horribly offensive stereotyping provoked Casey Kasem to quit the show. That's right; it was a joke so awful and racist that it broke Teletraan 1.
* In ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' near the beginning of the episode Rodger Codger is a sign for the fictional country "Republic of Balkavia" when the camera pans down you see that 5 people are hung from it. As a bonus the sign also says "Freedom, Peace, Unity". However it is probably a subversion as it turned out to be a CIA training course.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' has the Socialist Democratic Federated Republic of Carbombya, led by Supreme Military Commander, President-for-Life, and King of Kings Abdul Fakkadi. The horribly offensive stereotyping provoked Casey Kasem to quit the show. That's right; it was a joke so awful and racist that it broke Teletraan 1.
* In ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' near the beginning of the episode Rodger Codger "Rodger Codger" is a sign for the fictional country "Republic of Balkavia" when the camera pans down you see that 5 people are hung from it. As a bonus the sign also says "Freedom, Peace, Unity". However it is probably a subversion as it It turned out to be a CIA training course.


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* The Galactic Federation in ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' apparently has elected leaders, but seems to [[MasterRace reserve all political power for a single species of]] InsectoidAliens, is relentlessly expansionist, and turns its conquered planets into {{Police State}}s with heavily GovernmentDrugEnforcement. [[VichyEarth They conquer Earth in the second season finale]], [[spoiler:and then Rick destroys them entirely in the third season premier by devaluing their currency]].
* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' has the Socialist Democratic Federated Republic of Carbombya, led by Supreme Military Commander, President-for-Life, and King of Kings Abdul Fakkadi. The horribly offensive stereotyping provoked Casey Kasem to quit the show. That's right; it was a joke so awful and racist that it broke Teletraan 1.
19th Mar '17 2:37:13 PM Chytus
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** [[Literature/StarshipTroopers The book]] is a strange case that borders SquarePegRoundTrope. It's a mild form of this trope and isn't (late 2016) currently on the Literature section for this trope. The book is usually exaggerated to the point of parody by those who haven't read it, like (famously) the film's director. As this is a long discussion, it's in the note. [[note]]Heinlein wrote that a "thing given has no value," so forcing those who wished to execute "the supreme executive power" (IE: vote, but also things like law enforcement) had to pay for it with at least two years of service. This service could be military or not, but it was supposed to be rigorous and unpleasant and possibly dangerous, if only so those who made the choice to pursue government and political power paid dearly for it and would value it. As long as you could make your own legal decisions (IE: 18 years of age, not currently intoxicated, and not suffering mental illness) you could not be turned away. Some thoroughly unpleasant form of Federal service would be found to accommodate any level of disability. You could quit service as well, even right before a combat operation, and the only penalty was that you would not be allowed to re-enter and try to earn the franchise again. Claims like his world policed breeding are not found in the text (and are only found in the film). Rico's father, who is very wealthy and owns large business interests, is proud his family never had been in the service at the start of the book. Basically, service guarantees only the right to vote and serve in some elected or law enforcement roles, with most government posts being filled by civilian contractors. All that said, his Mobile Infantry really has a cavalier and terrifying attitude toward the life of its troops, a willingness to indoctrinate them beyond most modern armies, and a rather sexually repressed, rather joyless feel where the stretches between combat drops have little to no character, to say nothing of how quickly one's superiors could decide you were a lost cause and kick you out of the service, thus ending your dream of winning the franchise and voting rights. The MI also are quite alright with causing horrific civilian casualties to the enemy, such as the "Skinnies," with the initial raid on them specifically mentioning that the MI is not attempting to cause excessive civilian deaths ''this time'' because it's only meant to scare the Skinnies into realizing how dangerous it could get for them if they don't switch sides in the war. Furthermore, while the Federation seems to have united humanity without racial divisiveness and without subsuming individual cultures, gender roles are heavily enforced and things like corporal punishment, flogging, and hanging are still mainstays of criminal justice. Finally, the "species-ism" and submission of the individual in the book, where Johnny keeps talking about fighting for humanity, really only works because it's contrasted against the ant colony-like pseudoarachnids, who (probably) possess no individuality whatsoever.[[/note]]
* Rather [[NightmareFuel terrifyingly]], Bane [[spoiler:turns Gotham City into this]] during ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', complete with {{Kangaroo Court}}s reminiscent of the French Revolution (this link is quite explicit, as Commissioner Gordon actually quotes ''Literature/ATaleOfTwoCities'' at one point, and in an interview, we learn that Jonathan Nolan actually encouraged Christopher Nolan to read the book while he was writing the script). The wealthy are dragged out of their homes by angry mobs of armed criminals and summarily sentenced to death by a kangaroo court led by [[spoiler:Jonathan Crane... a.k.a. the Scarecrow]], who icily informs every defendant that "Your guilt has already been determined; this is merely a sentencing," where it turns out that [[MortonsFork both sentences are actually the same thing]]. Bane declares that this is a "liberation" and that he's a champion of "the people." [[spoiler:The audience isn't fooled, as he already made his ''real'' nature ''[[ToThePain painfully]]'' [[http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/when-gotham-is-ashes-you-have-my-permission-to-die clear]] to Batman earlier in the film.]]

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** [[Literature/StarshipTroopers The book]] is a strange case that borders SquarePegRoundTrope. It's a mild form of this trope and isn't (late 2016) currently on the Literature section for this trope. The book is usually exaggerated to the point of parody by those who haven't read it, like (famously) the film's director. As this is a long discussion, it's in the note. [[note]]Heinlein wrote that a "thing given has no value," so forcing those who wished to execute "the supreme executive power" (IE: vote, but also things like law enforcement) had to pay for it with at least two years of service. This service could be military or not, but it was supposed to be rigorous and unpleasant and possibly dangerous, if only so those who made the choice to pursue government and political power paid dearly for it and would value it. As long as you could make your own legal decisions (IE: 18 years of age, not currently intoxicated, and not suffering mental illness) you could not be turned away. Some thoroughly unpleasant form of Federal service would be found to accommodate any level of disability. You could quit service as well, even right before a combat operation, and the only penalty was that you would not be allowed to re-enter and try to earn the franchise again. Claims like his world policed breeding are not found in the text (and are only found in the film). Rico's father, who is very wealthy and owns large business interests, is proud his family never had been in the service at the start of the book. Basically, service guarantees only the right to vote and serve in some elected or law enforcement roles, with most government posts being filled by civilian contractors. All that said, his Mobile Infantry really has a cavalier and terrifying attitude toward the life of its troops, a willingness to indoctrinate them beyond most modern armies, and a rather sexually repressed, rather joyless feel where the stretches between combat drops have little to no character, to say nothing of how quickly one's superiors could decide you were a lost cause and kick you out of the service, thus ending your dream of winning the franchise and voting rights. The MI also are quite alright with causing horrific civilian casualties to the enemy, such as the "Skinnies," with the initial raid on them specifically mentioning that the MI is not attempting to cause excessive civilian deaths ''this time'' because it's only meant to scare the Skinnies into realizing how dangerous it could get for them if they don't switch sides in the war. Furthermore, while the Federation seems to have united humanity without racial divisiveness and without subsuming individual cultures, gender roles are heavily enforced and things like corporal punishment, flogging, and hanging are still mainstays of criminal justice. Finally, the "species-ism" and submission of the individual in the book, where Johnny keeps talking about fighting for humanity, really only works because it's contrasted against the ant colony-like pseudoarachnids, who (probably) possess no individuality whatsoever.[[/note]]
* Rather [[NightmareFuel terrifyingly]], Bane [[spoiler:turns Gotham City into this]] during ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', complete with {{Kangaroo Court}}s reminiscent of the French Revolution (this link is quite explicit, as Commissioner Gordon actually quotes ''Literature/ATaleOfTwoCities'' at one point, and in an interview, we learn that Jonathan Nolan actually encouraged Christopher Nolan to read the book while he was writing the script). The wealthy are dragged out of their homes by angry mobs of armed criminals and summarily sentenced to death by a kangaroo court led by [[spoiler:Jonathan Crane... a.k.a. the Scarecrow]], who icily informs every defendant that "Your guilt has already been determined; this is merely a sentencing," where it turns out that [[MortonsFork both sentences are actually the same thing]]. Bane declares that this is a "liberation" and that he's a champion of "the people." [[spoiler:The audience isn't fooled, as he already made his ''real'' nature ''[[ToThePain painfully]]'' [[http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/when-gotham-is-ashes-you-have-my-permission-to-die clear]] painfully clear to Batman earlier in the film.]]



* ''Series/{{Angel}}'': Possible AvertedTrope. The Groosalugg is exiled from Pylea once it becomes (as Gunn described it), "some kind of people's republic". Although this is a reference to what often happens in the sort of failed revolution that often produces people's republics (ie, old revolutionaries are branded traitors for disagreeing with the faction that wins), we never find out what Pylea is now like.

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* ''Series/{{Angel}}'': Possible AvertedTrope. The Groosalugg is exiled from Pylea once it becomes (as Gunn described it), "some kind of people's republic". Although this is a reference to what often happens in the sort of failed revolution that often produces people's republics (ie, (i.e., old revolutionaries are branded traitors for disagreeing with the faction that wins), we never find out what Pylea is now like.
18th Mar '17 12:57:30 PM nombretomado
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* This can be invoked by players of web-based nation-building games like NationStates and CyberNation.

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* This can be invoked by players of web-based nation-building games like NationStates Website/NationStates and CyberNation.
25th Feb '17 3:31:06 AM LtFedora
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* The Galactic Republic in the ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequels. As the Clone Wars drag on, the Republic becomes a military dictatorship in all but name. Palpatine becomes the only voice of authority and all worlds have a regiment of clone troopers for "protection." When he finally declares the formation of [[TheEmpire the First Galactic Empire]], it's really just a formal change in name.
3rd Jan '17 5:00:05 AM VicGeorge2011
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* [[UnderwaterCity Rapture]] in ''VideoGame/{{Bioshock}}'' was built to be a capitalist utopia free from religious and government interference, where anyone can achieve for his/her own gain rather than for the fulfilment of others, and where the artist need not fear the censor and the scientist need not be bound by petty morality. Too bad the man who built it, Andrew Ryan, was also a crazy hyper-capitalist who so strongly believed everyone had to be a SelfMadeMan that he prohibited publicly funded social programs and altruistic charities, so everything in the city was privately owned, [[{{Dehumanization}} the poor were thought of as "parasites"]] and absolutely everything had a price tag on it, even basic necessities like food, water, sanitation and ''oxygen''. This environment of completely unfettered dog-eat-dog economics alienated the worse-off citizens of Rapture and allowed a man named Frank Fontaine to make an absolute killing smuggling contraband from the surface. Ryan could not compete with Fontaine on even terms and this emerging threat to his power base pissed Ryan off to no end, so he founded a SecretPolice force to seize Fontaine Futuristics by force, scuttling his entire philosophy in the process. Ryan didn't know at the time but for the rest of Rapture, this meant that Ryan seize any business deemed ''too'' profitable, and [[CivilWar this was the last straw]]. Ryan, a man who founded an underwater city built on the ideals of personal liberty, began cracking down ever harder on his citizens - first his police came for the smugglers, then they came for political activists, and eventually they [[AllCrimesAreEqual came for the lounge singers who wrote mildly derisive songs about him]]. In the end, Ryan turned Rapture into a OneNationUnderCopyright NotSoDifferent [[HeWhoFightsMonsters from the collectivist states he so greatly despised]].

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* [[UnderwaterCity Rapture]] in ''VideoGame/{{Bioshock}}'' was built to be a capitalist utopia free from religious and government interference, where anyone can achieve for his/her own gain rather than for the fulfilment of others, and where the artist need not fear the censor and the scientist need not be bound by petty morality. Too bad the man who built it, Andrew Ryan, was also a crazy hyper-capitalist who so strongly believed everyone had to be a SelfMadeMan that he prohibited publicly funded social programs and altruistic charities, so everything in the city was privately owned, [[{{Dehumanization}} the poor were thought of as "parasites"]] and absolutely everything had a price tag on it, even basic necessities like food, water, sanitation and ''oxygen''. This environment of completely unfettered dog-eat-dog economics alienated the worse-off citizens of Rapture and allowed a man named Frank Fontaine to make an absolute killing smuggling contraband from the surface. Ryan could not compete with Fontaine on even terms and this emerging threat to his power base pissed Ryan off to no end, so he founded a SecretPolice force to seize Fontaine Futuristics by force, scuttling his entire philosophy in the process. Ryan didn't know at the time but for the rest of Rapture, this meant that Ryan can seize any business deemed ''too'' profitable, and [[CivilWar this was the last straw]]. Ryan, a man who founded an underwater city built on the ideals of personal liberty, began cracking down ever harder on his citizens - first his police came for the smugglers, then they came for political activists, and eventually they [[AllCrimesAreEqual came for the lounge singers who wrote mildly derisive songs about him]]. In the end, Ryan turned Rapture into a OneNationUnderCopyright NotSoDifferent [[HeWhoFightsMonsters from the collectivist states he so greatly despised]].
26th Dec '16 8:09:28 PM PaulA
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* ''Series/FlashGordon'': In the 2007 series, Ming's authoritarian state is called "The United Peoples of Mongo."

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* ''Series/FlashGordon'': In the 2007 series, ''Series/{{Flash Gordon|2007}}'': Ming's authoritarian state is called "The United Peoples of Mongo."Mongo".
7th Dec '16 4:40:49 PM chc232323
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** [[Literature/StarshipTroopers The book]] is a strange case that borders SquarePegRoundTrope. It's a mild form of this trope and isn't (late 2016) currently on the Literature section for this trope. The book is usually exaggerated to the point of parody by those who haven't read it, like (famously) the film's director. As this is a long discussion, it's in the note. [[note]]Heinlein wrote that a "thing given has no value," so forcing those who wished to execute "the supreme executive power" (IE: vote, but also things like law enforcement) had to pay for it with at least two years of service. This service could be military or not, but it was supposed to be rigorous and unpleasant and possibly dangerous, if only so those who made the choice to pursue government and political power paid dearly for it and would value it. As long as you could make your own legal decisions (IE: 18 years of age, not currently intoxicated, and not suffering mental illness) you could not be turned away. Some thoroughly unpleasant form of Federal service would be found to accommodate any level of disability. You could quit service as well, even right before a combat operation, and the only penalty was that you would not be allowed to re-enter and try to earn the franchise again. Claims like his world policed breeding are not found in the text (and are only found in the film). Rico's father, who is very wealthy and owns large business interests, is proud his family never had been in the service at the start of the book. Basically, service guarantees only the right to vote and serve in some elected or law enforcement roles, with most government posts being filled by civilian contractors. All that said, his Mobile Infantry really has a cavalier and terrifying attitude toward the life of its tropes, a willingness to indoctrinate them beyond most modern armies, and a rather sexually repressed, rather joyless feel where the stretches between combat drops have little to no character, to say nothing of how quickly one's superiors could decide you were a lost cause and kick you out of the service, thus ending your dream of winning the franchise and voting rights. The MI also are quite alright with causing horrific civilian casualties to the enemy, such as the "Skinnies," with the initial raid on them specifically mentioning that the MI is not attempting to cause excessive civilian deaths ''this time'' because it's only meant to scare the Skinnies into realizing how dangerous it could get for them if they don't switch sides in the war. Finally, the "species-ism" and submission of the individual in the book, where Johnny keeps talking about fighting for humanity, really only works because it's contrasted against the ant colony-like pseudoarachnids, who (probably) possess no individuality whatsoever.[[/note]]

to:

** [[Literature/StarshipTroopers The book]] is a strange case that borders SquarePegRoundTrope. It's a mild form of this trope and isn't (late 2016) currently on the Literature section for this trope. The book is usually exaggerated to the point of parody by those who haven't read it, like (famously) the film's director. As this is a long discussion, it's in the note. [[note]]Heinlein wrote that a "thing given has no value," so forcing those who wished to execute "the supreme executive power" (IE: vote, but also things like law enforcement) had to pay for it with at least two years of service. This service could be military or not, but it was supposed to be rigorous and unpleasant and possibly dangerous, if only so those who made the choice to pursue government and political power paid dearly for it and would value it. As long as you could make your own legal decisions (IE: 18 years of age, not currently intoxicated, and not suffering mental illness) you could not be turned away. Some thoroughly unpleasant form of Federal service would be found to accommodate any level of disability. You could quit service as well, even right before a combat operation, and the only penalty was that you would not be allowed to re-enter and try to earn the franchise again. Claims like his world policed breeding are not found in the text (and are only found in the film). Rico's father, who is very wealthy and owns large business interests, is proud his family never had been in the service at the start of the book. Basically, service guarantees only the right to vote and serve in some elected or law enforcement roles, with most government posts being filled by civilian contractors. All that said, his Mobile Infantry really has a cavalier and terrifying attitude toward the life of its tropes, troops, a willingness to indoctrinate them beyond most modern armies, and a rather sexually repressed, rather joyless feel where the stretches between combat drops have little to no character, to say nothing of how quickly one's superiors could decide you were a lost cause and kick you out of the service, thus ending your dream of winning the franchise and voting rights. The MI also are quite alright with causing horrific civilian casualties to the enemy, such as the "Skinnies," with the initial raid on them specifically mentioning that the MI is not attempting to cause excessive civilian deaths ''this time'' because it's only meant to scare the Skinnies into realizing how dangerous it could get for them if they don't switch sides in the war. Furthermore, while the Federation seems to have united humanity without racial divisiveness and without subsuming individual cultures, gender roles are heavily enforced and things like corporal punishment, flogging, and hanging are still mainstays of criminal justice. Finally, the "species-ism" and submission of the individual in the book, where Johnny keeps talking about fighting for humanity, really only works because it's contrasted against the ant colony-like pseudoarachnids, who (probably) possess no individuality whatsoever.[[/note]]
7th Dec '16 5:54:47 AM chc232323
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** It doesn't look quite as bad in [[Literature/StarshipTroopers the book]]. Maybe. But Heinlein appeared to have the opinion that a government that required you to earn the right to vote or breed might have been a good thing.

to:

** It doesn't look quite as bad in [[Literature/StarshipTroopers The book]] is a strange case that borders SquarePegRoundTrope. It's a mild form of this trope and isn't (late 2016) currently on the book]]. Maybe. But Heinlein appeared Literature section for this trope. The book is usually exaggerated to have the opinion point of parody by those who haven't read it, like (famously) the film's director. As this is a long discussion, it's in the note. [[note]]Heinlein wrote that a "thing given has no value," so forcing those who wished to execute "the supreme executive power" (IE: vote, but also things like law enforcement) had to pay for it with at least two years of service. This service could be military or not, but it was supposed to be rigorous and unpleasant and possibly dangerous, if only so those who made the choice to pursue government and political power paid dearly for it and would value it. As long as you could make your own legal decisions (IE: 18 years of age, not currently intoxicated, and not suffering mental illness) you could not be turned away. Some thoroughly unpleasant form of Federal service would be found to accommodate any level of disability. You could quit service as well, even right before a combat operation, and the only penalty was that required you would not be allowed to re-enter and try to earn the franchise again. Claims like his world policed breeding are not found in the text (and are only found in the film). Rico's father, who is very wealthy and owns large business interests, is proud his family never had been in the service at the start of the book. Basically, service guarantees only the right to vote and serve in some elected or breed might law enforcement roles, with most government posts being filled by civilian contractors. All that said, his Mobile Infantry really has a cavalier and terrifying attitude toward the life of its tropes, a willingness to indoctrinate them beyond most modern armies, and a rather sexually repressed, rather joyless feel where the stretches between combat drops have been little to no character, to say nothing of how quickly one's superiors could decide you were a good thing.lost cause and kick you out of the service, thus ending your dream of winning the franchise and voting rights. The MI also are quite alright with causing horrific civilian casualties to the enemy, such as the "Skinnies," with the initial raid on them specifically mentioning that the MI is not attempting to cause excessive civilian deaths ''this time'' because it's only meant to scare the Skinnies into realizing how dangerous it could get for them if they don't switch sides in the war. Finally, the "species-ism" and submission of the individual in the book, where Johnny keeps talking about fighting for humanity, really only works because it's contrasted against the ant colony-like pseudoarachnids, who (probably) possess no individuality whatsoever.[[/note]]
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