History Main / OrgyOfEvidence

2nd Oct '17 5:30:24 PM thatother1dude
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In RealLife, of course, this is unlikely to work as it does in fiction[[note]] i.e. in RealLife, the police will likely fall for it[[/note]]. Any defense made in court that "I wouldn't be that stupid" is doomed to fail. Even if you prove to the court that you have an IQ of 200, [[StupidCrooks so many other criminals have done stupid things]] that you would not be believed. The reason in fiction that the detective ''doesn't'' believe the evidence is generally that the detective is very experienced; the amount of evidence they find is ''so'' disproportional to the norm that it not only strikes them as unusual but ''implausible''. That's why they start to suspect that it was planted deliberately. A SignatureItemClue may be what is used in these.

to:

In RealLife, of course, this is unlikely to work as it does in fiction[[note]] i.e. in RealLife, the police will likely fall for it[[/note]]. Any defense made in court that "I wouldn't be that stupid" is doomed to fail.completely hopeless. Even if you prove to the court that you have an IQ of 200, [[StupidCrooks so many other criminals have done stupid things]] that you would not be believed. The reason in fiction that the detective ''doesn't'' believe the evidence is generally that the detective is very experienced; the amount of evidence they find is ''so'' disproportional to the norm that it not only strikes them as unusual but ''implausible''. That's why they start to suspect that it was planted deliberately. A SignatureItemClue may be what is used in these.
2nd Oct '17 2:05:14 PM thatother1dude
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In RealLife, of course, this is unlikely to work as it does in fiction[[note]] i.e. in RealLife, the police will likely fall for it[[/note]]. Any defense made in court that "I wouldn't be that stupid" is an EpicFail. Even if you prove to the court that you have an IQ of 200, [[StupidCrooks so many other criminals have done stupid things]] that you would not be believed. The reason in fiction that the detective ''doesn't'' believe the evidence is generally that the detective is very experienced; the amount of evidence they find is ''so'' disproportional to the norm that it not only strikes them as unusual but ''implausible''. That's why they start to suspect that it was planted deliberately. A SignatureItemClue may be what is used in these.

to:

In RealLife, of course, this is unlikely to work as it does in fiction[[note]] i.e. in RealLife, the police will likely fall for it[[/note]]. Any defense made in court that "I wouldn't be that stupid" is an EpicFail.doomed to fail. Even if you prove to the court that you have an IQ of 200, [[StupidCrooks so many other criminals have done stupid things]] that you would not be believed. The reason in fiction that the detective ''doesn't'' believe the evidence is generally that the detective is very experienced; the amount of evidence they find is ''so'' disproportional to the norm that it not only strikes them as unusual but ''implausible''. That's why they start to suspect that it was planted deliberately. A SignatureItemClue may be what is used in these.
31st Aug '17 5:23:33 PM SSJMagus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Literature/XWingSeries'' of books, Tycho Celchu is accused of being a sleeper agent, as well as of murdering Corran Horn. His lawyer is quick to point out to the military tribunal that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that proves Tycho's guilt, but that someone has been actively destroying anything that could exonerate Tycho.[[spoiler: In the end, Tycho is let go when other clues come up, like the fact that Corran himself walks into the room and declares that Tycho didn't kill him.]]

to:

* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Literature/XWingSeries'' of books, Tycho Celchu is accused of being a sleeper agent, as well as of murdering Corran Horn. His lawyer is quick to point out to the military tribunal that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that proves Tycho's guilt, but that someone has been actively destroying anything that could exonerate Tycho.[[spoiler: In For example there were numerous bank accounts indicating that Tycho had been paid millions of credits by the Empire, an amount completely disproportionate to his alleged importance as a spy. Not to mention that he was also supposedly {{brainwashed}} and thus there shouldn't have been any reason for the Empire to pay him at all. [[spoiler:In the end, Tycho is let go when other clues come up, like the fact that Corran himself walks into the room and declares that Tycho didn't kill him.him. It also turns out that [[TheSpymaster General Cracken]] knew Tycho was innocent all along (a fact which outrages the prosecutor, who was genuinely convinced of his guilt) and didn't reveal this to the tribunal [[BatmanGambit so that his Imperial counterpart Director Isard would keep devoting resources to maintaining the frame-up instead of moving on to a different plot]].]]
17th Aug '17 8:01:12 PM rjd1922
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Most ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' cases stack the deck against you and your client this way. The fourth case of the second game gives a clever twist on it, however: the victim is found with your defendant's knife in his chest and a torn, bloodied button from his costume lodged in the defendant's trousers. Even the non-too-bright local detective suspects a frame job. [[spoiler:As it turns out, someone did try to frame him, but your defendant [[FramingTheGuiltyParty really is guilty]].]]

to:

* Most ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' cases stack the deck against you and your client this way. The fourth case of the second game gives a clever twist on it, however: the victim is found with your defendant's knife in his chest and a torn, bloodied button from his costume lodged in the defendant's trousers. Even the non-too-bright local detective suspects a frame job. [[spoiler:As it turns out, someone did try to frame him, but your defendant [[FramingTheGuiltyParty really is guilty]].guilty]], albeit by hiring an assassin rather than committing the murder directly.]]



** ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa}}'': The 3rd case in the first game looks so damning that one character starts calling it a setup before the trial has begun. A whole story is spun where the frame target wears a ridiculous and out-of-character cardboard costume, attacks people with progressively lethal weapons, runs into a dead end and vanishes, and swiftly relocates a corpse when it is left alone for only a minute. And this is all while ''completely'' escaping detection from the entire cast, only to wind up trapped inside a locker later on.

to:

** ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa}}'': The 3rd third case in the first game looks so damning that one character starts calling it a setup before the trial has begun. A whole story is spun where the frame target wears a ridiculous and out-of-character cardboard costume, attacks people with progressively lethal weapons, runs into a dead end and vanishes, and swiftly relocates a corpse when it is left alone for only a minute. And this is all while ''completely'' escaping detection from the entire cast, only to wind up trapped inside a locker later on.
26th Jul '17 2:15:17 PM nielas
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* On ''Series/AmericanGods'' Shadow and Wednesday are arrested for a robbery they committed in a previous episode. The police detective has them dead to rights but is worried because the evidence is primarily satellite photos of the crime in progress. The technology used is state-of-the-art and is what governments use to track terrorist masterminds. She wants to know why someone with access to top secret surveillance satellites would use it to track two small time crooks. She is right to be worried since the source of the evidence was [[spoiler: Mr. World who had Wednesday arrested so he could offer him a deal that would prevent the coming war between the Old Gods and the New Gods. All the cops are massacred by Mr. Wood so there are no witnesses to the meeting.]]
23rd Jul '17 4:26:15 PM Dravencour
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''ComicBook/XMen Noir'', Tommy Halloway/the Angel investigates the murder of Jean Grey, which was clearly done with WolverineClaws. When he finds the missing X-Man, Anne-Marie Rankin, he's suspicious because she pointed him in the direction of Captain Logan almost immediately after they met. Halloway manages to figure out it couldn't be Logan very quickly, leading to the obvious conclusion that Rankin's trying to frame him - and since Logan's ''neko de'' aren't too hard to come by if you know where to look, she likely killed Jean herself.

to:

* In ''ComicBook/XMen Noir'', Tommy Halloway/the Angel investigates the murder of Jean Grey, which was clearly done with WolverineClaws. When he finds the missing X-Man, Anne-Marie Rankin, he's suspicious because she pointed him in the direction of Captain Logan almost immediately after they met. Halloway manages to figure out it couldn't be Logan very quickly, leading to the obvious conclusion that Rankin's trying to frame him - and since Logan's ''neko de'' ''nekode'' aren't too hard to come by if you know where to look, she likely killed Jean herself.
21st Jun '17 8:41:51 PM Discar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Danny Witwer:''' None. This was staged.

to:

'''Danny Witwer:''' None. This was staged.all arranged.
21st Jun '17 8:40:11 PM Discar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Danny Witwer:''' None.

to:

'''Danny Witwer:''' None. This was staged.
9th May '17 4:59:53 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the first season finale, Will Graham is able to deduce that he is being framed because while he might believe he was capable of [[spoiler:murdering Abigail Hobbs]], he couldn't possibly accept that [[spoiler:he also murdered the victims of the copycat killer (a.k.a Hannibal Lecter)]].
** Will Graham actually [[DiscussedTrope uses the trope name]] in the second season premiere when admitting to Jack Crawford that [[spoiler:Hannibal Lecter's frame-up was successful because it '''[[DefiedTrope avoided]]''' a glut of incriminating evidence in favor of just enough to convince Crawford]].
** Comes up later when Will predicts that evidence in the barn where [[spoiler: Miriam Lass]] was found will exonerate Lecter. Lecter, however, anticipated this and left evidence that ''could'' implicate himself...but could also be interpreted as implicating [[spoiler: Chilton]].

to:

** In the first season finale, Will Graham is able to deduce that he is being framed because while he might believe he was capable of [[spoiler:murdering Abigail Hobbs]], he couldn't possibly accept that [[spoiler:he also murdered the victims of the copycat killer (a.k.a Hannibal Lecter)]].
Lecter).]]
** Will Graham actually [[DiscussedTrope uses the trope name]] in the second season premiere when admitting to Jack Crawford that [[spoiler:Hannibal Lecter's frame-up was successful because it '''[[DefiedTrope avoided]]''' a glut of incriminating evidence in favor of just enough to convince Crawford]].
Crawford.]]
** Comes up later when Will predicts that evidence in the barn where [[spoiler: Miriam Lass]] was found will exonerate Lecter. Lecter, however, anticipated this and left evidence that ''could'' implicate himself...but could also be interpreted as implicating [[spoiler: Chilton]].Chilton.]]
22nd Apr '17 6:44:09 PM Occidensill
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/EagleEye'' has the Rogue AI frame the main character for terrorist activities to get him on the run and following its orders. To do so, it deposits a giant amount of money in his account, then he goes home to find that it has been made borderline inaccessible by the gigantic amount of weapons, classified documents, and other materials that has been delivered. The FBI do not find the overkill suspicious for the duration of the movie (the lead agent cites other reasons for his later skepticism).
* Esteban tries to point out this trope in ''Film/{{Fresh}}'' when the police find a gun just used in a murder and a huge bag of heroin under his mattress. It doesn't help his case that both the drugs and the gun were really Esteban's, Fresh just made sure they could be found.



** The TropeNamer has more logical reasoning than most entries on the page, though. Witwer is looking at dozens of photos that suggest the victim killed multiple children. One of the pictures includes the supposed murderer's child. Witwer is immediately baffled as to why, according to the scene, the victim had all these pictures lying on his bed before the murderer arrived. Even if the murderer had found the pictures somewhere else in the apartment, he would have no reason to carefully set up where they were dramatically placed. It's this knowledge that finally gets Witwer to investigate other possibilities.
* Esteban tries to point out this trope in ''Film/{{Fresh}}'' when the police find a gun just used in a murder and a huge bag of heroin under his mattress. It doesn't help his case that both the drugs and the gun were really Esteban's, Fresh just made sure they could be found.

to:

** The TropeNamer has more logical reasoning than most entries on the page, though. page. Witwer is looking at dozens of photos spread out on a bed that suggest the victim killed multiple children. One of the pictures includes the supposed murderer's child. Witwer is immediately baffled as to why, according to the scene, the victim had all these pictures lying on his bed before the murderer arrived. Even if the murderer had found the pictures somewhere else in the apartment, he would have no reason to carefully set up lay them out where they were dramatically placed. It's this knowledge that finally gets Witwer to investigate other possibilities.
* Esteban tries to point out this trope in ''Film/{{Fresh}}'' when the police find a gun just used in a murder and a huge bag of heroin under his mattress. It doesn't help his case that both the drugs and the gun were really Esteban's, Fresh just made sure they could be found.
possibilities.



** Deliberately invoked in ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' where a vast amount of stereoypical evidence implicating Klatch in a murder is planted, as the Klatchian ambassador realizes this will cause Sam Vimes to look everywhere except Klatch for the killers. It works flawlessly on Vimes because he's (justifiably) cynical about his own people; it fails to work on his Klatchian opposite number, as ''he's'' (justifiably) cynical about ''his'' own people...

to:

** Deliberately invoked in ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' where a vast amount of stereoypical stereotypical evidence implicating Klatch in a murder is planted, as the Klatchian ambassador realizes this will cause Sam Vimes to look everywhere except Klatch for the killers. It works flawlessly on Vimes because he's (justifiably) cynical about his own people; it fails to work on his Klatchian opposite number, as ''he's'' (justifiably) cynical about ''his'' own people...



* In the Literature/JackReacher novel ''One Shot'', this is what the case against James Barr becomes. However, what makes Reacher suspicious is not the amount of evidence, but [[spoiler: that the investigative team thought to look for a clue that they had no reason to believe existed.]]

to:

* In the Literature/JackReacher novel ''One Shot'', this is what the case against James Barr becomes. However, what makes Reacher suspicious is not the amount of evidence, but [[spoiler: that the investigative team thought to look for a clue that they had no reason to believe existed.]]



* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Literature/XWingSeries'' of books, Tycho Celchu is accused of being a sleeper agent, as well as for murdering Corran Horn. His lawyer is quick to point out to the military tribunal that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that proves Tycho's guilt, but that someone has been actively destroying anything that could exonerate Tycho.[[spoiler: In the end, Tycho is let go when other clues come up, like the fact that Corran himself walks into the room and declares that Tycho didn't kill him.]]

to:

* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Literature/XWingSeries'' of books, Tycho Celchu is accused of being a sleeper agent, as well as for of murdering Corran Horn. His lawyer is quick to point out to the military tribunal that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that proves Tycho's guilt, but that someone has been actively destroying anything that could exonerate Tycho.[[spoiler: In the end, Tycho is let go when other clues come up, like the fact that Corran himself walks into the room and declares that Tycho didn't kill him.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 153. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.OrgyOfEvidence