History Main / Outlaw

25th May '16 2:17:53 AM PaulA
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* The ''Jon Shannow'' books by Creator/DavidGemmell, being set in an AfterTheEnd western, has a lot of them, like Daniel Cade. They're usually the main antagonists of the book until the real BigBad shows up.

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* The ''Jon Shannow'' ''Literature/JonShannow'' books by Creator/DavidGemmell, being set in an AfterTheEnd western, has a lot of them, like Daniel Cade. They're usually the main antagonists of the book until the real BigBad shows up.
18th Apr '16 12:17:36 PM Morgenthaler
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SuperTrope to the {{Bandito}}.
18th Apr '16 7:03:23 AM Morgenthaler
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5th Mar '16 4:32:23 AM Grudgeal
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* In the second arc of ''Manga/VinlandSaga'', the "Guests" on Ketil's farm are all outlaws, and use nicknames because their real names could reveal their legal status.
25th Dec '15 6:46:33 PM nombretomado
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* Terra-Man, a SilverAge foe of {{Superman}}, combined the trappings of a Wild West outlaw with alien technology, since he was actually born in the appropriate time period.

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* Terra-Man, a SilverAge [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] foe of {{Superman}}, Franchise/{{Superman}}, combined the trappings of a Wild West outlaw with alien technology, since he was actually born in the appropriate time period.
13th Oct '15 7:17:43 AM JulianLapostat
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** During the trial of King UsefulNotes/LouisXVI, the revolutionary Saint-Just declared the King "Hors la loi!" (Outside the Law). He pointed out that as a result of France becoming a republic, the earlier constitution declaring the King inviolable was invalid. Furthermore, the King himself had violated that same constitution during the Flight to Varennes[[note]]where he and the Queen had intended to unleash an army of French emigres and Austrians on the French people but were caught in the frontier town of Varennes, totally disillusioning the French people[[/note]]. As such, the National Convention can't possibly consider ''itself''(as representatives of the Revolution) and the King [[LogicBomb legitimate at the same time]]. The subsequent, trial revealed new evidence of the King's guilt, and the Convention agreed that the King had put himself outside all legal protections, paving the way for his execution.

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** During the trial of King UsefulNotes/LouisXVI, the revolutionary Saint-Just declared the King "Hors la loi!" (Outside the Law). He pointed out that as a result of France becoming a republic, the earlier constitution declaring the King inviolable was invalid. Furthermore, the King himself had violated that same constitution during the Flight to Varennes[[note]]where he and the Queen had intended to unleash an army of French emigres and Austrians on the French people but were caught in the frontier town of Varennes, totally disillusioning the French people[[/note]]. As such, the National Convention can't possibly consider ''itself''(as representatives of the Revolution) and the King [[LogicBomb legitimate at the same time]]. The subsequent, subsequent trial revealed new evidence of the King's guilt, guilt and the Convention agreed that the King had put himself outside all legal protections, paving the way for his execution.
13th Oct '15 7:17:00 AM JulianLapostat
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** In the lead-up to the trial of King UsefulNotes/LouisXVI, Louis Antoine de Saint-Just stated that the King was essentially "Hors la loi!" (Outside the Law). The King had earlier sworn, in public, to uphold Constitutional Monarchy in 1791. Yet shortly after that, he along with Queen UsefulNotes/MarieAntoinette [[TheOathbreaker plotted the failed conspiracy]] known as the Flight to Varennes [[note]]where he and the Queen had intended to unleash an army of French emigres and Austrians on the French people but were caught in the frontier town of Varennes, totally disillusioning the French people[[/note]]. In 1792, after the Palace insurrection, the constitutional monarchy declared itself a Republic[[note]]During the Storming of the Tuilleries, an insurrection that forced the King to take refuge with the Legislative Assembly[[/note]], effectively annulling the earlier constitution (which provided immunity to the King), which the King himself rendered illegitimate by his treachery. Saint-Just and Robespierre pointed out that the National Convention can't possibly consider ''itself''(as representatives of the Revolution) and the King [[LogicBomb legitimate at the same time]] and so called for the death of the King without trial as an outlaw. The King ''did'' get a trial however, but in the end the legislators agreed that the King had essentially put himself outside all legal protections and further evidence revealed his bad faith, with most of them in favor of summary execution.
** Of course, turnaround is fair play. During Thermidor, Robespierre, Saint-Just, George Couthon, members of the Committee of Public Safety, the governing body at the time, were arrested and detained. However, the Paris Commune released them from government custody and Robespierre's faction holed up in Paris' city hall. The National Convention feared another popular insurrection or a coup, and so declared Robespierre, his friends and the Paris Commune outlaws. Whether Robespierre ''did'' plan a coup is fuzzy (it is known that he fatally delayed taking action and that none of his actions were violent on that night), but in the end Robespierre and his allies were executed without a trial. Indeed, the day after Robespierre's downfall, 77 members of the Paris Commune were executed by guillotine (without trial), with more than hundred dead in the course of three days, becoming the largest mass execution during the ReignOfTerror.
** UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte struggled for legitimacy for most of his reign, since as a Dictator who came to power with a coup d'etat, he had no legal and popular legitimacy, but as a beneficiary of revolutionary reforms and meritocracy, he was seen as "Robespierre on Horseback" by other European powers, an upstart and conqueror rather than a true sovereign on the levels of other royal families. On his first defeat, the allied nations stated after several early peace deals rejected by Napoleon, that France would be granted peace and favorable treaties if the Emperor was exiled and his heirs disinherited. When Napoleon returned during the Hundred Days, the Congress of Vienna declared Napoleon an outlaw, who ''"has placed himself without the pale of civil and social relations; and that, as an enemy and disturber of the tranquillity of the world, he has rendered himself liable to public vengeance."''

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** In the lead-up to During the trial of King UsefulNotes/LouisXVI, Louis Antoine de the revolutionary Saint-Just stated that declared the King was essentially "Hors la loi!" (Outside the Law). The King had He pointed out that as a result of France becoming a republic, the earlier sworn, in public, to uphold Constitutional Monarchy in 1791. Yet shortly after that, he along with Queen UsefulNotes/MarieAntoinette [[TheOathbreaker plotted constitution declaring the failed conspiracy]] known as King inviolable was invalid. Furthermore, the King himself had violated that same constitution during the Flight to Varennes [[note]]where Varennes[[note]]where he and the Queen had intended to unleash an army of French emigres and Austrians on the French people but were caught in the frontier town of Varennes, totally disillusioning the French people[[/note]]. In 1792, after the Palace insurrection, the constitutional monarchy declared itself a Republic[[note]]During the Storming of the Tuilleries, an insurrection that forced the King to take refuge with the Legislative Assembly[[/note]], effectively annulling the earlier constitution (which provided immunity to the King), which the King himself rendered illegitimate by his treachery. Saint-Just and Robespierre pointed out that As such, the National Convention can't possibly consider ''itself''(as representatives of the Revolution) and the King [[LogicBomb legitimate at the same time]] and so called for the death time]]. The subsequent, trial revealed new evidence of the King without trial as an outlaw. The King ''did'' get a trial however, but in King's guilt, and the end the legislators Convention agreed that the King had essentially put himself outside all legal protections and further evidence revealed protections, paving the way for his bad faith, with most of them in favor of summary execution.
** Of course, turnaround is fair play. During Thermidor, Robespierre, Saint-Just, George Couthon, members of the Committee of Public Safety, the governing body at the time, were arrested and detained. However, declared outlaws by the same National Convention, after the Paris Commune released them from government judicial custody and Robespierre's faction holed up in Paris' city hall. The [[note]]The National Convention feared another popular insurrection or a coup, and so declared Robespierre, his friends and the Paris Commune outlaws. Whether Robespierre ''did'' plan a coup is fuzzy (it is known that he fatally delayed taking action and that none of his actions were violent on that night), but in the end night)[[/note]]. Robespierre and his allies were executed without a trial. Indeed, trial, followed the day after Robespierre's downfall, by 77 members of the Paris Commune were executed by guillotine (without trial), with more than hundred dead in the course of three days, becoming Commune, which became the largest mass execution during the ReignOfTerror.
** UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte struggled for legitimacy for most of his reign, since as a Dictator dictator who came to power with a via coup d'etat, he had no legal and popular legitimacy, but as a beneficiary of revolutionary reforms and meritocracy, he was seen as "Robespierre on Horseback" by other European powers, an upstart and conqueror rather than a true sovereign on the levels of other royal families. On Emperor[[note]]On his first defeat, the allied nations stated after several early peace deals rejected by Napoleon, that France would be granted peace and favorable treaties if the Emperor was exiled and his heirs disinherited. disinherited.[[/note]] When Napoleon returned during the Hundred Days, the Congress of Vienna declared Napoleon an outlaw, who ''"has placed himself without the pale of civil and social relations; and that, as an enemy and disturber of the tranquillity of the world, he has rendered himself liable to public vengeance."''
12th Oct '15 10:51:16 PM JulianLapostat
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By the time of TheWildWest, prisons and organized law enforcement were in place, so the old practice of outlawry was obsolete, but the term continued to be used for those who chose to flee into the wilderness or other jurisdictions to escape punishment for their crimes.

In TheWestern, the outlaw is not completely removed from the protection of the law, but is wanted for crimes that make it impossible to stay in the community. Often, he will have a price on his head, making him the prey of the BountyHunter. Most outlaws will continue to lead lives of crime while in the wilderness, unless unjustly accused.

An individual outlaw, or the leader of an outlaw gang, will often overlap with TheGunslinger. Other members of an outlaw gang will generally be the Western's equivalent of the {{Mook}}. If the {{Outlaw}} is the protagonist, or otherwise meant to be sympathetic, expect them to be either shown as having a Robin Hood-like code of ethics as to who they rob, being an innocent person [[ClearMyName falsely accused]], or an AntiHero who does "what he has to do" to survive in a lawless land.

to:

By the time of TheWildWest, prisons and organized law enforcement were in place, so the old practice of outlawry was obsolete, but the term continued to be used for those who chose to flee into the wilderness or other jurisdictions to escape punishment for their crimes.

crimes. In TheWestern, the outlaw is not completely removed from the protection of the law, but is wanted for crimes that make it impossible to stay in the community. Often, he will have a price on his head, making him the prey of the BountyHunter. Most outlaws will continue to lead lives of crime while in the wilderness, unless unjustly accused.

accused. An individual outlaw, or the leader of an outlaw gang, will often overlap with TheGunslinger. Other members of an outlaw gang will generally be the Western's equivalent of the {{Mook}}. If the {{Outlaw}} is the protagonist, or otherwise meant to be sympathetic, expect them to be either shown as having a Robin Hood-like code of ethics as to who they rob, being an innocent person [[ClearMyName falsely accused]], or an AntiHero who does "what he has to do" to survive in a lawless land.
12th Oct '15 10:39:08 PM JulianLapostat
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* In the old days, [[RuthlessModernPirates pirates]]: assuming you weren't too scared to fight back or the crew didn't hate you enough to mutiny, you could kill them with impunity, as long as you could prove they were pirates. The only ones with an actual duty to try and get them to surrender before exterminating them were the captains specifically ordered to hunt them down, as some pirates had been forced to join and freeing them was a priority.

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* In the old days, [[RuthlessModernPirates pirates]]: assuming you weren't too scared to fight back [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfPiracy pirates]]. Governments of England, France and Spain essentially declared open season and many of them were executed with out so much as a trial or legal protection, they were declared "Hostis Humani Generis" - "Enemy of all Mankind". Things improved later under Governor Woodes Rogers who tried a more moderate approach but even taking the crew pardon didn't hate you enough to mutiny, you could kill them with impunity, as long as you could prove they were pirates. prevent UsefulNotes/{{Blackbeard}} from being killed. The only ones with an actual duty to try and get them to surrender before exterminating them were the captains specifically ordered to hunt them down, as some pirates had been forced to join and freeing them was a priority.priority.
* The term regained currency during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars, mostly because of the political instability and the question of legitimate authority, at various times French heads of state found themselves declared outlaws:
** In the lead-up to the trial of King UsefulNotes/LouisXVI, Louis Antoine de Saint-Just stated that the King was essentially "Hors la loi!" (Outside the Law). The King had earlier sworn, in public, to uphold Constitutional Monarchy in 1791. Yet shortly after that, he along with Queen UsefulNotes/MarieAntoinette [[TheOathbreaker plotted the failed conspiracy]] known as the Flight to Varennes [[note]]where he and the Queen had intended to unleash an army of French emigres and Austrians on the French people but were caught in the frontier town of Varennes, totally disillusioning the French people[[/note]]. In 1792, after the Palace insurrection, the constitutional monarchy declared itself a Republic[[note]]During the Storming of the Tuilleries, an insurrection that forced the King to take refuge with the Legislative Assembly[[/note]], effectively annulling the earlier constitution (which provided immunity to the King), which the King himself rendered illegitimate by his treachery. Saint-Just and Robespierre pointed out that the National Convention can't possibly consider ''itself''(as representatives of the Revolution) and the King [[LogicBomb legitimate at the same time]] and so called for the death of the King without trial as an outlaw. The King ''did'' get a trial however, but in the end the legislators agreed that the King had essentially put himself outside all legal protections and further evidence revealed his bad faith, with most of them in favor of summary execution.
** Of course, turnaround is fair play. During Thermidor, Robespierre, Saint-Just, George Couthon, members of the Committee of Public Safety, the governing body at the time, were arrested and detained. However, the Paris Commune released them from government custody and Robespierre's faction holed up in Paris' city hall. The National Convention feared another popular insurrection or a coup, and so declared Robespierre, his friends and the Paris Commune outlaws. Whether Robespierre ''did'' plan a coup is fuzzy (it is known that he fatally delayed taking action and that none of his actions were violent on that night), but in the end Robespierre and his allies were executed without a trial. Indeed, the day after Robespierre's downfall, 77 members of the Paris Commune were executed by guillotine (without trial), with more than hundred dead in the course of three days, becoming the largest mass execution during the ReignOfTerror.
** UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte struggled for legitimacy for most of his reign, since as a Dictator who came to power with a coup d'etat, he had no legal and popular legitimacy, but as a beneficiary of revolutionary reforms and meritocracy, he was seen as "Robespierre on Horseback" by other European powers, an upstart and conqueror rather than a true sovereign on the levels of other royal families. On his first defeat, the allied nations stated after several early peace deals rejected by Napoleon, that France would be granted peace and favorable treaties if the Emperor was exiled and his heirs disinherited. When Napoleon returned during the Hundred Days, the Congress of Vienna declared Napoleon an outlaw, who ''"has placed himself without the pale of civil and social relations; and that, as an enemy and disturber of the tranquillity of the world, he has rendered himself liable to public vengeance."''
1st Oct '15 4:43:02 PM nombretomado
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* By the futuristic setting of ''OutlawStar'', the term has decayed even further. "Outlaws" are independent spaceships and their crews who have no formal allegiance to the government or pirate guilds.

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* By the futuristic setting of ''OutlawStar'', ''Manga/OutlawStar'', the term has decayed even further. "Outlaws" are independent spaceships and their crews who have no formal allegiance to the government or pirate guilds.
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