History Main / OneStatToRuleThemAll

6th Jun '18 6:04:48 PM no_name86
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* The entire ''VideoGame/KisekiSeries'' speed is the most important stat of the game as it allows players to take more turns before the enemies do, or at least catch up to them. Strength and Arts are also important as well. Meanwhile, defense is usually the dump stat especially on [[HarderThanHard Nightmare Mode]] because of how insane damages get.

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* The In the entire ''VideoGame/KisekiSeries'' speed ''VideoGame/KisekiSeries'', Speed is the most important stat of the game as it allows players to take more turns before the enemies do, or at least catch up to them. Strength and Arts are also important as well. Meanwhile, defense Defense is usually the dump stat especially on [[HarderThanHard Nightmare Mode]] because of how insane damages get.
30th May '18 9:38:00 AM DanteVin
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* ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy'': Characters have two raw numerical stats, ATK and HP which represent their health and attack power respectively. There are also secondary stats represented by percentages such as Defense, Critical Hit Rate / Damage, Dodge Rate, Hostility Rate, Skill Damage, Charge Attack Damage, Stamina, Enmity, Damage Caps, Healing Caps, Debuff Success, and Debuff Resistance. While almost all of them can be boosted by [[TechPoints Extended Mastery Points]], Rings, and Weapon Skills, the Attack stat is considered as the best stat to invest towards. Granblue is ideally about being able to defeat opponents and enemies in the fastest way possible ([[JustifiedTrope Justified]], as multi-player raids have a time limit, and the best way to contribute to raids is to deal as much damage as possible within a few turns.
16th May '18 12:52:18 PM Luigifan
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In many tabletop {{Role Playing Game}}s, dexterity or speed is disproportionately powerful compared to the other attributes. These stats usually allow characters to dodge most attacks, give them extra actions or turns, and many useful skills in the game are governed by dexterity. The likelihood of dexterity or its equivalent being the One to Rule Them All seems to increase the more technologically advanced the game's setting is (as guns, whose use and the ability to avoid presumably both depend on it become more powerful while melee combat becomes conversely less useful): in a medieval fantasy game, arguments could still be commonly made in favor of, say, strength. In a modern game, as it was once put, "dexterity determines how easily you sneak into the compound, how quickly you pick the locks, how accurately you shoot at the guards, how many of their shots you dodge in turn, how fast you make it to the escape vehicle and how well you drive it."

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In many tabletop {{Role Playing Game}}s, dexterity or speed is disproportionately powerful compared to the other attributes. These stats usually allow characters to dodge most attacks, give them extra actions or turns, and many useful skills in the game are governed by dexterity. The likelihood of dexterity or its equivalent being the One to Rule Them All seems to increase the more technologically advanced the game's setting is (as guns, whose use and the ability to avoid presumably both depend on it it, become more powerful while melee combat becomes conversely less useful): in a medieval fantasy game, arguments could still be commonly made in favor of, say, strength. In a modern game, as it was once put, "dexterity determines how easily you sneak into the compound, how quickly you pick the locks, how accurately you shoot at the guards, how many of their shots you dodge in turn, how fast you make it to the escape vehicle vehicle, and how well you drive it."



See also MinmaxersDelight, ChangingGameplayPriorities

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See also MinmaxersDelight, ChangingGameplayPriorities
ChangingGameplayPriorities.



* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'': almost all of the standard classes in the game have a single ability score that will pretty much define how good the character is at their class's specialization, barring some kind of atypical build. For example, Fighters have Strength, Wizards have Intelligence, Rogues have Dexterity and Clerics have Wisdom. However, some of the hybrid classes, such as Bards, Paladins and Monks, have class abilities that are based on multiple stats, though there's still one obvious stat that is most vital. Some variations on the standard include:

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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'': almost all of the standard classes in the game have a single ability score that will pretty much define how good the character is at their class's specialization, barring some kind of atypical build. For example, Fighters have Strength, Wizards have Intelligence, Rogues have Dexterity Dexterity, and Clerics have Wisdom. However, some of the hybrid classes, such as Bards, Paladins Paladins, and Monks, have class abilities that are based on multiple stats, though there's still one obvious stat that is most vital. [[note]]However, while having three stats which govern a class's primary role is manageable (if slightly suboptimal), being dependent on four, five, or, gods forbid, all six ability scores is seen as a ''very bad thing'', and inevitably leads to being [[TierInducedScrappy firmly at the bottom]] of [[CharacterTiers tier lists]].[[/note]] Some variations on the standard include:



** The Factotum class is intended to function as the ClosestThingWeGot to anything else, and described ''in-universe'' as WeakButSkilled masters of faking their way though things like spellcasting, divine invocations, and hand-to-hand combat by having [[ButIReadABookAboutIt Read A Book About It]] and {{Indy Ploy}}s. As such, they gain abilities allowing them to [[InvokedTrope replace or augment every other stat in the game with their intelligence score]]. The factotum also [[InvertedTrope inverts]] this trope, however, when it comes to skill training. In addition to having a massive pool of skill points, a factotum can gain bonuses equal to their level to a skill check once per day, ''per trained skill'', and gets ''[[JackOfAllTrades all]]'' [[JackOfAllTrades skills as class skills]]. This allows absurdly high skill checks to be easily passed, and also means that the more a factotum spreads out their points, the more options they have. In the hands of a [[XanatosSpeedChess quick thinking]] or [[TheLoonie ...creative...]] factotum, even ordinarily absurd skills like Craft:Basketweaving are worth throwing a point or two into, [[ChekhovsSkill because it will inevitably be used]] to construct a [[HeartIsAnAwesomePower dragon slaying deathtrap]] in a pinch.

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** The Factotum class is intended to function as the ClosestThingWeGot to anything else, and is described ''in-universe'' as WeakButSkilled masters of faking their way though things like spellcasting, divine invocations, and hand-to-hand combat by having [[ButIReadABookAboutIt Read A Book About It]] and {{Indy Ploy}}s. As such, they gain abilities allowing them to [[InvokedTrope replace or augment every other stat in the game with their intelligence score]]. The factotum also [[InvertedTrope inverts]] this trope, however, when it comes to skill training. In addition to having a massive pool of skill points, points[[notes]]the developers assumed that players would [[MinMaxing min-max]] skills and balanced the skill point system around it, making the skill point cap directly proportional to character level; thus, a character cannot dump all their skill points into a single skill and be able to perform outrageously well at it[[/note]], a factotum can gain bonuses equal to their level to a skill check once per day, ''per trained skill'', and gets ''[[JackOfAllTrades all]]'' [[JackOfAllTrades skills as class skills]]. This allows absurdly high skill checks to be easily passed, and also means that the more a factotum spreads out their points, the more options they have. In the hands of a [[XanatosSpeedChess quick thinking]] quick-thinking]] or [[TheLoonie ...creative...]] factotum, even [[WhatKindOfLamePowerIsHeartAnyway ordinarily absurd skills skills]] like Craft:Basketweaving Craft: Basketweaving are worth throwing a point or two into, [[ChekhovsSkill because it will inevitably be used]] to construct a [[HeartIsAnAwesomePower dragon slaying dragon-slaying deathtrap]] in a pinch.



** In 5th Edition, Dexterity is often complained for being overpowered because it dictates attack accuracy and damage with ranged and finesse weapons as well as initiative, armour class, and a number of useful skills. The result is a character with far more versatility and power than any Strength-based build, as Strength only deals with attack and damage to non-finesse melee weapons and the (to be fair, very useful) Athletics skill.
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}} 3rd Edition'' the Quickness attribute directly or indirectly governs how well you sneak around the guards, how well you shoot firearms when they spot you anyway, how fast you run when the enemy turns out to have bulletproof vests, and how well you drive your escape car when they turn out to outnumber you 15 to one. Every character who isn't a Decker (Computer Hacker) usually maxes out quickness. Quickness even adds a big bonus to the all-powerful combat pool. Even many characters in wheelchairs are commonly seen with maxed out quickness. 4th edition partially toned this down by splitting quickness off from reaction speed, but it's still important there.
* 4th Edition, ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' has Agility. To make it clear, Agility is the base attribute for EVERY combat skill, with one exception (Dodge, which, to be fair, is pretty important). What this means is that having a high Agility makes you equally capable with melee weapons, guns, grenades, heavy weapons, vehicle-mounted weapons, your fists... You get the idea. Since it's much easier to increase your skill ratings than to increase your attributes, a combat character can just start with a high Agility (Augmented by one of the exceedingly cheap Agility-boosting implants) and spend a few skills points and - voila! Instant combat master.
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Mekton}} Zeta'', players commonly refer to Ref(lexes) as the God Stat. All combat actions - attack, defense, initiative - were determined off this one stat. Since all the stats were assigned an equal value, however, it became stupidly easy to min-max. Min-maxers would put two points in everything (as required by the rulebook) and then dump the remaining points to the following stats in order: Ref(lexes), Int(elligence) [Skill Points, Electronic Warfare skill in Z+, and Awareness/Notice, used in some tracking rolls], Education [Skill points]. This only requires 44 points to have a max-reflex character with 30 skill points to start with, a decent amount of which will, obviously, go into reflex combat skills.

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** In 5th Edition, Dexterity is often complained about for being overpowered because it dictates attack accuracy and damage with ranged and finesse weapons as well as initiative, armour class, and a number of useful skills. The result is a character with far more versatility and power than any Strength-based build, as Strength only deals with attack and damage to non-finesse melee weapons and the (to be fair, very useful) Athletics skill.
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}} 3rd Edition'' Edition'', the Quickness attribute directly or indirectly governs how well you sneak around the guards, how well you shoot firearms when they spot you anyway, how fast you run when the enemy turns out to have bulletproof vests, and how well you drive your escape car when they turn out to outnumber you 15 to one. Every character who isn't a Decker (Computer Hacker) usually maxes out quickness. Quickness even adds a big bonus to the all-powerful combat pool. Even many characters in wheelchairs are commonly seen with maxed out maxed-out quickness. 4th edition partially toned this down by splitting quickness off from reaction speed, but it's still important there.
* 4th Edition, Edition ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' has Agility. To make it clear, Agility is the base attribute for EVERY combat skill, with one exception (Dodge, which, to be fair, is pretty important). What this means is that having a high Agility makes you equally capable with melee weapons, guns, grenades, heavy weapons, vehicle-mounted weapons, your fists... You get the idea. Since it's much easier to increase your skill ratings than to increase your attributes, a combat character can just start with a high Agility (Augmented by one of the exceedingly cheap Agility-boosting implants) and spend a few skills points and - voila! Instant combat master.
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Mekton}} Zeta'', players commonly refer to Ref(lexes) as the God Stat. All combat actions - attack, defense, initiative - were determined off this one stat. Since all the stats were assigned an equal value, however, it became stupidly easy to min-max. Min-maxers would put two points in everything (as required by the rulebook) and then dump the remaining points to the following stats in order: Ref(lexes), Int(elligence) [Skill Points, Electronic Warfare skill in Z+, and Awareness/Notice, used in some tracking rolls], Education [Skill points]. This only requires 44 points to have a max-reflex character with 30 skill points to start with, a decent amount of which will, obviously, go into reflex combat skills.



** In the Urban Arcana setting, Knowledge (Arcane Lore) is king. No party without it can dream of doing the ridiculously heavy duty stuff Incantations make possible. Furthermore, reasonably high Knowledge (Arcane Lore) checks can easily layer on months - or even years-long buffs that allow you crush any non-buffed opponent into the ground - including, without much interpretation, buffs to Knowledge (Arcane Lore).

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** In the Urban Arcana setting, Knowledge (Arcane Lore) is king. No party without it can dream of doing the ridiculously heavy duty heavy-duty stuff Incantations make possible. Furthermore, reasonably high Knowledge (Arcane Lore) checks can easily layer on months - months- or even years-long buffs that allow you to crush any non-buffed opponent into the ground - including, without much interpretation, buffs to Knowledge (Arcane Lore).



* In the ''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness''

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* In the ''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness''''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness'':



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}''
** Dexterity is the absolute key to both avoiding getting hit and hitting enemies. You can make up for a low level of strength with a better weapon and augment your poor stamina with better armor, but if your dexterity is low you're not going to be doing much in combat except bleeding. There is a merit that lets you use Strength for attack rolls, which is a notorious GameBreaker. The issue is that Exalted as a system is aware of how important Dexterity is, and prices it accordingly. Anything which increases Attributes will charge extra for Dexterity, with lower limits on how much it can be increased. Strength is comparatively trivial to raise, so the Merit which lets you use it for attack rolls is basically a free pass to game-breakingly large attack pools.

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* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}''
''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'':
** Dexterity is the absolute key to both avoiding getting hit and hitting enemies. You can make up for a low level of strength with a better weapon and augment your poor stamina with better armor, but if your dexterity is low low, you're not going to be doing much in combat except bleeding. There is a merit that lets you use Strength for attack rolls, which is a notorious GameBreaker. The issue is that Exalted as a system is aware of how important Dexterity is, and prices it accordingly. Anything which increases Attributes will charge extra for Dexterity, with lower limits on how much it can be increased. Strength is comparatively trivial to raise, so the Merit which lets you use it for attack rolls is basically a free pass to game-breakingly large attack pools.
9th May '18 12:24:10 PM DarkWillow
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*** While Dexterity is good, having run several games using this system the 'extra actions' problem is often not as big of an issue as it first appears, and if it is in some groups it can easily be houseruled. The Angel and BtVS Corebooks even provide alternate action rules for this very purpose.
*** Strength is also hugely beneficial for combat-orientated characters. The default Cinematic rules (which are also frequently houseruled) calculate damage using multiples of Strength, with bigger/more lethal weapons having bigger multipliers. In the hands of a character as strong as Buffy or Angel themselves, such weapons would kill most enemies in one standard hit. Strength also dictates jumping and lifting, as well as helping to calculate Hit Points and Speed.


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*** Will is definitely the go-to stat for magic-users in Buffy/Angel games. Intelligence is less important. It's also worth noting that 'Buffing' spells are almost non-existent in that setting as Magic can be exceptionally powerful in the Buffyverse, if with dangerous/unpredictable side-effects if something goes wrong. While a Mage-type character would not be expected to have high Strength, Dex or Constitution, a few points in them is advisable since not all nasties are going to always stay at a respectable distance.
28th Apr '18 3:13:20 PM nombretomado
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* ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'': This topic [[InternetBackdraft is the source of well-mannered debate]]. Depending on the game, your preferred character build (magic vs. strength), and to what degree you can control stat distribution, which stat is ''the'' OneStatToRuleThemAll is a your mileage may vary issue. To prevent flame wars, ''ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' players created a guide calculating exactly how many points of damage would be added for each point spent in the relevant stats.

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* ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'': This topic [[InternetBackdraft is the source of well-mannered debate]]. Depending on the game, your preferred character build (magic vs. strength), and to what degree you can control stat distribution, which stat is ''the'' OneStatToRuleThemAll is a your mileage may vary issue. To prevent flame wars, ''ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' players created a guide calculating exactly how many points of damage would be added for each point spent in the relevant stats.
26th Apr '18 8:53:49 AM GigaHand
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* Even in the purely turn-based ''Franchise/FireEmblem'', most players agree Speed is the most important stat. It determines evasion (Luck does too, but to a much smaller degree) which, in a game with FinalDeath, is ''VERY'' important. It also determines double attacks (a unit hit twice if their speed is more than a certain amount above their opponent's) which can be the difference between finishing the enemy in one move or having to waste a second charater's move to deal the final blow. Furthermore, doubling works for the enemy too, meaning slow characters tend to get hit twice, which is especially bad if the unit also has low defense, [[SquishyWizard like most magic users]], and [[FromBadToWorse even worse]] if the enemy has a non-zero CriticalHit chance, as now they have two chances to get a critical instead of one (and one is [[RandomNumberGod usually bad enough]]). It gets so bad that on the [[NintendoHard higher difficulty levels]] of the latest games, MightyGlacier characters with high Defense are actually ''less'' durable than someone with worse Defense, but enough speed to avoid being doubled. (Getting hit twice for 15 damage each is worse than getting hit once for 25)

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* Even in the purely turn-based ''Franchise/FireEmblem'', most players agree Speed is the most important stat. It determines evasion (Luck does too, but to a much smaller degree) which, in a game with FinalDeath, is ''VERY'' important. It also determines double attacks (a unit hit twice if their speed is more than a certain amount above their opponent's) which can be the difference between finishing the enemy in one move or having to waste a second charater's move to deal the final blow.blow, which sometimes isn't possible or practical. Furthermore, doubling works for the enemy too, meaning slow characters tend to get hit twice, which is especially bad if the unit also has low defense, [[SquishyWizard like most magic users]], and [[FromBadToWorse even worse]] if the enemy has a non-zero CriticalHit chance, as now they have two chances to get a critical instead of one (and one is [[RandomNumberGod usually bad enough]]). It gets so bad that on the [[NintendoHard higher difficulty levels]] of the latest games, MightyGlacier characters with high Defense are actually ''less'' durable than someone with worse Defense, but enough speed to avoid being doubled. (Getting hit twice for 15 damage each is worse than getting hit once for 25)25)
** This is still mostly the case in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', but any combat involving a unit with the skill [[MinmaxersDelight Wary Fighter]] means neither unit can do a follow-up attack, reducing speed to a DumpStat.
4th Mar '18 3:41:16 PM nombretomado
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* The Mind stat, and its substats, in Pre-Combat Upgrade StarWarsGalaxies. These were the only stats that could not be healed by medics or buffed by doctors and, as a result, were the target of choice in PVP. As a result, most minmaxers dropped their other stats down to their bare minimums (which made the character completely worthless if unbuffed - although, at that point in the game, no one ever willingly entered combat unbuffed) and threw every point they could into their mental stats.

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* The Mind stat, and its substats, in Pre-Combat Upgrade StarWarsGalaxies.VideoGame/StarWarsGalaxies. These were the only stats that could not be healed by medics or buffed by doctors and, as a result, were the target of choice in PVP. As a result, most minmaxers dropped their other stats down to their bare minimums (which made the character completely worthless if unbuffed - although, at that point in the game, no one ever willingly entered combat unbuffed) and threw every point they could into their mental stats.
3rd Mar '18 10:32:34 PM nombretomado
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* ''TricksterOnline'' gives us the four types. Each of the four types has one stat that you're expected to put all your points into for non-PVP play.

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* ''TricksterOnline'' ''VideoGame/TricksterOnline'' gives us the four types. Each of the four types has one stat that you're expected to put all your points into for non-PVP play.
3rd Mar '18 11:42:35 AM nombretomado
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* Cinematic {{Unisystem}}, the core engine of the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/{{Angel}}'', and ''[[Franchise/EvilDead Army of Darkness]]'' [=RPGs=].

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* Cinematic {{Unisystem}}, UsefulNotes/{{Unisystem}}, the core engine of the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/{{Angel}}'', and ''[[Franchise/EvilDead Army of Darkness]]'' [=RPGs=].
23rd Feb '18 9:48:29 AM InvisibleJester89
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*** There's of course another practical reason for high POW - POW is the stat that gives your character their [[SanityMeter starting Sanity]], so a higher POW means a ''slightly'' better chance that you ''won't'' go shrieking into insanity first thing from seeing a Deep One. It also means that character will last longer mentally speaking, so long as they don't do anything to [[TemptingFate tempt fate]] or [[BrokeYourArmPunchingOutCthulhu try to fight the horrors head on]].
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