History Main / PatchworkMap

16th Mar '16 8:22:58 AM bobwolf
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* ''{{Zootopia}}'': The titular city has several extremely climate-controlled suburbs - a snowed-over polar zone is sandwiched between an extremely dry and windy desert and a wet equatorial jungle. Justified in that the city's infrastructure works to transfer atmospheric conditions from one area to another, creating extremes in both. For example, the air conditioners that freeze Tundra Town produce a lot of heat exhaust, which heats the adjacent Sahara Square.
4th Mar '16 11:18:31 PM StClair
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* One of the most dramatic change in scenery and map patchwork is Western UsefulNotes/{{China}}, due to the [[SarcasmMode little-known]] mountain range known as the Himalayas shielding the interior region from rainfall, an event known as the rain shadow effect. You have lush farmland directly to the south of the mountains in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, then shifting abruptly to the highest mountain range on Earth, snow-capped all-year-round and having the largest and highest amount of glaciers on Earth (the Himalayas is the world's third-largest stock of untapped water, after the Antarctic and the Arctic). Directly to the north is the dry Tibetan Plateau, also known as the "Roof of the World". These combined heights created one of the driest, hottest, and, curiously, the coldest places on Earth: the Tarim Basin, which contains the Taklamakan Desert and its ever-changing temperature. Further north will take you to the the grassy steppes of Central Asia, which itself also contains a desert (Gurbantünggüt) containing the remotest point from the sea on Earth.

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* One of the most dramatic change in scenery and map patchwork is Western UsefulNotes/{{China}}, due to the [[SarcasmMode little-known]] mountain range known as the Himalayas shielding the interior region from rainfall, an event known as the rain shadow effect.rainfall. You have lush farmland directly to the south of the mountains in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, then shifting abruptly to the highest mountain range on Earth, snow-capped all-year-round and having the largest and highest amount of glaciers on Earth (the Himalayas is the world's third-largest stock of untapped water, after the Antarctic and the Arctic). Directly to the north is the dry Tibetan Plateau, also known as the "Roof of the World". These combined heights created one of the driest, hottest, and, curiously, the coldest places on Earth: the Tarim Basin, which contains the Taklamakan Desert and its ever-changing temperature. Further north will take you to the the grassy steppes of Central Asia, which itself also contains a desert (Gurbantünggüt) containing the remotest point from the sea on Earth.
4th Mar '16 11:16:43 PM StClair
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** The "rain shadow" phenomenon plays a big role in the patchwork nature of western North America. Basically, when rain clouds travel over a mountain range the pressure differential makes them dump all their precipitation on the windward face of the mountain. The land on the other side of the range is left virtually bone dry. Since the prevailing winds in the west are coming off the Pacific and the western half of North America is a continuous patchwork of mountains...

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** The "rain shadow" phenomenon plays a big role in the patchwork nature of western North America. Basically, when rain clouds travel over a mountain range the pressure differential makes them dump all their precipitation on the windward face of the mountain. The land on the other side of the range is left virtually bone dry. Since the prevailing winds in the west are coming off the Pacific and the western half of North America is a continuous patchwork of mountains...mountains and the spaces between them...
28th Feb '16 4:19:10 PM Theriocephalus
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* Christopher Paolini's ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'' has a desert right next to a dense forest in an otherwise medieval setting. Justified due to the forest being noted to have been grown with the elves' magic and the desert also being very close to a [[UpToEleven twelve mile high]] mountain range.

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* Christopher Paolini's ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'' has a desert right next to a dense forest in an otherwise medieval setting. Justified due to the forest being noted to have been grown with the elves' magic and the desert also being very close to a [[UpToEleven twelve mile high]] mountain range. The numerous large lakes that lack either tributary or distributary rivers without emptying or overflowing are a little harder to explain.
24th Feb '16 4:53:29 PM Dimas28
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* One of the most dramatic change in scenery and map patchwork is Western UsefulNotes/{{China}}, due to the [[SarcasmMode little-known]] mountain range known as the Himalayas shielding the interior region from rainfall, an event known as the rain shadow effect. You have lush farmland directly to the south of the mountains in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, then shifting abruptly to the highest mountain range on Earth, snow-capped all-year-round and having the largest and highest amount of glaciers on Earth (the Himalayas is the world's third-largest stock of untapped water, after the Antarctic and the Arctic). Directly to the north is the dry Tibetan Plateau, also known as the "Roof of the World". These combined heights created one of the driest, hottest, and, curiously, the coldest places on Earth: the Tarim Basin, which contains the Taklamakan Desert and its ever-changing temperature. Further north will take you to the the grassy steppes of Central Asia, which itself also contains a desert (Gurbantünggüt) containing the remotest point from the sea on Earth.
** The Himalayas itself also deserves a mention. It is actually located in the subtropics, on the same latitude as North Africa and the Southernmost United States including Texas and Louisiana. Yet it manages to not only be snow-capped all-year, but becomes the world center of glaciers on account of its sheer size, purely due to its great altitude.



* One of the more dramatic transitions is caused by the Himalayas and their rain shadow. First there's a lush landscape, followed by the world's tallest mountains complete with glaciers, then the dryer Tibetan plateau and the driest Taklamakan Desert on the other side.
20th Feb '16 6:42:38 PM Thranx
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** The "rain shadow" phenomenon plays a big role in the patchwork nature of western North America. Basically, when rain clouds travel over a mountain range the pressure differential makes them dump all their precipitation on the windward face of the mountain. The land on the other side of the range is left virtually bone dry. Since the prevailing winds in the west are coming off the Pacific and the western half of North America is a continuous patchwork of mountains...
19th Feb '16 5:42:23 PM morenohijazo
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* ''VideoGame/TheWitness'': There are an awful lot of different biomes close together on such a small island. It's possible to stand in one biome and see three others at any given time.
2nd Feb '16 7:42:55 PM ryttu3k
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* Arizona transitions pretty abruptly from ponderosa pine forests that regularly get snow (north, near Flagstaff) to desert (most of the rest). You can be traveling down from Flagstaff and see nothing but pine forests, and five minutes later be staring at the start of the desert and a rather large amount of saguaro cacti.

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* Due to the Colorado Plateau, Arizona transitions pretty abruptly from ponderosa pine forests that regularly get snow (north, near Flagstaff) to desert (most of the rest). You can be traveling down from Flagstaff and see nothing but pine forests, and five minutes later be staring at the start of the desert and a rather large amount of saguaro cacti.
2nd Feb '16 7:40:53 PM ryttu3k
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* Arizona transitions pretty abruptly from ponderosa pine forests that regularly get snow (north, near Flagstaff) to desert (most of the rest). You can be traveling down from Flagstaff and see nothing but pine forests, and five minutes later be staring at the start of the desert and a rather large amount of saguaro cacti.
26th Jan '16 12:52:57 PM pittsburghmuggle
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'': Blink and you'll miss it (and perfectly fitting this trope), but in "Speedtrapped" the countryside goes from the lush greens of Lawndale to the dry desert lands of Fremont in an instant when Daria pulls over to let Quinn drive.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PatchworkMap