History Main / OutofCharacterMoment

21st Sep '17 5:23:01 AM jormis29
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* Mario of all people gets a out of character moment in ''Yoshi's Safari'' when, during the results screen at the end of a stage, he walks up to Yoshi with the Super Scope in hand and starts shooting at him for no apparent reason. Yoshi is sent fleeing in panic and runs around in said panic while Mario does his victory pose. Granted, it was probably all done as a gag, but the idea of Mario shooting his companion for shits and giggles makes him look like a completely different character.

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* Mario of all people gets a out of character moment in ''Yoshi's Safari'' ''VideoGame/YoshisSafari'' when, during the results screen at the end of a stage, he walks up to Yoshi with the Super Scope in hand and starts shooting at him for no apparent reason. Yoshi is sent fleeing in panic and runs around in said panic while Mario does his victory pose. Granted, it was probably all done as a gag, but the idea of Mario shooting his companion for shits and giggles makes him look like a completely different character.
16th Sep '17 11:47:40 AM SeptimusHeap
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* In an episode of the ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' cartoon, Beast's girlfriend is kidnapped by the [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain Friends of Humanity]], at the same time Wolverine is trying to infiltrate the group by posing as a prospective member; Logan's reaction upon hearing that Beast ''has'' a girlfriend is, "huh, will wonders never cease?" But it goes even further when Beast lashes out at the villains in rage while Wolvie plays the GuileHero by calling the team and telling them to use Cerebro to access Sabertooth's file. (Graydon Creed is his son, and Wolvie figures seeing the file will cause Creed to suffer a VillainousBSOD, which it clearly does.) Jubilee can't help but comment on how crazy it is that Beast is the one going off the rails while Wolvie is the one using his head.

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* In an episode of the ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' cartoon, Beast's girlfriend is kidnapped by the [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain Friends of Humanity]], at the same time Wolverine is trying to infiltrate the group by posing as a prospective member; Logan's reaction upon hearing that Beast ''has'' a girlfriend is, "huh, will wonders never cease?" But it goes even further when Beast lashes out at the villains in rage while Wolvie plays the GuileHero by calling the team and telling them to use Cerebro to access Sabertooth's file. (Graydon Creed is his son, and Wolvie figures seeing the file will cause Creed to suffer a VillainousBSOD, which it clearly does.) Jubilee can't help but comment on how crazy it is that Beast is the one going off the rails while Wolvie is the one using his head.
15th Aug '17 12:49:28 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In ''VideoGame/YuGiOhReshefOfDestruction'', Seto Kaiba gets an EvilLaugh that's written as "Wahahahaha!"

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* %%* In ''VideoGame/YuGiOhReshefOfDestruction'', Seto Kaiba gets an EvilLaugh that's written as "Wahahahaha!"
15th Aug '17 12:44:24 PM lalalei2001
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* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhReshefOfDestruction'', Seto Kaiba gets an EvilLaugh that's written as "Wahahahaha!"

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* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhReshefOfDestruction'', ''VideoGame/YuGiOhReshefOfDestruction'', Seto Kaiba gets an EvilLaugh that's written as "Wahahahaha!"
4th Aug '17 4:15:19 PM DarkHunter
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** There's also the somewhat unusual incident in which Jesus causes a fig tree to wither because it will not bear fruit out of season.

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** There's also the somewhat unusual incident in which Jesus causes a fig tree to wither because it will not bear fruit out of season. It's the only example given of Jesus using His divine powers to harm a living thing instead of healing it.



** Interestingly enough in the Gospels, Jesus denounced himself as good when approached by a man. Explaining no one is good, not even him. ''Only God is good''. Makes sense considering he only came to Earth to reconcile creation to creator, ''[[FridgeBrilliance because God wanted him to]]''.

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** Interestingly enough in the Gospels, Jesus denounced himself Himself as good when approached by a man. Explaining no one is good, not even him.Him. ''Only God is good''. Makes sense considering he He only came to Earth to reconcile creation to creator, ''[[FridgeBrilliance because God wanted him Him to]]''.
26th Jul '17 4:33:31 PM LinTaylor
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* In ''Manga/DragonBall'', Vegeta spends most of the [[NonSerialMovie first Broly movie]] [[HeroicBSOD too scared to fight]], simply because Broly "is the legendary Super Saiyan", and that means they have no chance to win. This is the same Vegeta who spends every spare moment either bargaining for more power or picking the hardest fights he can to exercise said power.

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* In ''Manga/DragonBall'', Vegeta spends most of the [[NonSerialMovie first Broly movie]] [[HeroicBSOD too scared to fight]], simply because Broly "is the legendary Super Saiyan", and that means they have no chance to win. This is the same Vegeta who spends every spare moment either bargaining for more power or picking the hardest fights he can to exercise said power. Years later he'd act the same way when confronted with the God of Destruction Beerus...[[BerserkButton until Beerus slaps his wife Bulma]], at which point all bets were off.



** This trope is also displayed by Gohan during his fight with Cell after turning Super Saiyan 2 as well as his fight with Super Buu as Mystic Gohan

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** This trope is also displayed by Gohan has a couple of moments like this, both during his fight with Cell after turning critical fights and both causing major problems. When he achieved Super Saiyan 2 as well as his 2, he acted uncharacteristically bloodthirsty and malicious, refusing to end the fight with because he wanted Cell to suffer[[note]]There is actually a precedent for this: It had been previously established that Super Saiyan forms reinforce one's latent Saiyan traits, including battle-lust and cruelty; when Goku first transformed while fighting Freeza, he ordered Gohan to get to safety while he was still in full control of himself[[/note]]; this resulted in Goku having to do a HeroicSacrifice to keep Cell from [[TakingYouWithMe self-destructing and destroying the planet]]. Years later during the Buu Saga, the Elder Supreme Kai unlocks Gohan's full potential and he gets overly cocky while fighting Super Buu; as Mystic Gohana result of him not finishing the fight when he had the opportunity, he got absorbed by Buu and was later killed.
22nd Jul '17 10:46:09 AM jouXIII
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** Considering that [=LadyDevimon=] is the devilish EvilCounterpart to her angelic digimon, it may have [[BewareTheNiceOnes become]] [[ItsPersonal personal]] for Kari. She is the sister of the HotBlooded [[TheLeader Leader]], after all.

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** Considering that [=LadyDevimon=] is the devilish EvilCounterpart to her angelic digimon, it may have [[BewareTheNiceOnes become]] [[ItsPersonal personal]] for Kari.Hikari. She is the sister of the HotBlooded [[TheLeader Leader]], after all.
20th Jul '17 8:00:00 PM chasemaddigan
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[[/folder]]
19th Jul '17 8:24:16 AM ClintEastwood
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** Sam's behaviour going from her usual JerkAss self to being nice when Brad is around leads Carly and Freddie to believe Sam likes him.
* Weird example from ''Series/RedDwarf''. In the episode 'Parallel Universe' the crew travel to a parallel universe populated by opposite sex versions of themselves. Lister ends up sleeping with his female alternate universe self and when the possibility of him being pregnant is raised - in this universe men are the ones who carry the baby - the female Lister is amazingly callous and indifferent, claiming it was solely his problem and that he should have used protection. Now the episode is very clear that the female counterparts have ''identical'' personalities to the regular crew and it is impossible to imagine the regular universe Lister being so insensitive to a woman he might have gotten pregnant.
** It's also hard to imagine Rimmer ever behaving the way his female equivalent did. In the rare occasions when he's been seen interacting with women, he's normally either been quite shy or highly respectful to their position as a superior officer (Consider 'Camille' and 'Holoship'). For as much of a smeg head as he can be, it's extremely difficult to imagine him ever wanting to show a woman some video of two women together to turn them on. It seems evident that the female versions actually had vastly different attitudes to their male equivalents.

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** Sam's behaviour going from her usual JerkAss {{Jerkass}} self to being nice when Brad is around leads Carly and Freddie to believe Sam likes him.
* Weird example from ''Series/RedDwarf''. In the episode 'Parallel Universe' "[[Recap/{{Red Dwarf Season II Parallel Universe}} Parallel Universe]]" the crew travel to a parallel universe populated by opposite sex versions of themselves. Lister ends up sleeping with his female alternate universe self and when the possibility of him being pregnant is raised - in this universe men are the ones who carry the baby - the female Lister is amazingly callous and indifferent, claiming it was solely his problem and that he should have used protection. Now the episode is very clear that the female counterparts have ''identical'' personalities to the regular crew and it is impossible to imagine the regular universe Lister being so insensitive to a woman he might have gotten pregnant.
** It's also hard to imagine Rimmer ever behaving the way his female equivalent did. In the rare occasions when he's been seen interacting with women, he's normally either been quite shy or highly respectful to their position as a superior officer (Consider 'Camille' "[[Recap/RedDwarfSeasonIVCamille Camille]]" and 'Holoship')."[[Recap/{{Red Dwarf Season V Holoship}} Holoship]]"). For as much of a smeg head as he can be, it's extremely difficult to imagine him ever wanting to show a woman some video of two women together to turn them on. It seems evident that the female versions actually had vastly different attitudes to their male equivalents.



** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators The Dominators]]" centres around the Doctor trying to get a peaceful civilisation to take up guns against alien invaders without even considering any diplomacy or ScienceHero methods - partly why Troughton decides to play his part with lots of HamAndCheese. He even does a LampshadeHanging on it in an obvious adlib: The Doctor tells a Dulcian that the Dominators are aliens and therefore don't understand the meaning of pacifism, the Dulcian retorts that the Doctor is also an alien, and the Doctor quickly adds "You got me there!" ''just'' before the edit cuts into it.

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators The Dominators]]" centres around the Doctor trying to get a peaceful civilisation to take up guns against alien invaders without even considering any diplomacy or ScienceHero methods - partly why Troughton Creator/PatrickTroughton decides to play his part with lots of HamAndCheese. He even does a LampshadeHanging on it in an obvious adlib: The Doctor tells a Dulcian that the Dominators are aliens and therefore don't understand the meaning of pacifism, the Dulcian retorts that the Doctor is also an alien, and the Doctor quickly adds "You got me there!" ''just'' before the edit cuts into it.



** In "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E4TheDoctorsWife The Doctor's Wife]]", the Eleventh Doctor decides to confront the invisible Monster of the Week by swinging a stick at it, apparently attempting to bludgeon it into submission. In other episodes, especially since the reboot, the Doctor disdains weapons and always attempts to find a peaceful solution first. He is, however, trying to protect [[spoiler:Vincent Van Gogh]] who's kind of important to the timeline. This can be excused by him being under the impression that Amy's life was in immediate danger, and the fact that each new incarnation of the character is different from the last, including their tendency of using martial force.

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** In "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E4TheDoctorsWife The Doctor's Wife]]", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E10VincentAndTheDoctor Vincent and the Doctor]]", the Eleventh Doctor decides to confront the invisible Monster of the Week by swinging a stick at it, apparently attempting to bludgeon it into submission. In other episodes, especially since the reboot, the Doctor disdains weapons and always attempts to find a peaceful solution first. He is, however, trying to protect [[spoiler:Vincent Van Gogh]] who's kind of important to the timeline. This can be excused by him being under the impression that Amy's life was in immediate danger, and the fact that each new incarnation of the character is different from the last, including their tendency of using martial force.



** Averted by Creator/StevenMoffat in "[[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor The Day of the Doctor]]". He didn't use the Eighth Doctor as the Time War Doctor as he felt him destroying Gallifrey would be out of character. The War Doctor was used when Creator/ChristopherEccleston decided not to participate (though the Ninth Doctor is supposed to be newly regenerated at the time of the revival, so that wouldnt make much sense either). Apparently the Doctor being a warrior is really out of character, which is justified as the War Doctor was specifically meant as a warrior. In fact the War Doctor rejects the title entirely, which is why he isn't counted in the numbering.

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** Averted by Creator/StevenMoffat in "[[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor The Day of the Doctor]]". He didn't use the Eighth Doctor as the Time War Doctor as he felt him destroying Gallifrey would be out of character. The War Doctor was used when Creator/ChristopherEccleston decided not to participate (though the Ninth Doctor is supposed to be newly regenerated at the time of the revival, so that wouldnt wouldn't make much sense either). Apparently the Doctor being a warrior is really out of character, which is justified as the War Doctor was specifically meant as a warrior. In fact the War Doctor rejects the title entirely, which is why he isn't counted in the numbering.




** ''Series/OnceUponaTime''
* EVERY main character on the show has been written as out of character in service of a nonsensical plot twist or storyline that has been making less and less sense ever since S1 has been writtten OOC at one point or another, but particularly Rumplestiltskin/Mr. Gold and his main love interest, Belle French, and I pay the most attention to them because they are my favorites on the show, so I'll use them as examples.
* I think S4 was more so underdeveloped bad writing and flanderdization of some of Rumplestiltskin's worst traits, like his emotional cowardice, his selfishness, and his duplicity, rather than necessarily OOC. He had never been that selfless in terms of anyone outside of those he held closest to his heart, like Belle, Baelfire, and sort of Henry, after S3. He had trouble opening up to them and being honest, going all the way back to S1 because he was afraid that they would see that he was so broken inside, and hate him.

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\n** * ''Series/OnceUponaTime''
* ** EVERY main character on the show has been written as out of character in service of a nonsensical plot twist or storyline that has been making less and less sense ever since S1 has been writtten OOC at one point or another, but particularly Rumplestiltskin/Mr. Gold and his main love interest, Belle French, and I pay the most attention to them because they are my favorites on the show, so I'll use them as examples.
* ** I think S4 was more so underdeveloped bad writing and flanderdization of some of Rumplestiltskin's worst traits, like his emotional cowardice, his selfishness, and his duplicity, rather than necessarily OOC. He had never been that selfless in terms of anyone outside of those he held closest to his heart, like Belle, Baelfire, and sort of Henry, after S3. He had trouble opening up to them and being honest, going all the way back to S1 because he was afraid that they would see that he was so broken inside, and hate him.






* In season five, Belle seems to be actively interested in starting over with Rumplestiltskin at the end of the "Bear and the Bow" episode when he pulls Excalibur, telling him "It's never too late," and encouraging him to face the bear and Emma by staying in Storybrooke because a "hero never runs away." Then, a few episodes later that takes place a day later, Belle is suddenly being uncharacteristically cruel, cold, and wishy washy with Rumplestiltskin by telling him that she doesn't know whether she wants to work things out with him, and nearly skipping town in the middle of a crisis when Rumplestiltskin gives her an easy out to leave.
* Rumplestiltskin taking back the curse out of nowhere in 5x11, after showing no signs of any power hunger throughout 5A with the curse removed from him for no other motive stated on screen than "It's the man that I am,"and creating a very "character assassinating" moment on the show. Although, Kitsowitz, and the canon narrative context suggests that Rumplestiltskin took the curse back because he was afraid to die, and because he thought Belle was gone forever. Still, neither of those things were directly stated on screen as motives for why Rumplestiltskin took back the curse, so...
* In the Underworld, Belle is willing to work with Zelena, the same woman, who she scorned for killing her husband's son, torturing him, controlling him with a dagger, and caging him for a whole year. Also, Belle being a hypocrite in the Underworld by getting pissed off at Rumple for using dark magic to protect her and their kid, but then going to someone else to use it for the same purpose, and flat out denying the fact that she ever used dark magic to be a hero when she literally met Rumplestiltskin and became his maid because she wanted him to stop the ogre wars in her kingdom of Avonlea.
* The way Belle kisses Rumple at the end of 5x17, telling him that "I love you and I've always known who you are" at the end of "Her Handsome Hero," and then seemingly realizing that sometimes she has to make dark choices to protect her family when she pushes Gaston into the River Of Souls, and then hugs him at the end of the episode, only to completely blow him off, and get pissed off at Rumplestiltskin for having to kill Gaston to save him in the next episode, "Ruby Slippers."
* Both Rumplestiltskin and Belle's incredibly OOC, illogical, controlling, overprotective, threatening, mean, inconsiderate, and insane words and behavior towards each other in 6A that pretty much come out of nowhere in their distrust of each other and paranoid desperation to keep their unbornkid safe/have their love without realizing the harmful/hurtful impact that they were having on each other. It all comes down to Belle finally stands still long enough to allow Rumple to get a word in edgewise throughout all of 6A when he's cornering her on an elevator with the threat to speed up her pregnancy, she finally snaps him out of it, and makes him realize that he's about to go too far and make an unforgivable choice by doing that. This all happened because they were both were dumbed down enough to believe what Morfetus told them about hating Rumple, and this PLOT for 6A refused to allow them to be in-character, and have a full conversation until Rumple almost went too far with both of them acting like illogically OOC, blindly paranoid, insane, and inconsiderate assholes to each other in their fear over losing their child.
* In every other storyline with Belle in their present day relationship on the show throughout the series, Rumplestiltskin has never been anything less than extraordinarily loving, gentle, considerate, respectful, tender, and patient with his true love, and he is big on giving her space, freedom, and letting her go. He's also incredibly intelligent. However, from 6.04-6.09 Kitsowitz made Rumple uncharacteristically illogical, controlling, impatient, overprotective, mean, and threatening towards Belle for the first, and thankfully, ONLY time ever on an arc by giving him this majorly OOC blindly insane paranoia over losing his kid, largely to vilify him in service to that garbage Morfetus plot that came out of nowhere in 6x04. Rumple started out 6x01-6x03 by trying to wake Belle from the sleeping curse she put herself in. Then, when they come back to Storybrooke, after Morfetus wakes her with TLK, he reveals that he is their son and thinks that she should stay away from Rumple because he will destroy their family, Belle is dumbed down enough to actually believe it without question, and stays on Hook's ship when he offers. However, Rumple still gives her her space, and gives her a tape recording with a poem on it for their kid with David's help.
* Then, without warning or precedence in 6.04, Rumple cuts his hair, and starts going off the deep end by trapping Belle on Hook's ship to protect her from Hyde with a very OOC snarky attitude when she won't listen to him about her needing his protection, tells him that her "friends" will protect her, and cruelly shuts him down first. And it only got worse from there all the way up to 6.09 with Rumple putting a magic bracelet on Belle's wrist with an uncharacteristically insane and shitty attitude to keep her from attempting to run off to another realm with their unborn child without his consent with Zelena's help, and then threatening to speed up her pregnancy when it wasn't even a logical decision for the storyline at all by that point since Belle couldn't run away with their kid with the bracelet on her wrist trapping her there, so I can't think of an in-character reason for why he would do it beyond almost getting carried away by blind paranoia and OOC writing to escalate suspense at the last minute before Belle snapped him out of it, and made him realize that he was about to go too far.
After Rumple and Belle realize that they have both were going about things in 6A like illogical assholes in their desire to protect Gideon, Rumple went back to being the same old loving, tender, self-aware, respectful and gentle Rumple with Belle that he normally is at the end of 6.09 when she snapped him out of his insanity before he went too far.

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* ** In season five, Belle seems to be actively interested in starting over with Rumplestiltskin at the end of the "Bear and the Bow" episode when he pulls Excalibur, telling him "It's never too late," and encouraging him to face the bear and Emma by staying in Storybrooke because a "hero never runs away." Then, a few episodes later that takes place a day later, Belle is suddenly being uncharacteristically cruel, cold, and wishy washy with Rumplestiltskin by telling him that she doesn't know whether she wants to work things out with him, and nearly skipping town in the middle of a crisis when Rumplestiltskin gives her an easy out to leave.
* ** Rumplestiltskin taking back the curse out of nowhere in 5x11, after showing no signs of any power hunger throughout 5A with the curse removed from him for no other motive stated on screen than "It's the man that I am,"and creating a very "character assassinating" moment on the show. Although, Kitsowitz, and the canon narrative context suggests that Rumplestiltskin took the curse back because he was afraid to die, and because he thought Belle was gone forever. Still, neither of those things were directly stated on screen as motives for why Rumplestiltskin took back the curse, so...
* ** In the Underworld, Belle is willing to work with Zelena, the same woman, who she scorned for killing her husband's son, torturing him, controlling him with a dagger, and caging him for a whole year. Also, Belle being a hypocrite in the Underworld by getting pissed off at Rumple for using dark magic to protect her and their kid, but then going to someone else to use it for the same purpose, and flat out denying the fact that she ever used dark magic to be a hero when she literally met Rumplestiltskin and became his maid because she wanted him to stop the ogre wars in her kingdom of Avonlea.
* ** The way Belle kisses Rumple at the end of 5x17, telling him that "I love you and I've always known who you are" at the end of "Her Handsome Hero," and then seemingly realizing that sometimes she has to make dark choices to protect her family when she pushes Gaston into the River Of Souls, and then hugs him at the end of the episode, only to completely blow him off, and get pissed off at Rumplestiltskin for having to kill Gaston to save him in the next episode, "Ruby Slippers."
* ** Both Rumplestiltskin and Belle's incredibly OOC, illogical, controlling, overprotective, threatening, mean, inconsiderate, and insane words and behavior towards each other in 6A that pretty much come out of nowhere in their distrust of each other and paranoid desperation to keep their unbornkid safe/have their love without realizing the harmful/hurtful impact that they were having on each other. It all comes down to Belle finally stands still long enough to allow Rumple to get a word in edgewise throughout all of 6A when he's cornering her on an elevator with the threat to speed up her pregnancy, she finally snaps him out of it, and makes him realize that he's about to go too far and make an unforgivable choice by doing that. This all happened because they were both were dumbed down enough to believe what Morfetus told them about hating Rumple, and this PLOT for 6A refused to allow them to be in-character, and have a full conversation until Rumple almost went too far with both of them acting like illogically OOC, blindly paranoid, insane, and inconsiderate assholes to each other in their fear over losing their child.
* ** In every other storyline with Belle in their present day relationship on the show throughout the series, Rumplestiltskin has never been anything less than extraordinarily loving, gentle, considerate, respectful, tender, and patient with his true love, and he is big on giving her space, freedom, and letting her go. He's also incredibly intelligent. However, from 6.04-6.09 Kitsowitz made Rumple uncharacteristically illogical, controlling, impatient, overprotective, mean, and threatening towards Belle for the first, and thankfully, ONLY time ever on an arc by giving him this majorly OOC blindly insane paranoia over losing his kid, largely to vilify him in service to that garbage Morfetus plot that came out of nowhere in 6x04. Rumple started out 6x01-6x03 by trying to wake Belle from the sleeping curse she put herself in. Then, when they come back to Storybrooke, after Morfetus wakes her with TLK, he reveals that he is their son and thinks that she should stay away from Rumple because he will destroy their family, Belle is dumbed down enough to actually believe it without question, and stays on Hook's ship when he offers. However, Rumple still gives her her space, and gives her a tape recording with a poem on it for their kid with David's help.
* ** Then, without warning or precedence in 6.04, Rumple cuts his hair, and starts going off the deep end by trapping Belle on Hook's ship to protect her from Hyde with a very OOC snarky attitude when she won't listen to him about her needing his protection, tells him that her "friends" will protect her, and cruelly shuts him down first. And it only got worse from there all the way up to 6.09 with Rumple putting a magic bracelet on Belle's wrist with an uncharacteristically insane and shitty attitude to keep her from attempting to run off to another realm with their unborn child without his consent with Zelena's help, and then threatening to speed up her pregnancy when it wasn't even a logical decision for the storyline at all by that point since Belle couldn't run away with their kid with the bracelet on her wrist trapping her there, so I can't think of an in-character reason for why he would do it beyond almost getting carried away by blind paranoia and OOC writing to escalate suspense at the last minute before Belle snapped him out of it, and made him realize that he was about to go too far.
** After Rumple and Belle realize that they have both were going about things in 6A like illogical assholes in their desire to protect Gideon, Rumple went back to being the same old loving, tender, self-aware, respectful and gentle Rumple with Belle that he normally is at the end of 6.09 when she snapped him out of his insanity before he went too far.



* It really pissed me off that the writers had to continue to taint Belle, and partially taint Rumple's one consistent character trait on this show throughout all of the shitty writing for him and Belle from 4A-S5 with that god awful arc in 6A, even though I know that neither of them were being abusive to each other by intent in 6A, like Hook was to Emma in 5A. And that's probably why they did it. To make the audience forget that they romanticized an inherently abusive relationship with that whole 50 Shades/Twilight Dark Swan/Dark Hook arc in 5A, even though that arc for them alone was still a billion times worse than any of the OOC unhealthy arcs that they gave Rumbelle from 4A-6A? I just don't understand why else they would give Rumple and Belle such an OOC nonsensical toxic plot/characterization in 6A, and deliberately frame them as being "abusive," other than the fact that they felt the need to validate Hook/CS by trying to make the audience forget how toxic they were/are from 5A-S6. I just can't see why else they would give Rumbelle the idiot ball, and reduce them to OOC, insane, and mean to each other in their desperation to keep their baby safe.
* While Belle had been less and less in-character in regards to Rumple from the moment she started using the dagger, she never would have been stupid enough to blindly trust a dream, if written in-character, and leg Rumple have a say back in S5. Plus, she was never knowingly cruel enough to use his fears of failure against him by calling him "too weak to be good" before 6A. Then, she went back to being the same old warm, supportive, self-aware, logical and loving Belle of S1-S3 again with Rumple in 6B.
* Rumplestiltskin making out with the Evil Queen in 6A to get a pair of magical shears and to get back at Zelena when he has literally never shown any sort of romantic interest in Regina/EQ before in the series, and spent the first three episodes of the 6A pushing her away.
* Belle working with Zelena to try to kidnap her and Rumple's unborn child by almost traipsing off to another without letting him have a say first when he tries to reach out.
* Rumplestiltskin cutting his hair short in 6A out of nowhere when he has had the exact same long,shaggy, and wild hairstyle throughout the series up to that point. Although, I think that it was supposed to be a sign of Rumplestiltskin's bizzare OOC mental breakdown in 6A, a symbol of his own self-loathing because he didn't like the man he saw in the mirror, and didn't know how to go about changing for the better because the one person in his life still alive, who he actually still gave a damn about enough to try for, Belle kept rejecting his every attempt to reach out to her for emotional support with honesty, love, and compassion, anyway, and he refused to look for any other source of healthy mental/emotional support when he couldn't get it from her, and went off the rails by falling back on the darkness in a blind panic over losing his kid without totally realizing it.

[[folder: Mythology and Religion]]

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* ** It really pissed me off that the writers had to continue to taint Belle, and partially taint Rumple's one consistent character trait on this show throughout all of the shitty writing for him and Belle from 4A-S5 with that god awful arc in 6A, even though I know that neither of them were being abusive to each other by intent in 6A, like Hook was to Emma in 5A. And that's probably why they did it. To make the audience forget that they romanticized an inherently abusive relationship with that whole 50 Shades/Twilight Dark Swan/Dark Hook arc in 5A, even though that arc for them alone was still a billion times worse than any of the OOC unhealthy arcs that they gave Rumbelle from 4A-6A? I just don't understand why else they would give Rumple and Belle such an OOC nonsensical toxic plot/characterization in 6A, and deliberately frame them as being "abusive," other than the fact that they felt the need to validate Hook/CS by trying to make the audience forget how toxic they were/are from 5A-S6. I just can't see why else they would give Rumbelle the idiot ball, and reduce them to OOC, insane, and mean to each other in their desperation to keep their baby safe.
* ** While Belle had been less and less in-character in regards to Rumple from the moment she started using the dagger, she never would have been stupid enough to blindly trust a dream, if written in-character, and leg Rumple have a say back in S5. Plus, she was never knowingly cruel enough to use his fears of failure against him by calling him "too weak to be good" before 6A. Then, she went back to being the same old warm, supportive, self-aware, logical and loving Belle of S1-S3 again with Rumple in 6B.
* ** Rumplestiltskin making out with the Evil Queen in 6A to get a pair of magical shears and to get back at Zelena when he has literally never shown any sort of romantic interest in Regina/EQ before in the series, and spent the first three episodes of the 6A pushing her away.
* ** Belle working with Zelena to try to kidnap her and Rumple's unborn child by almost traipsing off to another without letting him have a say first when he tries to reach out.
* ** Rumplestiltskin cutting his hair short in 6A out of nowhere when he has had the exact same long,shaggy, and wild hairstyle throughout the series up to that point. Although, I think that it was supposed to be a sign of Rumplestiltskin's bizzare OOC mental breakdown in 6A, a symbol of his own self-loathing because he didn't like the man he saw in the mirror, and didn't know how to go about changing for the better because the one person in his life still alive, who he actually still gave a damn about enough to try for, Belle kept rejecting his every attempt to reach out to her for emotional support with honesty, love, and compassion, anyway, and he refused to look for any other source of healthy mental/emotional support when he couldn't get it from her, and went off the rails by falling back on the darkness in a blind panic over losing his kid without totally realizing it.

[[folder: Mythology [[folder:Mythology and Religion]]



** What became of Marge in the episode "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Marge" how she just seems to be insane and AxCrazy rather than CloserToEarth or worst NotSoAboveItAll. Marge never before and after went after any potential suitor for Homer with a broken glass cone, her treatment of Becky was very much unlike her.

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** What became of Marge in the episode "It's "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS11E21ItsAMadMadMadMadMarge It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Marge" Marge]]" how she just seems to be insane and AxCrazy rather than CloserToEarth or worst NotSoAboveItAll. Marge never before and after went after any potential suitor for Homer with a broken glass cone, her treatment of Becky was very much unlike her.
19th Jul '17 7:35:35 AM ClintEastwood
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** The episode "The Outcast" has Worf break character for a scene in order to dismiss a certain method of playing poker as "a woman's game" (i.e. a weak one) in order to enforce the Aesop that the Federation [[NotSoDifferent isn't as advanced in its gender politics as any other, "less evolved" spacefaring culture]]. It's jarring hearing it from a Starfleet character since we rarely, if ever, see sexism in the fleet, but it's ''especially'' jarring coming from a Klingon character like Worf, as he comes from a culture with a completely different history than Earth's [[FridgeLogic where sexism never really caught on in the first place.]]

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** The episode "The Outcast" "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E17TheOutcast}} The Outcast]]" has Worf break character for a scene in order to dismiss a certain method of playing poker as "a woman's game" (i.e. a weak one) in order to enforce the Aesop that the Federation [[NotSoDifferent isn't as advanced in its gender politics as any other, "less evolved" spacefaring culture]]. It's jarring hearing it from a Starfleet character since we rarely, if ever, see sexism in the fleet, but it's ''especially'' jarring coming from a Klingon character like Worf, as he comes from a culture with a completely different history than Earth's [[FridgeLogic where sexism never really caught on in the first place.]]



** Happened in the original script of "All Our Yesterdays" with Spock falling in love and kissing Zarabeth but averted in the filmed episode at Nimoy's insistence. Instead, his behavior was {{hand wave}}d with the explanation that, having gone back in time, he became like the savage Vulcans of that time.
** Spock has several interesting examples. In the original un-aired pilot, he broadly grinned when touching a strange, quivering plant, and in "Man Trap" he began violently striking a monster-disguised-as-a-woman to prove that she really wasn't [=McCoy=]'s long-lost love, the "woman" in question showing no ill effects and casually throwing Spock across the room in retaliation. These can be attributed to the fact that it was early in the series and Spock's character -- not to mention Vulcan culture in general -- hadn't been fully realized. Then in the Season 2 episode "Amok Time", a visibly distraught Spock thinks he has killed Kirk during a Pon Farr duel in which Spock was basically out of his mind thanks to crazy Vulcan hormones, but when Kirk unexpectedly shows up alive and well, Spock smiles with joy and excitedly rushes towards his friend before quickly regaining control of his emotions and apologizing for his embarrassing outburst. This, of course, was to show the depth of the friendship between he and Kirk.
** In the episode "Requiem For Methuselah", Kirk completely ignores the fact that his crew is in danger and keeps hitting on Rayna. Even though Kirk is a well-established horndog, he would never put that above duty to his ship and friends.
** "The Mark of Gideon", wherein Kirk lets an overpopulated race start a pandemic. First of all, Kirk himself survived a similar massacre and was very angry at the man who did it, and second of all, he doesn't so easily accept no-win scenarios.

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** Happened in the original script of "All "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E23AllOurYesterdays}} All Our Yesterdays" Yesterdays]]" with Spock falling in love and kissing Zarabeth but averted in the filmed episode at Nimoy's Creator/LeonardNimoy's insistence. Instead, his behavior was {{hand wave}}d with the explanation that, having gone back in time, he became like the savage Vulcans of that time.
** Spock has several interesting examples. In the [[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage}}the original un-aired pilot, pilot]], he broadly grinned when touching a strange, quivering plant, and in "Man Trap" "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E1TheManTrap}} The Man Trap]]" he began violently striking a monster-disguised-as-a-woman to prove that she really wasn't [=McCoy=]'s long-lost love, the "woman" in question showing no ill effects and casually throwing Spock across the room in retaliation. These can be attributed to the fact that it was early in the series and Spock's character -- not to mention Vulcan culture in general -- hadn't been fully realized. Then in the Season 2 episode "Amok Time", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E1AmokTime}} Amok Time]]", a visibly distraught Spock thinks he has killed Kirk during a Pon Farr duel in which Spock was basically out of his mind thanks to crazy Vulcan hormones, but when Kirk unexpectedly shows up alive and well, Spock smiles with joy and excitedly rushes towards his friend before quickly regaining control of his emotions and apologizing for his embarrassing outburst. This, of course, was to show the depth of the friendship between he and Kirk.
** In the episode "Requiem For Methuselah", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E19RequiemForMethuselah}} Requiem for Methuselah]]", Kirk completely ignores the fact that his crew is in danger and keeps hitting on Rayna. Even though Kirk is a well-established horndog, he would never put that above duty to his ship and friends.
** "The "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E16TheMarkOfGideon}} The Mark of Gideon", Gideon]]", wherein Kirk lets an overpopulated race start a pandemic. First of all, Kirk himself survived a similar massacre and was very angry at the man who did it, and second of all, he doesn't so easily accept no-win scenarios.



** At the start of season two, Buffy's behavior changes in response to the trauma of her near-death at the hands of the Master; she is sullen, actively lashes out at people, and flirts with Xander purely to upset Angel (and hurts Xander and Willow as a result).

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** At the start of [[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS2E1WhenSheWasBad season two, two]], Buffy's behavior changes in response to the trauma of her near-death at the hands of the Master; she is sullen, actively lashes out at people, and flirts with Xander purely to upset Angel (and hurts Xander and Willow as a result).



** In a presumably less intentional example, in the episode "Fool for Love", when Riley is prowling the cemetery for vampires while Buffy is injured, he brings along Willow, Xander, and Anya, who instead of using their long experience to help him, chatter, crunch on chips loudly, don't take cover, and generally act like stupid muggle amateurs. Even though Willow and Xander at least not only saved the slayer's ass numerous times and dealt with vampires for five years, but actually once ''hunted them without Buffy for an entire summer'', with a 60% success rate. They never had and never would act like that again, and presumably were only played that way to make Riley, who many fans consider TheScrappy, look good. Alternatively, it made Riley look overly militarized, as opposed to the generally more laid-back Scoobies.
** The episode 'I Was Made To Love You' featured several characters acting out of character - Anya makes a deliberate effort not to be jealous around Xander, Tara surprises everyone by swearing, and it is probably the first time we see Willow openly checking out another girl. This was deliberate on the writer's part, as the theme of the episode was women attempting to change themselves.

to:

** In a presumably less intentional example, in the episode "Fool for Love", "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS5E7FoolForLove}} Fool For Love]]", when Riley is prowling the cemetery for vampires while Buffy is injured, he brings along Willow, Xander, and Anya, who instead of using their long experience to help him, chatter, crunch on chips loudly, don't take cover, and generally act like stupid muggle amateurs. Even though Willow and Xander at least not only saved the slayer's ass numerous times and dealt with vampires for five years, but actually once ''hunted them without Buffy for an entire summer'', with a 60% success rate. They never had and never would act like that again, and presumably were only played that way to make Riley, who many fans consider TheScrappy, look good. Alternatively, it made Riley look overly militarized, as opposed to the generally more laid-back Scoobies.
** The episode 'I "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS5E15IWasMadeToLoveYou}} I Was Made To Love You' You]]" featured several characters acting out of character - Anya makes a deliberate effort not to be jealous around Xander, Tara surprises everyone by swearing, and it is probably the first time we see Willow openly checking out another girl. This was deliberate on the writer's part, as the theme of the episode was women attempting to change themselves.



** In "The Underwater Menace", there's a scene where Polly is trapped in a flooding chamber and [[HystericalWoman panicking and screaming that she can't do it]], and Jamie pulls her to her feet and [[GetAHoldOfYourselfMan slaps her on the face]]. This was in a MissingEpisode, and when the BBC's narrated audio reconstruction was made, Anneke Wills (who played Polly and narrated the action) and the director both agreed that Jamie [[CanonDiscontinuity didn't slap Polly]] because it didn't fit his character or their relationship, and they felt that Jamie dragging Polly to her feet would have been enough to snap her out of it.
** "The Dominators" centres around the Doctor trying to get a peaceful civilisation to take up guns against alien invaders without even considering any diplomacy or ScienceHero methods - partly why Troughton decides to play his part with lots of HamAndCheese. He even does a LampshadeHanging on it in an obvious adlib: The Doctor tells a Dulcian that the Dominators are aliens and therefore don't understand the meaning of pacifism, the Dulcian retorts that the Doctor is also an alien, and the Doctor quickly adds "You got me there!" ''just'' before the edit cuts into it.
** The Fourth Doctor story "The Seeds of Doom" shows a Fourth Doctor who is noticeably more TuxedoAndMartini-like than he is normally, even in his episodes which were originally written with the very SpyFiction-influenced Third Doctor [[CharacterizationMarchesOn still in the writer's minds]] (like "Robot"). For instance, he is very much an ActionHero in it, and willing to use fists at first opportunity, the same thing the Leela era (when he has a warrior as a companion) makes a very big thing out of him ''not'' doing. He also uses WigDressAccent to infiltrate a mansion, even though the Fourth Doctor had very little skill at disguises and tended to prefer force of personality and charm (one of the things that separated him from Three, who used secret identities, and Two, who was [[MasterActor a chameleon]]). This is all because the script was adapted from a script for ''Series/TheAvengers'' by an ''Avengers'' writer.
** The tie-in audio drama "Doctor Who and the Pescatons" is notorious for this. The writer had worked on Second Doctor stories mainly ("Fury from the Deep" and "Tomb of the Cybermen") and so the Fourth Doctor is written with the quirk of always playing the piccolo in times of stress (an echo of the Second Doctor's gimmick of playing the recorder badly). This, however, pales in comparison to the fact that the story shows the Doctor and Sarah Jane committing a genocide of an (apparently AlwaysChaoticEvil) alien race and [[GuiltFreeExterminationWar showing absolutely no remorse or conflict about it whatsoever]].
** During the final scene of "The Waters of Mars", the Tenth Doctor shows a very selfish side unlike his usual compassionate attitude. He argues with Adelaide that he gets to decide who's important and who's not, who gets to live and die, and calls himself a winner in a tone similar to how the famous Charlie Sheen calls himself a winner. When Adelaide calls him out saying he's wrong, he simply replies, "That's for me to decide." This is portrayed as what the Doctor is like if he's both wracked with guilt and loneliness for a long time and left without a companion to regulate him. By the end he's given a sharp wake up call about just how OOC he's being and it's the start of him realizing that he needs to regenerate because he's becoming dangerously prideful from being 10 for so long. Made even more alarming when you realize that, at the time of his regeneration, 10 lived less than a decade. As the Eleventh Doctor would later put it, he had "vanity issues" which caused him an abnormal amount of attachment to a specific incarnation and fear of regenerating.
*** The Twelfth Doctor acts this way in the aptly-titled "Hell Bent" (the Series 9 finale) for similar reasons: He has no companion/MoralityChain (because [[spoiler: she was unjustly executed]], which only makes things worse) and just suffered ColdBloodedTorture, so he's been DrivenToMadness. Luckily he comes around, though not without the help of [[spoiler: Mind Rape]].
** "The Vampires of Venice" has the Eleventh Doctor outright scream at his companion when she doesn't want to wait somewhere safe. It is a little odd since he is normally a lot nicer in this kind of situation and other episodes use TranquilFury to show this doctor's anger unless pushed to the extremes. It may be a result of it being one of his earlier episodes, before the character was truly pounded out.
** In "Vincent and the Doctor", the Eleventh Doctor decides to confront the invisible Monster of the Week by swinging a stick at it, apparently attempting to bludgeon it into submission. In other episodes, especially since the reboot, the Doctor disdains weapons and always attempts to find a peaceful solution first. He is, however, trying to protect [[spoiler:Vincent Van Gogh]] who's kind of important to the timeline. This can be excused by him being under the impression that Amy's life was in immediate danger, and the fact that each new incarnation of the character is different from the last, including their tendency of using martial force.
** In "Let's Kill Hitler," he explains "she's been brainwashed, plus, she's a woman!" when claiming that River Song is trying to kill him right after trying to marry him, and then pleads to be given some leeway for his comments because he's just been poisoned. It's a line [[SocietyMarchesOn right out of the Troughton era]] which makes no sense in context, since the Doctor wasn't raised in and has never been culturally assimilated into a sexist society, so he wouldn't fall back on stereotypes even in a moment of extreme stress.
** The seventh series episode ''A Town Called Mercy'' seems to be using this to set up a significant character arc for the Doctor as he [[spoiler:forces an alien man at gunpoint to what they both know will be his death]].

to:

** In "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E5TheUnderwaterMenace The Underwater Menace", Menace]]", there's a scene where Polly is trapped in a flooding chamber and [[HystericalWoman panicking and screaming that she can't do it]], and Jamie pulls her to her feet and [[GetAHoldOfYourselfMan slaps her on the face]]. This was in a MissingEpisode, and when the BBC's Creator/TheBBC's narrated audio reconstruction was made, Anneke Wills (who played Polly and narrated the action) and the director both agreed that Jamie [[CanonDiscontinuity didn't slap Polly]] because it didn't fit his character or their relationship, and they felt that Jamie dragging Polly to her feet would have been enough to snap her out of it.
** "The Dominators" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators The Dominators]]" centres around the Doctor trying to get a peaceful civilisation to take up guns against alien invaders without even considering any diplomacy or ScienceHero methods - partly why Troughton decides to play his part with lots of HamAndCheese. He even does a LampshadeHanging on it in an obvious adlib: The Doctor tells a Dulcian that the Dominators are aliens and therefore don't understand the meaning of pacifism, the Dulcian retorts that the Doctor is also an alien, and the Doctor quickly adds "You got me there!" ''just'' before the edit cuts into it.
** The Fourth Doctor story "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E6TheSeedsOfDoom The Seeds of Doom" Doom]]" shows a Fourth Doctor who is noticeably more TuxedoAndMartini-like than he is normally, even in his episodes which were originally written with the very SpyFiction-influenced Third Doctor [[CharacterizationMarchesOn still in the writer's minds]] (like "Robot")."[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E1Robot Robot]]"). For instance, he is very much an ActionHero in it, and willing to use fists at first opportunity, the same thing the Leela era (when he has a warrior as a companion) makes a very big thing out of him ''not'' doing. He also uses WigDressAccent to infiltrate a mansion, even though the Fourth Doctor had very little skill at disguises and tended to prefer force of personality and charm (one of the things that separated him from Three, who used secret identities, and Two, who was [[MasterActor a chameleon]]). This is all because the script was adapted from a script for ''Series/TheAvengers'' by an ''Avengers'' writer.
** The tie-in audio drama "Doctor Who and the Pescatons" is notorious for this. The writer had worked on Second Doctor stories mainly ("Fury ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E6FuryFromTheDeep Fury from the Deep" Deep]]" and "Tomb "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E1TheTombOfTheCybermen The Tomb of the Cybermen") Cybermen]]") and so the Fourth Doctor is written with the quirk of always playing the piccolo in times of stress (an echo of the Second Doctor's gimmick of playing the recorder badly). This, however, pales in comparison to the fact that the story shows the Doctor and Sarah Jane committing a genocide of an (apparently AlwaysChaoticEvil) alien race and [[GuiltFreeExterminationWar showing absolutely no remorse or conflict about it whatsoever]].
** During the final scene of "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E16TheWatersOfMars The Waters of Mars", Mars]]", the Tenth Doctor shows a very selfish side unlike his usual compassionate attitude. He argues with Adelaide that he gets to decide who's important and who's not, who gets to live and die, and calls himself a winner in a tone similar to how the famous Charlie Sheen calls himself a winner. When Adelaide calls him out saying he's wrong, he simply replies, "That's for me to decide." This is portrayed as what the Doctor is like if he's both wracked with guilt and loneliness for a long time and left without a companion to regulate him. By the end he's given a sharp wake up call about just how OOC he's being and it's the start of him realizing that he needs to regenerate because he's becoming dangerously prideful from being 10 for so long. Made even more alarming when you realize that, at the time of his regeneration, 10 lived less than a decade. As the Eleventh Doctor would later put it, he had "vanity issues" which caused him an abnormal amount of attachment to a specific incarnation and fear of regenerating.
*** The Twelfth Doctor acts this way in the aptly-titled "Hell Bent" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]" (the Series 9 finale) for similar reasons: He has no companion/MoralityChain (because [[spoiler: she was unjustly executed]], which only makes things worse) and just suffered ColdBloodedTorture, so he's been DrivenToMadness. Luckily he comes around, though not without the help of [[spoiler: Mind Rape]].
** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E6TheVampiresOfVenice The Vampires of Venice" Venice]]" has the Eleventh Doctor outright scream at his companion when she doesn't want to wait somewhere safe. It is a little odd since he is normally a lot nicer in this kind of situation and other episodes use TranquilFury to show this doctor's anger unless pushed to the extremes. It may be a result of it being one of his earlier episodes, before the character was truly pounded out.
** In "Vincent and the Doctor", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E4TheDoctorsWife The Doctor's Wife]]", the Eleventh Doctor decides to confront the invisible Monster of the Week by swinging a stick at it, apparently attempting to bludgeon it into submission. In other episodes, especially since the reboot, the Doctor disdains weapons and always attempts to find a peaceful solution first. He is, however, trying to protect [[spoiler:Vincent Van Gogh]] who's kind of important to the timeline. This can be excused by him being under the impression that Amy's life was in immediate danger, and the fact that each new incarnation of the character is different from the last, including their tendency of using martial force.
** In "Let's "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler," Hitler]]", he explains "she's been brainwashed, plus, she's a woman!" when claiming that River Song is trying to kill him right after trying to marry him, and then pleads to be given some leeway for his comments because he's just been poisoned. It's a line [[SocietyMarchesOn right out of the Troughton era]] which makes no sense in context, since the Doctor wasn't raised in and has never been culturally assimilated into a sexist society, so he wouldn't fall back on stereotypes even in a moment of extreme stress.
** The seventh series episode ''A "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E3ATownCalledMercy A Town Called Mercy'' Mercy]]" seems to be using this to set up a significant character arc for the Doctor as he [[spoiler:forces an alien man at gunpoint to what they both know will be his death]].



** Averted by Steven Moffat in "The Day of the Doctor". He didn't use the Eighth Doctor as the Time War Doctor as he felt him destroying Gallifrey would be out of character. The War Doctor was used when Creator/ChristopherEccleston decided not to participate (though the Ninth Doctor is supposed to be newly regenerated at the time of the revival, so that wouldnt make much sense either). Apparently the Doctor being a warrior is really out of character, which is justified as the War Doctor was specifically meant as a warrior. In fact the War Doctor rejects the title entirely, which is why he isn't counted in the numbering.

to:

** Averted by Steven Moffat Creator/StevenMoffat in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor The Day of the Doctor".Doctor]]". He didn't use the Eighth Doctor as the Time War Doctor as he felt him destroying Gallifrey would be out of character. The War Doctor was used when Creator/ChristopherEccleston decided not to participate (though the Ninth Doctor is supposed to be newly regenerated at the time of the revival, so that wouldnt make much sense either). Apparently the Doctor being a warrior is really out of character, which is justified as the War Doctor was specifically meant as a warrior. In fact the War Doctor rejects the title entirely, which is why he isn't counted in the numbering.



** In "There's No Disgrace Like Home" Marge gets drunk and actually embarrasses Homer, who wants their family to be normal and appreciated by the rest of society. Part of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness, of course.

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** In "There's "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS1E4TheresNoDisgraceLikeHome There's No Disgrace Like Home" Home]]" Marge gets drunk and actually embarrasses Homer, who wants their family to be normal and appreciated by the rest of society. Part of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness, of course.



** "The Trouble With Trillions" has an OOCM that sticks out like a sore thumb: When the family is being asked by government agents what would Homer do with the ZillionDollarBill he's been accused of stealing, Marge says that the money should go to the kids' college fund... only for ''Lisa'' to reply "Who needs college? Let's buy dune buggies!" '''''Huh?''''' This coming from the girl who, after helping put Mr. Burns back on his feet, refused her rightful million dollar advisor fee out of moral disapprobation for how he did it.
** In "Rosebud", Homer and Bart are gloating that they can demand any price for returning Bobo to Mr Burns, and Marge replies "Now I'm sure he'll offer a fair reward ... And then we'll make him double it!" When the rest of the family stares at her, she adds, "[[LampshadeHanging Why can't I be greedy every once in a while?]]"

to:

** "The "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS9E20TheTroubleWithTrillions The Trouble With Trillions" with Trillions]]" has an OOCM that sticks out like a sore thumb: When the family is being asked by government agents what would Homer do with the ZillionDollarBill he's been accused of stealing, Marge says that the money should go to the kids' college fund... only for ''Lisa'' to reply "Who needs college? Let's buy dune buggies!" '''''Huh?''''' This coming from the girl who, after helping put Mr. Burns back on his feet, refused her rightful million dollar advisor fee out of moral disapprobation for how he did it.
** In "Rosebud", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS5E4Rosebud Rosebud]]", Homer and Bart are gloating that they can demand any price for returning Bobo to Mr Burns, and Marge replies "Now I'm sure he'll offer a fair reward ... And then we'll make him double it!" When the rest of the family stares at her, she adds, "[[LampshadeHanging Why can't I be greedy every once in a while?]]"



** In "Das Bus", Sherri defends her (and Terri's) nemesis Lisa when Bart knocks Lisa during the Model UN Conference, but even as it's an equivalent of if Nelson defended Bart (though Nelson stayed in character in this scene), it was probably done for the sake of starting a fight with everybody. Curiously, later when the Springfield kids are stranded on an island, Sherri blames Lisa for the crash, but Nelson blames Milhouse, who rolled a grapefruit on the bus floor, which accidentally jammed the brake pedal, causing the bus to crash.
** In "Hurricane Neddy", Ned Flanders has an OOCM when he snaps and gets angry with the people who rebuilt his house. Ned himself recognizes the severity of the outburst, and immediately drives himself to a mental institution. However, this was explained as the result of Ned repressing his rage and hatred of his parents for literally ''decades''. The piss-poor job the citizens did rebuilding his house was just the last straw.
** Marge again in "Catch Them If Your Can", in which she ''absolutely hates'' being a mother and would abandon her kids if she could.
** In "Hello Gutter, Hello Fadder", Mr. Burns does ''not'' have to be reminded who Homer is.
** In "How the Test Was Won", Lisa completely chokes on a standardized test with no explanation why while everyone else seems to be able to do it fine including Milhouse. Since the test is thrown out anyway at the end, there's no real telling if the problem was with Lisa or the test itself with Lisa being the only one visibly distraught.
** It may be non-canon, but Lisa has one in "Treehouse of Horror XIII" where she's duped by the epitaph of a man named William Bonney into unleashing zombies upon the town. You'd think someone as book-smart as her would recognize Billy the Kid's real name. (Never mind the biggest thing wrong with the story, which is how ''in the world'' did Billy and the other outlaws get interred in Springfield?)

to:

** In "Das Bus", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS9E14DasBus Das Bus]]", Sherri defends her (and Terri's) nemesis Lisa when Bart knocks Lisa during the Model UN Conference, but even as it's an equivalent of if Nelson defended Bart (though Nelson stayed in character in this scene), it was probably done for the sake of starting a fight with everybody. Curiously, later when the Springfield kids are stranded on an island, Sherri blames Lisa for the crash, but Nelson blames Milhouse, who rolled a grapefruit on the bus floor, which accidentally jammed the brake pedal, causing the bus to crash.
** In "Hurricane Neddy", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS8E8HurricaneNeddy Hurricane Neddy]]", Ned Flanders has an OOCM when he snaps and gets angry with the people who rebuilt his house. Ned himself recognizes the severity of the outburst, and immediately drives himself to a mental institution. However, this was explained as the result of Ned repressing his rage and hatred of his parents for literally ''decades''. The piss-poor job the citizens did rebuilding his house was just the last straw.
** Marge again in "Catch Them "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS15E18CatchEmIfYouCan Catch 'Em If Your Can", You Can]]", in which she ''absolutely hates'' being a mother and would abandon her kids if she could.
** In "Hello "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS11E6HelloGutterHelloFadder Hello Gutter, Hello Fadder", Fadder]]", Mr. Burns does ''not'' have to be reminded who Homer is.
** In "How "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS20E11HowTheTestWasWon How the Test Was Won", Won]]", Lisa completely chokes on a standardized test with no explanation why while everyone else seems to be able to do it fine including Milhouse. Since the test is thrown out anyway at the end, there's no real telling if the problem was with Lisa or the test itself with Lisa being the only one visibly distraught.
** It may be non-canon, but Lisa has one in "Treehouse "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS14E1TreehouseOfHorrorXIII Treehouse of Horror XIII" XIII]]" where she's duped by the epitaph of a man named William Bonney into unleashing zombies upon the town. You'd think someone as book-smart as her would recognize Billy the Kid's real name. (Never mind the biggest thing wrong with the story, which is how ''in the world'' did Billy and the other outlaws get interred in Springfield?)



** In "Family Gay", Brian sends [[ItMakesSenseInContext the temporarily gay Peter]] to a Christian anti-gay camp to turn him straight. Brian admits it goes against everything he stands for, but he does it to make Lois happy.

to:

** In "Family Gay", "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS7E8FamilyGay Family Gay]]", Brian sends [[ItMakesSenseInContext the temporarily gay Peter]] to a Christian anti-gay camp to turn him straight. Brian admits it goes against everything he stands for, but he does it to make Lois happy.



** Brian also has a very out of character moment in the episode "Be Careful What You Fish For". Stewie complains to Brian about the horrible conditions the preschool is in and how the teacher lets the kids do whatever they want. Brian goes to have a talk with the teacher until he sees how hot she looks. Brian then decides to ''defend the teacher'' and being the horn dog that he is, tries to date her. Stewie suffers more under the horrible conditions and tries to tell Lois, only for Brian to shut him up. Brian then sees the teacher has a boyfriend already so Brian decides to call the cops on her for how she ran the school just because of that.
** Peter in "Meg and Quagmire", where he actually cares about Meg's safety.

to:

** Brian also has a very out of character moment in the episode "Be "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS10E14BeCarefulWhatYouFishFor Be Careful What You Fish For".For]]". Stewie complains to Brian about the horrible conditions the preschool is in and how the teacher lets the kids do whatever they want. Brian goes to have a talk with the teacher until he sees how hot she looks. Brian then decides to ''defend the teacher'' and being the horn dog that he is, tries to date her. Stewie suffers more under the horrible conditions and tries to tell Lois, only for Brian to shut him up. Brian then sees the teacher has a boyfriend already so Brian decides to call the cops on her for how she ran the school just because of that.
** Peter in "Meg "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS10E10MegAndQuagmire Meg and Quagmire", Quagmire]]", where he actually cares about Meg's safety.



** Meg in "Chris Cross," when she blackmails Chris and takes it too far to the point when Chris runs away from home.

to:

** Meg in "Chris Cross," "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS11E13ChrisCross Chris Cross]]," when she blackmails Chris and takes it too far to the point when Chris runs away from home.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.OutofCharacterMoment