History Main / Opera

17th Dec '17 7:34:13 AM WillBGood
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** ''[[Literature/TristanAndIseult TristanUndIsolde]]''

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** ''[[Literature/TristanAndIseult TristanUndIsolde]]''Tristan und Isolde]]''
17th Dec '17 7:33:59 AM WillBGood
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** ''Theatre/TristanUndIsolde''

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** ''[[Literature/TristanAndIseult TristanUndIsolde]]''
%%**
''Theatre/TristanUndIsolde''
17th Dec '17 7:08:42 AM WillBGood
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** ''[[Theatre/TannhaeuserUndDerSaengerkriegAufWartburg Tannhäuser]]''

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** ''[[Theatre/TannhaeuserUndDerSaengerkriegAufWartburg Tannhäuser]]''''Theatre/{{Tannhaeuser}}''
15th Dec '17 1:05:18 PM Anddrix
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** In [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart's]] ''Theatre/DonGiovanni'', one was apparently {{enforced}}. ([[LoveItOrHateIt Opinions vary wildly]] on whether it's better when performed with or without it.)

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** In [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart's]] ''Theatre/DonGiovanni'', one was apparently {{enforced}}. ([[LoveItOrHateIt Opinions (Opinions vary wildly]] wildly on whether it's better when performed with or without it.)



* LoveItOrHateIt: Music/RichardWagner. Composer of the finest music and producer of the best plots ever, or overly bombastic and just too damn long-winded? One of the less intelligent criticisms of Wagner is that he was "UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler's favorite composer". This is kind of unfair; Wagner couldn't possibly have pandered to Hitler in any way, since he died before Hitler was even born. (And of course, HitlerAteSugar.)
** Modern Opera especially, there really is no in between.
24th Nov '17 10:33:04 PM Maryloohoo
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* EvilSoundsDeep: Usually. Although this is subverted far more often than you'd think. There are many good guy low voice-ers (Figaro, Hamlet, Cenerentola, and Rosina par example) and more than one high voiced baddy (Duke of Mantua, Queen of the Night, Pinkerton and Turandot to name a few) in operatic repetoire. However, it is generally safe to guess that the baritone is not who you should be rooting for.

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* EvilSoundsDeep: Usually. Although this is subverted far more often than you'd think. There are many good guy low voice-ers (Figaro, Hamlet, Billy Budd, Cenerentola, and Rosina par example) and more than one high voiced baddy (Duke of Mantua, Queen of the Night, Pinkerton and Turandot to name a few) in operatic repetoire. However, it is generally safe to guess that the baritone is not who you should be rooting for.
13th Nov '17 11:17:55 AM RoseAndHeather
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Opera has been around since the end of the [[OlderThanSteam 16th century]] and still going strong. Major opera composers include [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart]], Music/GeorgeFredericHandel, Music/GiuseppeVerdi, Music/GioachinoRossini, [[Music/RichardWagner Wagner]], Puccini and Richard Strauss, though there are, of course, many more.

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Opera has been around since the end of the [[OlderThanSteam 16th century]] and is still going strong. Major opera composers include [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart]], Music/GeorgeFredericHandel, Music/GiuseppeVerdi, Music/GioachinoRossini, [[Music/RichardWagner Wagner]], Puccini and Richard Strauss, though there are, of course, many more.
10th Nov '17 10:10:25 PM MasterofGalaxies4628
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Not to be confused with the {{Cantata}}, though at least one cantata, Music/{{Johann Sebastian Bach}}'s Coffee Cantata, can be considered a miniature comic opera according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki. The {{Oratorio}} is an intermediate form between the cantata and an opera, being a sung musical work that is long, generally divided into acts, and has recognizable characters interacting to tell a story, but not involving any acting of any significance; they were historically written for circumstances in which opera was infeasible or inappropriate (for being too vulgar), typically religious venues, or when the composer couldn't convince a patron to let him write an opera (which is much more expensive; this cost factor drove Music/GeorgeFredericHandel's prodigious output of oratorios late in his career, as he had previously focused on opera, but the English public's tastes had shifted away from that form).

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Not to be confused with the {{Cantata}}, though at least one cantata, Music/{{Johann Sebastian Bach}}'s Music/JohannSebastianBach's [[Music/SchweigtStillePlaudertNicht Coffee Cantata, Cantata]], can be considered a miniature comic opera according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki. The {{Oratorio}} is an intermediate form between the cantata and an opera, being a sung musical work that is long, generally divided into acts, and has recognizable characters interacting to tell a story, but not involving any acting of any significance; they were historically written for circumstances in which opera was infeasible or inappropriate (for being too vulgar), typically religious venues, or when the composer couldn't convince a patron to let him write an opera (which is much more expensive; this cost factor drove Music/GeorgeFredericHandel's prodigious output of oratorios late in his career, as he had previously focused on opera, but the English public's tastes had shifted away from that form).



!!Tropes typical of opera

* {{Aesop}}

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!!Tropes typical of opera

opera:

* {{Aesop}}AnAesop:
7th Nov '17 5:34:12 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* AllThereInTheManual Without a program, good luck trying to understand what's going on on stage. Many modern opera houses (Especially in Germany) show the text right above the stage, and some fancy opera houses even have a small screen on the back of the seats with the text in several selectable languages. Performing opera in translation has disadvantages too. It's often just as hard to make out the words, and when you can the effect isn't always what it might be. For example, to an English ear Theatre/{{Tosca}} may sound dramatic when she sings 'Muori! Muori! Muori! ... È morto.' but translated into English this becomes 'Die! Die! Die! ... He's dead.' 'Nuff said.

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* AllThereInTheManual AllThereInTheManual: Without a program, good luck trying to understand what's going on on stage. Many modern opera houses (Especially in Germany) show the text right above the stage, and some fancy opera houses even have a small screen on the back of the seats with the text in several selectable languages. Performing opera in translation has disadvantages too. It's often just as hard to make out the words, and when you can the effect isn't always what it might be. For example, to an English ear Theatre/{{Tosca}} may sound dramatic when she sings 'Muori! Muori! Muori! ... È morto.' but translated into English this becomes 'Die! Die! Die! ... He's dead.' 'Nuff said.
20th Sep '17 10:52:19 AM Gravidef
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** Size and body shape are especially ignored in opera. As described in BrawnHilda above, opera requires a big voice, especially considering that many of the works were written before microphones and other forms of amplification had been invented--singers had to hit the back of the opera house on their own. A bigger voice might naturally result from a bigger body (the larger the frame, the larger the lungs and diaphragm/back and shoulder muscles, and thus the larger the sound). Ergo, it's more than likely to see the IllGirl lead, such as ''La Bohème'''s Mimi--a frail, impoverished girl dying of tuberculosis who might be expected to be slight and sickly--or Violetta from ''La traviata''--a courtesan who has just recovered from a case of TB and later suffers and dies from another attack of it--played by heavyset women.

to:

** Size and body shape are especially ignored in opera. As described in BrawnHilda above, opera requires a big voice, especially considering that many of the works were written before microphones and other forms of amplification had been invented--singers had to hit the back of the opera house on their own. A bigger voice might naturally result from a bigger body (the larger the frame, the larger the lungs and diaphragm/back and shoulder muscles, and thus the larger the sound). Ergo, it's more than likely to see the IllGirl lead, such as ''La Bohème'''s Mimi--a frail, impoverished girl dying of tuberculosis who might be expected to be slight and sickly--or Violetta from ''La traviata''--a courtesan who has just recovered from a case of TB and later suffers and dies from another attack of it--played by a heavyset women.woman.


Added DiffLines:

* SeriousBusiness: During the "golden age" of opera (roughly the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries), France and Italy had an extremely bitter rivalry over who had the better composers. It didn't help that much of the rest of Europe thought that opera ''had'' to be written in Italian; Jean-Baptiste Lully, who brought the form to France from Italy, broke this tradition and instead wrote in French lines. As such, it was common for critics from one nation to travel to the other upon a new opera's debut, watch it, then go back to their own country and write [[CausticCritic incredibly scathing reviews]] of the work.
20th Sep '17 10:46:28 AM Gravidef
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** Size and body shape are especially ignored in opera. As described in BrawnHilda above, opera requires a big voice, especially considering that many of the works were written before microphones and other forms of amplification had been invented--singers had to hit the back of the opera house on their own. A bigger voice might naturally result from a bigger body (the larger the frame, the larger the lungs and diaphragm/back and shoulder muscles, and thus the larger the sound). Ergo, it's more than likely to see the IllGirl lead, such as ''La Bohème'''s Mimi--a frail, impoverished girl dying of tuberculosis who might be expected to be slight and sickly--or ''La traviata'''s Violetta--a courtesan who has just recovered from a case of TB and later suffers and dies from another attack of it--played by heavyset women.

to:

** Size and body shape are especially ignored in opera. As described in BrawnHilda above, opera requires a big voice, especially considering that many of the works were written before microphones and other forms of amplification had been invented--singers had to hit the back of the opera house on their own. A bigger voice might naturally result from a bigger body (the larger the frame, the larger the lungs and diaphragm/back and shoulder muscles, and thus the larger the sound). Ergo, it's more than likely to see the IllGirl lead, such as ''La Bohème'''s Mimi--a frail, impoverished girl dying of tuberculosis who might be expected to be slight and sickly--or Violetta from ''La traviata'''s Violetta--a traviata''--a courtesan who has just recovered from a case of TB and later suffers and dies from another attack of it--played by heavyset women.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Opera