History Main / OneStatToRuleThemAll

23rd Feb '17 3:30:27 PM GuiRitter
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*** On the offensive side, Magic Power is far more important then Vigor/Strength. Not just spells, but most of the worthwhile special attacks, such as Sabin's most powerful Blitzes, use Magic Power.

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*** On the offensive side, Magic Power is far more important then than Vigor/Strength. Not just spells, but most of the worthwhile special attacks, such as Sabin's most powerful Blitzes, use Magic Power.
13th Feb '17 2:55:10 PM DastardlyDemolition
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** In the ''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}} 1]]'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}} 2]]'', and ''VideoGame/{{Fallout Tactics|BrotherhoodOfSteel}}'', Agility is one of the most useful stats because it gives you more action points, which let you attack more often, and helps with small guns, the weapons you will use for most of the game. Intelligence is of lesser but still significant importance, governing how many skill points you get per level up and giving you more conversation options.

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** In the ''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}} 1]]'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}} 2]]'', and ''VideoGame/{{Fallout Tactics|BrotherhoodOfSteel}}'', Agility is one of the most useful stats because it gives you more action points, which let you attack more often, and helps with small guns, the weapons you will use for most of the game. Agility also allows you to move farther distances in combat, which is useful in the Navarro Run as it gives you a better chance to escape the various random encounters that the player will face along with escaping the [[spoiler:Enclave]] patrolmen that roam around Navarro and will kill you in a few turns at most. Intelligence is of lesser but still significant importance, governing how many skill points you get per level up and giving you more conversation options.
12th Feb '17 9:41:54 PM LucaEarlgrey
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** In games that use the Press Turn system (''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'', both volumes of ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'', and ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV''), Agility is a very important stat, but for another reason: If a character's attack misses and it's not a status or OneHitKill spell, their side will lose an additional turn. Increasing Agility means the player can minimize their turn losses while maximizing the enemy's.

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** In games that use the Press Turn system (''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'', both volumes of ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'', ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'', ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV'', and ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV''), ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIVApocalypse''), Agility is a very important stat, but for another reason: If a character's attack misses and it's not a status or OneHitKill spell, their side will lose an additional turn. Increasing Agility means the player can minimize their turn losses while maximizing the enemy's.
8th Feb '17 10:37:45 AM InsomniacWeasel
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** Fate Accelerated, the system's "lite" equivalent, replaces all skills with six "Approaches" - Carefully, Cleverly, Flashily, Forcefully, Quickly and Sneakily. The idea is that you always use the Approach that best fits the description of the action you're performing, as you're performing it... the problem is that, as many have pointed out, the correct action in almost every situation, ''basically by definition'', could be described as Clever. Someone who's maximized Cleverly, thus, will be able to always use it and thus always roll at their best.
8th Feb '17 9:55:51 AM InsomniacWeasel
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** In a sense, every Epic Attribute in Scion was the [[JustForPun (aptly named, in this case)]] God Stat in relation to every none-epic one. This might very well have been intentional, except that the mechanical execution tended to make the in-game effects... wonky, to put lightly. Each dot in an Epic Attribute added a number of automatic successes (which could be thought of as the equivalent of 3 dots in a regular attribute) ''equal to its level, cumulatively''. That means that the number of extra successes one gains from Epic Attributes goes from 1 for the first dot to 2 for the second to 4 for the third, then to 7 for the fourth, 11 for the fifth and quickly building up into utter ridiculousness (at the 10 dot level, a character got ''42'' automatic successes for every use of the attribute, before even rolling). This was all fine and dandy, especially in the lower rungs, except that in practice what it meant was that past a certain point a character with even ''1'' dot higher in an Epic Attribute would pretty much always defeat one with a lower rating, no matter what. Since dexterity still governed all combat, that meant that by the time the Band hit Legend 4 everyone without a maxed out Epic Dexterity was just about as good as a liability the moment combat started. Meanwhile, since the only way to make non-combat tasks challenging for a ludicrously capable character was to give them stupendous difficulty ratings, any late-game character who wasn't specifically specialized at doing anything couldn't ever hope to accomplish any task beyond their narrow area of expertise. A subset of the issue was that with guns: since unlike bows and melee weapons guns did ''not'' benefit from the wielder having higher stats for the purposes of damage, they became essentially worthless past Legend 4 since any enemy the Band couldn't curbstomp would likely be completely immune to them. [[StoryAndGameplaySegregation All this while the fluff keeps insisting guns are useful and assigning characters legendary guns in lieu of other Relics.]] This has been significantly toned down for the 2nd edition, which removed all non-physical Epic Attributes and turned them into Purview rather than giving them special mechanical effects - someone with Epic Strength can now use it to pull off a lot more impressive strength based stunts, but not actually get dozens of automatic successes for every damage roll.
8th Feb '17 9:41:16 AM InsomniacWeasel
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In many tabletop [=RPGs=], dexterity or speed is disproportionately powerful compared to the other attributes. These stats usually allow characters to dodge most attacks, give them extra actions or turns, and many useful skills in the game are governed by dexterity.

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In many tabletop [=RPGs=], dexterity or speed is disproportionately powerful compared to the other attributes. These stats usually allow characters to dodge most attacks, give them extra actions or turns, and many useful skills in the game are governed by dexterity. \n The likelihood of dexterity or its equivalent being the One to Rule Them All seems to increase the more technologically advanced the game's setting is (as guns, whose use and the ability to avoid presumably both depend on it become more powerful while melee combat becomes conversely less useful): in a medieval fantasy game, arguments could still be commonly made in favor of, say, strength. In a modern game, as it was once put, "dexterity determines how easily you sneak into the compound, how quickly you pick the locks, how accurately you shoot at the guards, how many of their shots you dodge in turn, how fast you make it to the escape vehicle and how well you drive it."
1st Feb '17 5:47:11 PM ZombieAladdin
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** In competitive Pokémon, Speed is considered the most important stat, as it's advantageous to be able to KO the opposing Pokémon before it can make a move. Generally, the only thing players don't make as fast as possible are [[StoneWall walls]]; in only a couple generations was Speed really end-all, but players tend to max it out more than other stats anyway. A few craftier veteran players will defy this. In Generation IV, a move called "Trick Room" was introduced that inverts turn order -- this means that on some Pokémon, it is more advantageous to have a low speed stat.

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** In competitive Pokémon, Speed is considered the most important stat, as it's advantageous to be able to KO the opposing Pokémon before it can make a move. Generally, the only thing players don't make as fast as possible are [[StoneWall walls]]; in only a couple generations was Speed really end-all, but players tend to max it out more than other stats anyway. A few craftier veteran players will defy this. In Generation IV, a move called "Trick Room" was introduced that inverts turn order -- this means that on some Pokémon, it is more advantageous to have a low speed stat. Any Pokémon on the slow side ''needs'' a reliable healing move, no matter how much of a wall they are--fast Pokémon can defeat multiple opponents without taking damage, but slow Pokémon don't have that kind of benefit and need some way to erase the damage they'll inevitably sustain.
30th Oct '16 11:47:08 AM DastardlyDemolition
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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' Agility/Evasion (Agility goes point-for-point into Evasion-%) are basically the godstat duo. Your Evasion-% determines your chances of avoiding attacks (especially important for instant-death/petrification attacks), turn order in battle, odds of getting preemptive strikes or being ambushed, and chances of running from battle. Incidentally, your chance of gaining Agility after battle is entirely based on Evasion-%, meaning the more Agility you get, the more Agility you ''will'' get.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' has a minor version. Each job has fixed stats per level for everything except HP, which is determined by your Vitality at the time you level up, making Vit a god stat until you hit max HP.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' has a bug that means evade is useless and Magic block (essentially magic evasion) worked as both stats. Which means that if you load a character with magic block boosting items they become borderline-invincible. This was fixed in the GBA version of the game.
** With a magic block of 128, all attacks that ''can'' miss, ''will'' miss, period. 128 is actually fairly easy to pull off, at least on one character.
** On the offensive side, Magic Power is far more important then Vigor/Strength. Not just spells, but most of the worthwhile special attacks, such as Sabin's most powerful Blitzes, use Magic Power.
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', Spirit is by far the most useful stat, as it affects many different aspects of combat -- including speeding up both your Trance gauge and the rate of Auto-Regen.
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' there are separate stats for Evasion and Accuracy, both of which are increased in the same manner as all the other stats (by filling in nodes on the Sphere Grid), and both max out at 255 - but the separate Luck stat grants a bonus to ''both'' Evasion and Accuracy, with Luck effectively maxing both stats out separately, as well as being the determining stat for critical hit rates. However, Luck is mostly relegated to post-endgame MinMaxing due to how tedious it is to increase.
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXI'', capping Haste has become trivial--and, correspondingly, it's no longer the God-stat it used to be.
** For meleeing and melee Weapon skills, the all-important stat is Accuracy. It doesn't matter how much Attack, Double Attack, Triple Attack, or Store TP you have if you can't land a hit--and most bosses these days are Lightning Bruisers
** Likewise, for ranged attacks and Weapon Skills, the most important stat is Ranged Accuracy--although Store TP is a much closer second for ranged attacks than for melee.
** For nukes and elemental Weapon Skills, however, Magic Attack Bonus is God. It doesn't matter how slow your cast time, recast time, or magic accuracy are if you can burst Meteor or Death for 64k+ damage. By the same token, Leaden Salute, the signature move of Corsairs, is one of the most powerful WSs in the game, right next to Savage Blade and Rudra's Storm--as long as the player takes the time to stack enough MAB.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' gives your characters only THREE stats: Hit Points, strength, and magic power. Low strength and magic can be made up for with special abilities, [[BreakMeter staggering]], and customizing weapons and equipment, but low HP means everything can kill you in two hits because you take full damage from every attack in the game. This essentially means that until near the end of the game, you'll want to keep a few HP boosters on your characters, or something that makes them take X% less HP damage per attack. The developers also locked the best HP boosts at the end of the Crystarium so they weren't available until the very end of the game.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' exemplifies the trope in several ways. Your base stats (strength, vitality, dexterity, mind, intelligence, and piety) grow as you level up and each level up grants you a bonus point to use on a stat to boost it further. Tanks will go for vitality, melee DPS will go for strength, ranged, non-magical DPS will go for dexterity, healers will go for mind piety, while DPS casters will pour points into intelligence. Because every class takes advantage of only specific stats, you're actually encouraged to min-max since stats not used by your class are pointless to invest in (casters wouldn't invest in strength for example). Gear also encourages this type of behavior since they're made specifically for classes who can take advantage of their most used stats. You're likely be yelled at by other players if you're using gear that isn't suited for your class.

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* The ''Final Fantasy'' series:
**
In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' Agility/Evasion (Agility goes point-for-point into Evasion-%) are basically the godstat duo. Your Evasion-% determines your chances of avoiding attacks (especially important for instant-death/petrification attacks), turn order in battle, odds of getting preemptive strikes or being ambushed, and chances of running from battle. Incidentally, your chance of gaining Agility after battle is entirely based on Evasion-%, meaning the more Agility you get, the more Agility you ''will'' get.
* ** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' has a minor version. Each job has fixed stats per level for everything except HP, which is determined by your Vitality at the time you level up, making Vit a god stat until you hit max HP.
* ** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' has a bug that means evade is useless and Magic block (essentially magic evasion) worked as both stats. Which means that if you load a character with magic block boosting items they become borderline-invincible. This was fixed in the GBA version of the game.
** *** With a magic block of 128, all attacks that ''can'' miss, ''will'' miss, period. 128 is actually fairly easy to pull off, at least on one character.
** *** On the offensive side, Magic Power is far more important then Vigor/Strength. Not just spells, but most of the worthwhile special attacks, such as Sabin's most powerful Blitzes, use Magic Power.
* ** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', Spirit is by far the most useful stat, as it affects many different aspects of combat -- including speeding up both your Trance gauge and the rate of Auto-Regen.
* ** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' there are separate stats for Evasion and Accuracy, both of which are increased in the same manner as all the other stats (by filling in nodes on the Sphere Grid), and both max out at 255 - but the separate Luck stat grants a bonus to ''both'' Evasion and Accuracy, with Luck effectively maxing both stats out separately, as well as being the determining stat for critical hit rates. However, Luck is mostly relegated to post-endgame MinMaxing due to how tedious it is to increase.
* ** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXI'', capping Haste has become trivial--and, correspondingly, it's no longer the God-stat it used to be.
** *** For meleeing and melee Weapon skills, the all-important stat is Accuracy. It doesn't matter how much Attack, Double Attack, Triple Attack, or Store TP you have if you can't land a hit--and most bosses these days are Lightning Bruisers
** *** Likewise, for ranged attacks and Weapon Skills, the most important stat is Ranged Accuracy--although Store TP is a much closer second for ranged attacks than for melee.
** *** For nukes and elemental Weapon Skills, however, Magic Attack Bonus is God. It doesn't matter how slow your cast time, recast time, or magic accuracy are if you can burst Meteor or Death for 64k+ damage. By the same token, Leaden Salute, the signature move of Corsairs, is one of the most powerful WSs in the game, right next to Savage Blade and Rudra's Storm--as long as the player takes the time to stack enough MAB.
* ** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' gives your characters only THREE stats: Hit Points, strength, and magic power. Low strength and magic can be made up for with special abilities, [[BreakMeter staggering]], and customizing weapons and equipment, but low HP means everything can kill you in two hits because you take full damage from every attack in the game. This essentially means that until near the end of the game, you'll want to keep a few HP boosters on your characters, or something that makes them take X% less HP damage per attack. The developers also locked the best HP boosts at the end of the Crystarium so they weren't available until the very end of the game.
* ** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' exemplifies the trope in several ways. Your base stats (strength, vitality, dexterity, mind, intelligence, and piety) grow as you level up and each level up grants you a bonus point to use on a stat to boost it further. Tanks will go for vitality, melee DPS will go for strength, ranged, non-magical DPS will go for dexterity, healers will go for mind piety, while DPS casters will pour points into intelligence. Because every class takes advantage of only specific stats, you're actually encouraged to min-max since stats not used by your class are pointless to invest in (casters wouldn't invest in strength for example). Gear also encourages this type of behavior since they're made specifically for classes who can take advantage of their most used stats. You're likely be yelled at by other players if you're using gear that isn't suited for your class.
18th Oct '16 10:38:31 AM Jhimmibhob
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** Constitution is the only stat that isn't required by any standard class, however it is always one of the most important for any character because it affects hit points and Fortitude saves. In short, Constitution helps your character not die.

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** Constitution is the only stat that isn't required by any standard class, however it is always class; however, it's also the one of the most important for any that no character because it of any class can afford to treat as a DumpStat. It affects hit points and Fortitude saves. In short, Constitution helps saves, so the more of it you have, the less likely your character not die. is to die.
16th Oct '16 4:52:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* In the HeroSystem, Dexterity affects your ability to hit, your ability to avoid being hit, is the base stat for Speed (which is how often you act) and affects a large array of adventure-useful skills. So it costs three Character Points per point, while Intelligence is only one Character Point per point.

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* In the HeroSystem, ''TabletopGame/HeroSystem'', Dexterity affects your ability to hit, your ability to avoid being hit, is the base stat for Speed (which is how often you act) and affects a large array of adventure-useful skills. So it costs three Character Points per point, while Intelligence is only one Character Point per point.
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