History Main / Padding

25th Jan '16 7:15:45 PM ajr1218
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** The War arc has taken Padding through so many turns of the dial that listing all the examples would take up several times as much space as ''this entire page''. The most notable example is the rampant Obito flashbacks plaguing his reveal, Naruto's attempt to redeem him, and his teamup with Kakashi; said flashbacks are extremely repetitive and pad out several panels to several ''episodes'', and the reveal's flashback padding actually ''derailed'' to show an entire arc Kakashi's and Yamato's post-Rin-death history.
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** The War arc has taken Padding through so many turns of the dial that listing all the examples would take up several times as much space as ''this entire page''. The most notable example is the rampant Obito flashbacks plaguing his reveal, Naruto's attempt to redeem him, and his teamup with Kakashi; said flashbacks are extremely repetitive and pad out several panels to several ''episodes'', and the reveal's flashback padding actually ''derailed'' to show an entire arc of Kakashi's and Yamato's post-Rin-death history.
25th Jan '16 7:11:40 PM ajr1218
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Added DiffLines:
** The War arc has taken Padding through so many turns of the dial that listing all the examples would take up several times as much space as ''this entire page''. The most notable example is the rampant Obito flashbacks plaguing his reveal, Naruto's attempt to redeem him, and his teamup with Kakashi; said flashbacks are extremely repetitive and pad out several panels to several ''episodes'', and the reveal's flashback padding actually ''derailed'' to show an entire arc Kakashi's and Yamato's post-Rin-death history.
24th Jan '16 3:58:27 PM SunriseWarrior
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* ''Film/TheHungerGamesMockingjayPart1''. Some fans aren't happy with [[Literature/TheHungerGames the book]] being split into two films and resulting in a lot of the first film just hanging around in the bunker waiting for the real story in Part 2. At times you can tell there wasn't enough material for two movies made of the book. In fact, much of the bunker scenes in part 1 could be lost with little to no consequence.
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* ''Film/TheHungerGamesMockingjayPart1''. Some fans aren't happy with [[Literature/TheHungerGames the book]] being split into two films and resulting in a lot of the first film just hanging around in the bunker waiting for the real story in Part 2. At times you can tell there wasn't enough material for two movies made of the book. In fact, much of the bunker scenes in part Part 1 could be lost with little to no consequence.
23rd Jan '16 9:02:49 AM nombretomado
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* The ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' books have lots of padding such as StephenieMeyer describing how beautiful Edward was and how much Bella loved him and the step-by-step descriptions of Bella getting up, brushing her teeth, picking out her clothes, making breakfast for her and Charlie, [[ExaggeratedTrope closing all the pop-up boxes after running her web browser]], etc. The most extreme example of padding was in the second book (''New Moon''), where there are (literally) ten blank pages in the middle of the book. It essentially goes blank when Edward decides he must remove all traces of his life from Bella's.
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* The ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' books have lots of padding such as StephenieMeyer Creator/StephenieMeyer describing how beautiful Edward was and how much Bella loved him and the step-by-step descriptions of Bella getting up, brushing her teeth, picking out her clothes, making breakfast for her and Charlie, [[ExaggeratedTrope closing all the pop-up boxes after running her web browser]], etc. The most extreme example of padding was in the second book (''New Moon''), where there are (literally) ten blank pages in the middle of the book. It essentially goes blank when Edward decides he must remove all traces of his life from Bella's.
8th Jan '16 5:50:42 AM jormis29
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This is more easily identifiable in television shows, when a scene is obvious padding to get the episode up to sufficient length. In film, it's often entirely a matter of opinion; for instance, many people wonder why the movie ''{{Fargo}}'' wasted time showing the detective's husband fixing her breakfast when there was a compelling ReverseWhodunnit in the works, whereas the movie's most ardent fans feel that such scenes were the whole point.
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This is more easily identifiable in television shows, when a scene is obvious padding to get the episode up to sufficient length. In film, it's often entirely a matter of opinion; for instance, many people wonder why the movie ''{{Fargo}}'' ''Film/{{Fargo}}'' wasted time showing the detective's husband fixing her breakfast when there was a compelling ReverseWhodunnit in the works, whereas the movie's most ardent fans feel that such scenes were the whole point.
19th Dec '15 10:00:19 PM nombretomado
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** It probably reflects both improvements in stage technology and Oscar Hammerstein's more mature sense of pacing that the 1946 revival of ''ShowBoat'' eliminated the waterfront gambling saloon and Sherman House lobby scenes and heavily rewrote the scene showing Joe and Queenie after the TimeSkip. All these were originally played in front of the curtain.
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** It probably reflects both improvements in stage technology and Oscar Hammerstein's more mature sense of pacing that the 1946 revival of ''ShowBoat'' ''Theatre/ShowBoat'' eliminated the waterfront gambling saloon and Sherman House lobby scenes and heavily rewrote the scene showing Joe and Queenie after the TimeSkip. All these were originally played in front of the curtain.
16th Dec '15 3:46:03 PM eroock
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* Creator/MichaelHaneke has been known to be one of the worst abusers of this trope. He often aims for the NothingIsScarier angle with the [[LeaveTheCameraRunning looooooong static shots where nothing happens]], and in some cases it succeeds (the static shots of houses in ''Cache''), but most cases it just serves to drag the movie out. ** ''Cache'', aside from the house shots, pretty much is filled to the brim with pointlessly long shots, the worst offenders being one scene where we hear Georges have a conversation with his TV show crew that serves no purpose to the plot whatsoever, and a 3 minute long scene where we watch a character undress and go to bed.
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* Creator/MichaelHaneke has been known to be one of the worst abusers of this trope. He often aims for the NothingIsScarier angle with the [[LeaveTheCameraRunning looooooong static shots where nothing happens]], and in some cases it succeeds (the static shots of houses in ''Cache''), ''Film/{{Cache}}''), but most cases it just serves to drag the movie out. ** ''Cache'', ''Film/{{Cache}}'', aside from the house shots, pretty much is filled to the brim with pointlessly long shots, the worst offenders being one scene where we hear Georges have a conversation with his TV show crew that serves no purpose to the plot whatsoever, and a 3 minute long scene where we watch a character undress and go to bed.

** ''Amour'' is also no different, where we are treated to a ten minute scene of a woman reading a book. This is only one of many scenes to abuse the trope.
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** ''Amour'' ''Film/{{Amour}}'' is also no different, where we are treated to a ten minute scene of a woman reading a book. This is only one of many scenes to abuse the trope.
5th Dec '15 4:29:08 PM nombretomado
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* ''TheElectricCompany'' and ''SesameStreet'': Both Children's Television Workshop programs adjusted the length of the corporate credits plug ("The Electric Company"/"Sesame Street" is a production of... the Children's Television Workshop) depending on the length of the segments in the given episode. This wasn't noticed so much on ''Sesame Street'' except on Friday shows, when the ending theme began in progress at different points in the show to play over the extended credits. On ''The Electric Company'', the show's theme for that season would begin in progress and took anywhere from 15 to 45 seconds (of a song that took around 1 minute, 10 seconds to play), meaning that on one show the individual corporate sponsor names would flash by very quickly (sometimes two seconds or less) and be shown for seven or eight seconds on the next.
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* ''TheElectricCompany'' and ''SesameStreet'': ''Series/SesameStreet'': Both Children's Television Workshop programs adjusted the length of the corporate credits plug ("The Electric Company"/"Sesame Street" is a production of... the Children's Television Workshop) depending on the length of the segments in the given episode. This wasn't noticed so much on ''Sesame Street'' except on Friday shows, when the ending theme began in progress at different points in the show to play over the extended credits. On ''The Electric Company'', the show's theme for that season would begin in progress and took anywhere from 15 to 45 seconds (of a song that took around 1 minute, 10 seconds to play), meaning that on one show the individual corporate sponsor names would flash by very quickly (sometimes two seconds or less) and be shown for seven or eight seconds on the next.
4th Dec '15 6:11:14 PM nombretomado
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* As [[http://contest.disastermovie.org/?page_id=133 a review]] of ''[[SeltzerAndFriedberg Meet the Spartans]]'' pointed out, the movie itself ends at 67 minutes, and then are 19 minutes of credits and gags.
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* As [[http://contest.disastermovie.org/?page_id=133 a review]] of ''[[SeltzerAndFriedberg ''[[Creator/SeltzerAndFriedberg Meet the Spartans]]'' pointed out, the movie itself ends at 67 minutes, and then are 19 minutes of credits and gags.
3rd Dec '15 8:02:44 AM eroock
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* Michael Haneke has been known to be one of the worst abusers of this trope. He often aims for the NothingIsScarier angle with the [[LeaveTheCameraRunning looooooong static shots where nothing happens]], and in some cases it succeeds (the static shots of houses in ''Cache''), but most cases it just serves to drag the movie out.
to:
* Michael Haneke Creator/MichaelHaneke has been known to be one of the worst abusers of this trope. He often aims for the NothingIsScarier angle with the [[LeaveTheCameraRunning looooooong static shots where nothing happens]], and in some cases it succeeds (the static shots of houses in ''Cache''), but most cases it just serves to drag the movie out.
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