History Main / OurZombiesAreDifferent

18th Jan '16 10:17:06 PM MrUnderhill
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* The Undead in ''VideoGame/DarkSouls''. They start off as living humans marked with the "Darkring." Upon death, they turn into something akin to a revenant -- a near-mummified corpse still retaining its human mind and intelligence. Over time or as they die more, they eventually lose all of their humanity and become Hollow -- monstrous killing machines that, although not utterly mindless, don't seem to be capable of anything more thoughtful than wielding weapons and trying to kill all who cross their path. It ''is'' possible for them to regain their humanity and the appearance of life, but it's not an easy process -- methods include reclaiming humanity from corpses (slow, but comparatively safe), helping other Undead with their trials, or attacking other Undead to steal humanity from them.
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* The Undead in ''VideoGame/DarkSouls''. They ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' start off as living humans marked with the "Darkring." "Darksign," a black spot ringed with fire on their bodies. These include almost every human character in the game, including the PlayerCharacter. Upon death, they turn into something akin to a revenant -- a near-mummified corpse still retaining its human mind and intelligence. Over time or as they die more, they eventually lose all of their humanity and become Hollow -- monstrous killing machines that, although not utterly mindless, don't seem to be capable of anything more thoughtful than wielding weapons and trying to kill all who cross their path. It ''is'' possible for them to regain their humanity and the appearance of life, but it's not an easy process -- methods include reclaiming humanity from corpses (slow, but comparatively safe), helping other Undead with their trials, or attacking other Undead to steal humanity from them. And it's not permanent, either; as soon as the Undead dies again, they go right back to near-Hollow state.
16th Jan '16 12:54:35 PM ScorpiusOB1
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A [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zombie_star Zombie star]] is the remnant of a certain type of supernova, in which the star is not completely destroyed but instead sent elsewhere at very high speeds. That said star is a white dwarf -kind of a stellar corpse- justifies the name.
15th Jan '16 10:27:21 PM DastardlyDemolition
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** In Part 1 (and possibly Part 2 and 3[[note]]Part 2 and 3 are less clear about the difference between a zombie and vampire. Straizo is explicitly called a vampire but it can't be said that the Pillar Men's minions are vampires or less deformed zombies. Part 3's Nukesaku and Vanilla Ice could be as much vampires as zombies due to Dio giving them his extract to empower them.[[/note]]), a zombie is a human infected by a Vampire's extract and is given powerful healing abilities at the expense of being deformed into horrifying abominations and losing their humanity and free will with only two zombie are spared of this, Tarkus and Bruford.
14th Jan '16 3:50:36 PM jormis29
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* ''Siren'' has people known as "Shibito". Shibito have all the standard setup of a zombie-like entity, but are not technically dead. [[spoiler: they are controlled by the alien god Datatsushi to eventually turn the world into a hellish realm for him to live.]] The Shibito cannot die, they can be harmed but can heal very quickly, their bodies can mutate and become bug like or grow an excessive number of eyes, they lash out at anything not infected, they are hive minded, they use firearms, they plan and think, and they wander about pointlessly looking for people not under the control. How one becomes a Shibito is vague at best, as multiple individuals that fit the criteria for a Shibito are not Shibito during any part of the game, while other people who have nothing to do with the town become Shibito towards the end.
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* ''Siren'' ''VideoGame/{{Siren}}'' has people known as "Shibito". Shibito have all the standard setup of a zombie-like entity, but are not technically dead. [[spoiler: they are controlled by the alien god Datatsushi to eventually turn the world into a hellish realm for him to live.]] The Shibito cannot die, they can be harmed but can heal very quickly, their bodies can mutate and become bug like or grow an excessive number of eyes, they lash out at anything not infected, they are hive minded, they use firearms, they plan and think, and they wander about pointlessly looking for people not under the control. How one becomes a Shibito is vague at best, as multiple individuals that fit the criteria for a Shibito are not Shibito during any part of the game, while other people who have nothing to do with the town become Shibito towards the end.

* The zombies in the Korean Web Toon ''Wake Up Deadman'' are just normal people who happen to be dead and rotting, it's the media and the government that makes them out to be a mindless cannibal hoard. They don't need to eat or sleep, although [[spoiler: if they become sleepy it means they're too damaged and will die for good]].
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* The zombies in the Korean Web Toon ''Wake Up Deadman'' ''Webcomic/WakeUpDeadman'' are just normal people who happen to be dead and rotting, it's the media and the government that makes them out to be a mindless cannibal hoard. They don't need to eat or sleep, although [[spoiler: if they become sleepy it means they're too damaged and will die for good]].
14th Jan '16 3:45:58 PM jormis29
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* The song "Aim for the Head" by Creature Feature is about a ZombieApocalypse caused by zombies that can be killed by a headshot (hence the song title), and are here because, according to the song "there is no more room in Hell''.
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* The song "Aim for the Head" by Creature Feature Music/CreatureFeature is about a ZombieApocalypse caused by zombies that can be killed by a headshot (hence the song title), and are here because, according to the song "there is no more room in Hell''.

* In LMFAO's music video "Party Rock Anthem", the "zombies" are people who have been infected by an affliction that causes them to continually "shuffle" every hour of every day. According to the survivor the two group members meet after waking up, the virus is transmitted into the person's bones and forces them to "keep shuffling, nonstop, all day, every day", and requires that survivors put on headphones and continually move to avoid being surrounded and overtaken by the infected. * The zombies from Music/MichaelJackson's ''Thriller'' are somewhat like {{Flesh Eating Zombie}}s, but with the added benefit of synchronized dancing.
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* In LMFAO's Music/{{LMFAO}}'s music video "Party Rock Anthem", the "zombies" are people who have been infected by an affliction that causes them to continually "shuffle" every hour of every day. According to the survivor the two group members meet after waking up, the virus is transmitted into the person's bones and forces them to "keep shuffling, nonstop, all day, every day", and requires that survivors put on headphones and continually move to avoid being surrounded and overtaken by the infected. * The zombies from Music/MichaelJackson's ''Thriller'' ''Music/{{Thriller}}'' are somewhat like {{Flesh Eating Zombie}}s, but with the added benefit of synchronized dancing.
14th Jan '16 3:43:35 PM jormis29
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* ''Literature/ZombiesVsUnicorns'' story "Love Will Tear Us Apart" features a protagonist that is a clear mishmash zombie - he eats brains as the result of an infection, but retains his intelligence and some memory of his previous life, and even [[spoiler: has the capacity to love, aww!]]
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* ''Literature/ZombiesVsUnicorns'' story ''Literature/ZombiesVsUnicorns'': ** The "Love Will Tear Us Apart" story features a protagonist that is a clear mishmash zombie - he eats brains as the result of an infection, but retains his intelligence and some memory of his previous life, and even [[spoiler: has the capacity to love, aww!]]aww!]] ** The "Inoculata" story has a lot of plague-bearing zombies, but [[spoiler: the main characters all end up infected with the disease, but in such a way that they aren't... zombie like. The other zombies don't bother them (i.e. try to eat them), and they have some... symptoms, so they're technically zombies, but not. They're inoculated.]] ** Creator/JohnGreen's offering into the Literature/ZombiesVsUnicorns genre was the novella ''Zombicorn'', about a zombie apocalypse caused by a strain of GMO corn that produces zombies that are singlemindedly obsessed with ''corn farming''.

* Creator/JohnGreen's offering into the Literature/ZombiesVsUnicorns genre was the novella ''Zombicorn'', about a zombie apocalypse caused by a strain of GMO corn that produces zombies that are singlemindedly obsessed with ''corn farming''.

* ''Literature/ZombiesVsUnicorns'' story "Inoculata" has a lot of plague-bearing zombies, but [[spoiler: the main characters all end up infected with the disease, but in such a way that they aren't... zombie like. The other zombies don't bother them (i.e. try to eat them), and they have some... symptoms, so they're technically zombies, but not. They're inoculated.]]
14th Jan '16 3:40:08 PM jormis29
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* The zombies in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse novels ''Literature/DeathTroopers'' and ''Red Harvest'' are a peculiar combination of voodoo, flesh-eating, and plague-bearing. The Blackwing virus, as revealed in ''Red Harvest'', was originally the product of Sith Alchemy (the Dark Side being pretty much the in-universe equivalent of black magic), specifically an immortality potion GoneHorriblyWrong-- the Sith Lord who created it intended for its user to complete the ritual by devouring the heart of a Jedi with a high midichlorian count after infecting himself, but no one ever managed to get that far before becoming a zombie. The virus fell into obscurity for a few millenia, before being rediscovered by the Galactic Empire and reworked through scientific means into a biological weapon. It's primarily spread through bite wounds, and takes effect faster that way, but the Imperial version can also be refined into an airborne agent that takes longer to kick in, but transcends all biohazard containment barriers (except in the case of rare individuals who are immune to it; bites work the same even in their case). The undead themselves share a kind of group consciousness, and while they start out mindless and feral upon reanimation, seeking only to either eat or infect others, they eventually learn and adapt to such a degree that they can operate blasters, lightsabers, and even starfighters. When it comes to fighting them, the usual methods of decapitation and burning work best, while those reanimated by the airborne version have the unique weakness of only being able to operate in an environment that's thoroughly saturated with the plague agent, dropping dead as soon as they leave it.
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* The zombies in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse novels ''Literature/DeathTroopers'' and ''Red Harvest'' ''[[Literature/StarWarsRedHarvest Red Harvest]]'' are a peculiar combination of voodoo, flesh-eating, and plague-bearing. The Blackwing virus, as revealed in ''Red Harvest'', was originally the product of Sith Alchemy (the Dark Side being pretty much the in-universe equivalent of black magic), specifically an immortality potion GoneHorriblyWrong-- the Sith Lord who created it intended for its user to complete the ritual by devouring the heart of a Jedi with a high midichlorian count after infecting himself, but no one ever managed to get that far before becoming a zombie. The virus fell into obscurity for a few millenia, before being rediscovered by the Galactic Empire and reworked through scientific means into a biological weapon. It's primarily spread through bite wounds, and takes effect faster that way, but the Imperial version can also be refined into an airborne agent that takes longer to kick in, but transcends all biohazard containment barriers (except in the case of rare individuals who are immune to it; bites work the same even in their case). The undead themselves share a kind of group consciousness, and while they start out mindless and feral upon reanimation, seeking only to either eat or infect others, they eventually learn and adapt to such a degree that they can operate blasters, lightsabers, and even starfighters. When it comes to fighting them, the usual methods of decapitation and burning work best, while those reanimated by the airborne version have the unique weakness of only being able to operate in an environment that's thoroughly saturated with the plague agent, dropping dead as soon as they leave it.
14th Jan '16 3:33:35 PM jormis29
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* By the same creator as the Zombie Fans comic (See below), [[http://bogleech.com/mortasheen.htm Mortasheen]] zombies have an extremely powerful HealingFactor, most are insane but some retain their former intellect (And thus are suitable as player characters), and if they try to [[{{Squick}} have sex]] they can produce one out of many horrible zombie/fetus monsters.
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* By the same creator as the Zombie Fans comic (See below), [[http://bogleech.com/mortasheen.htm Mortasheen]] ''TabletopGame/{{Mortasheen}}'' zombies have an extremely powerful HealingFactor, most are insane but some retain their former intellect (And thus are suitable as player characters), and if they try to [[{{Squick}} have sex]] they can produce one out of many horrible zombie/fetus monsters.
14th Jan '16 12:38:08 PM Anicomicgeek
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* The zombies in the ''ZMD'' (from the mind of Kevin Grevioux, the guy behind the ''Film/{{Underworld}}'' movies) comics are a mix of flesh-eating and plague-bearing. However, they were specifically designed by the US government to be deployed in conflict areas instead of living troops. In order to contain the threat, a build-in fail-safe causes them to sublimate when [[WeakenedByTheLight exposed to the sun]] (which means they also get a vampire trait). They are exceptionally strong, able to literally tear body parts off their victims or punch through someone's ribcage. The problem appears when one of the prototypes goes missing following a deployment in the Middle East. Apparently, the zombie experiences FailsafeFailure and is able to walk in the sun. The scientist in charge of the project is very concerned, fearing the zombie virus could mutate into an airborne form. They send the protagonist, a veteran soldier named Drake to find and destroy the runaway zombie, who is terrorizing towns in the Middle East, creating an army of zombies. Additionally, it turns out that the zombie virus works on other species too. At least two animal species are found infected: dogs and camel spiders. There is a cure of sorts, but it has to be injected within the hour of exposure, or the infection is irreversible. All zombies rot very quickly. Additionally, any zombie resulting from the bite of the mutated zombie is immune to sunlight.
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* The zombies in the ''ZMD'' (from the mind of Kevin Grevioux, Creator/KevinGrevioux, the guy behind the ''Film/{{Underworld}}'' movies) comics are a mix of flesh-eating and plague-bearing. However, they were specifically designed by the US government to be deployed in conflict areas instead of living troops. In order to contain the threat, a build-in fail-safe causes them to sublimate when [[WeakenedByTheLight exposed to the sun]] (which means they also get a vampire trait). They are exceptionally strong, able to literally tear body parts off their victims or punch through someone's ribcage. The problem appears when one of the prototypes goes missing following a deployment in the Middle East. Apparently, the zombie experiences FailsafeFailure and is able to walk in the sun. The scientist in charge of the project is very concerned, fearing the zombie virus could mutate into an airborne form. They send the protagonist, a veteran soldier named Drake to find and destroy the runaway zombie, who is terrorizing towns in the Middle East, creating an army of zombies. Additionally, it turns out that the zombie virus works on other species too. At least two animal species are found infected: dogs and camel spiders. There is a cure of sorts, but it has to be injected within the hour of exposure, or the infection is irreversible. All zombies rot very quickly. Additionally, any zombie resulting from the bite of the mutated zombie is immune to sunlight.
7th Jan '16 7:26:38 PM jormis29
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** The reverse has happened so frequently in Japan, it's generated a term of its own. ''"Kodokushi"'', which means "lonely death". It refers to people who have died alone, and as their deaths have gone undocumented, they aren't registered as dead for a long time, sometimes by as long as a decade or more. With the growing elderly population and an epidemic of social isolation, it's become a serious social problem. It's estimated that as many as 32,000 people might have died "lonely deaths" in 2009 alone.

** The reverse has happened so frequently in Japan, it's generated a term of its own. ''"Kodokushi"'', which means "lonely death". It refers to people who have died alone, and as their deaths have gone undocumented, they aren't registered as dead for a long time, sometimes by as long as a decade or more. With the growing elderly population and an epidemic of social isolation, it's become a serious social problem. It's estimated that as many as 32,000 people might have died "lonely deaths" in 2009 alone.
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** The reverse has happened so frequently in Japan, it's generated a term of its own. ''"Kodokushi"'', which means "lonely death". It refers to people who have died alone, and as their deaths have gone undocumented, they aren't registered as dead for a long time, sometimes by as long as a decade or more. With the growing elderly population and an epidemic of social isolation, it's become a serious social problem. It's estimated that as many as 32,000 people might have died "lonely deaths" in 2009 alone.
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