History Main / PanderingToTheBase

21st Jan '18 4:58:14 PM nombretomado
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* Mark Rosewater's columns on [[http://www.magicthegathering.com Magic: The Gathering.com]] have used this argument to justify such things as bad cards, skill-testers, overly simple Core Sets, and its focus on recent-duration formats. While WizardsOfTheCoast appreciates its devoted fanbase, it needs to ensure that newer players have a clear path into learning the game without being inundated with complexities early on.

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* Mark Rosewater's columns on [[http://www.magicthegathering.com Magic: The Gathering.com]] have used this argument to justify such things as bad cards, skill-testers, overly simple Core Sets, and its focus on recent-duration formats. While WizardsOfTheCoast Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast appreciates its devoted fanbase, it needs to ensure that newer players have a clear path into learning the game without being inundated with complexities early on.
16th Jan '18 2:08:08 AM Cryoclaste
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* [[ZerothLawOfTropeExamples Shakespeare did it.]] ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' was first performed in front of an audience including King James I, and popular {{Fanon}} at the time was that James was descended from main character Banquo. Shakespeare reversed Banquo's role into a benevolent character to appeal to James. There's also some speculation that several scenes of the Three Witches were added later because they were found to be popular.

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* [[ZerothLawOfTropeExamples [[JustForFun/ZerothLawOfTropeExamples Shakespeare did it.]] ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' was first performed in front of an audience including King James I, and popular {{Fanon}} at the time was that James was descended from main character Banquo. Shakespeare reversed Banquo's role into a benevolent character to appeal to James. There's also some speculation that several scenes of the Three Witches were added later because they were found to be popular.
3rd Jan '18 4:09:11 PM chucknormie
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* ''Anime/LoveLive'': [[{{Tsundere}} Maki]]/[[TheFakeCutie Nico]] was one of the most popular {{Fan Preferred Couple}}s despite being ShipsThatPassInTheNight for the entire first season, as they rarely interacted and didn't have many in-story reasons to. The second season took note of how much the fans loved them together and ramped up the ShipTease, although there was zero explanation for why two characters that barely acknowledged each other's existence before were suddenly all over each other.
30th Dec '17 6:23:45 PM Ninamarie124
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17th Dec '17 12:08:37 PM louisXVI
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** The series been criticized by some western gamers for doing this too much in the direction of Japanese fans at the expense of the rest of
the world, as many playable characters reflect Japanese popularity rather than global fame. The inclusion of Marth and Roy in ''Smash Bros. Melee'', for instance, provoked some head-scratching, given it predated the release of any FireEmblem game in America. The constant inclusion of Jigglypuff, likewise, though now seen by westerners as a sort of weird-but-fun franchise tradition, has its roots in pandering to Japanese audiences, where Jigs has long been one of the most popular Pokemon.

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** The series been criticized by some western gamers for doing this too much in the direction of Japanese fans at the expense of the rest of
of the world, as many playable characters reflect Japanese popularity rather than global fame. The inclusion of Marth and Roy in ''Smash Bros. Melee'', for instance, provoked some head-scratching, given it predated the release of any FireEmblem game in America. The constant inclusion of Jigglypuff, likewise, though now seen by westerners as a sort of weird-but-fun franchise tradition, has its roots in pandering to Japanese audiences, where Jigs has long been one of the most popular Pokemon.
17th Dec '17 12:08:12 PM louisXVI
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** The series been criticized by some western gamers for doing this too much in the direction of Japanese fans at the expense of the rest of
the world, as many playable characters reflect Japanese popularity rather than global fame. The inclusion of Marth and Roy in ''Smash Bros. Melee'', for instance, provoked some head-scratching, given it predated the release of any FireEmblem game in America. The constant inclusion of Jigglypuff, likewise, though now seen by westerners as a sort of weird-but-fun franchise tradition, has its roots in pandering to Japanese audiences, where Jigs has long been one of the most popular Pokemon.
17th Dec '17 11:51:47 AM louisXVI
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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'' (also known as the Japanese version of ''Super Mario Bros 2'') is one of the earliest examples of the trope. Nintendo created a sequel to the original ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros'' that was a MissionPackSequel designed for players who mastered the first game and its subtitle was dubbed "For Super Players". Nintendo of America feared that the game would be too difficult for American players and would tarnish sales after the first ''Mario'' game sold so well. And they were right; ''Lost Levels'' has enemy placement and traps designed to catch players off guard very frequently, and many levels require a deep understanding of SMB physics to complete, including exploitation of glitches. Among other things, the game introduced the PoisonMushroom, warp pipes that send the player ''backwards'' in the level progression, Bloopers that fly. To top it off, the final set of worlds can only be unlocked by ''beating the game eight times in a row'' a fact which the game gives no real indication of. Western players would eventually get the game in ''Super Mario All-Stars'' with ''slightly'' reduced difficulty, but still [[NintendoHard bone crushingly hard]] overall and players would also get the original version of the game on the Wii's UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'' (also known as the Japanese version of ''Super Mario Bros 2'') is one of the earliest examples of the trope. Nintendo created a sequel to the original ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros'' that was a MissionPackSequel designed for players who mastered the first game and its subtitle was dubbed "For Super Players". Nintendo of America feared that the game would be too difficult for American players and would tarnish sales after the first ''Mario'' game sold so well. And they were right; ''Lost Levels'' has enemy placement and traps designed to catch players off guard very frequently, and many levels require a deep understanding of SMB physics to complete, including exploitation of glitches. Among other things, the game introduced the PoisonMushroom, warp pipes that send the player ''backwards'' in the level progression, and Bloopers that fly. To top it off, the final set of worlds can only be unlocked by ''beating the game eight times in a row'' a fact which the game gives no real indication of. Western players would eventually get the game in ''Super Mario All-Stars'' with ''slightly'' reduced difficulty, but still [[NintendoHard bone crushingly hard]] overall and players would also get the original version of the game on the Wii's UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole.
17th Dec '17 11:50:53 AM louisXVI
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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'' (also known as the Japanese version of ''Super Mario Bros 2'') is one of the earliest examples of the trope. Nintendo created a sequel to the original ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros'' that was a MissionPackSequel designed for players who mastered the first game and its subtitle was dubbed "For Super Players". Nintendo of America feared that the game would be too difficult for American players and would tarnish sales after the first ''Mario'' game sold so well. And they were right; ''Lost Levels'' has enemy placement and traps designed to catch players off guard very frequently, introduces the PoisonMushroom, has warp pipes that send the player ''backwards'' in the level progression, and has an extra set of worlds that can only be unlocked by ''beating the game eight times in a row''. Western players would eventually get the game in ''Super Mario All-Stars'' with ''slightly'' reduced difficulty, but still [[NintendoHard bone crushingly hard]] overall and players would also get the original version of the game on the Wii's UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'' (also known as the Japanese version of ''Super Mario Bros 2'') is one of the earliest examples of the trope. Nintendo created a sequel to the original ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros'' that was a MissionPackSequel designed for players who mastered the first game and its subtitle was dubbed "For Super Players". Nintendo of America feared that the game would be too difficult for American players and would tarnish sales after the first ''Mario'' game sold so well. And they were right; ''Lost Levels'' has enemy placement and traps designed to catch players off guard very frequently, introduces and many levels require a deep understanding of SMB physics to complete, including exploitation of glitches. Among other things, the game introduced the PoisonMushroom, has warp pipes that send the player ''backwards'' in the level progression, and has an extra Bloopers that fly. To top it off, the final set of worlds that can only be unlocked by ''beating the game eight times in a row''.row'' a fact which the game gives no real indication of. Western players would eventually get the game in ''Super Mario All-Stars'' with ''slightly'' reduced difficulty, but still [[NintendoHard bone crushingly hard]] overall and players would also get the original version of the game on the Wii's UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole.
17th Dec '17 11:37:14 AM louisXVI
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** In some democracies, candidates are nominated by and from a narrower group of professional party "members," rather than ordinary voters. Depending on how strict the party's formal membership rules are, and how small the membership is, this can result in nominations being dictated by an even more ideologically extreme, or simply eccentric faction of the public. This can actually present something of a paradox for small parties: the party knows on some level it needs to broaden their appeal, yet because the party membership is tiny and dominated by "true believers," it's hard for them to put forth more moderate or mainstream candidates.
17th Dec '17 11:13:27 AM louisXVI
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** Creator/JohnNathanTurner's tenure as producer of ''Doctor Who'' is frequently criticised for doing this. He was probably the first producer to really interact with and respond to the desires of the fanbase, an approach that initially made him quite popular. Unfortunately, this same approach eventually resulted in [[FanWank constant ham-fisted continuity references]], return appearances from one-off villains who hadn't been seen in ten years, sequels to stories that hadn't been broadcast in ''twenty'' years, an overdose of self-indulgence, and the gradual feeling that the only people who could enjoy the show were anoraky types who kept detailed charts of every single thing that happened in the show's twenty-five-year history and had them close at hand while watching. To make matters worse, some of the original material being referenced was material that was missing and presumed wiped, making it near-impossible to actually go back and catch up on it. As it turned out, the fanbase was quick to realize that what they ''thought'' they wanted wasn't actually what they ''really'' wanted, and today Nathan Turner's tenure is considered controversial by fans, to say the least; he's often blamed for the show's gradual decline in popularity and eventual cancellation in the 1980s.

to:

** Creator/JohnNathanTurner's tenure as producer of ''Doctor Who'' (1980-1989) is frequently criticised for doing this. He was probably the first producer to really interact with and respond to the desires of the fanbase, an approach that initially made him quite popular. Unfortunately, this same approach eventually resulted in [[FanWank constant ham-fisted continuity references]], return appearances from one-off villains who hadn't been seen in ten years, sequels to stories that hadn't been broadcast in ''twenty'' years, an overdose of self-indulgence, and the gradual feeling that the only people who could enjoy the show were anoraky types who kept detailed charts of every single thing that happened in the show's twenty-five-year history and had them close at hand while watching. To make matters worse, some of the original material being referenced was material that was missing and presumed wiped, making it near-impossible to actually go back and catch up on it. As it turned out, the fanbase was quick to realize that what they ''thought'' they wanted wasn't actually what they ''really'' wanted, and today Nathan Turner's tenure is considered controversial by fans, to say the least; he's often blamed for the show's gradual decline in popularity and eventual cancellation in the 1980s.
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