History Main / OrgyOfEvidence

22nd Apr '17 6:44:09 PM Occidensill
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* ''Film/EagleEye'' has the Rogue AI frame the main character for terrorist activities to get him on the run and following its orders. To do so, it deposits a giant amount of money in his account, then he goes home to find that it has been made borderline inaccessible by the gigantic amount of weapons, classified documents, and other materials that has been delivered. The FBI do not find the overkill suspicious for the duration of the movie (the lead agent cites other reasons for his later skepticism).
* Esteban tries to point out this trope in ''Film/{{Fresh}}'' when the police find a gun just used in a murder and a huge bag of heroin under his mattress. It doesn't help his case that both the drugs and the gun were really Esteban's, Fresh just made sure they could be found.



** The TropeNamer has more logical reasoning than most entries on the page, though. Witwer is looking at dozens of photos that suggest the victim killed multiple children. One of the pictures includes the supposed murderer's child. Witwer is immediately baffled as to why, according to the scene, the victim had all these pictures lying on his bed before the murderer arrived. Even if the murderer had found the pictures somewhere else in the apartment, he would have no reason to carefully set up where they were dramatically placed. It's this knowledge that finally gets Witwer to investigate other possibilities.
* Esteban tries to point out this trope in ''Film/{{Fresh}}'' when the police find a gun just used in a murder and a huge bag of heroin under his mattress. It doesn't help his case that both the drugs and the gun were really Esteban's, Fresh just made sure they could be found.

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** The TropeNamer has more logical reasoning than most entries on the page, though. page. Witwer is looking at dozens of photos spread out on a bed that suggest the victim killed multiple children. One of the pictures includes the supposed murderer's child. Witwer is immediately baffled as to why, according to the scene, the victim had all these pictures lying on his bed before the murderer arrived. Even if the murderer had found the pictures somewhere else in the apartment, he would have no reason to carefully set up lay them out where they were dramatically placed. It's this knowledge that finally gets Witwer to investigate other possibilities.
* Esteban tries to point out this trope in ''Film/{{Fresh}}'' when the police find a gun just used in a murder and a huge bag of heroin under his mattress. It doesn't help his case that both the drugs and the gun were really Esteban's, Fresh just made sure they could be found.
possibilities.



** Deliberately invoked in ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' where a vast amount of stereoypical evidence implicating Klatch in a murder is planted, as the Klatchian ambassador realizes this will cause Sam Vimes to look everywhere except Klatch for the killers. It works flawlessly on Vimes because he's (justifiably) cynical about his own people; it fails to work on his Klatchian opposite number, as ''he's'' (justifiably) cynical about ''his'' own people...

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** Deliberately invoked in ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' where a vast amount of stereoypical stereotypical evidence implicating Klatch in a murder is planted, as the Klatchian ambassador realizes this will cause Sam Vimes to look everywhere except Klatch for the killers. It works flawlessly on Vimes because he's (justifiably) cynical about his own people; it fails to work on his Klatchian opposite number, as ''he's'' (justifiably) cynical about ''his'' own people...



* In the Literature/JackReacher novel ''One Shot'', this is what the case against James Barr becomes. However, what makes Reacher suspicious is not the amount of evidence, but [[spoiler: that the investigative team thought to look for a clue that they had no reason to believe existed.]]

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* In the Literature/JackReacher novel ''One Shot'', this is what the case against James Barr becomes. However, what makes Reacher suspicious is not the amount of evidence, but [[spoiler: that the investigative team thought to look for a clue that they had no reason to believe existed.]]



* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Literature/XWingSeries'' of books, Tycho Celchu is accused of being a sleeper agent, as well as for murdering Corran Horn. His lawyer is quick to point out to the military tribunal that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that proves Tycho's guilt, but that someone has been actively destroying anything that could exonerate Tycho.[[spoiler: In the end, Tycho is let go when other clues come up, like the fact that Corran himself walks into the room and declares that Tycho didn't kill him.]]

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* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Literature/XWingSeries'' of books, Tycho Celchu is accused of being a sleeper agent, as well as for of murdering Corran Horn. His lawyer is quick to point out to the military tribunal that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that proves Tycho's guilt, but that someone has been actively destroying anything that could exonerate Tycho.[[spoiler: In the end, Tycho is let go when other clues come up, like the fact that Corran himself walks into the room and declares that Tycho didn't kill him.]]
17th Apr '17 10:31:07 PM Chariset
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* It would be quicker to list the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' cases which ''don't'' have mountains of evidence incriminating your client. For instance, in the fourth case of the second game, a character has been murdered and is found with your defendant's knife in his chest while one of the bloodied buttons on his costume was found in your defendant's pants. This is considered too incriminating and casts suspicion upon another character with a motive to frame your defendant. [[spoiler:As it turns out, she did plant that evidence to frame him, but the defendant actually ''is'' guilty.]]

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* It would be quicker to list the Most ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' cases which ''don't'' have mountains of evidence incriminating stack the deck against you and your client. For instance, in the client this way. The fourth case of the second game, game gives a character has been murdered and clever twist on it, however: the victim is found with your defendant's knife in his chest while one of the and a torn, bloodied buttons on button from his costume was found lodged in your the defendant's pants. This is considered too incriminating and casts suspicion upon another character with trousers. Even the non-too-bright local detective suspects a motive to frame your defendant. job. [[spoiler:As it turns out, she someone did plant that evidence try to frame him, but the your defendant actually ''is'' guilty.[[FramingTheGuiltyParty really is guilty]].]]
1st Mar '17 6:14:11 PM Gosicrystal
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A common tactic for fictional criminals (especially murderers) is to plant false clues at the scene of their crime: either to deliberately frame someone else or merely to throw suspicion away from themselves. Sometimes, however, they take things too far and the sheer amount of clues they plant has the opposite effect. No detective will believe that any criminal could be so careless as to leave that much incriminating evidence behind. He may also be suspicious because his investigation seems to be turning up all this evidence [[TooGoodToBeTrue far more quickly and easily than is usual for this kind of case]]. Alternately, the ''quantity'' of evidence isn't the problem; the problem is the plausibility of the ''existence'' of the evidence, or the ability of the investigator to ''find'' the purported evidence (the latter usually leads to either a DetectiveMole or a TheBadGuysAreCops situation, although that can be avoided in the case of evidence that shows up ''after'' a thorough search in a place already searched).

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A common tactic for fictional criminals (especially murderers) is to plant false clues at the scene of their crime: either to [[FrameUp deliberately frame someone else else]] or merely to throw suspicion away from themselves. Sometimes, however, they take things too far and the sheer amount of clues they plant has the opposite effect. No detective will believe that any criminal could be so careless as to leave that much incriminating evidence behind. He may also be suspicious because his investigation seems to be turning up all this evidence [[TooGoodToBeTrue far more quickly and easily than is usual for this kind of case]]. Alternately, the ''quantity'' of evidence isn't the problem; the problem is the plausibility of the ''existence'' of the evidence, or the ability of the investigator to ''find'' the purported evidence (the latter usually leads to either a DetectiveMole or a TheBadGuysAreCops situation, although that can be avoided in the case of evidence that shows up ''after'' a thorough search in a place already searched).
1st Mar '17 6:11:38 PM Gosicrystal
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* In the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games, this happens a few times. For instance, in the fourth case of the second game, a character has been murdered and is found with your defendant's knife in his chest while one of the bloodied buttons on his costume was found in your defendant's pants. This is considered too incriminating and casts suspicion upon another character with a motive to frame your defendant. [[spoiler:As it turns out, she did plant that evidence to frame him, [[FramingTheGuiltyParty but the defendant actually ''is'' guilty.]]]]
** It would be quicker to list the ''Ace Attorney'' cases which ''don't'' have mountains of evidence incriminating your client.

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* In It would be quicker to list the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games, this happens a few times.cases which ''don't'' have mountains of evidence incriminating your client. For instance, in the fourth case of the second game, a character has been murdered and is found with your defendant's knife in his chest while one of the bloodied buttons on his costume was found in your defendant's pants. This is considered too incriminating and casts suspicion upon another character with a motive to frame your defendant. [[spoiler:As it turns out, she did plant that evidence to frame him, [[FramingTheGuiltyParty but the defendant actually ''is'' guilty.]]]]
** It would be quicker to list the ''Ace Attorney'' cases which ''don't'' have mountains of evidence incriminating your client.
]]
18th Jan '17 4:14:36 AM alnair20aug93
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See also NeverTheObviousSuspect. [[IThoughtItMeant If you're looking for]] that ''other'' kind of [[APartyAlsoKnownAsOrgy orgy]], then get your mind out of the gutter.

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See also NeverTheObviousSuspect. [[IThoughtItMeant If you're looking for]] that ''other'' ''that'' kind of [[APartyAlsoKnownAsOrgy [[APartyAlsoKnownAsAnOrgy orgy]], then get your mind out of the gutter.
18th Jan '17 4:10:59 AM alnair20aug93
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See also NeverTheObviousSuspect.

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See also NeverTheObviousSuspect. [[IThoughtItMeant If you're looking for]] that ''other'' kind of [[APartyAlsoKnownAsOrgy orgy]], then get your mind out of the gutter.
16th Jan '17 10:30:11 AM nighttrainfm
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* Deliberately invoked in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' where a vast amount of stereoypical evidence implicating Klatch in a murder is planted, as the Klatchian ambassador realizes this will cause Sam Vimes to look everywhere except Klatch for the killers. It works flawlessly on Vimes because he's (justifiably) cynical about his own people; it fails to work on his Klatchian opposite number, as ''he's'' (justifiably) cynical about ''his'' own people...

to:

* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
**
Deliberately invoked in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' where a vast amount of stereoypical evidence implicating Klatch in a murder is planted, as the Klatchian ambassador realizes this will cause Sam Vimes to look everywhere except Klatch for the killers. It works flawlessly on Vimes because he's (justifiably) cynical about his own people; it fails to work on his Klatchian opposite number, as ''he's'' (justifiably) cynical about ''his'' own people...
11th Jan '17 11:29:35 AM SnakeEyes
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** ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa}}'': The 3rd case in the first game looks so damning that one character starts calling it a setup before the trial has begun.
** ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganronpa2'': The second case in the second game, meanwhile, ends up making the patsy an impossibility as far as suspects go because of all the inconsistencies in her characterization with the evidence left behind.

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** ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa}}'': The 3rd case in the first game looks so damning that one character starts calling it a setup before the trial has begun.
begun. A whole story is spun where the frame target wears a ridiculous and out-of-character cardboard costume, attacks people with progressively lethal weapons, runs into a dead end and vanishes, and swiftly relocates a corpse when it is left alone for only a minute. And this is all while ''completely'' escaping detection from the entire cast, only to wind up trapped inside a locker later on.
** ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganronpa2'': The second case in the second game, meanwhile, ends up making the patsy an impossibility as far as suspects go because of all the inconsistencies in her characterization with the evidence left behind. The blood soaked corpse was moved to block a door (forcing the scapegoat to leave behind footprints through sand), and yet the scapegoat didn't have any blood on their clothing or body. Also, the culprit tried to leave behind the scapegoat's TrademarkFavoriteFood at the scene of the crime, but they got the details wrong and chose a variant that the scapegoat doesn't eat.
31st Dec '16 1:34:46 PM nombretomado
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* In one ''Five Finder-Outers'' book by EnidBlyton, the kids do this deliberately to confuse the [[PoliceAreUseless policeman]]. He seems to be fooled only for a while, though.

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* In one ''Five Finder-Outers'' book by EnidBlyton, Creator/EnidBlyton, the kids do this deliberately to confuse the [[PoliceAreUseless policeman]]. He seems to be fooled only for a while, though.
11th Dec '16 2:04:01 AM Xtifr
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* Discussed in Anthony Boucher's ''The Case of the Baker Street Irregulars''. When someone questions why Harrison Ridgely is so ready to call attention to anything that makes him look guilty, the police officer sighs "It's an old trick to make the case against yourself so black an investigator will automatically disregard it. Trouble is, it so seldom works."

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* Discussed in Anthony Boucher's Creator/AnthonyBoucher's ''The Case of the Baker Street Irregulars''. When someone questions why Harrison Ridgely is so ready to call attention to anything that makes him look guilty, the police officer sighs "It's an old trick to make the case against yourself so black an investigator will automatically disregard it. Trouble is, it so seldom works."
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