History Main / OverHeating

25th Apr '16 4:47:48 AM EchoFourDelta
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A particularly bizarre version can occur in games that feature mounted and handheld versions of the same machine gun, which may be governed by totally separate rules; for example, one may require reloading while the other does not but is able to overheat. Real mounted weapons often have rather obvious and bulky extra cooling hardware installed, though this is rarely reflected in-game.

to:

A particularly bizarre version can occur in games that feature mounted and handheld versions of the same machine gun, which may be governed by totally separate rules; for example, one may require reloading while the other does not but is able to overheat. Real mounted weapons often have rather obvious and bulky extra cooling hardware installed, though this is rarely reflected in-game.
overheat.
13th Apr '16 6:24:53 AM Jake
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** This was also TruthInTelevision for the suppressed version of the Sten, the barrel of which got hot enough to take the skin off your fingers if you dumped a whole magazine in one go.
16th Mar '16 10:14:23 PM MadCat221
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the ''VideoGame/{{Mechwarrior}}'' games, this is an inherent gameplay trait. All weapons create heat that must be dissipated by your 'Mech, but energy and missile weapons cause the most heat. Heat sinks can help dissipate the heat generated, but there's still a danger of overheating, and once you pass a certain threshold the 'Mech engages an automatic shutdown. If you override this automatic shutdown[[note]]or if your 'Mech is forced into critical overheat too quickly for it to trigger[[/note]], you run the risk of [[MadeOfExplodium ammunition explosions and reactor meltdowns]]. In ''Living Legends'', going past the shutdown heat while overriding will cause your armor to literally melt off, generally starting with both arms. If you mount a Gauss rifle in either arm, [[MadeOfExplodium it'll explode when destroyed]].

to:

* In the ''VideoGame/{{Mechwarrior}}'' games, much like its parent ''TableTopGame/BattleTech'' franchise, this is an inherent gameplay trait. All weapons create heat that must be dissipated by your 'Mech, but energy and missile weapons cause the most heat. Heat sinks can help dissipate the heat generated, but there's still a danger of overheating, and once you pass a certain threshold the 'Mech engages an automatic shutdown. If you override this automatic shutdown[[note]]or if your 'Mech is forced into critical overheat too quickly for it to trigger[[/note]], you run the risk of [[MadeOfExplodium ammunition explosions and reactor meltdowns]]. In ''Living Legends'', going past the shutdown heat while overriding will cause your armor to literally melt off, generally starting with both arms. If you mount a Gauss rifle in either arm, [[MadeOfExplodium it'll explode when destroyed]].
16th Mar '16 9:23:24 PM MadCat221
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''TableTopGame/BattleTech'', heat is an important balancing factor. [=BattleMechs=] are environmentally sealed, powered by fusion engines and artificial muscles that aren't exactly 100% efficient, and often bristling with energy, ballistic, and/or missile weapons; virtually everything they do starting with simple movement will cause heat to build up, which needs to be funneled out of the 'Mech via dedicated 'heat sinks'. Build up heat faster than those can handle, and your 'Mech will slow down and the accuracy of its weapons fire will suffer until they have caught up again. At sufficiently high levels it may even automatically shut down and/or see explosive ammo start to cook off.

to:

* In ''TableTopGame/BattleTech'', heat is an important balancing factor. [=BattleMechs=] are environmentally sealed, powered by fusion engines and artificial muscles that aren't exactly 100% efficient, and often bristling with energy, ballistic, and/or missile weapons; virtually everything they do starting with simple movement will cause heat to build up, which needs to be funneled out of the 'Mech via dedicated 'heat sinks'. Build up heat faster than those can handle, and your 'Mech will slow down and the accuracy of its weapons fire will suffer until they have caught up again. At sufficiently high levels it may even automatically shut down and/or see explosive ammo start to cook off.


Added DiffLines:

** Even in the meta-game of 'mech design, heat control is a critical factor. Ten heat sinks come free of mass costs with a fusion engine (its integrated thermal control system), and any beyond that take up mass in the chassis. Sometimes those extra sinks can be bundled inside the reactor's volume so they don't take up critical space, though only if the engine is big enough to begin with (and if it's too small, sometimes even those ten mass-free integral sinks can't all fit inside the engine's volume). Double Heat Sinks, systems that cool twice as much for the same mass, are ''supposed'' to be counterbalanced by being much bulkier, but the engine integration factor significantly mitigates that (even the free-of-mass/space sinks are double). They are a point of contention with many old players, as it's posited that it disrupts gameplay balance and makes heat much less of an issue. Proponents argue that double heat sinks de-nerf the entire energy weapons lineup, giving them potential they didn't have before. Most on both sides agree that the meta-game would be screwed up even more if their rules were altered or they were removed outright.
7th Mar '16 10:30:30 PM wolftickets1969
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* The Minigun and Gatling Laser in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' overheat and glow red when fired extensively, despite the cyclic barrels being designed to prevent this.
7th Feb '16 8:58:22 AM Khathi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The rumor goes that in a serious enough firefight (that is, up to a dozen mags fired back-to-back or with little intervals) the overheating gets so severe that the rifle's polymer frame warps and in some cases even ''melts'' from the heat, throwing the sights hopelessly out of alignment and requiring a weapon's complete rebuild.

to:

** The rumor goes that in a serious enough firefight (that is, up to as little as a dozen ''couple'' of mags fired back-to-back or with little intervals) back-to-back) the overheating gets so severe that the rifle's polymer frame warps and in some cases even ''melts'' from the heat, throwing the sights hopelessly out of alignment and requiring a weapon's complete rebuild. A dozen mags reportedly can cause the rifle to literally ''melt''.
30th Jan '16 10:17:49 PM Khathi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The rumor goes that in a serious enough firefight (that is, up to a dozen mags fired back-to-back or with little intervals) the overheating gets so severe that the rifle's polymer frame warps and in some cases even ''melts'' from the heat, throwing the sights hopelessly out of alignment and requiring a weapon's complete rebuild.
8th Jan '16 4:00:17 AM REV6Pilot
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Although modern weapons have put a lot of clever thought into averting or at least mitigating this trope, it was a huge concern for early gunpowder weapons, and cannon in particular. A cannon that fired too many times in succession or with too big a charge of gunpowder risked ''[[ReliablyUnreliableGuns exploding]]'', usually with catastrophic results for the crew. The so-called "leather cannon" were particularly hurt by it because of their construction; they had a typical thin metal barrel, but whereas other cannon had outer layers of metal banded around the bore for strength, leather cannon used much smaller metal straps and, yes, leather wraps. These were strong enough for the light shot used, but caused the barrel to retain heat, limiting the gun to no more than ''[[EpicFail two or three shots per battle]]''.

to:

* Although modern weapons have put a lot of clever thought into averting or at least mitigating this trope, it was a huge concern for early gunpowder weapons, and cannon in particular. A cannon that fired too many times in succession or with too big a charge of gunpowder risked ''[[ReliablyUnreliableGuns exploding]]'', usually with catastrophic results for the crew. The so-called "leather cannon" were particularly hurt by it because of their construction; they had a typical thin metal barrel, but whereas other cannon had outer layers of metal banded around the bore for strength, leather cannon used much smaller metal straps and, yes, leather wraps. These were strong enough for the light shot used, but caused the barrel to retain heat, limiting the gun to no more than ''[[EpicFail [[ReliablyUnreliableGuns two or three shots per battle]]''.battle]].
8th Dec '15 6:35:49 AM LordAndrew
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Ditto in ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' and ''VideoGame/FarCry4''; Mounted guns still have infinite ammo and will overheat if fired continuously and you can carry a man-portable version that won't overheat like last time. [[GunsDoNotWorkThatWay This time around, the player character gives the weapon's charging handle a good yank, as if that would cool the weapon down.]]
15th Oct '15 5:26:13 AM REV6Pilot
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This trope shows up, played ''perfectly'' straight, in a very unsuspecting device: the flashlight. More specifically, the small-size high-power, tactical or tactical-ish LED light. LED's may be more energy-efficient than incandescent bulbs of old, but they still generate a ''godawful'' amount of heat if driven hard enough, and that heat can burn up the diode. Heat sinks mostly solve the issue in larger appliances, but when you have to keep it compact for portability's sake, even an entire aluminium body with the user's hand sucking up some of the heat an uncomfortable practice even in the cold, as depending on its size and power [[labelnote:*]]such as the Thrunite [=TN36=], a light the size of a soda can that can put out over 6500 lumens, more than ''double'' of a regular car's headlight[[/labelnote]], the light gets '''HOT''' isn't enough. As such, these lights for the most part have a step-down feature in their circuits that either drops the output to a lower level or turns the torch off altogether before the heat buildup can become damaging.[[note]]Now [[AluminiumChristmasTrees good luck finding that]] as a justification for the TenSecondFlashlight trope so common even in futuristic fiction.[[/note]]

to:

* This trope shows up, played ''perfectly'' straight, in a very unsuspecting device: the flashlight. More specifically, the small-size high-power, tactical or tactical-ish LED light. LED's may be more energy-efficient than incandescent bulbs of old, but they still generate a ''godawful'' amount of heat if driven hard enough, and that heat can burn up the diode. Heat sinks mostly solve the issue in larger appliances, but when you have to keep it compact for portability's sake, even an entire aluminium body with the user's hand sucking up some of the heat an uncomfortable practice even in the cold, as depending on its size and power [[labelnote:*]]such power[[labelnote:*]]such as the Thrunite [=TN36=], a light the size of a soda can that can put out over 6500 lumens, more than ''double'' of a regular car's headlight[[/labelnote]], the light gets '''HOT''' isn't enough. As such, these lights for the most part have a step-down feature in their circuits that either drops the output to a lower level or turns the torch off altogether before the heat buildup can become damaging.[[note]]Now [[AluminiumChristmasTrees good luck finding that]] as a justification for the TenSecondFlashlight trope so common even in futuristic fiction.[[/note]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 169. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.OverHeating